Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Across the globe, many students have easy and constant access to media, yet they often receive little or no instruction about the impact of their media consumption. This article outlines a «24 hours without media» exercise in accordance with the guidelines set in Module 7, Unit 1 of the UNESCO curriculum. In the fall of 2010, nearly 1,000 students from a dozen universities across five continents took part in «The World Unplugged» study. Researchers at the University of Maryland gathered students’ narrative responses to the going without media assignment and analyzed them by using grounded theory and analytic abduction, assisted by IBM’s ManyEyes computer analysis software. Results showed that going without media made students dramatically more cognizant of their own media habits –with many self-reporting an «addiction» to media– a finding further supported by a clear majority in every country admitting outright failure of their efforts to go unplugged. Students also reported that having constant access to digital technology is integral to their personal identities; it is essential to the way they construct and manage their work and social lives. «The World Unplugged» exercise enabled experiential learning; students gained increased self-awareness about the role of media in their lives and faculty came to better understand the Internet usage patterns of their students, enhancing their ability to help young people become more media literate.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Increasingly, university students across the globe have constant access to media. They can read and share information, connect with friends and family, and be «plugged in» no matter their setting due to widespread Internet access and a plethora of mobile devices. Recent studies, focused primarily on secondary school students, illustrate the extent to which young people live in a media-saturated world. Students are increasingly reliant on mobile devices for their news and entertainment (Nielsen 2009) and are tethered to social media sites (Lenhart et al. 2010). Eight- to 18-year-olds consume more than 7.5 hours of media daily, with the majority of time spent viewing television content, listening to music, using the computer and playing video games (Kaiser Family Foundation, 2010).

As a consequence, media literacy scholars have suggested (Hobbs & Frost 2003) that media literacy curricula in K-12 environments include activities that invite students to reflect on and analyze their own media consumption habits. And indeed, Module 7, Unit 1 of the UNESCO Curriculum, «Internet Opportunities and Challenges», actively promotes the concept of media self-awareness in two of its learning objectives: «Understand young people’s Internet usage patterns and interests» and «Develop their ability to use educational methods and basic tools to help young people use the Internet responsibly – and make them aware of the related opportunities, challenges and risks». Yet students often receive little or no instruction about the possible consequences of their media use (Thoman & Jolls, 2004; Puddephatt, 2006; Livingstone, 2004; Martens, 2010).

Students cannot learn how to fully participate in their societies as citizens and consumers, nor can they have a full appreciation for the roles of media in their lives, until they have taken a close look at their own media diet. Media literacy educators need to identify learning experiences in which students can reach their own conclusions about how to «fully participate as citizens and consumers in a media-saturated society» (Hobbs 2004: 44). As the Kaiser Family Foundation report notes, «Understanding the role of media in young people’s lives is essential for those concerned about promoting the healthy development of children and adolescents». Current media literacy curricula teaches students to access, analyze, evaluate, communicate and create media (De Andrea, 2011; Rogow, 2004). But recent media literacy research, including «The World Unplugged» study outlined in this article, suggest that a sixth skill of self-awareness should be added to this rubric. Before students can effectively analyze and evaluate media texts, they should be given the opportunity to become aware of how they access and use media.

In the fall of 2010, researchers at the University of Maryland, College Park, USA led a global study, titled «The World Unplugged,» to address this educational objective. «The World Unplugged» study was based on a «24 hours without media» project first assigned at the University of Maryland earlier that year, in spring semester 2010. Students in a core media literacy university course had been asked to go media-free for 24 hours and then blog about their experience: to report their successes, admit to any failures, and generally reflect on what they learned about their own consumption of media. The Maryland «24 hours without media» exercise offered university students an opportunity to track their own connectedness, and then analyze how they themselves could mitigate or prevent negative consequences of their media use. More than 200 students took part in that spring 2010 assignment, and in the aggregate students wrote more than 110,000 words about their experiences. After institutional review board (IRB) approval, that rich data became a research study, and the online release of the results1 attracted a great deal of media attention both in the United States and internationally.

Researchers from that study presented their results to the partner universities of the Salzburg Academy of Media & Global Change during its 2010 July-August session. A dozen universities expressed interest in participating in a comparable global research project. As a result, that fall nearly 1,000 students from 10 countries2 took part in a 24-hour media-free exercise that formed the basis for the «The World Unplugged» research.

The international «The World Unplugged» version of the «24 hours without media» exercise provided students across five continents with an opportunity to become more self-aware about how much they depend on media in their daily lives and how much media both enhance as well as circumscribe their activities and relationships. As one UK-based student said after completing the exercise: «We feel the need to be plugged in to media all day long. Our lives basically revolve around it. It is the way we are informed about news, about gossip, the way we communicate with friends and plan our days».

2. Methods

A dozen universities in 10 countries (Argentina, Chile, China-mainland, China-Hong Kong, Lebanon, Mexico, Slovakia, Uganda, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America) on five continents (Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and South America) participated in «The World Unplugged Project».

Students at all the universities completed «The World Unplugged» project in a 24-hour period between September and December 2010, dependent on each university’s semester calendar and curricular needs. All 12 universities shared the same assignment template, a translation of it, or a close copy adapted for an individual country and/or university3. In advance of their participation, students were not told about previous students’ experiences or the results of a prior study in order to avoid influencing their expectations and therefore the perception of their experiences during the exercise.

In the global study, as in the first U.S. – based one, participants at the various universities were asked to complete a SurveyMonkey online poll that included basic demographic data, including country of origin, racial identity, age, gender, religious identity, as well as questions about their ownership and use of particular media devices (e.g. Do you own a mobile phone or MP3 player? How many hours do you spend each day playing video games or on social-networking sites?). Students’ narrative responses were gathered by the universities and collected by researchers at the University of Maryland. Responses in Chinese from Chongqing University were translated in China by university translators; other non-English responses were translated at the University of Maryland by native language speakers, assisted by automatic translation software.

The total number of words in the collected student responses totaled nearly 500,000 – about as many words as Leo Tolstoy’s «War and Peace»4. After the data collection (and translation when needed) of those responses across the 12 global universities, the analytic process followed a combined approach using grounded theory (Glaser & Strauss 1967) and analytic abduction as suggested by Peirce (1955). The process of analytical abduction can be best described as a continuous back and forth between empirical data and preexisting theoretical constructs. Researchers first analyzed the data using grounded theory, which allowed nuanced understanding of participants’ personal essays and could take into account cultural, social, economic and political distinctions among the participants from 4 continents, then analytic abduction followed. Before starting the analysis, researchers were trained to ensure coder reliability. All responses were read at a minimum by two researchers. In the first reading of the responses, researchers isolated categories and keywords that emerged from student’s responses. Each researcher individually identified these categories. There was significant convergence in the categories and variations concerning the identification of keywords were reconciled (Strauss, Corbin & Lynch 1990). For instance three researchers used the responses to generate categories around a list of emotional words and devices, and then grouped them accordingly. Terms such as «dependence», «addiction», and «withdrawal» were gathered under a «Dependence» category, while words such as «peaceful», «relief», and «happy» were gathered under a «Benefits of Unplugging» category. The keywords were then plugged into IBM’s ManyEyes software, which allowed researchers to highlight the different socio-cultural, technological and socio-behavioral classifications that were found within the responses. These categories were developed primarily on the emotional reactions to the experiment and reactions to the experiment based on the student’s relationship to a particular type of medium (mobile phone or TV, for example).

Following the computer-assisted analysis of the data, the responses were hand-coded by at least two researchers, and then reevaluated by a second team of researchers who then further organized, analyzed and wrote up the data by country, by medium and by emotional response. The findings of both the narrative responses and the quantitative surveys were released on a dedicated website.

