Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Communication Research field has an extraordinary growth pattern, indeed bigger than other research fields. In order to extract knowledge from such amount, intelligent techniques are needed. In such a way, using bibliometric techniques, the evolution of the conceptual, social and intellectual aspects of this research field could be analysed, and hence, understood. Although the communication research field has been widely analysed using bibliometric techniques and science mapping tools, a conceptual analysis of the whole communication research field is still needed. Therefore, this article introduces the first science mapping analysis in the communication research field based on the Web of Science Subject Category "Communication," showing its conceptual structure and scientific evolution. SciMAT, a bibliometric science mapping software tool based on co-word analysis and h-index, is applied using a sample of 33.627 research documents from 1980 to 2013 published in 74 main communication journals indexed in the Journal Citation Reports of the Web of Science. The results show that research conducted in the communication research is concentrated on the following sixteen disconnected thematic areas: “children”, “psychological aspects”, “news”, “audience”, “surveys”, “advertising”, “health”, “relationship”, “gender”, “discourse”, “telephone communication”, “public relation”, “telecommunications”, “public opinion”, “activism” and “internet”. These areas have progressively disconnected among them, which drives to a Communication field relatively fragmented.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

As pointed by Rogers (1994), communication is a professional field and also a scientific discipline. It has an extraordinary growth rate (Park & Leydesdorff, 2009), even more rapid than in biotech or computer sciences (Koivisto & Thomas, 2011). Moreover, Web of Science contains a category entitled “Communications” where different related communication journals are grouped. Since there is a huge amount of communication studies, the analysis of the conceptual evolution of the field must be done using intelligent tools, such as bibliometric and science mapping analysis.

Bibliometrics is a relevant resource to evaluate and analyse the scholarly production in the different areas of Science and Knowledge (Martínez, Cobo, Herrera, & Herrera-Viedma, 2015). They allow assessing the bibliographic production developed at different levels and by different agents, from nations to individuals, including institutions or journals (Martínez, Herrera, López-Gijón, & Herrera-Viedma, 2014).

Science mapping and performance analysis stand out as the main bibliometric methods used in this sense (Noyons, Moed, & Luwel, 1999). Performance analysis deals with the scientific impact and citation reached by different actors such as universities or scientists. Science mapping draws a representation of the structure of scientific research as well as its evolution at the intellectual, theoretical or social spheres.

These methods have been applied to analyse the structure of Communication through different levels such as authorship (Barnett & Danawoski, 1992), associations (Barnett & Danawoski, 1992; Chung, Lee, Barnett, & Kim, 2009), institutions (Koivisto & Thomas, 2011), participation on Doctoral commitees (White, 1999), the influence of gender on received quotations (Knobloch-Westerwick & Glynn, 2013) and the relationship of communication with other areas (Barnett, Huh, Kim, & Park, 2011; So, 1988). When approaching the scientific production of the field, previous studies have selected papers from specific journals (Hakanen & Wolfram, 1995; Rogers, 1999; Leydesdorff & Probst, 2009; Poor, 2009; Schönbach & Lauf, 2006; Smith, 2000), from specific geographical areas (De-Filippo, 2013; Fernández-Quijada & Masip, 2013; So, 2010), published by certain authors (Lin & Kaid, 2000; Lauf, 2005), dealing with specific topics (Chung, Barnett, Kim, & Lackaff, D, 2013; Míguez-González, Baamonde-Silva, & Corbacho-Valencia, 2014; Repiso, Torres & Delgado, 2011; Tai, 2009) or quoted by flagship journals (Park & Leydesdorff, 2009).

This paper introduces the first science mapping conceptual analysis of the entire communication category, showing the field’s structure, evolution and new trends. To do that, the communication research production (1980-2013) indexed at the Journal Citation Reports (JCR), and Web of Science (WoS) is examined using the SciMAT software tool (Cobo, López-Herrera, Herrera-Viedma, & Herrera, 2012).

Communication research field Research from the communication field has been traditionally divided into two disciplines (Barnett & al., 2011; Rogers, 1999): on the one hand mass communication and the other hand interpersonal communication. This issue is evidenced by the degree to which both disciplines cite each other (Rogers, 1999). It has also been described as a lack of communication among the communication researchers (Paisley, 1984; So, 1988) who in fact, use separate literature.

Nowadays, there is a great debate about the structure of communication research field and its fragmentation (Corner, 2013). Some authors argue that communication research field is an incomplete aggregation of atomized research domains (Park & Leydesdorff, 2009), and therefore, the field cannot be divided into mass and interpersonal communication (Barnett & al., 2011). Moreover, communication is influenced by other fields such as psychology, political science, and sociology (Barnett & al., 2011; Leydesdorff & Probst, 2009). For example, (Barnett & Danawoski, 1992) there are claims for a more complex structure, finding three different dimensions within the field: communication/interpersonal, humanistic/scientific, and theoretical/applied studies. This more complex structure is also supported by Barnett & al. (Barnett & al., 2011). In fact, communication could be split into various academic entities (Park & Leydesdorff, 2009), such as political communication (Lin & Kaid, 2000), technical communication (Smith, 2000), agenda-setting (Tai, 2009), speech communication, advertising, etc. Communication research field cannot be addressed as a stable set, but it is on the way towards the establishment of a specialty of its own (Leydesdorff & Probst, 2009).

This work provides maps to be useful for research policy actions as well as to science sociologists. It may also be useful for communication researchers who may need a science tree of their discipline to research career orientation purposes.

The current paper aims to draw the evolution of the Communication research field through the following research questions:

• RQ1. Which are the main research themes in Communication?

• RQ2. How central and developed are those themes?

• RQ3. Which are the most important topics according to production and impact?

• RQ4. How have those themes evolved since 1980?

2. Material and methods

SciMAT (Cobo & al., 2012) synthesizes most of the assets of the existing science mapping software tools (Cobo, López-Herrera, Herrera-Viedma, & Herrera, 2011b). It was developed following the system designed by Cobo, López-Herrera, Herrera-Viedma and Herrera (2011a), based on the h-index (Hirsch, 2005) and on co-word analysis (Callon, Courtial, Turner, & Bauin, 1983). Performance analysis and science mapping are thus simultaneously used to scrutinize a research field by detecting and visualizing its conceptual subdomains as well as its thematic evolution. A longitudinal co-word science mapping analysis carried out with SciMAT is based on four stages (Cobo & al., 2011a):

• Detection of the research themes. The keywords extracted from the documents of each period are used to build a whole network based on co-occurrence. That is, in the network, the nodes will represent the keywords, and there will be an edge between two nodes if both keywords co-appear in a set of documents. Then, a clustering algorithm (Coulter, Monarch, & Konda, 1998) is applied to a normalized co-word network in each period to identify the existing research themes. A cluster or theme will represent a set of keywords strongly related to each other.

• Visualizing research themes and thematic network. A graphic representation of the identified topics is drawn through two different instruments: strategic diagram and thematic network. Following Callon, Courtial, and Laville (1991), two dimensions are used to characterize each topic: centrality and density. The former measures the external interaction among each network and can be understood as the relevance value of the topic. The latter measures the internal cohesion of the network, and it should be interpreted as a measure of the theme’s development. Through centrality and density, a research field can be represented in a two-axis strategic diagram which draws four different categories:

a) Upper-right quadrant. Topics placed in this category are identified as “motor themes”, as they are well developed and essential for building the research field.

b) Upper-left quadrant hosts topics characterized by strong internal ties but weak external links, with low relevance for the field. They stand as specialized themes on the area periphery.

c) Lower-left quadrant includes topics lacking development and relevance. They represent either emerging or disappearing themes.

d) Lower-right quadrant shows relevant themes but lacking development. They can be understood as transversal, basic and general topics.

• Discovery of thematic areas. The main themes of the field and their evolution are drawn through their diachronic changes. These changes are identified by overlaps in the clusters from one period to the following. That is, there is evolution if a theme from the period T1 share keywords with a theme of the period T2. As more keywords two clusters of consecutive periods have in common, stronger will be the evolution.

• Performance analysis. Each theme and thematic area are comprised of a set of keywords that appear in a set of documents. That is, a set of documents could be associated with each theme and thematic area. In that sense, the production and scientific impact of each topic and each thematic area are measured using bibliometric indicators such as the number of published documents, citations, or different types of h-index (Hirsch, 2005).

The Journal Citation Reports (JCR) provided by Clarivate Analytics is used to obtain the most important communication journals because it presents the best retrospective coverage and it provides quality data to develop our study. The JCR (2013) listed 74 journals under the Communication subject category. Data were retrieved from Web of Science database

The sample is further restricted to the period 1980-2013 and it only includes articles and reviews. It includes 33.627 documents and their citations up to August 2014.

