Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Service-Learning, a popular approach to citizenship education in the US, provides youth with opportunities to define and address public needs while reflecting on the knowledge, skills, and relationships needed to do such work. This approach assumes education for democratic citizenship must help youth understand themselves as part of a larger community, increase their sense of agency and efficacy as civic actors, and increase their ability to analyze social and political issues. It also assumes that these outcomes are best learned through experience. Creating these conditions can be quite challenging in the context of schools, where students are typically separated from the community, highly controlled in their activities, and have limited time to grasp the complexities of a given topic. This piece responds to the growing role of new media in civic and political activity. Specifically, it examines how the integration of new media into service learning may facilitate or challenge the core pedagogical goals of this approach to civic education and the implications for the practice of supporting youth civic engagement in school settings. Based on a review of existing programs and research, the authors illustrate how new media can be used to support four primary goals of service learning – designing authentic learning environments, connecting to community, supporting youth voice, and encouraging engagement with issues of social justice.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The historical portrait of US youth civic engagement suggests youth are capable of intensive participation and leadership in the right circumstances but face barriers that yield lower rates of overall engagement. While youth have played critical roles in varied social movements, their participation in regularly available avenues of civic and political participation are relatively low. The 2008 election demonstrated the possibility of energizing youth around politics, but research suggests this is more exception than rule. Recent studies find that youth under 25 vote at lower rates than their adult counterparts (Circle, 2010), and even when taking into account a variety of political acts, the majority of youth are not politically active (Cohen & Kahne, 2012).

Experiential approaches such as Education for Democratic Citizenship (EDC) have emerged in the US, under the umbrella of Civic Education, as an effective method for supporting youth civic engagement (Gould, 2011). This approach builds on participatory theories of democracy (Dewey, 1916; Barber, 1984) and assumes the ultimate goal of EDC is to prepare youth to work with others to define and address issues of public concern through both formal governmental channels and informal voluntary associations. Service-learning, «an instructional methodology that makes intentional links between the academic curriculum and student work that benefits the community by providing meaningful opportunities for students to apply what they learn to issues that matter to them» (Gould, 2011: 29) has been found to support a variety of civic and political outcomes (Kahne, Crow & Lee, 2012).

As new media becomes an increasingly important set of tools and contexts for civic engagement, there is a growing need to understand how changes in social networks, information access, and media production associated with the rise of new media influence what «best practice» in civic education looks like. In this piece, we consider how the integration of new media into service-learning might support, extend, or transform its pedagogical goals.

2. Service-learning – an experiential approach to civic education

Service-learning emerged in the 1990s as part of a shift towards experiential, project-based approaches to civic education – approaches that do not simply impart facts about the structure and function of government and rights and rules of citizenship, but aim to design «authentic» learning experiences. These priorities are guided by three assumptions: a) democracy is a social practice where people negotiate, compete, and collaborate to make decisions about how to prioritize and address public issues (Dewey, 1916; Barber, 1984); b) civic identity development is a process of defining what role one plays in this social practice and how central the practice of democracy is to self-definition (Youniss & Yates, 1997); and c) education should include opportunities to connect the learning of knowledge and skills to the social practices where they will be applied (Dewey, 1916; Rogoff, 2003).

The term authentic learning experiences draws attention to the last assumption. For example, Rogoff (2003) contrasts learning that is organized around «intent participation» – where youth learn and complete increasingly responsible tasks as part of inclusion in adult activity or a mature community of practice – with «assembly line instruction» where youth learn knowledge and skills in well-defined discrete chunks assigned by experts in preparation for, but not in the context of, the practice where they will be applied.