With the participation of 1,000 people globally, the Unplugged study could not be a representative sampling of students around the world; in the aggregate the data reflect only a snapshot of possible responses to going without media in the 12 universities and in the 10 countries that participated. It is worth noting as well that the sample size of participating students varied among universities, as did the size of the entire student populations of the participating universities from which participants were drawn. Still, despite vast differences among the participating schools and countries –geographic, political, religious and economic– researchers found striking consistencies in the responses of students. The ubiquity and dependence on social media and mobile devices, in particular, extended to every university from Uganda to Hong Kong, from the UK to Chile. In their media use students in this study appear to relate to each other in ways that transcend disparate national origins.

3. Results

Going without media during «The World Unplugged» study made students more cognizant of the presence of media – both media’s benefits and limitations. But perhaps what students became most aware of was their absolute inability to direct their lives without media. The depths of the «addiction» that students reported prompted some to confess that they had learned that they needed to curb their media habits. Most students doubted they would have much success, but they acknowledged that their reliance on media was to some degree self-imposed and actually inhibited their ability to manage their lives as fully as they hoped – to make proactive rather than reactive choices about work and play.

There were multiple major findings across countries.

Among the top results:

1) Students around the world repeatedly used the language of «addiction» and dependency to speak about their media habits. «Media is my drug; without it I was lost», said one student from the UK. «I am an addict. How could I survive 24 hours without it?». A student from Argentina observed: «Sometimes I felt ‘dead». A student from Slovakia simply noted: «I felt sad, lonely and depressed».

2) A clear majority in every country admitted outright failure of their efforts to go unplugged. The failure rate didn’t appear to relate to the relative affluence of the country, or students’ personal access to a range of devices and technologies. The research documented that students failed because of how essential and pervasive digital technologies had become in their lives. «It was a difficult day …a horrible day», said a student from Chile. «After this, I can’t live without media! I need my social webs, my cell phone, my Mac, my mp3 always!». Students also reported how desperately bored they were when they were unplugged. «I literally didn’t know what to do with myself», said one student from the UK. «Going down to the kitchen to pointlessly look in the cupboards became a regular routine, as did getting a drink».

3) Students reported that media –especially their mobile phones– have literally become an extension of themselves, integral to their personal identities. Said a student from the UK: «Unplugging my ethernet cable feels like turning off a life support system». For many students, going without media for 24 hours ripped back the curtain on their hidden loneliness. «When I couldn’t communicate with my friends» by mobile phone, reported a student from China, «I felt so lonely as if I was in a small cage on an island». And the problems for some students went beyond loneliness. Some came to recognize that ‘virtual’ connections had been substituting for real ones – their relationship to media was one of the closest «friendships» they had. Wrote a student from Chile: «I felt lonely without multimedia. I arrived at the conclusion that media is a great companion».

4) Students reported that being tethered to digital technology 24/7 is not just a habit, it is essential to the way they construct and manage their friendships and social lives. The leading social media site across all five continents in the study was Facebook. Students reported that how they use social media shapes how others think of them and how they think about themselves. «There is no doubt that Facebook is really high profile in our daily life», said a student from Hong Kong. «Everybody uses it to contact other persons, also we use it to pay attention to others».

5) Many students said that although they knew they could be distracted at times, they hadn’t been fully aware of how much time they committed to social networking and how poorly they actually were able to multitask. «I usually study and chat or listen to music at the same time so I won’t be bored and feel asleep», wrote a student from Lebanon. «But what I mainly realized is that… when you really get off the media you realize… how many quality things you can do».

6) Students noted they use different communication tools to reach different types of people. Students can simultaneously be on multiple communication platforms, but in different ways: They call their mothers, they text and Skype Chat close friends, they Facebook with their social groups, they email their professors and employers. Students consider and sort through all these permutations automatically, but the implications are real for how they construct their personas and social networks.

7) Most students reported that they rarely search for «hard» news at mainstream news sites. Instead they inhale, almost unconsciously, the news that is served up on the sidebar of their email account, on friends’ Facebook walls, and on Twitter. Because social media are increasingly the way students reported getting their news and information, very few students mentioned any traditional news outlets by name.

8) Many students noted some benefits to their media-free exercise: a sense of liberation or freedom, a feeling of peace and contentment, better communication with close friends and family, and more time to do things they had been neglecting. Rarely, but in cases across the globe, students expressed a desire to set aside time to go media-free again in the future.

9) Some students commented on the positive qualitative differences in even close relationships during the period they went unplugged. «I interacted with my parents more than the usual», reported a student in Mexico. «I fully heard what they said to me without being distracted with my BlackBerry. I helped to cook and even to wash the dishes». A student from the U.S. wrote: «I’ve lived with the same people for three years now, they’re my best friends, and I think that this is one of the best days we’ve spent with together. I was able to really see them, without any distractions, and we were able to revert to simple pleasures».

4. Discussion

The primary value of conducting a «24 hours without media» assignment is in the increased self-awareness students gain with regard to the role of media in their lives. Self-awareness is fundamental to empowerment – in order to understand how to make responsible use of the Internet, students must first become aware of their own usage patterns and behaviors. Thus, the assignment addresses the learning objectives of Unit 1 of Module 7 of the UNESCO curriculum by helping teachers understand the Internet usage patterns and interests of students, developing teachers’ ability to help young people use the Internet responsibly, and prompting students to themselves become more aware of the opportunities, challenges and risks the Internet provides.

Module 7, «Internet Opportunities and Challenges», opens by stating that «Taking part in the information society is essential for citizens of all age groups». It is often assumed that young people –considered «digital natives» who grew up in a wired world– are fully aware of their own media habits, as well as the benefits and pitfalls of living in an information society. As Module 7 notes, this is not the case. Young people, while being able to benefit both from the resources available on the Internet and the ever-growing roster of web-enabled mobile devices, remain a vulnerable population. But rather than advocating a protectionist approach, UNESCO’s Curriculum rightly suggests that «The best way to help them stay out of harm’s way is to empower and educate them on how to avoid or manage risks related to Internet use» (UNESCO 128).

The «Unplugged» study has added a global perspective to the growing body of literature on the media habits of college students, which includes research on the level of student involvement with electronic media as it relates to leisure activities (Kamalipour, Robinson & Nortman, 1998), an investigation into the relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participation in Facebook activities, and student engagement (Junco, R. 2011) and a case study of whether a social media site designed for students can help students make the transition from high school to college (DeAndrea & al., 2011). The «Unplugged» study provided a comprehensive picture of students’ media use because it asked them to reflect on media broadly defined – from video games to cell phone use to Facebook visits.

The U.S. – based «24 hours without media» study began in early 2010 as an assignment to teach students to be more mindful about their media consumption patterns. However, the instructors quickly realized the didactic potential of the visceral experiences the conscious and self-administered media withdrawal provided. Instead of simply hearing a lecture about how media have influenced society, students experienced first-hand how media shape their daily behavior and access to information. Overnight the experiment enlightened the students about their media usage. Very few of the students had previously reflected about their media consumption patterns; after this exercise, they expressed a more conscious appreciation of how their media use enabled, determined and influenced their own behavior and socio-cultural location.

4.1 Impact on students and teaching

Educators around the world can reproduce the simple «one-day without media» exercise. As the two studies discussed in this article suggest, such an exercise heightens students’ awareness of their own media habits and additionally leads to a more deliberate use and understanding of mediated information and media technologies.

Instructors face a choice when determining how best to educate students about the benefits and challenges of living in an age of infinite information. Lecturing students about the importance of being media literate, showing them statistics about how much time people their age spend on their computers, phones and other mobile devices, and exposing them to research about the effects of being constantly «plugged in» is one delivery method. But research suggests that a more effective way of educating and empowering students is to let them discover these lessons for themselves (Berkeley, 2009).