Author’s keywords as well as they their Keywords Plus were used as units of analysis. Additionally, a de-duplication operation was carried out to refine data. As some documents lacked enough keywords, descriptive keywords were manually added. Those additional keywords were elaborated matching title words with other keywords already present in the Web of Science database. Last, some keywords were excluded because of their low informational value: that was the case with stop words or terms which were deemed too generic, for instance, Communication. Finally, 29.951 keywords were used.

Next, the comprehended time lapse was divided into four periods: 1980-1989, 1990-1999, 2000-2009 and 2010-2013. WoS included 3,731, 6,583, 13,203 and 10,107 documents respectively for each one of these periods.

3. Results

3.1. Communication research themes


Montero-Diaz et al 2018a-66322-en026.jpg

A diagram is presented for each chronologic period to analyse the most relevant themes in the communication research field. In each diagram, the sphere size is related to the sum of documents linked to each research topic. Also, the sum of citations received by each topic is offered in brackets.

• First period (1980-1989). During this period, the communication research field pivoted on eighteen research themes (Figure 1).

The performance measures stated in Table 1 remark two topics: “Advertising” and “Television”. Both themes got the largest number of documents and achieved more than four-thousand citations.

“Advertising” is the most central theme, standing as a basic and transversal topic, achieving a high citation rate and impact, related to brands, sales, and products.

The theme “Television” is categorized as basic and transversal, and it is very central in that period. It achieves the highest impact rate. This theme comprises research conducted on different aspects of television, such as the coverage of different disasters, social uses of television, and communication patterns among others.

• Second period (1990-1999). According to the strategic diagram shown in Figure 1, the research field was mainly composed of motor themes in those years. Also, there is a great number of emerging themes which will be the basis of future themes in the next periods.

The theme “News” evolves from an emerging topic in the first period to one of the most important motor themes during this decade. According to Table 1, it ranks as the most productive theme in third place, according to its citations.

The theme “Response” is consolidated as a motor theme, is one of the most attractive to communication researchers. It is still covering and delving into similar topics.


Montero-Diaz et al 2018a-66322-en027.jpg

The motor theme “Gender” obtained the highest impact rate in this period. It is related to gender/sex difference, intimacy, and sex as well as behaviour.

“Advertising” is also consolidated as the motor theme, reaching great impact with a limited number of documents. Among other topics, the use of advertisement on the Internet is studied.

• Third period (2000-2009). During this period, the communication research field pivoted on twenty-two research themes (Figure 1).

The motor-theme “News” is the most important according to its performance indicators (Table 1). It studies topics related to news and mass media, the media effects models, and news coverage.

“Advertising” is consolidated as motor-theme in that period. It is devoted to different aspects, such as its use on Internet, corporations sponsoring, effectiveness or brand placement in video games.

“Internet” appears as an important motor theme with a high citation score and also with the best h-index. It covers different aspects of this news media. For instance, the differences among Web and mail survey response rates, patterns on Internet, and on-line Social Networks among others.

“Close-Relationship” is focused on aspects related to romantic relationships such as satisfaction, positive illusions, dating, dynamics of emotional reactions, and attachment.

“Children” become an important motor theme in this period, obtaining a huge impact rate. It is mainly focused on the analysis of the behaviour of children and youth, especially on the Internet. Also, it covers aspects related to the effects of violent video games and violent media content.

“Discourse” is strengthened as the motor theme in this period by improving its impact rate. Mainly the research conducted during this period was devoted to language, identity, ideology, narration as well as the discourse analysis.

The theme “Gender” obtained a moderate impact rate. It is centred on opinion gender gaps, sex differences in video games playing, differences in attitudes toward homosexuality or differences in empathic accuracy.

• Fourth period (2010-2013). During this period, the communication research field pivoted on twenty-three themes (Figure 1).

Taking into account their performance measures (Table 1), the motor themes “News” and “Internet” stand out. The former covers a great variety of topics, such as the diffusion of news in new on-line tools like Twitter, framing or the media coverage of different news. The latter is focused on different aspects of the on-line communication.

Moreover, “Gender” is consolidated as the motor theme, and refers to topics such as the sexually explicit internet material, gender differences in the Internet, sex difference in on-line dating, gender roles and work-life, sex-difference in video games, or the necessity of seeking health information.

The theme “Advertising”, although it is laid out in the fourth quadrant, it is very close to the centre of the strategic diagram. Also, due to its evolution and impact rate in this period, it could be considered as an important topic. It covers aspects related to in-game brand exposure, how users assess credibility to websites of brands, commercial media environment or the understanding of advertisements by children.


Montero-Diaz et al 2018a-66322-en029.jpg

3.2. Thematic evolution of the communication research field


Montero-Diaz et al 2018a-66322-en028.jpg

Using SciMAT, the research output in the field was observed to concentrate around 16 areas: “Children”, “Psychological aspects”, “News”, “Audience”, “Surveys”, “Advertising”, “Health”, “Relationship”, “Gender”, “Discourse”, “Telephone communication”, “Public relation”, “Telecommunications”, “Public opinion”, “Activism” and “Internet” (Figure 2). In this Figure, thematic links are represented by a solid line. In other sense, a dotted line connects topics which share common keywords other than their respective names (for a better understanding, the dotted lines which connect themes of different thematic areas were deleted). Meanwhile, the size of the sphere represents the number of documents belonging to each theme. Additionally, the different shadows gather the topics labeled under the same thematic area.

Structural analysis of the evolution of the communication scientific field. As seen in Figure 2, the analysed research output is characterised by a solid cohesion. Most of the identified topics are gathered under a thematic area. They derive from a topic appeared in the previous period. Also, they show a continuous evolution with almost no jumps or gaps. Regarding the starting period, ten thematic areas started in the first period. Thus, they could be considered as classic. Moreover, in the second period, three new thematic areas emerged: “Health”, “Relationship” and “Internet”. In fact, the thematic area “Internet” plays an important role in the development of the field. Regarding the theme composition, the thematic areas “News”, “Relationship”, “Gender” and “Internet” are mainly composed of motor themes in all the periods. Also, the thematic areas “News”, “Gender” and “Internet” show a significant growth according to the rise in the number of documents (that is, volume of spheres in Figure 2).

Performance analysis of the evolution of the communication scientific field. Table 2 shows the performance indexes of each topic. The order in the table is the same as the order of the thematic areas highlighted in Figure 2. Regarding the impact scores, two thematic areas stand out: “News” and “Internet”. Both could be considered thematic areas with a global impact, playing a central role in the development of the field. Their evolution of h-index and citations show a rising trend. It is also remarkable the huge rising trend of the thematic area “Internet”, which started with little impact and now becoming the origin of a new research area. In fact, since the beginning of this thematic area, the topics covered by the other ones are closely related to “Internet”. Moreover, the thematic areas “Children”, “Health” and “Gender” achieved a great impact, but their evolution performance was not growing across the periods equally. That is, in the second or third period there was little interest in those thematic areas, but in the last period they continued attracting the interest of the scientific community. The remaining thematic areas could be divided into two groups. On one hand, the thematic areas “Advertising”, “Relationship”, “Discourse”, “Telephone Communication” and “Public Relations” present an adequate impact, and their themes occupy a central position according to their h-index. Also, “Telephone Communication” and “Public Relations” show a small scientific decreasing interest in the central periods. On the other hand, “Psychological aspects”, “Audience”, “Public opinion” and “Activism” present low impact scores. It should be pointed out that while “Psychological Aspects” and “Public Opinion” present a fading trend, “Activism”, although with little impact rate, seems to be the origin of a new research area of interest.

4. Discussion

Regarding the thematic evolution shown by the detected thematic areas (Figure 2), some conclusion should be done:

• The thematic area “Children” is present in the four periods, covering topics related to the communication aspects, behaviour or patterns at different ages. In the first years, it was mainly devoted to the effects and behaviour in the use of media by children and young people. Later, although the interest in children media behaviour and effects continued, new topics related to bullying, attachment formation and relationships, predictors of children’s friendships, or the perceptions of their sibling relationships appeared. In the period 2000-2009, there was an increase in the interest of topics related to the behaviour of children on the Internet. Finally, in the last period, the topics covered were focused mainly on the Internet.

• “Psychological Aspects” was devoted in the first period to issues related to compliance gaining and perception. In the second period, it was focused on the levels of processing, dimensions of emotional experience, cognitive capacity, or third-person effect. Later, the topics evolved to narrative persuasion. Finally, some specific Psychological aspects of communication were analysed.

• “News” is one of the main thematic areas of the communication research field. In the first years, it was dedicated to the seeking of gratification, news memory, news comprehension, news structure and diversity of news. In the second period, the interest on it grew up, covering topics related to news coverage of different events, effects of news frames on readers’ thoughts and recall, news reception, or the relationship between journalistic story frames and the thoughts and feelings of readers. Next, the thematic area covered a variety of topics, for instance: news framing, agenda setting, and priming effects, media aspects, news coverage, aspects of on-line news or event-driven news. Finally, in the period 2010-2013, due to its structural characteristics, it was related to other thematic areas. Some topics covered in those years were: news on Twitter, media and news coverage and framing.

• The thematic area “Audience” was devoted in the first period to the analysis of the audience of different ages, genders, and races, and to the measurement of the audience of television news and soap operas. From 1990 to 1999, it covered topics such as audience reception, perception, and levels, or response to media content. Later, the thematic area focused on specific topics such as relationships between media companies, hostile media perception, television audience polarization, the audience for corporate Web sites and product (or brand), as well as placement in films. Finally, the interest of the audience on the Internet rose during the last analysed period. Also, this area covered journalism audience and campaign evaluation.

• “Surveys” was only present in the two first periods, is an important research area in those years. In both periods, it was devoted to the study of surveys, response rates, deal with non-response or asking for sensitive questions.

• “Advertising” is devoted to producing a purchase by showing the products to consumers and trying to reach their attention. In the first period, it included themes regarding the effectiveness of advertising in different media, image management, political advertising or the use of sex in advertisements. Next, the interest on advertising grew up, is an important motor theme. In the third period, the interest of advertising on the Internet increased dramatically. Also, the thematic area pivoted on other topics such as effectiveness, brand evaluation, credibility and international advertising. In the last period, in addition to the topics covered early, “Advertising” is devoted to in-game brand exposure, children understanding of advertisers and viral advertising effectiveness.

• The thematic area “Health” started in the period 1990-1999 focusing on the health communication related issues, for instance: social support messages exchanged by persons with disabilities, factors influencing responses to questions on sexual behaviour, persuasive health messages, effectiveness health communication or health communication campaigns. Afterwards, it focused on the presentation of health information, information sources, health information seeking and avoiding, and also the analysis of media consumption patterns. Recently (2010-2013), this area has been mainly focused on health communication through the Internet.

• The thematic area “Relationship” compromises the research conducted on the communication process of personal relationships, especially into romantic relationships. It started in the second period (1990-1999), focusing on scales and models. Also, it refers to attachment and coping strategies. In the next period, the thematic area was articulated into three main topics: attachment, dating, couples, and family. Finally, from 2010 to 2013, this thematic area covered predictors of non-marital romantic relationship dissolution, adult and adolescent attachment, online dating, and model for relational turbulence.

• “Gender” started as a thematic area referred to research conducted on differences among genders or specific analysis of the gender behavior. In the second period, it became an important motor theme, and therefore, it was related to themes, such as relationship or advertising effect and reception. In the period 2000-2009, it remained an interest in the gender differences and gender identity, masculinity, male violence, racial minorities, stereotypes, and also the role of gender in the third-person effect. In the last period, this thematic area was heavily influenced by the Internet.

• The thematic area “Discourse” refers to the research conducted on the communication process such as rhetoric, narrative and language. In the first years, it covered topics related to rhetoric of science, link between rhetoric and ideology, reciprocity in negotiations, initial interactions, discourse strategies or narrative in organizations. In the second period, it centred on the research conducted on conversation and language. Also, in those years it began to cover topics related to the Internet. In the third period, it focused on advance communication topics, such as, identity as produced in linguistic interaction, narrative persuasion, discourse analysis, multilingualism among others. Finally, in the last period it continued studying advance issues and topics related to the analysis of on-line discourse.

• The thematic area “Telephone Communication” varied across the periods from studies related to telephone coverage and usage, to mobile phone and mobile data usage.

• “Public Relation” was focused, in the first years, on the communication process in organizations such as social responsibility, moral values, licensing, issue management or role models. Afterwards, the interest continued in aspects related to social responsibility. It should be noted that there was an incipient interest on the relation of public relation and the Internet. In the third period, it covered general and advanced aspects of social responsibility and public relations. In the last period, there was a great influence of the Internet.

• The research area “Telecommunication” was present in the two first periods. In the former, it was focused on broadcasting and telecommunication policy and also in the television deregulation. In the latter, among others, it was comprised on the research conducted in telecommunication behaviour, Internet adoption, differences in Internet connectivity, standards-setting for global telecommunication services, channel repertoire and the differences between VCRS and cable television.

• “Public Opinion” is mainly focused on the democratic process, voter’s behaviour and political issues. In the first years, it consisted in the research conducted on polls, evaluation of poll data and voting behaviour. In the second period, it broadened to include topics related to campaign media, democracy deliberation, mediatisation of politics, relation of public opinion and public policy, or the influence of news coverage on the perceptions of public sentiment. Afterwards, it was focused on similar topics and also some aspects related to the Internet. In the last period, the influence of the Internet increased, covering topics such as college students’ use of on-line media for political purposes, levels of interactivity of Presidential Candidates’ Websites and the influence of these social media on political cynicism. Moreover, it comprised other topics such as civic engagement and democratic communication.

• “Activism” arose in the third period (2000-2009) covering aspects related to some social movements and protests. Moreover, it compromised the research conducted on democratic media activism, and alternative media. In the last period, it was focused on the personalization of collective actions, and many social movements around the globe.

• Since “Internet” appeared as a thematic area in the second period, the whole communication research field has been heavily influenced by it, especially from the third period up to now. In the years 1990-1999, it referred to the research conducted on exploring Web users’ motivations and concerns, users’ issues, and on-line service adoption. In the third period, it was related to Internet use and social network among others. Finally, in the period 2010-2013 there was an increase interest in communication issues in on-line social network. For instance, whether Facebook users have different connection strategies, such as Twitter, social scientists, predictors of Facebook communication and relational closeness. Also, it comprised the research conducted on e-science technologies, online credibility or the use of big data to resolve significant questions.

5. Conclusion

As pointed above, Communication Research has been labeled as a fragmented field. This survey supports this claim by delimiting sixteen thematic areas with almost no topical links among them. Connections were more common from 1980 to 2000, but in the 21st century, those areas are becoming isolated.

Anyway, this outcome does only reflect scientific production indexed at WoS, which is biased towards the English language. Further research might compare the results with samples from other databases such as Scopus or Google Scholar with a wider geographical and linguistic scope (Delgado & Repiso, 2013), allowing then to significant transnational comparisons. In the same sense, future studies might collect papers according to a purposeful selection of journals.

Funding agency

The authors would like to acknowledge FEDER funds under grants TIN2013-40658-P and TIN2016-75850-R, and the financial support from the University of Cádiz Project PR2016-067.

References

Barnett, G. A., Huh, C., Kim, Y., & Park, H.W. (2011). Citations among communication journals and other disciplines: a network analysis. Scientometrics, 88(2), 449-469. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-011-0381-2

Barnett, G.A., & Danawoski, J.A. (1992). The structure of communication. Human Communication Research, 19(2), 264-285. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2958.1992.tb00302.x

Bastian, M., Heymann, S., & Jacomy, M. (2009). Gephi: An open source software for exploring and manipulating networks. In Proceedings of the International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media.

Callon, M., Courtial, J.P., & Laville, F. (1991). Co-word analysis as a tool for describing the network of interactions between basic and technological research: The case of polymer chemsitry. Scientometric, 22(1). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02019280

Callon, M., Courtial, J.P., Turner, W.A., & Bauin, S. (1983). From translations to problematic networks: An introduction to co-word analysis. Social Science Information. https://doi.org/10.1177/053901883022002003

Chung, C.J., Barnett, G.A., Kim, K., & Lackaff, D. (2013). An analysis on communication theory and discipline. Scientometrics, 95(3), 985-1002. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-012-0869-4

Chung, C.J., Lee, S., Barnett, G.A., & Kim, J.H. (2009). A comparative network analysis of the Korean Society of Journalism and Communication Studies (KSJCS) and the International Communication Association (ICA) in the era of hybridization. Asian Journal of Communication, 19(2), 170-191. https://doi.org/10.1080/01292980902827003

Cobo, M. J., Martínez, M.A., Gutiérrez-Salcedo, M., Fujita, H., & Herrera-Viedma, E. (2015). 25 years at knowledge-based systems: A bibliometric analysis. Knowledge-Based Systems, 80, 3-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.knosys.2014.12.035

Cobo, M.J., López-Herrera, A.G., Herrera-Viedma, E., & Herrera, F. (2011a). An approach for detecting, quantifying, and visualizing the evolution of a research field: A practical application to the fuzzy sets theory field. Journal of Informetrics, 5(1), 146-166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joi.2010.10.002