A compelling way to get students thinking about how reliant they are on media is to take everything away from them and have them reflect on the consequences (Moeller, 2009; NAMLE, 2007; Singh & al., 2010). A day-without-media exercise enables experiential learning as described by Kolb and Fry (1975). The four-step experiential learning model derived from Lewin (1948), Dewey (1963) and Piaget (1973) argues that higher involvement leads to better learning. Kolb and Fry (1975) proposed that an experience is followed by observations of the experience. Such experiential observations help form abstract concepts, which in turn can be tested in new experiential situations. Similar to Kolb and Fry’s model, the «24 hours without media» project begins with an experiential exercise. This is followed by a written reflection, which is used to reinforce key media literacy concepts that can be further strengthened in activities throughout a semester of work. In other words, the 24-hour exercise creates a basis upon which students can relate, reflect and analyze subjects and topics introduced in media literacy readings, lectures and discussions.

An additional value of the exercise is its open-endedness. The exercise as designed requires students to decide when over a preset time period they will go for a day without media. That requirement ensures that even before the media fast, students have to be reflective about the patterns of their media use in order to determine their personally optimum time for abstaining from media. In «The World Unplugged» study, some students prioritized the role of media in facilitating their social life, and so avoided conducting their media-free period over a weekend. Other students determined that they needed to use media in their coursework and outside jobs and so selected a weekend 24-hour period. No matter their choice, the fact of their being forced to make a conscious decision contributed to the students proactively evaluating media’s roles in their lives. The «24 hours without media» exercise also creates a shared group experience that encourages animated class participation. The common experience fosters closer bonds among students, which also often inspires more active student engagement with the class and each other, an advantage especially for any later class group projects. In an effort to enhance students’ learning beyond the classroom, faculty implementing this exercise may find it useful to encourage student-run media to report on their peers participating in this project. News coverage of the exercise can reinforce for students who are participating that what they are doing has meaning outside their own classroom, and it can communicate to students who are not themselves going «unplugged» the powerful impact of media on daily lives and work.

4.2 Recommendations for teachers

The «24 hours without media» exercise enables teachers to gauge how their specific population of young people uses media. Such an exercise provides both teachers and students with current data (rather than statistics from some other group at some other time) that can be referenced throughout a semester or year-long course of study. The «24 hours without media» exercise allows students to critically examine their own specific media habits and see how their media-free experience compares to that of their immediate peers. Because this assignment requires self-examination and reflection rather than memorization or research, it is the experience of these researchers that the lessons learned remain with students.

The appeal of the «24 hours without media» exercise is in its simplicity. Teachers the world over are always looking for exercises that are easy to explain and implement, require few resources, take little time to complete and produce tangible results. Laying out the details of the media-free assignment is simple. All students need to know is that they are to refrain from using any form of media (from mobile phones to the Internet, from radio to television) for one full 24-hour period within a designated timeframe, and that they are to write about their experience immediately after finishing their media-free period. Teachers need not do any preparation for this assignment beyond articulating exactly what they want students to write about in their response essay – usually a mixture of logistics of the day, what technologies were missed most and what kind of emotions were felt during and after the exercise. Prior to the exercise, teachers should not explain to students why they are being given this assignment, nor should they provide students with any background (including past students’ experience or news coverage) about the exercise, as student should come into this assignment with as few preconceptions as possible5.

Beyond the simplicity of the «unplugged» exercise, the exercise is also appealing because of its portability: it can be used in all media environments and in many classroom settings. The assignment meets students where they are: if they live in an immersive «broadband» environment, then students will likely need to forego for 24 hours a broad range of media, from mobile and digital technologies, to print and broadcast ones. If students are in a more limited media environment, they may only have to forego one or two media outlets – for example a mobile phone and the radio. In either case, students will emerge from the exercise more mindful of how, when and why they use media, and what the impact of their use is on their intellectual, social, political and family life.

The «24 hours without media» exercise is appropriate for use in both secondary schools and at colleges seeking to promote critical thinking, media awareness and media literacy (The researchers have also consulted with middle schools that have adapted the exercise for younger students). The exercise can also be used across discipline and in all size classes. Journalism classes can use it as an introduction to the ways in which young people access information in the twenty-first century, the growth of user-generated content and the changing definition of the term «news».

Communication studies courses can use it as a starting point for a discussion about how audiences process information and increasingly expect to engage in two-way conversations with content producers. Political science courses can use it to discuss how changes in technology affect the state of political discourse and engagement. However and wherever it is used, «24 hours without media» fits well as an introductory assignment that gets students talking about their media use and the role and authority of media in their own environments. Teachers can use lessons learned from this exercise to broaden their class discussions however they see fit.

Researchers note that the «24 hours without media» assignment can be variously adapted to serve specific purposes. Teachers can assign students to spend more than 24 hours without media, to go media-free on a specific day, or to only forego certain types of media. The assignment can be adapted by asking students to go 24 hours without media and then immediately afterward asking students to track their regular media use for 24 hours. Students can also be asked to repeat the assignment over the course of a semester to create a more longitudinal study. Teachers can exercise freedom in establishing the parameters of the exercise, without considerably diminishing the impact of the project on students or limiting the rather sophisticated comprehension the teachers themselves gain about how their students find, share and experience media.

As a UK-based student who participated in «The World Unplugged» study said: «I’d actually recommend anyone take part in the challenge, as it heightens your awareness to how much we as people rely on media for so many things». Such student reactions to the «24 hours without media» exercise make a compelling case for such an assignment to become a core part of any media literacy course in secondary schools and universities around the world.

Acknowledgements

Dr. Susan D. Moeller led the collaborative research for both the «24 hours without media» and «The World Unplugged» studies. In addition to co-authors Elia Powers and Jessica Roberts, Michael Koliska, a Ph.D. student also in the Philip Merrill College of Journalism, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (USA) (mkoliska@umd.edu) was a co-author of this article. Ph.D. students Stine Eckert, Sergei Golitsinski and Soo-Kwang Oh, together with other graduate and undergraduate students at the University of Maryland assisted in the analysis of data for «The World Unplugged» study. Faculty at the various participating international universities were invaluable in gathering, translating and evaluating the data from their schools.

Notes

1 www.withoutmedia.wordpress.com. (12-01-2012).

2 Universities participating in «The World Unplugged» (2010-11) study were as follows: Lead University: University of Maryland, College Park – School of Journalism (USA); American University of Beirut – Department of Social/Behavioral Sciences (Lebanon); Bournemouth University – Media School (United Kingdom); Chinese University of Hong Kong – School of Journalism and Communication (China/Hong Kong); Chongqing University – Literature and Journalism (China); Hofstra University – School of Communication (USA); Hong Kong Shue Yan University – Department of Journalism and Communication (China/Hong Kong); Makerere University – Department of Mass Communication (Uganda); Pontificia Universidad Catolica – School of Journalism (Argentina); Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile – School of Journalism (Chile); Universidad Iberoamericana – Department of Communications (Mexico); University of St. Cyril and Methodius – Marketing and Mass Media (Slovakia).

3 The template assignment gave to the dozen universities is available in the following link: www.withoutmedia.wordpress.com/about(12-01-2012).

4 That total number of words is approximate because many of the students who participated in the global study did not write about their experiences in English.

References

Berkeley, L. (2009). Media Education and New Technology: A Case Study of Major Curriculum Change within a University Media Degree. Journal of Media Practice, 10 (2&3), 185-197.