Cobo, M.J., López-Herrera, A.G., Herrera-Viedma, E., & Herrera, F. (2011b). Science mapping software tools: Review, analysis, and cooperative study among tools. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 62(7), 1382-1402. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.21525

Cobo, M.J., López-Herrera, A.G., Herrera-Viedma, E., & Herrera, F. (2012). SciMAT: A new science mapping analysis software tool. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 63(8), 1609-1630. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.22688

Corner, J. (2013). Is there a «field» of media research? - The «fragmentation» issue revisited. Media, Culture & Society, 35(8), 1011-1018. https://doi.org/10.1177/0163443713508702

Coulter, N., Monarch, I., & Konda, S. (1998). Software engineering as seen through its research literature: A study in coword analysis. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 49(13), 1206-1223. https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1097-4571(1998)49:13<1206::AID-ASI7>3.0.CO;2-F

De-Filippo, D. (2013). Spanish scientific output in communication sciences in WOS. The Scientific Journals in SSCI (2007-12). Comunicar, 21(41), 25-34. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-02

Delgado, E., & Repiso, R. (2013). The impact of scientific journals of communication: Comparing Google Scholar Metrics, Web of Science and Scopus. Comunicar, 21(41), 45-52. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-04

Fernández-Quijada, D., & Masip, P. (2013). Three decades of Spanish communication research: Towards legal age. Comunicar, 21(41), 15-24. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-01

Hakanen, E.A., & Wolfram, D. (1995). Citation relationships among international mass communication journals. Journal of Information Science, 21(3), 209-215. https://doi.org/10.1177/016555159502100306

Hirsch, J.E. (2005). An index to quantify an individual’s scientific research output. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 102(46), 16569-16572. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0507655102

Knobloch-Westerwick, S., & Glynn, C.J. (2013). The Matilda effect-role congruity effects on scholarly communication: A citation analysis of communication research and journal of communication articles. Communication Research, 40(1), 3-26. https://doi.org/10.1177/0093650211418339

Koivisto, J., & Thomas, P.D. (2011). Mapping communication and media research: Conjunctures, institutions, challenges. Mapping communication and media research: Conjunctures, institutions, challenges. Tampere University Press.

Lauf, E. (2005). National diversity of major international journals in the field of communication. Journal of Communication, 55(1), 139151. https://doi.org/10.1093/joc/55.1.139

Leydesdorff, L., & Probst, C. (2009). The delineation of an interdisciplinary specialty in terms of a journal set: The case of communication studies. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 60(8), 1709-1718. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.21052

Lin, Y., & Kaid, L.L. (2000). Fragmentation of the intellectual structure of political communication study: Some empirical evidence. Scientometrics, 47(1), 143-164. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1005678011835

Martínez, M.A., Cobo, M.J., Herrera, M., & Herrera-Viedma, E. (2015). Analyzing the scientific evolution of social work using science mapping. Research on Social Work Practice, 5(2), 257-277. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049731514522101

Martínez, M.A., Herrera, M., López-Gijón, J., & Herrera-Viedma, E. (2014). H-Classics: Characterizing the concept of citation classics through H-index. Scientometrics, 98(3), 1971-1983. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-013-1155-9

Míguez-González, M.I., Baamonde-Silva, X.M., & Corbacho-Valencia, J.M. (2014). A bibliographic study of public relations in Spanish media and communication journals, 2000-2012. Public Relations Review, 40(5), 818-828. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pubrev.2014.08.002

Noyons, E.C.M., Moed, H.F., & Luwel, M. (1999). Combining mapping and citation analysis for evaluative bibliometric purposes: A bibliometric study. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 50(2), 115-131. https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1097-4571(1999)50:2<115::AID-ASI3>3.0.CO;2-J

Paisley, W. (1984). Communication in the communication sciences. In B. Dervin & M. Voigt (Eds.), Progress in the communication sciences (Vol. 5, pp. 1-43). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Park, H.W., & Leydesdorff, L. (2009). Knowledge linkage structures in communication studies using citation analysis among communication journals. Scientometrics, 81(1), 157-175. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-009-2119-y

Poor, N.D. (2009). Global citation patterns of open access communication studies journals: Pushing beyond the Social Science Citation Index. International Journal of Communication, 3, 27. (https://goo.gl/qesFYN).

Repiso, R., Torres, D., & Delgado, E. (2011). Bibliometric and social network analysis applied to television dissertations presented in Spain (1976/2007). Comunicar, 19(37), 151-159. https://doi.org/10.3916/C37-2011-03-07

Rogers, E.M. (1994). A history of communication study: A biographical approach. Free Press.

Rogers, E.M. (1999). Anatomy of the two subdisciplines of communication study. Human Communication Research, 25(4), 618-631. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2958.1999.tb00465.x

Schönbach, K., & Lauf, E. (2006). Are national communication journals still necessary? A case study and some suggestions. Communications, 31(4), 447-454. https://doi.org/10.1515/COMMUN.2006.028

Smith, E.O. (2000). Strength in the technical communication journals and diversity in the serials cited. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 14(2), 131-184. https://doi.org/10.1177/105065190001400201

So, C.Y.K. (1988). Citation patterns of core communication journals an assessment of the developmental status of communication. Human Communication Research, 15(2), 236-255. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2958.1988.tb00183.x

So, C.Y.K. (2010). The rise of Asian communication research: A citation study of SSCI journals. Asian Journal of Communication, 20(2), 230-247. https://doi.org/10.1080/01292981003693419

Tai, Z. (2009). The structure of knowledge and dynamics of scholarly communication in agenda setting research, 1996-2005. Journal of Communication, 59(3), 481-513. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-2466.2009.01425.x

White, W. (1999). Academic topographies a network analysis of disciplinarity among communication faculty. Human Communication Research, 25(4), 604-617. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2958.1999.tb00464.x



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El campo científico de la comunicación ha experimentado un enorme crecimiento a lo largo de los años, superando incluso a algunas áreas científicas consagradas. Mediante el uso de técnicas bibliométricas, podemos analizar la evolución conceptual, social e intelectual de esta área, así como comprenderla. En particular, el área de «Comunicación» ha sido ampliamente estudiada desde un punto de vista bibliométrico, pero no se ha realizado un análisis conceptual global del área englobado en un marco longitudinal. En este sentido, este artículo muestra el primer análisis de mapas científicos del área de investigación de la comunicación basándose en la Categoría de la Web of Science «Communication», centrándose en la estructura conceptual y cómo esta ha evolucionado. El estudio se ha realizado mediante la herramienta de análisis de mapas científicos SciMAT, basada en los mapas de co-palabras y en el índice-h. Un conjunto de 33.627 artículos científicos, publicados entre 1980 y 2013 en las 74 principales revistas del Journal Citation Reports de la Web of Science, han sido estudiados. Analizando los resultados, podemos destacar que la investigación llevada a cabo en el área de la comunicación se ha centrado en dieciséis áreas temáticas: «infancia», «aspectos psicológicos», «noticias», «audiencias», «sondeos», «publicidad», «salud», «relaciones», «género», «discurso», «comunicación telefónica», «relaciones públicas», «telecomunicaciones», «opinión pública», «activismo» e «Internet». Estas áreas se han desconectado entre ellas progresivamente, lo que conduce a un campo relativamente fragmentado.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La comunicación es un campo de actividad profesional y disciplina científica (Rogers, 1994). Esta última ha experimentado un crecimiento extraordinario (Park & Leydesdorff, 2009), más rápido incluso que la biotecnología o las ciencias de la computación (Koivisto & Thomas, 2011). De hecho, Web of Science incluye la categoría de «Communication» y en ella agrupa las revistas relacionadas con el campo. Este crecimiento y amplitud de los estudios sobre comunicación justifica un análisis de la evolución conceptual del área mediante herramientas bibliométricas inteligentes.

Los recursos bibliométricos permiten evaluar y analizar la producción académica en las diferentes áreas de la Ciencia y el Conocimiento (Martínez, Cobo, Herrera, & Herrera-Viedma, 2015), y posibilitan el análisis de la producción bibliográfica en diferentes niveles y según los diferentes actores: naciones, individuos, instituciones o revistas (Martínez, Herrera, López-Gijón, & Herrera-Viedma, 2014). Entre los recursos bibliométricos más importantes destacan los mapas de la ciencia y los análisis de rendimiento (Noyons, Moed, & Luwel, 1999). El análisis de rendimiento atiende al impacto científico y a las citas conseguidas por los diferentes agentes (como universidades o investigadores). Los mapas de la ciencia dibujan una representación de la estructura de la investigación científica, así como su evolución en los ámbitos intelectuales, conceptuales y sociales.