De Abreu, B. (2011). Media Literacy, Social Networking, and the Web 2.0. Environment for the K-12 Educator. New York: Peter Lang.

De Andrea, D.C. & al. (2011). Serious Social Media : On the Use of Social Media for Improving Students’ Adjustment to College. The Internet and Higher Education, 15(1), 15-23 (DOI: 10.1016/j.iheduc.2011.05.009).

Dewey, J. (1963). Experience and Education. New York: Collier Books.

Glaser, B.G. & Strauss, A.L. (1967). Grounded Theory: The Discovery of Grounded Theory. New York: de Gruyter.

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation (Ed.) (2010). Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18-year-olds. Menlo Park, CA. (www. kff.org/entmedia/upload/8010.pdf) (05-01-2012).

Hobbs, R. & Frost, R. (2003). Measuring the Acquisition of Media-Literacy Skills. Reading Research Quarterly, 38(3), 300-355.

Hobbs, R. (2004). A Review of School-Based Initiatives in Media Literacy Education. American Behavioral Scientist, 48(1), 42-59.

Junco, R. (2011). The Relationship between Frequency of Face book Use, Participation in Facebook Activities, and Student Enga gement. Computers & Education, 58(1), 162-171.

Kamalipour, Y.R., Robinson, W.L. & Nortman, M.L. (1998). College Students’ Media Habits: A Pilot Study. (www.eric.ed. gov/ PDFS/ED415564.pdf) (05-01-2012).

Kolb, D.A. & Fry, R. (1975). Toward an Applied Theory of Expe riential Learning. In C. Cooper (Ed.), Theories of Group Process. London: John Wiley.

Lenhart, A., Purcell, K., Smith, A. & Zickuhr, K. (2010). Social Media & Mobile Internet Use Among Teens and Young Adults. Pew Internet & American Life Project. (www.pewinternet. org/~/­media//Files/Reports/2010/PIP_Social_Media_and_Young_Adults_Report_Final_with_toplines.pdf) (05-01-2012).

Lewin, K. (1948). Resolving Social Conflicts. Selected Papers on Group Dynamics. New York: Harper & Row.

Licoppe, C. (2004). Connected Presence: the Emergence of a New Repertoire for Managing Social Relationships in a Changing Com munication Technoscape. Environment and Planning D. So ciety and Space, 22(1), 135-156.

Livingstone, S. (2004). Media Literacy and the Challenge of New Information and Communication Technologies. The Communica tion Review, 7(1), 3-14.

Martens, H. (2010). Evaluating Media Literacy Education: Concepts, Theories and Future Directions. The Journal of Media Literacy, 2(1). (www.jmle.org/index.php/JMLE/article/view/71) (30-12-2011).

Moeller, S. (2009). Media Literacy: Helping to Educate the Pu blic in a Rapidly Changing World. Workshop based on CIMA Reports. (http://cima.ned.org/publications/research-reports/media-lite racy-understanding-news) (05-01-2012).

NAMLE (Ed.) (2007). Core Principles of Media Literacy Educa tion in the United States. (http://namle.net/publications/core-principles) (05-01-2012).

Peirce, C.S. (1955). Abduction and induction. In J. Buchler (Ed.), Philosophical Writings of Peirce. New York: Dover.

Piaget, J. (1973). To Understand is to Invent. New York: Gross man Publishers.

Puddephatt, A. (2006). A Guide to Measuring the Impact of Right to Information Programmes: Practical Guidance Note. UNDP.

Rogow, F. (2004). Shifting From Media to Literacy: One Opinion on the Challenges of Media Literacy Education. American Beha vioral Scientist, 48(1), 30-34.

Singh, J. & al. (2010). International Information and Media Lite racy Survey (IILMS). Washington (DC): UNESCO: IFAP Project Template. The European Charter for Media Literacy. (www.euromedialiteracy.eu/charter.php) (05-01-2012).

Strauss, A.L., Corbin, J.M. & Lynch, M. (1990). Basics of Qua li tative Research: Grounded Theory Procedures and Techni ques. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

The Nielsen Company (Ed.) (2009). How Teens Use Media : A Nielsen Report on the Myths and Realities of Teen Media Trends. (http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/reports/nielsen_howteensusemedia_june09.pdf) (05-01-2012).

Thoman, E. & Jolls, T. (2004). Media Literacy. A National Priority for a Changing World. American Behavioral Scientist 48(1), 18-29.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La mayoría de los jóvenes del mundo se conecta habitualmente a los medios de comunicación; sin embargo, en pocas ocasiones reciben formación respecto a los impactos que este consumo mediático tiene en ellos mismos. Este artículo expone la experiencia llevada a cabo en el marco del Currículum UNESCO, denominada «24 horas sin medios». En otoño de 2010, cerca de 1.000 estudiantes de 12 universidades de cuatro continentes participaron en el estudio «El mundo desconectado». Investigadores de la Universidad de Maryland (Estados Unidos) recogieron rigurosamente las reflexiones de los alumnos que participaron y las analizaron a través del programa estadístico IBM’s ManyEyes. Los resultados muestran que los jóvenes, a raíz del ejercicio, fueron más conscientes de sus hábitos mediáticos, y muchos de ellos indagaron sobre su propia «adicción» a los medios, mientras que otros no consiguieron siquiera concluir estas 24 horas sin medios. También se pone en evidencia que el acceso cotidiano a la tecnología digital forma parte ya de su identidad juvenil y son básicas para entender su forma de trabajar y sus relaciones sociales. También se demuestra que los alumnos aumentaron su autoconciencia sobre el papel de los medios en sus vidas, y el profesorado comenzó a comprender mejor los intereses de sus alumnos, así como sus parámetros de consumo de Internet, mejorando sus habilidades para ayudar a los jóvenes a estar más alfabetizados mediáticamente.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Cada vez más, los estudiantes universitarios de todo el mundo tienen acceso permanente a los medios de comunicación. Pueden leer y compartir la información, conectarse con amigos y familiares y estar «conectados», dado el acceso universal a Internet y a una amplia variedad de dispositivos móviles. Estudios recientes, centrados principalmente en estudiantes de Secundaria, ponen en evidencia el grado en que los jóvenes viven en un mundo saturado de medios. Los estudiantes son cada vez más dependientes de los dispositivos móviles para acceder a las noticias y al entretenimiento (The Nielsen Company, 2009) y están permanentemente «enganchados» a las redes sociales (Lenhart & al., 2010). De los 8 a los 18 años de edad consumen más de 7,5 horas de media al día, dedicando la mayoría del tiempo al consumo de la televisión, escuchar música, usar el ordenador y jugar con videojuegos (Kaiser Family Foundation, 2010).

Como consecuencia de ello, los investigadores han señalado (Hobbs & Frost, 2003) que los programas de alfabetización mediática en adolescentes han de incluir actividades que inviten a los estudiantes a reflexionar y analizar sus propios hábitos de consumo de medios. Así, en la Unidad 1 del Módulo 7 del Currículum UNESCO, «Oportunidades de Internet y desafíos», promueve activamente el concepto de auto-conocimiento de los medios en sus objetivos de aprendizaje: «Comprender los patrones de uso de Internet por parte de los jóvenes y sus intereses» y «Desarrollar la capacidad de utilizar los métodos educativos y las herramientas básicas para ayudar a los jóvenes a utilizar Internet de forma responsable, haciéndolos conscientes de las oportunidades, los retos y los riesgos». Sin embargo, hoy en día, los estudiantes reciben muy poca o ninguna formación acerca de sus posibles consecuencias (Thoman & Jolls, 2004; Puddephatt de 2006, Livingstone, 2004; Martens, 2010).