Estos métodos se han aplicado al análisis de la estructura del área de Comunicación en distintos niveles: autoría (Barnett & Danawoski, 1992), asociaciones (Barnett & Danawoski, 1992; Chung, Lee, Barnett, & Kim, 2009), instituciones (Koivisto & Thomas, 2011), participación en tribunales de tesis (White, 1999), influencia del género en las citas recibidas (Knobloch-Westerwick & Glynn, 2013) y relación de la Comunicación con otros ámbitos (Barnett, Huh, Kim, & Park, 2011; So, 1988). Sobre la producción científica del área se han analizado artículos de un conjunto determinado de revistas (Hakanen & Wolfram, 1995; Rogers, 1999; Leydesdorff & Probst, 2009; Poor, 2009; Schönbach & Lauf, 2006; Smith, 2000), de determinadas áreas geográficas (De-Filippo, 2013; Fernández-Quijada & Masip, 2013; So, 2010), publicados por ciertos autores (Lin & Kaid, 2000; Lauf, 2005), sobre temas específicos (Chung, Barnett, Kim, & Lackaff, D, 2013; Míguez-González, Baamonde-Silva, & Corbacho-Valencia, 2014; Repiso, Torres, & Delgado, 2011; Tai, 2009) o citados por revistas emblemáticas o de referencia (Park & Leydesdorff, 2009).

Este artículo presenta el primer mapa de la ciencia del conjunto completo del campo y muestra su estructura, su evolución y las tendencias. Se ha analizado toda la producción (1980-2013) del área indexada en Journal Citation Reports (JCR) y en Web of Science (WoS) mediante la herramienta informática SciMAT (Cobo, López-Herrera, Herrera-Viedma, & Herrera, 2012).

El área de Comunicación se ha dividido tradicionalmente en dos bloques (Barnett & al., 2011; Rogers, 1999): comunicación de masas de una parte y comunicación interpersonal de otra. La intensidad de esta escisión se evidencia en el escaso grado en que ambos se citan entre sí (Rogers, 1999). Los investigadores de cada bloque se ignoran (Paisley, 1984; So, 1988) y de hecho emplean bibliografías diferentes y separadas.

Actualmente el debate se centra en la estructura del área y su fragmentación (Corner, 2013). Algunos argumentan que Comunicación es un agregado incompleto de dominios de investigación atomizados (Park & Leydesdorff, 2009), por eso el campo no podría dividirse solo entre comunicación interpersonal y comunicación de masas (Barnett & al., 2011). Sobre el campo actuarían, además, otras disciplinas como la psicología, las ciencias políticas y la sociología (Barnett & al., 2011; Leydesdorff & Probst, 2009). Se apunta (Barnett & Danawoski, 1992; Barnett & al., 2011) a una estructura más compleja donde los estudios se organizarían en torno a tres dicotomías: comunicación social/interpersonal, humanístico/científico y teóricos/aplicados. De hecho, la comunicación podría dividirse en varias unidades académicas (Park & Leydesdorff, 2009): la comunicación política (Lin & Kaid, 2000), la comunicación técnica (Smith, 2000), «agenda-setting» (Tai, 2009), comunicación oral, publicidad, etc. Comunicación, en fin, no podría entenderse como campo estable, sino como una disciplina en vías de consolidación como especialidad propia (Leydesdorff & Probst, 2009).

Este trabajo ofrece mapas que serán útiles para las políticas de investigación y para sociólogos de la ciencia. También ayudarán a los investigadores en comunicación que necesiten un árbol de la disciplina para orientar su carrera académica. Este artículo se propone dibujar la evolución del área de Comunicación a través de las siguientes preguntas de investigación:

• PI1. ¿Cuáles son los principales temas de investigación en comunicación?

• PI2. ¿Cuál es la centralidad y el desarrollo de esos temas?

• PI3. ¿Cuáles son los temas más importantes en cuanto a producción e impacto?

• PI4. ¿Cómo han evolucionado esos temas desde 1980?

2. Materiales y métodos

SciMAT (Cobo & al., 2012) sintetiza la mayoría de las ventajas de las herramientas informáticas para la elaboración de mapas de la ciencia (Cobo, López-Herrera, Herrera-Viedma, & Herrera, 2011b). Se ha desarrollado según la metodología de Cobo, López-Herrera, Herrera-Viedma y Herrera (2011a), basado en el índice-H (Hirsch, 2005) y en el análisis de co-palabras (Callon, Courtial, Turner, & Bauin, 1983). De este modo, se realiza simultáneamente un mapa de la ciencia y un análisis de rendimiento para detectar y visualizar los subdominios conceptuales de un campo de investigación, así como su evolución temática. El análisis de co-palabras longitudinal desarrollado con SciMAT se basa en cuatro fases (Cobo & al., 2011a):

• Detección de temas de investigación. A partir de las palabras clave extraídas de los documentos de cada período se construye una red basada en la co-ocurrencia. En esta red los nodos representan las palabras clave. Los nodos se conectan entre sí cuando dos palabras clave co-aparecen en un conjunto de documentos. Para cada período, se construye una red de co-palabras normalizada. Posteriormente, se aplica un algoritmo de «clustering» (Coulter, Monarch, & Konda, 1998) para identificar los temas de investigación existentes. Así, un «cluster» o un tema representará un conjunto de palabras clave fuertemente relacionadas entre sí.

• Visualización de temas de investigación y red temática. Los temas identificados se representan gráficamente mediante dos instrumentos distintos: un diagrama estratégico y una red temática. Siguiendo a Callon, Courtial y Laville (1991), se emplean dos dimensiones para caracterizar cada tema: centralidad y densidad. La primera mide la interacción externa de cada red y puede entenderse como la relevancia del tema. La segunda, la cohesión interna de la red, y debe interpretarse como el grado de desarrollo del tema. Mediante la centralidad y la densidad un campo de investigación puede representarse en un diagrama estratégico de dos ejes que delimita cuatro grandes categorías:

a) Cuadrante superior derecho. Los temas ubicados en esta zona se identifican como «temas motores»: están bien desarrollados y son esenciales para construir el área de investigación

b) Cuadrante superior izquierdo. Alberga temas caracterizados por lazos internos y externos débiles, con escasa relevancia para el campo. Se trata de temas especializados en la periferia del área.

c) Cuadrante inferior derecho. Incluye temas que carecen de desarrollo y relevancia. Podrían ser temas emergentes o bien en decadencia.

d) Cuadrante inferior izquierdo. Muestra los temas relevantes pero con escaso desarrollo. Pueden entenderse como temas generales, transversales y básicos.

• Identificación de áreas temáticas. Los principales temas del campo y su evolución se representan a través de sus cambios diacrónicos. Estos cambios se identifican por superposiciones en los «clusters» de un período al del siguiente. Es decir, existe una evolución si un tema del período T1 comparte palabras clave con un tema del período T2. Cuantas más palabras clave tengan en común dos «clusters» de períodos consecutivos, más sólida será su evolución.

• Análisis de rendimiento. Cada tema y cada área temática se componen de un conjunto de palabras clave que aparecen en un grupo de documentos. Es decir, cada tema y cada área temática pueden asociarse a un conjunto de documentos. Ello implica que la producción científica y el impacto de cada tema y área temática puede medirse mediante indicadores bibliométricos: número de documentos publicados, citas o los diferentes tipos de índice-h (Hirsch, 2005).

Para identificar las revistas más importantes del área se ha utilizado el Journal Citation Reports (JCR) gestionado por Clarivate Analytics dado que presenta la mejor cobertura retrospectiva del área y ofrece datos de calidad para el desarrollo de este estudio. El JCR (2013) incluía 74 revistas dentro de la categoría «Communication». Los datos se han obtenido de WoS.

La muestra se restringe al período 1980-2013 y solo incluye artículos y revisiones. Se compone de 33.627 documentos y sus respectivas citas hasta agosto de 2014.

Se emplearon como unidades de análisis las palabras clave escogidas por los autores así como las «Keywords Plus». De manera adicional se llevó a cabo un proceso de de-duplicación para refinar los datos. Como algunos documentos carecían de suficientes palabras clave se añadieron manualmente términos descriptivos adicionales. Estos términos se elaboraron combinando el título con otras palabras clave presentes en WoS. Algunos términos se excluyeron por su escaso valor informacional, concretamente palabras vacías o términos genéricos como «Comunicación». Se han manejado 29.951 palabras clave.

El arco cronológico se ha dividido en cuatro períodos: 1980-1989, 1990-1999, 2000-2009 y 2010-2013. WoS incluye 3.731, 6.583, 13.203 y 10.107 documentos respectivamente en cada uno.

3. Resultados

3.1. Temas de investigación

Para analizar los temas más relevantes en el área se presenta un diagrama para cada período. En ellos el tamaño de la esfera es proporcional al conjunto de documentos vinculado al respectivo tema de investigación. Entre paréntesis se ofrece el número total de citas de cada tema.

• Primer período: 1980-1989. Durante esta década el campo pivota alrededor de dieciocho temas (Figura 1).


Montero-Diaz et al 2018a-66322 ov-es026.jpg

– De acuerdo a las medidas de rendimiento indicadas en la Tabla 1, destacan dos temas: «Publicidad» y «Televisión». Ambos consiguen el mayor número de documentos y superan las cuatro mil citas.

– El tema de mayor centralidad del período es «Publicidad». Se consolida como tópico básico y transversal, con un elevado impacto y número de citas. Se relaciona con marcas, ventas y productos.

– El tema «Televisión» se categoriza como básico y transversal y es central también en este período. Consigue el mayor índice de impacto, incluye investigaciones sobre distintos aspectos como la cobertura televisiva de diferentes desastres, los usos sociales del medio o sus patrones de comunicación, entre otros.

• Segundo período: 1990-1999. En estos diez años el campo se compuso principalmente de temas motor. También se da un amplio número de temas emergentes que serán la base de temas motor en siguientes períodos.

El tema «Noticias» pasa de emergente a tema motor: fue el más productivo y el tercero en cuanto a citas recibidas. El tema «Respuesta» se consolida como tema motor. Fue uno de los más atractivos para los investigadores en comunicación. También se abordó desde temas similares. El tema motor «Género» obtuvo el mayor índice de impacto en este período. Atendió a las diferencias por género/sexo, intimidad, sexo y también comportamiento.

«Publicidad» se consolidó como tema motor. Consiguió un gran impacto con un número limitado de documentos. Entre otros asuntos se estudió la publicidad en Internet.

• Tercer período: 2000-2009. Durante esta etapa el campo comunicación pivota alrededor de veintidós temas de investigación (Figura 1).

– El tema motor «Noticias» es el más importante según los indicadores de rendimiento (Tabla 1). Estudia asuntos relacionados con las noticias y los medios de masas, los modelos de efectos de los medios y la cobertura informativa.


Montero-Diaz et al 2018a-66322 ov-es027.jpg

– «Publicidad» se consolida como tema motor en este período. Se ocupa de asuntos como la publicidad en Internet, el patrocinio empresarial, la efectividad o el emplazamiento publicitario en videojuegos.

– «Internet» aparece como un importante tema motor, con un alto número de citas y también el mejor índice-h. Incluye distintos aspectos de este nuevo medio, como por ejemplo diferencias entre tasas de respuesta entre las webs y los correos electrónicos, patrones en Internet, redes sociales, etc.

– «Relaciones íntimas» se centra en asuntos vinculados a las relaciones románticas: satisfacción, citas, dinámicas de reacciones emocionales, compromiso o ilusiones positivas.

– «Infancia» se convierte en un importante tema motor, con un elevado índice de impacto. Se centra en el análisis del comportamiento de niños y jóvenes, especialmente en Internet. Además, también se ocupa de los efectos de la violencia en los videojuegos y contenidos mediáticos.

– «Discurso» se refuerza como tema motor al mejorar su impacto. La mayor parte de los documentos se ocupan de lenguaje, identidad, ideología, narración y de análisis del discurso.

El tema «Género» obtiene una moderada tasa de impacto. Se centra en el sesgo de género en las opiniones, diferencias en el uso de videojuegos según el sexo del jugador, diferentes actitudes hacia la homosexualidad o diferencias en la empatía.

• Cuarto período: 2010-2013. Aquí el campo pivota alrededor de veintitrés temas (Figura 1).

– A tenor de las medidas de rendimiento (Tabla 1), destacan los temas motor «noticias» e «Internet». El primero cubre una gran variedad de asuntos, como la distribución de noticias en nuevas herramientas como Twitter, el encuadre y la cobertura mediática de distintos asuntos. El segundo se centra en diferentes aspectos de la comunicación «online».

– «Género» se consolida como tema motor y se refiere a tópicos como material sexualmente explícito en Internet, roles de género y trabajo o diferencias de género en Internet, en citas online, videojuegos o búsqueda de información sobre salud.

– Aunque el tema «Publicidad» aparece en el cuarto cuadrante, está muy cerca del centro del diagrama estratégico. Por su evolución y su índice de impacto en este período puede considerarse un tema relevante. Incluye aspectos relacionados con la exposición de marcas dentro de videojuegos, la credibilidad de las webs corporativas para los usuarios, el entorno mediático comercial o la comprensión de anuncios por el público infantil.

3.2. Evolución temática del campo

Mediante SciMAT se observó que la producción científica se concentra en torno a 16 áreas: «Infancia», «Aspectos psicológicos», «Noticias», «Audiencias», «Sondeos», «Publicidad», «Salud», «Relaciones», «Género», «Discurso», «Comunicación telefónica», «Relaciones públicas», «Telecomunicaciones», «Opinión pública», «Activismo» e «Internet» (Figura 2). En esta figura, las líneas sólidas representan vínculos temáticos. Las líneas de puntos conectan temas que comparten términos clave diferentes a sus respectivos nombres (se han eliminado las líneas de puntos que conectan temas de áreas temáticas diferentes). Por otro lado, el tamaño de la esfera representa el número de documentos que pertenecen a cada tema. Las sombras reúnen los asuntos etiquetados dentro de una misma área temática.

Análisis estructural de la evolución del campo científico. Como puede verse en la Figura 2, la producción científica analizada se caracteriza por una cohesión sólida. Muchos de los temas identificados se cobijan bajo una misma área temática y proceden de temas aparecidos en períodos anteriores. Asimismo, muestran una evolución continua sin apenas saltos o vacíos. En el período inicial aparecen diez áreas temáticas, que por lo tanto pueden considerarse clásicas. En el segundo período aparecen tres nuevas áreas temáticas: «Salud», «Relaciones» e «Internet». De hecho «Internet» desarrolla un papel importante en el desarrollo del campo. En cuanto a la composición de temas, las áreas «Noticias», «Relaciones», «Género» e «Internet» se componen de temas motores en el período. Asimismo, las áreas temáticas «Noticias», «Género» e «Internet» muestran un significativo aumento en el número de documentos (es decir, en el volumen de las esferas de la Figura 2).

Análisis de rendimiento de la evolución del campo. La Tabla 2 muestra los índices de rendimiento de cada tema. El orden de la tabla es el mismo que el de las áreas temáticas destacadas en la Figura 2. Dos de estas destacan por su impacto: «Noticias» e «Internet». Ambas pueden considerarse áreas temáticas con un impacto central, fundamentales para el desarrollo del campo. La evolución de su índice-h y de sus citas muestran una tendencia alcista. Sobresale el rápido desarrollo del área «Internet», que aunque empezó con poco impacto se convierte progresivamente en germen de una nueva área de investigación. De hecho, desde su aparición, los asuntos analizados por otras áreas están íntimamente vinculados a «Internet».


Montero-Diaz et al 2018a-66322 ov-es028.jpg

Por otro lado, las áreas «Infancia», «Salud» y «Género» aunque consiguen un impacto inicial elevado su rendimiento no crece por igual a lo largo de todos los períodos. En el segundo o tercer período despertaron poco interés; sin embargo, en el último período vuelven a atraer la atención de la comunidad científica. El resto de áreas pueden separarse en dos grupos. Por un lado, las áreas temáticas «Publicidad», «Relaciones», «Discurso», «Comunicación telefónica» y «Relaciones públicas». Presentan un impacto adecuado y sus temas ocupan una posición central de acuerdo a su índice-h. Dentro de ellas, «Comunicación telefónica» y «Relaciones públicas» muestran un modesto descenso en el interés científico en los períodos centrales. En el otro grupo están: «Aspectos psicológicos», «Audiencias», «Opinión pública» y «Activismo» que ofrecen un impacto bajo. Debe señalarse que mientras «Aspectos psicológicos» y «Opinión pública» presentan una tendencia descendente, «Activismo», pese a su reducido impacto, parece más el germen de una nueva área de interés.


Montero-Diaz et al 2018a-66322 ov-es029.jpg

4. Discusión

A la vista de la evolución temática de las áreas detectadas (Figura 2) cabe señalar:

– «Infancia» aparece en los cuatro períodos. En la primera década analizada se ocupaba del uso y efecto de los medios en los niños y jóvenes. Más tarde, pese a que continúa ese interés por los hábitos mediáticos de niños y jóvenes y sus efectos, aparecieron nuevos asuntos vinculados al «bullying», formación de relaciones, predictores de amistad en los niños o a la percepción de las relaciones de sus familiares. En el período 2000-2009 aumentó el interés hacia temas relacionados con el comportamiento de los niños en Internet. En el último período, los temas de esta área se centran principalmente en Internet.