Los alumnos no pueden aprender a participar plenamente en la sociedad como ciudadanos y consumidores, ni pueden tener una valoración global de las funciones de los medios de comunicación en sus vidas, sin haber reflexionado acerca de su propia dieta comunicativa. Los educadores de alfabetización mediática tienen el reto de identificar experiencias de aprendizaje donde los jóvenes puedan reflexionar sobre su forma de «participar plenamente como ciudadanos y consumidores en una sociedad saturada de medios» (Hobbs 2004: 44). Como señala el informe de la Fundación Kaiser Family, «comprender el papel de los medios de comunicación en la vida de los jóvenes es esencial para quienes se preocupan por promover el desarrollo sano de niños y adolescentes». El currículum actual de alfabetización mediática enseña a los estudiantes a acceder, analizar, evaluar, comunicar y crear medios de comunicación (De Andrea, 2011; Rogow, 2004). Pero investigaciones recientes en alfabetización mediática –en donde se contextualiza «The World Unplugged», estudio descrito en este artículo– sugieren que ha de partirse de la toma de conciencia de sí mismo. Antes de que los estudiantes puedan analizar y evaluar textos de los medios, se les debe dar la oportunidad también de tomar conciencia de cómo acceder a ellos, utilizando la comunicación.

En el otoño de 2010, investigadores de la Universidad de Maryland en College Park (EEUU) realizaron un estudio mundial, titulado «El mundo conectado» para afrontar este objetivo. El estudio se basó en la experiencia «24 horas sin medios de comunicación», primer proyecto desarrollado en la Universidad de Maryland en la primavera de 2010. Los estudiantes de un centro de alfabetización habían solicitado ir a diferentes medios de comunicación durante 24 horas, narrando luego en un blog su experiencia: los éxitos, los problemas y, en general, describir y reflexionar sobre lo que aprendieron de su consumo de los medios de comunicación. «24 horas sin medios de comunicación» permitió a los estudiantes universitarios la oportunidad de reflexionar sobre sus relaciones con los medios, y analizar cómo mitigar o prevenir las potenciales consecuencias negativas de su uso. Más de 200 estudiantes participaron en la primavera de 2010, recogiendo cientos de textos y reflexiones acerca de sus experiencias, que dio pie, por parte de la Junta Institucional (IRB) de la Universidad a realizar un estudio de investigación, y la posterior publicación on-line de los resultados (www.withoutmedia.wordpress.com), de enorme repercusión en los medios, tanto en los Estados Unidos como internacionalmente.

Se presentaron los resultados de esta investigación en la Academia de Salzburgo de Medios de Comunicación y Cambio Global 2010, el verano de 2010. Una docena de universidades1 expresaron su interés en replicar a nivel global el proyecto de investigación. Como consecuencia de ello, cerca de 1.000 estudiantes de 10 países2 participaron en las 24 horas, ejercicio que sirvió de base para el «The World Unplugged».

La versión internacional de «24 horas sin medios» permitió a estudiantes de los cinco continentes tener la oportunidad de tomar conciencia de la dependencia de los medios en su vida diaria y cómo la comunicación puede beneficiarles constructivamente. Como señaló un estudiante del Reino Unido, después de completar la actividad: «Sentimos la necesidad de estar conectados a los medios de comunicación durante todo el día. Nuestras vidas giran básicamente alrededor de eso. Es la forma en que nos informamos de las noticias, las historias… la forma de comunicarnos con los amigos y de planificar nuestras actividades».

2. Metodología

Una docena de universidades en 10 países (Argentina, Chile, China, Hong Kong, Líbano, México, Eslovaquia, Uganda, Reino Unido y los Estados Unidos de América) de cuatro continentes (África, Asia, Europa, América del Norte y Sur) participaron en el proyecto «El mundo desconectado».

Los estudiantes de todas estas universidades pusieron en marcha este proyecto de «El mundo desconectado» entre septiembre y diciembre de 2010, en función del calendario de cada universidad y sus necesidades curriculares. Las 12 universidades compartieron el mismo diseño del ejercicio3, con traducciones en su caso, o modelos adaptados. A los estudiantes que participaron no se les informó sobre las experiencias anteriores ni de los resultados previos, con el fin de no influir en sus expectativas y experiencias.

En el estudio global, como en el realizado en Estados Unidos, se solicitó completar una encuesta on-line (SurveyMonkey) con datos demográficos (país, identidad racial, edad, género, identidad religiosa, propiedades, uso de dispositivos tecnológicos: teléfono móvil o reproductor de MP3, videojuegos, redes sociales).

El resultado final del informe se acerca a las 500.000 palabras, tantas como escribió Tolstoi en «Guerra y Paz»4. Después de la recopilación de datos de las respuestas a través de las 12 universidades, se inició el proceso analítico, combinando la teoría fundamentada de Glaser y Strauss (1967) con el análisis sugerido por Peirce (1955). El proceso se puede describir como un constante flujo de datos empíricos y constructos teóricos ya existentes. Los investigadores analizaron las experiencias personales de los participantes, desde sus perspectivas cultural, social, económica y política, procedentes de 4 continentes. Posteriormente, antes de iniciar el análisis, se garantizó la fiabilidad de la codificación. Todas las respuestas fueron leídas como mínimo por dos investigadores. En la primera, aislaron las categorías y palabras clave que surgieron de las respuestas de los estudiantes, identificando individualmente estas categorías. Así hubo convergencia significativa en las categorías y las variaciones relativas a la identificación de palabras clave (Strauss, Corbin & Lynch, 1990). Por ejemplo, tres investigadores utilizaron las respuestas para generar categorías en torno a una lista de palabras emocionales y dispositivos, agrupándose posteriormente. Términos como «hábito», «adicción» o «desconexión» se reunieron en la categoría «dependencia», mientras «paz», «alivio» y «felicidad» se reunieron en la categoría «beneficios». Las palabras clave se procesaron con el software de IBM ManyEyes, generando diferentes clasificaciones socio-culturales, tecnológicas y socio-conductuales, analizándose las diferentes reacciones emocionales a la experiencia.

Tras el análisis informático de los datos, las respuestas fueron codificadas por, al menos, dos investigadores, y posteriormente revisadas por un segundo equipo de investigadores que procesaron los datos por países, por medios y por respuestas. Los resultados se publicaron posteriormente en una web.

Con la participación de 1.000 estudiantes de cuatro continentes, el estudio «El mundo desconectado» no pretendía ser una muestra representativa a nivel mundial; los datos solo reflejan una amplia y diversa instantánea de potenciales respuestas de jóvenes de 10 países y 12 universidades ante el hecho de estar sin medios de comunicación. No obstante, el tamaño de la muestra no fue regular y variaba entre las diferentes universidades, así como la población estudiantil de las universidades participantes. Sin embargo, a pesar de las diferencias geográficas, políticas, religiosas y económicas entre las escuelas y países participantes, los investigadores hallaron interesantes coincidencias en las respuestas de los estudiantes: la ubicuidad y la dependencia en las redes sociales y en particular de los dispositivos móviles, en todos los jóvenes, desde Uganda a Hong Kong, desde Reino Unido a Chile. Se constata que, en relación a los medios, existen constantes que trascienden los diferentes orígenes nacionales.

3. Resultados

Estar desconectados de los medios durante esta experiencia internacional permitió a los estudiantes ser más conscientes de la presencia de los medios de comunicación en sus vidas, tanto en beneficios como en limitaciones. Sin embargo, los alumnos constataron, ante todo, su absoluta incapacidad para vivir sin medios. Los grados de «adicción» que los estudiantes percibieron les permitieron a algunos confesar que habían captado la necesidad de controlar sus hábitos de consumo.

La mayoría de ellos dudaron de su capacidad para poder lograrlo, pero reconocieron que su dependencia era, en cierta medida, autoimpuesta y, de hecho, inhibía su capacidad para desenvolverse como desearían (para hacer elecciones proactivas en lugar de reactivas sobre el trabajo y el juego).

Como hallazgos más importantes entre todos los países, destacan:

1) Los estudiantes de todos los países, en repetidas ocasiones, emplearon el término «adicción» y «dependencia» para referirse a sus hábitos frente a los medios de comunicación. «Los medios son mi droga, sin ellos estaría perdido», dijo un estudiante del Reino Unido. «Yo soy un adicto. ¿Cómo podría sobrevivir 24 horas sin ellos?»; un estudiante de Argentina apuntó: «A veces me sentía muerto», mientras que un estudiante de Eslovaquia se limitó a señalar: «Me sentí muy triste, solo y deprimido».

2) Una mayoría de jóvenes de todos los países admitió su incapacidad y fracaso para realmente desconectarse. Esta tasa no está vinculada con la riqueza relativa del país o con el acceso personal de los estudiantes a la amplia gama de dispositivos y tecnologías. «Fue un... día horrible, no usé mi teléfono celular en toda la noche», dijo un estudiante de Chile. «¡Después de esto, no puedo vivir sin los medios de comunicación! Necesito mis redes sociales, mi móvil, mi MAC, mi MP3 ¡siempre!». Los informes muestran que las tecnologías digitales se han hecho esenciales y omnipresentes. Los estudiantes reflejaron también el aburrimiento que genera la desconexión. «Literalmente, no sabía qué hacer conmigo», dijo un estudiante del Reino Unido. «Bajar a la cocina a buscar inútilmente en los armarios se convirtió en una rutina regular, lo mismo que ir a beber desesperadamente».

3) Los estudiantes concluyeron que los medios de comunicación, especialmente sus teléfonos móviles, se han convertido literalmente en una extensión de sí mismos, parte integral de su identidad personal. Un estudiante del Reino Unido dijo: «Desconecté Internet y me sentí como si me apagaran». Para muchos estudiantes, estar sin los medios de comunicación durante las 24 horas, generó una cortina de soledad oculta. «Cuando ya no pude comunicarme con mis amigos por teléfono móvil –dijo una joven china–, me sentí tan sola como si estuviera dentro de una pequeña jaula en una isla». Los problemas, para algunos estudiantes, fueron más allá de la soledad. Algunos llegaron a reconocer que las conexiones virtuales habían sustituido a las verdaderas; su relación con los medios de comunicación era casi el sustituto de la «amistad» real. Un chileno escribió: «Me sentí solo sin multimedia. Llegué a la conclusión de que los medios de comunicación son mi gran compañía».

4) Los jóvenes afirmaron que la conectividad tecnológica-digital las 24 horas al día y a la semana (24/7) no es solo un hábito, es esencial en la forma en que construyen y manejan sus amistades y su vida social. El principal sitio de redes sociales en los cinco continentes fue Facebook. Piensan que la forma en que utilizan las redes sociales determina lo que los demás piensan de ellos y cómo piensan ellos de sí mismos. «No hay duda de que Facebook tiene realmente un papel preponderante en nuestra vida cotidiana –dijo un estudiante de Hong Kong–. Todo el mundo lo utiliza para comunicarse con otras personas, también lo usamos para prestar atención a los demás».

5) Los jóvenes utilizan simultáneamente diferentes herramientas de comunicación para llegar a diferentes tipos de personas. Pueden estar al mismo tiempo en múltiples plataformas de comunicación, pero con diferentes maneras: llaman a sus padres, escriben y conversan por Skype con sus amigos cercanos; se relacionan por Facebook con sus grupos sociales, escriben por correo electrónico a sus profesores. Los alumnos se relacionan e interaccionan de forma permanente con estos recursos, pero sus consecuencias son reales.

6) Muchos alumnos apuntaron que, a pesar de que sabían que podían distraerse con los medios, no eran plenamente conscientes del tiempo que les dedicaban a las redes sociales. «Yo suelo estudiar y conversar o escuchar música al mismo tiempo, por lo que no me aburriría ni sentiría sueño –escribió un estudiante libanés–, pero de lo que me di cuenta es que... cuando realmente dejas los medios... es el montón de cosas de calidad que se pueden hacer».

7) La mayoría de los estudiantes afirmaron que raramente buscan noticias «serias» en portales de noticias. En su lugar, absorben, casi inconscientemente, las noticias que aparecen en la barra lateral de su cuenta de correo electrónico, en el muro de Facebook de sus amigos y en Twitter. Debido a que las redes sociales son cada vez más absorbentes, los alumnos declaran consumir noticias e información por estos canales y muy pocos mencionaron por su nombre a los medios tradicionales.

8) Algunos jóvenes reflejaron las diferencias cualitativas positivas, incluso en sus relaciones cercanas, que experimentaron durante el período de desconexión. «Me relacioné con mis padres más de lo normal –informó un joven mexicano–, escucho completamente todo lo que me dicen sin distraerme con mi BlackBerry. Ayudo a cocinar e incluso a lavar los platos». Un norteamericano escribió: «He vivido con la misma gente desde hace tres años, son mis mejores amigos, y creo que éste es uno de los mejores días que hemos pasado juntos. Tuve la oportunidad de verlos realmente, sin ningún tipo de distracciones, y hemos sido capaces de volver a los placeres simples».

9) Muchos estudiantes señalaron algunos beneficios de la desconexión temporal de los medios de comunicación: una sensación de liberación o libertad, un sentimiento de paz y felicidad, una mejor comunicación con familiares y amigos cercanos y más tiempo para hacer cosas que habían descuidado. En raras ocasiones, aunque sí en algunos casos, los alumnos expresaron su deseo de reservar un tiempo para desconectarse nuevamente de los medios de comunicación en el futuro.

4. Discusión

El valor principal de esta actividad de «24 horas sin medios» fue, sin duda, el crear en los estudiantes una mayor conciencia sobre el papel que los medios tienen en sus vidas, hecho clave para el «empoderamiento». Para comprender cómo hacer un uso responsable de Internet, los alumnos deben primero tomar conciencia de sus propios patrones de uso y comportamientos. Aquí se entronca con los objetivos de aprendizaje de la Unidad 1 del Módulo 7 del Currículum de la UNESCO de Educación en Medios, que pretende ayudar a los profesores a comprender los patrones de uso de Internet y los intereses de sus alumnos, desarrollándoles la capacidad de utilizar Internet de forma responsable, e incitándoles a ser más conscientes de las oportunidades, riesgos y desafíos que ofrece Internet.

El Módulo 7 «Oportunidades y desafíos de Internet» comienza afirmando «Participar en la sociedad de la información es esencial para los ciudadanos de todas las edades». A menudo se asume que los jóvenes –considerados «nativos digitales» que crecieron en un mundo conectado– son plenamente conscientes de sus propios hábitos mediáticos, así como de las ventajas y desventajas de vivir en la sociedad de la información. Pero, como se menciona en el Módulo 7, este no es el caso. Los jóvenes, además de poder beneficiarse tanto de los recursos disponibles en Internet y de los dispositivos de Internet móvil, continúan siendo una población vulnerable. En lugar de abogar por un enfoque proteccionista, el Currículum UNESCO acertadamente sugiere que «la mejor manera de ayudarles a mantenerse fuera de peligro consiste en capacitarlos y educarlos sobre cómo evitar o controlar los riesgos relacionados con el uso de Internet» (UNESCO, 128).