– «Aspectos psicológicos» atendió en el primer período a asuntos vinculados con la confianza y la percepción. En el segundo, se centró en los niveles de procesamiento, dimensiones de experiencia emocional, capacidad cognitiva o en el efecto de tercera persona. Más adelante, estos temas evolucionaron hacia la persuasión narrativa. En el más cercano, se analizaron algunos aspectos psicológicos particulares.

– «Noticias» es una de las principales áreas temáticas. En los primeros años se ocupó de la búsqueda de gratificaciones, recuerdo y comprensión de noticias, estructura de las mismas y diversidad informativa. En el segundo período, el interés del área temática creció. Incluyó asuntos referidos a cobertura informativa de distintos eventos, relación entre los encuadres informativos y las ideas y sentimientos de los lectores o la recepción de noticias. En el tercer período, el área cubrió una amplia variedad de asuntos que incluyeron, por ejemplo: encuadre de las noticias, efectos de la «agenda setting» y «priming», cobertura informativa o aspectos de las noticias online. Finalmente, en el período 2010-2013, por su carácter estructural, se relaciona con otras áreas temáticas. Entre los tópicos incluidos en esos años aparecen: noticias en Twitter, cobertura informativa y mediáticas, y «framing».

– «Audiencias» se ocupó durante el primer período del análisis de las audiencias de diferentes edades, géneros y razas; también de la medida de audiencias de televisión, de noticias y de «soap operas». Entre 1990 y 1999 se dedicó a asuntos como recepción, percepción y niveles de respuesta al contenido mediático. Más adelante, se centró en temas específicos como relaciones entre grupos mediáticos, percepción hostil de los medios, polarización de las audiencias televisivas, audiencias de sitios web corporativos y de productos (o marcas) y emplazamiento de productos. Durante el último período aumentó el interés por las audiencias en Internet. Asimismo, esta área cubre las audiencias del periodismo y la evaluación de campañas.

– «Sondeos» solo aparece en los dos primeros períodos. Allí se sitúa como una importante área de investigación. En ambos, se estudió sondeos, tasas de respuesta y no respuesta, o preguntas por cuestiones sensibles.

– «Publicidad» se centra en la promoción de ventas al mostrar los productos a los consumidores y tratar de ganar su atención. En el primer período se analizó la efectividad de la publicidad en diferentes soportes, la gestión de la imagen, la publicidad política o el uso del sexo en los anuncios. En el siguiente tramo, la publicidad misma recibió una mayor atención y se convirtió en tema motor. En el tercero aumentó significativamente su interés por la publicidad en Internet. Otros asuntos relevantes fueron la efectividad, la evaluación de la marca, la credibilidad o la publicidad internacional. En el último período, además de estos asuntos, la «Publicidad» se ocupó de la exposición de marcas «in-game», comprensión de los anuncios por el público infantil y efectividad de las campañas virales.

– «Salud» arrancó en el período 1990-1999 con asuntos vinculados a la comunicación en salud: mensajes de apoyo social entre personas con discapacidad, factores influyentes en las respuestas a preguntas sobre hábitos sexuales, mensajes de persuasión sobre salud, efectividad de la comunicación en salud, fuentes de información, búsqueda de información o campañas de prevención e información. En 2000-2009 se centró en la presentación de información sobre salud, fuentes de información, búsqueda y evitación de información sobre salud y en el análisis de patrones de consumo mediático. Recientemente (2010-2013) se ha centrado en la comunicación sobre salud mediante Internet.

– «Relaciones» recoge la investigación sobre la comunicación en las relaciones personales, especialmente en las de tipo romántico. Comenzó (1990-1999) con el análisis de escalas y modelos. También con la investigación sobre la idea de compromiso y las estrategias de defensa. En el siguiente período, el área se articuló en torno a tres temas principales: compromiso, estrategias de defensa y familia y citas. En el último (2010-2013) predominan los estudios sobre predicción de disolución de relaciones románticas no maritales, compromiso adulto y adolescente, citas online y modelos de relaciones turbulentas.

– «Género» comenzó como un área temática referida a las diferencias entre géneros y al análisis de comportamientos específicos de cada uno. En la segunda etapa se convirtió en un tema motor vinculado a asuntos como relaciones, efectos de la publicidad o recepción. En el período 2000-2009 abordó las diferencias y la identidad de género, masculinidad, violencia masculina, minorías raciales, estereotipos y también en el papel del género en el efecto de tercera persona. En el último período, esta área aparece fuertemente influida por Internet.

– «Discurso» incluye los trabajos sobre el proceso de comunicación desde la retórica, la narrativa o el lenguaje. En los primeros años abordó la retórica de la ciencia, relaciones retórica-ideología, reciprocidad en negociaciones, interacciones iniciales, estrategias del discurso o narrativas en las organizaciones. En el segundo se vinculó a la investigación sobre lenguaje y conversación. También a los asuntos relacionados con Internet. En la tercera etapa se centró en tópicos como identidad e interacción lingüística, persuasión narrativa, análisis del discurso o multilingüismo, entre otros. Estos temas han continuado en el último período, incluyendo también el análisis del discurso online.

– «Comunicación telefónica» evoluciona desde los estudios relacionados con la cobertura telefónica al uso del teléfono móvil y el uso de datos móviles.

– «Relaciones públicas» se centró en el primer período en los procesos de comunicación en las organizaciones: responsabilidad social, valores morales, licencias, gestión de incidentes o modelos de comportamiento. A continuación (1990-1999), pasó a ocuparse más de responsabilidad social. Debe subrayarse un creciente interés en las relaciones públicas mediante Internet. En el tercer período, incluyó aspectos generales y avanzados de la responsabilidad social y las relaciones públicas. En el último tramo, Internet también tiene una gran influencia.

– «Telecomunicación» estuvo presente en los dos primeros períodos. Primero, se centró en políticas de radiodifusión y telecomunicación, así como en la desregulación de la televisión. Luego (1990-1999) se ocupó, entre otros, del comportamiento de las telecomunicaciones, adopción de Internet, diferencias en la conectividad de Internet, estándares de servicios globales de telecomunicación, repertorio de canales y diferencias entre videorreproductores y televisión por cable.

– «Opinión pública» atiende fundamentalmente al proceso democrático, comportamiento del voto y asuntos políticos. En los primeros años se investigó sobre las encuestas y su evaluación, también sobre el comportamiento de los votantes. En el segundo período amplió temas: asuntos vinculados a las campañas mediáticas, deliberación democrática, mediatización de la política, relación entre opinión pública y política o la influencia de la cobertura informativa en la percepción del sentimiento público. A continuación, se centró en aspectos similares y en otros relacionados con Internet. En los últimos años ha aumentado la influencia de Internet e incluye asuntos como el uso de medios digitales por los estudiantes para fines políticos, niveles de interactividad en las webs de los candidatos presidenciales o cómo los medios sociales incrementan el cinismo político. Además, incluye asuntos como el compromiso ciudadano o la comunicación democrática.

– «Activismo» surge en el período 2000-2009 y cubre aspectos sobre movimientos sociales y protestas. Ha abordado también la investigación sobre medios y activismo democrático y medios alternativos. En el último período se ha centrado en la personalización de acciones colectivas y multitud de movimientos sociales en el mundo.

– Desde que «Internet» apareció como área temática en el segundo período, ha influido fuertemente en todo el campo de comunicación, especialmente desde el tercer período hasta la actualidad. En 1990-1999 se centró en explorar los motivos y preocupaciones de los internautas, así como en la adopción del servicio. En el tercer período se ocupó del uso de Internet y de redes sociales, entre otros. Por último, (2010-2013) ha aumentado el interés por la comunicación en redes sociales. Por ejemplo: las diferentes estrategias de conexión entre usuarios de Facebook, Twitter, científicos sociales, predictores de comunicación en Facebook y proximidad relacional. También incluye investigación acerca de e-ciencia, credibilidad online y uso del «big data».

5. Conclusión

Comunicación es un campo de investigación bastante fragmentado. Este estudio apoya esta conclusión y delimita, además, 16 áreas temáticas fundamentales sin apenas relación entre ellas. Las conexiones mutuas fueron más comunes entre 1980 y 2000, pero a partir de entonces las áreas temáticas se han ido aislando progresivamente.

De todos modos, este resultado solo refleja la producción científica indexada en WoS, que presenta un fuerte sesgo hacia el inglés. Futuros trabajos deberían comparar estos resultados con muestras de otras bases de datos como Scopus o Google Scholar que incluyen un rango geográfico e idiomático más amplio (Delgado & Repiso, 2013) lo que permitiría comparaciones transnacionales también significativas. Otros trabajos podrían seleccionar artículos en función de selecciones representativas de revistas.

Apoyos

Este trabajo ha sido financiado por los fondos FEDER (becas TIN2013-40658-P y TIN2016-75850-R) y por el proyecto de la Universidad de Cádiz PR2016-067.

Referencias

Barnett, G. A., Huh, C., Kim, Y., & Park, H.W. (2011). Citations among communication journals and other disciplines: a network analysis. Scientometrics, 88(2), 449-469. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-011-0381-2

Barnett, G.A., & Danawoski, J.A. (1992). The structure of communication. Human Communication Research, 19(2), 264-285. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2958.1992.tb00302.x

Bastian, M., Heymann, S., & Jacomy, M. (2009). Gephi: An open source software for exploring and manipulating networks. In Proceedings of the International AAAI Conference on Weblogs and Social Media.

Callon, M., Courtial, J.P., & Laville, F. (1991). Co-word analysis as a tool for describing the network of interactions between basic and technological research: The case of polymer chemsitry. Scientometric, 22(1). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02019280

Callon, M., Courtial, J.P., Turner, W.A., & Bauin, S. (1983). From translations to problematic networks: An introduction to co-word analysis. Social Science Information. https://doi.org/10.1177/053901883022002003

Chung, C.J., Barnett, G.A., Kim, K., & Lackaff, D. (2013). An analysis on communication theory and discipline. Scientometrics, 95(3), 985-1002. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-012-0869-4

Chung, C.J., Lee, S., Barnett, G.A., & Kim, J.H. (2009). A comparative network analysis of the Korean Society of Journalism and Communication Studies (KSJCS) and the International Communication Association (ICA) in the era of hybridization. Asian Journal of Communication, 19(2), 170-191. https://doi.org/10.1080/01292980902827003

Cobo, M. J., Martínez, M.A., Gutiérrez-Salcedo, M., Fujita, H., & Herrera-Viedma, E. (2015). 25 years at knowledge-based systems: A bibliometric analysis. Knowledge-Based Systems, 80, 3-13. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.knosys.2014.12.035

Cobo, M.J., López-Herrera, A.G., Herrera-Viedma, E., & Herrera, F. (2011a). An approach for detecting, quantifying, and visualizing the evolution of a research field: A practical application to the fuzzy sets theory field. Journal of Informetrics, 5(1), 146-166. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joi.2010.10.002

Cobo, M.J., López-Herrera, A.G., Herrera-Viedma, E., & Herrera, F. (2011b). Science mapping software tools: Review, analysis, and cooperative study among tools. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 62(7), 1382-1402. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.21525

Cobo, M.J., López-Herrera, A.G., Herrera-Viedma, E., & Herrera, F. (2012). SciMAT: A new science mapping analysis software tool. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 63(8), 1609-1630. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.22688

Corner, J. (2013). Is there a «field» of media research? - The «fragmentation» issue revisited. Media, Culture & Society, 35(8), 1011-1018. https://doi.org/10.1177/0163443713508702

Coulter, N., Monarch, I., & Konda, S. (1998). Software engineering as seen through its research literature: A study in coword analysis. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 49(13), 1206-1223. https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1097-4571(1998)49:13<1206::AID-ASI7>3.0.CO;2-F

De-Filippo, D. (2013). Spanish scientific output in communication sciences in WOS. The Scientific Journals in SSCI (2007-12). Comunicar, 21(41), 25-34. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-02

Delgado, E., & Repiso, R. (2013). The impact of scientific journals of communication: Comparing Google Scholar Metrics, Web of Science and Scopus. Comunicar, 21(41), 45-52. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-04

Fernández-Quijada, D., & Masip, P. (2013). Three decades of Spanish communication research: Towards legal age. Comunicar, 21(41), 15-24. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-01

Hakanen, E.A., & Wolfram, D. (1995). Citation relationships among international mass communication journals. Journal of Information Science, 21(3), 209-215. https://doi.org/10.1177/016555159502100306

Hirsch, J.E. (2005). An index to quantify an individual’s scientific research output. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 102(46), 16569-16572. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0507655102

Knobloch-Westerwick, S., & Glynn, C.J. (2013). The Matilda effect-role congruity effects on scholarly communication: A citation analysis of communication research and journal of communication articles. Communication Research, 40(1), 3-26. https://doi.org/10.1177/0093650211418339

Koivisto, J., & Thomas, P.D. (2011). Mapping communication and media research: Conjunctures, institutions, challenges. Mapping communication and media research: Conjunctures, institutions, challenges. Tampere University Press.

Lauf, E. (2005). National diversity of major international journals in the field of communication. Journal of Communication, 55(1), 139151. https://doi.org/10.1093/joc/55.1.139

Leydesdorff, L., & Probst, C. (2009). The delineation of an interdisciplinary specialty in terms of a journal set: The case of communication studies. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 60(8), 1709-1718. https://doi.org/10.1002/asi.21052

Lin, Y., & Kaid, L.L. (2000). Fragmentation of the intellectual structure of political communication study: Some empirical evidence. Scientometrics, 47(1), 143-164. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1005678011835

Martínez, M.A., Cobo, M.J., Herrera, M., & Herrera-Viedma, E. (2015). Analyzing the scientific evolution of social work using science mapping. Research on Social Work Practice, 5(2), 257-277. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049731514522101

Martínez, M.A., Herrera, M., López-Gijón, J., & Herrera-Viedma, E. (2014). H-Classics: Characterizing the concept of citation classics through H-index. Scientometrics, 98(3), 1971-1983. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-013-1155-9

Míguez-González, M.I., Baamonde-Silva, X.M., & Corbacho-Valencia, J.M. (2014). A bibliographic study of public relations in Spanish media and communication journals, 2000-2012. Public Relations Review, 40(5), 818-828. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pubrev.2014.08.002

Noyons, E.C.M., Moed, H.F., & Luwel, M. (1999). Combining mapping and citation analysis for evaluative bibliometric purposes: A bibliometric study. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 50(2), 115-131. https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1097-4571(1999)50:2<115::AID-ASI3>3.0.CO;2-J

Paisley, W. (1984). Communication in the communication sciences. In B. Dervin & M. Voigt (Eds.), Progress in the communication sciences (Vol. 5, pp. 1-43). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Park, H.W., & Leydesdorff, L. (2009). Knowledge linkage structures in communication studies using citation analysis among communication journals. Scientometrics, 81(1), 157-175. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-009-2119-y

Poor, N.D. (2009). Global citation patterns of open access communication studies journals: Pushing beyond the Social Science Citation Index. International Journal of Communication, 3, 27. (https://goo.gl/qesFYN).

Repiso, R., Torres, D., & Delgado, E. (2011). Bibliometric and social network analysis applied to television dissertations presented in Spain (1976/2007). Comunicar, 19(37), 151-159. https://doi.org/10.3916/C37-2011-03-07

Rogers, E.M. (1994). A history of communication study: A biographical approach. Free Press.

Rogers, E.M. (1999). Anatomy of the two subdisciplines of communication study. Human Communication Research, 25(4), 618-631. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2958.1999.tb00465.x

Schönbach, K., & Lauf, E. (2006). Are national communication journals still necessary? A case study and some suggestions. Communications, 31(4), 447-454. https://doi.org/10.1515/COMMUN.2006.028

Smith, E.O. (2000). Strength in the technical communication journals and diversity in the serials cited. Journal of Business and Technical Communication, 14(2), 131-184. https://doi.org/10.1177/105065190001400201

So, C.Y.K. (1988). Citation patterns of core communication journals an assessment of the developmental status of communication. Human Communication Research, 15(2), 236-255. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2958.1988.tb00183.x

So, C.Y.K. (2010). The rise of Asian communication research: A citation study of SSCI journals. Asian Journal of Communication, 20(2), 230-247. https://doi.org/10.1080/01292981003693419

Tai, Z. (2009). The structure of knowledge and dynamics of scholarly communication in agenda setting research, 1996-2005. Journal of Communication, 59(3), 481-513. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-2466.2009.01425.x

White, W. (1999). Academic topographies a network analysis of disciplinarity among communication faculty. Human Communication Research, 25(4), 604-617. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2958.1999.tb00464.x

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/18
Accepted on 31/03/18
Submitted on 31/03/18

Volume 26, Issue 1, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C55-2018-08
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 4
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?