El estudio analizado ha añadido una perspectiva global a la creciente literatura sobre los hábitos de los medios de comunicación de los estudiantes universitarios, sobre su nivel de interacción con los medios electrónicos en actividades de ocio. Kamalipour, Robinson y Nortman (1998) apunta una investigación sobre la relación entre la frecuencia de uso de Facebook, la participación en actividades de Facebook y el compromiso de los alumnos. Junco (2011) realiza un estudio de caso sobre una red social diseñada para que los alumnos se ayuden entre sí a hacer la transición de la escuela secundaria a la universidad (DeAndrea & al., 2011). El estudio «The World Unplugged» generó también un amplio panorama de los medios de comunicación en sentido amplio, desde los videojuegos, el móvil y Facebook.

El estudio se inició a principios de 2010 en Estados Unidos, «24 horas sin medios», con el objeto de enseñar a los alumnos a ser más conscientes acerca de sus patrones de consumo. Sin embargo, los investigadores detectaron el potencial didáctico de estas experiencias de desconexión consciente y limitada. Frente a la teoría, los estudiantes experimentaron cómo los medios de comunicación moldean su comportamiento cotidiano y el acceso a la información. Muy pocos alumnos habían reflexionado previamente sobre sus patrones de consumo; en cambio, después del ejercicio, estimaron de forma más consciente sus relaciones con los medios de comunicación, y sus influencias en su propio comportamiento y ubicación socio-cultural.

4.1. Impacto en los alumnos y en los docentes

Sin duda, profesores de todo el mundo pueden poner en práctica esta experiencia de «Un día sin medios». Estos dos estudios han demostrado que estas actividades aumentan la autoconciencia de los estudiantes sobre sus hábitos comunicativos y, además, conduce a un uso más deliberado y comprensivo de la información mediada por los medios y las tecnologías.

Los profesores han de seleccionar la mejor manera de educar a los jóvenes en esta era de información infinita. Frente a un modelo teórico, mediante charlas sobre la importancia de los medios de comunicación, estadísticas de consumo o presentación teórica de resultados de investigación sobre los efectos de estar constantemente «conectado», esta investigación sugiere una manera más efectiva de educar y capacitar a los alumnos: hacerles descubrir su consumo en su experiencia personal (Berkeley, 2009).

Una manera atractiva para que los jóvenes reflexionen sobre su nivel de dependencia de los medios de comunicación es generar desconexión temporal y hacerles reflexionar (Moeller, 2009; Namle, 2007; Singh & al., 2010). «Un día sin medios» se adentra en el aprendizaje experiencial (Kolb & Fry, 1975). El modelo de cuatro pasos de aprendizaje experiencial derivado de Lewin (1948), Dewey (1963) y Piaget (1973) apunta a que el aumento de la implicación genera un mejor aprendizaje. Kolb y Fry (1975) señalaron que una experiencia provoca necesariamente observaciones vivenciales. Tales observaciones experimentales ayudan a formar conceptos abstractos, que a su vez pueden ser probados en nuevas situaciones reales. Al igual que en este modelo, «24 horas sin medios» se inicia con ejercicios experienciales, seguidos por una reflexión escrita, para reforzar los principales conceptos de alfabetización audiovisual que pueden fortalecerse aún más en las actividades a lo largo de un semestre de trabajo. Un valor adicional de esta actividad es su carácter flexible, ya que los estudiantes han de decidir a lo largo del tiempo del ejercicio cuándo van a realizar el día sin medios.

En el estudio «El mundo desconectado», algunos estudiantes priorizaron su vida social evitando la realización de su ejercicio durante un fin de semana. Otros alumnos decidieron que era importante utilizar los medios en sus estudios y realizaron la actividad un fin de semana. Este hecho de optar por una decisión consciente contribuyó activamente a evaluar las funciones de los medios en sus vidas. «24 horas sin medios» generó también una experiencia compartida de grupo que animó a la participación en clase. La experiencia común promovió vínculos más estrechos entre los alumnos, un compromiso más activo con la clase y entre ellos.

4.2. Recomendaciones para los educadores

El ejercicio «24 horas sin medios» permitió a los profesores evaluar cómo utilizan los medios de comunicación los jóvenes. Este ejercicio proporcionó tanto a profesores como a estudiantes, datos cercanos y personales, en lugar de las estadísticas generales. La experiencia permitió a los alumnos examinar críticamente sus propios hábitos mediáticos y comparar su experiencia de desconexión con la experiencia de sus compañeros, debido a que esta tarea requirió de auto-examen y reflexión más que de memorización o de investigación.

Lo más atractivo del ejercicio «24 horas sin medios» está en su simplicidad. Los profesores siempre buscan, como es normal, ejercicios fáciles de explicar y de experimentar, que requieran pocos recursos, se ejecuten fácilmente y produzcan resultados tangibles.

Todo lo que los estudiantes necesitaban saber era que se abstendrían de utilizar cualquier medio de comunicación (desde teléfonos móviles hasta Internet, desde la radio hasta la televisión) durante un período completo de 24 horas, y que escribirían sobre su experiencia inmediatamente después de terminar. Podían elegir el momento de la desconexión (dentro de un período de una semana). Los profesores no necesitan realizar ninguna preparación para esta tarea, más allá de concretar exactamente lo que quieren que los estudiantes escriban en su reflexión sobre su experiencia: un diario más o menos personal cronometrado, las tecnologías recordadas y el tipo de emociones y sentimientos presentes durante y después del ejercicio. Los profesores no debían explicar a los alumnos por qué se les fue asignada esta tarea; tampoco debían proporcionarles ningún antecedente (incluida la experiencia de anteriores alumnos o reseñas de prensa) sobre el ejercicio, ya que los alumnos debían participar sin prejuicios ni conocimientos.

Esta tarea también es atractiva debido a su potencial de generalización: se puede utilizar en todos los contextos mediáticos y en muchas aulas. El ejercicio se adapta fácilmente en entornos de «banda ancha»–probablemente tendrán que renunciar durante 24 horas a una amplia gama de medios: móviles, tecnologías digitales, medios impresos–. Si los alumnos están en entornos mediáticos más limitados tecnológicamente, tendrán lógicamente menos recursos que renunciar, pero sí contarán, por ejemplo, con el teléfono móvil y la radio. En cualquier caso, los alumnos saldrán de este ejercicio más conscientes de cómo, cuándo y por qué utilizan los medios de comunicación, y cuál es el impacto de su uso en sus vidas en el ámbito intelectual, social, político y familiar.

«24 horas sin medios» es un ejercicio adecuado para aplicar tanto en escuelas secundarias como en universidades, buscando promover el pensamiento crítico, la conciencia ante los medios y la alfabetización mediática. En las clases de Periodismo se puede utilizar como una introducción a las formas en que los jóvenes acceden a la información en el siglo XXI, el aumento de los contenidos generados por los usuarios y la cambiante definición de la expresión «noticias». En los cursos sobre Estudios de Comunicación se puede usar como punto de partida para una discusión sobre cómo la audiencia procesa la información. En los cursos de Ciencia Política se puede analizar cómo los cambios en tecnología afectan el discurso político y el compromiso. En cualquier contexto, permite que los estudiantes hablen acerca de su uso de los medios, y del papel y la autoridad que los medios de comunicación tienen en sus propios entornos. Los profesores pueden utilizar este ejercicio para ampliar los debates en clase.

«24 horas sin medios» puede ser adaptado para servir a fines específicos. Los profesores pueden solicitar a los alumnos experiencias más prolongadas que las 24 horas sin medios, o bien no utilizando medios de comunicación algún día específico, o renunciar solo a cierto tipo de medios. Inmediatamente después, se pueden hacer el seguimiento o también se puede solicitar repetir el ejercicio a lo largo del curso para crear con ello un estudio más longitudinal. Los profesores pueden trabajar con libertad en el establecimiento de los parámetros, sin disminuir demasiado el impacto del proyecto en los estudiantes o sin que esto signifique limitar la comprensión sobre cómo sus estudiantes obtienen, comparten y experimentan los medios.

Como dijo un alumno del Reino Unido que participó en «El mundo desconectado», «Me gustaría recomendar a todos tomar parte en el desafío, ya que aumentará su conciencia de lo mucho que el pueblo confía en los medios de comunicación para hacer muchas cosas». Estas reacciones de desconexión son ejemplos de alfabetización mediática como parte del currículo en las escuelas secundarias y en las universidades de todo el mundo. Una forma de lograr que los alumnos comiencen a pensar analíticamente acerca de los medios de comunicación que consumen: hacerlos participar en un experimento «desconectado».

Agradecimientos

Susan Moeller dirigió las dos investigaciones «24 horas sin medios» y «El mundo desconectado». Además, de las dos coautoras, Elia Powers y Jessica Roberts, Michael Koliska, un estudiante de doctorado de la Facultad de Periodismo «Philip Merrill», todos ellos de la Universidad de Maryland en College Park, MD (USA) han participado en este artículo. Los alumnos de Doctorado Stine Eckert, Sergei Golitsinski y Soo-Kwang Oh, conjuntamente con otros alumnos graduados y no graduados de la Universidad de Maryland, colaboraron en el análisis de datos de la investigación. Además, los docentes de las diversas universidades internacionales participantes fueron también de un gran valor en la recogida, traducción y evaluación de los datos de sus centros.

Notas

1 Las universidades que participaron en el estudio «El mundo desconectado» (2010-11) fueron: Lead University: University of Maryland, College Park, School of Journalism (USA); American University of Beirut, Department of Social/Behavioral Sciences (Lebanon); Bournemouth University, Media School (United Kingdom); Chinese University of Hong Kong, School of Journalism and Communication (China/Hong Kong); Chongqing University, Literature and Journalism (China); Hofstra University, School of Communication (USA); Hong Kong Shue Yan University, Department of Journalism and Communication (China/Hong Kong); Makerere University, Department of Mass Communication (Uganda); Pontificia Universidad Católica, School of Journalism (Argentina); Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, School of Journalism (Chile); Universidad Iberoamericana, Department of Communications (Mexico); University of St. Cyril and Methodius, Marketing and Mass Media (Slovakia).

2 La plantilla que trabajaron los estudiantes de las doce universidades se puede consultar en: www.withoutmedia.wordpress.com/about (12-01-2012).

3 El número total de palabras es aproximado ya que muchos de los alumnos que participaron en el estudio global no narraron sus experiencias en inglés.

4 En los últimos meses profesores de algunas de las universidades participantes han propuesto a sus estudiantes analizar la cobertura de prensa sobre los resultados de estos dos estudios, reflejándose que los mismos han recibido atención, no solo de académicos dedicados a la investigación, sino también de periodistas e interesados en tecnología digital y alfabetización mediática.

Referencias

Berkeley, L. (2009). Media Education and New Technology: A Case Study of Major Curriculum Change within a University Media Degree. Journal of Media Practice, 10 (2&3), 185-197.

De Abreu, B. (2011). Media Literacy, Social Networking, and the Web 2.0. Environment for the K-12 Educator. New York: Peter Lang.

De Andrea, D.C. & al. (2011). Serious Social Media : On the Use of Social Media for Improving Students’ Adjustment to College. The Internet and Higher Education, 15(1), 15-23 (DOI: 10.1016/j.iheduc.2011.05.009).

Dewey, J. (1963). Experience and Education. New York: Collier Books.

Glaser, B.G. & Strauss, A.L. (1967). Grounded Theory: The Discovery of Grounded Theory. New York: de Gruyter.

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation (Ed.) (2010). Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18-year-olds. Menlo Park, CA. (www. kff.org/entmedia/upload/8010.pdf) (05-01-2012).

Hobbs, R. & Frost, R. (2003). Measuring the Acquisition of Media-Literacy Skills. Reading Research Quarterly, 38(3), 300-355.

Hobbs, R. (2004). A Review of School-Based Initiatives in Media Literacy Education. American Behavioral Scientist, 48(1), 42-59.

Junco, R. (2011). The Relationship between Frequency of Face book Use, Participation in Facebook Activities, and Student Enga gement. Computers & Education, 58(1), 162-171.

Kamalipour, Y.R., Robinson, W.L. & Nortman, M.L. (1998). College Students’ Media Habits: A Pilot Study. (www.eric.ed. gov/ PDFS/ED415564.pdf) (05-01-2012).

Kolb, D.A. & Fry, R. (1975). Toward an Applied Theory of Expe riential Learning. In C. Cooper (Ed.), Theories of Group Process. London: John Wiley.

Lenhart, A., Purcell, K., Smith, A. & Zickuhr, K. (2010). Social Media & Mobile Internet Use Among Teens and Young Adults. Pew Internet & American Life Project. (www.pewinternet. org/~/­media//Files/Reports/2010/PIP_Social_Media_and_Young_Adults_Report_Final_with_toplines.pdf) (05-01-2012).

Lewin, K. (1948). Resolving Social Conflicts. Selected Papers on Group Dynamics. New York: Harper & Row.

Licoppe, C. (2004). Connected Presence: the Emergence of a New Repertoire for Managing Social Relationships in a Changing Com munication Technoscape. Environment and Planning D. So ciety and Space, 22(1), 135-156.

Livingstone, S. (2004). Media Literacy and the Challenge of New Information and Communication Technologies. The Communica tion Review, 7(1), 3-14.

Martens, H. (2010). Evaluating Media Literacy Education: Concepts, Theories and Future Directions. The Journal of Media Literacy, 2(1). (www.jmle.org/index.php/JMLE/article/view/71) (30-12-2011).

Moeller, S. (2009). Media Literacy: Helping to Educate the Pu blic in a Rapidly Changing World. Workshop based on CIMA Reports. (http://cima.ned.org/publications/research-reports/media-lite racy-understanding-news) (05-01-2012).

NAMLE (Ed.) (2007). Core Principles of Media Literacy Educa tion in the United States. (http://namle.net/publications/core-principles) (05-01-2012).

Peirce, C.S. (1955). Abduction and induction. In J. Buchler (Ed.), Philosophical Writings of Peirce. New York: Dover.

Piaget, J. (1973). To Understand is to Invent. New York: Gross man Publishers.

Puddephatt, A. (2006). A Guide to Measuring the Impact of Right to Information Programmes: Practical Guidance Note. UNDP.

Rogow, F. (2004). Shifting From Media to Literacy: One Opinion on the Challenges of Media Literacy Education. American Beha vioral Scientist, 48(1), 30-34.

Singh, J. & al. (2010). International Information and Media Lite racy Survey (IILMS). Washington (DC): UNESCO: IFAP Project Template. The European Charter for Media Literacy. (www.euromedialiteracy.eu/charter.php) (05-01-2012).

Strauss, A.L., Corbin, J.M. & Lynch, M. (1990). Basics of Qua li tative Research: Grounded Theory Procedures and Techni ques. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

The Nielsen Company (Ed.) (2009). How Teens Use Media : A Nielsen Report on the Myths and Realities of Teen Media Trends. (http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/reports/nielsen_howteensusemedia_june09.pdf) (05-01-2012).

Thoman, E. & Jolls, T. (2004). Media Literacy. A National Priority for a Changing World. American Behavioral Scientist 48(1), 18-29.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/12
Accepted on 30/09/12
Submitted on 30/09/12

Volume 20, Issue 2, 2012
DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-02-04
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 18
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?