In the context of civic education, assigning youth to learn how a bill becomes a law, as one of many facts to be recalled on a test, because they will eventually vote and should understand the process, might be characterized as «assembly line instruction». Youth learning how a bill becomes a law as they work to stop a law from being passed might reflect learning through «intent participation». The strength of the latter approach is that it provides an immediate and compelling answer to the question, «Why do we need to know this?». Youth not only have a pressing and immediate motivation to learn – they have tasks to accomplish with social accountability and real-world consequences – but they also see how their learning fits into a larger set of practices. This approach offers a few advantages that are particularly relevant for youth civic development. In addition to providing youth with opportunities to 1) engage in authentic learning for the practice of civic engagement, service-learning projects are also more likely to provide youth with opportunities to 2) connect to community and social movements; 3) exercise voice and decision-making, and 4) grapple with issues of justice and fairness. These priorities are rooted in research that suggests that each of these foci is central to the development of civic identity.

Indeed, studies have found that feeling part of «history» or «something bigger» is an important motivator for engagement in both activism and systemic forms of participation (McAdam, 1988; Cohen, 2010). Studies have also documented a close relationship between social trust (Kwak, Shah & Holbert, 2004) or sense of community (Albanesi, Cicognani & Zani, 2007) and civic and political engagement. Thus service-learning programs explicitly work to provide opportunities for youth to build community amongst themselves and to connect to broader networks of individuals working for change, which research suggests positively supports civic identity later in life (Youniss & Yates, 1997).

Furthermore, while most approaches to citizenship education assume that youth are being prepared for future, adult roles, studies of civic identity development suggest adolescence is a critical time for such development and thus an important time for engaging youth in civic and political activity (Youniss & Yates, 1997). Unfortunately, many youth who are politically interested report that their encounters with politically active adults are discouraging – they are greeted with low expectations about their commitment and ability to contribute (Gordon & Taft, 2011), challenging their chances of maintaining interest into adulthood. In contrast, it is considered best practice to prioritize «youth voice» defined as «the inclusion of young people as a meaningful part of the creation and implementation of service opportunities» (Fredericks, Kaplan & Zeisler, 2001). Service-learning programs, at their best, seek to give youth opportunities to make suggestions, give feedback, and make decisions throughout the process of selecting, designing, and evaluating service projects (Billig, Brown & Turnbull, 2008).

Finally, one of the reasons for encouraging youth civic engagement is a belief that policies and institutions constructed by a broad and diverse public are more likely to be just and fair than those constructed by a small group of elites. The questions of how to participate in ways that promote a more just and representative democracy are not easily resolved, and people hold very different ideas about what just outcomes are and how to best achieve them. If youth are going to engage actively in civic and political life, these are questions they will necessarily grapple with themselves. Youth in late adolescence and early adulthood have both the capability and motivation to think through these questions (Erikson, 1968). Perhaps even more importantly, a concern for justice and fairness can be a powerful motivator for political engagement. For many young people, the connections between issues they find compelling and the details of civic and political life are not obvious. Those who study or practice service-learning suggest youth benefit from analyzing and reflecting on structural conditions and social forces that allow the issues they are working to address to persist (Westheimer & Kahne, 2004).

3. Challenges of experiential civic education in the school setting

While the body of research on service-learning and other experiential approaches to civic education suggest positive results for a variety of outcomes, integrating these approaches into the typical school setting can be challenging. The power of service-learning for supporting youth civic engagement lies in its aim to engage youth in the authentic practice of doing civic work, but the norms and structures of schools do not necessarily support this kind of practice. The work of defining and addressing public needs typically takes place over long stretches of time, engages a range of knowledge and skills, and is done in collaboration with a variety of stake-holders and partners. In contrast, the structure of schooling is one in which students spend a limited amount of time with individual teachers and subjects. Furthermore, content areas are divided and schools are structurally and functionally separate from other spheres of community life.

Common challenges in service-learning programs include a tendency to adopt functional or simplistic service activities –such as brief demonstrations to raise awareness about an issue– that do not require collaboration with community partners or very much time spent on analysis of complex social problems (Jones, Segar, & Gasiorski, 2008). While these are understandable accommodations to the pressures of time and resources that schools typically face, the risk is that students will adopt overly simplistic models of citizenship (Westheimer & Kahne, 2004). The question of how to balance the need to engage students in a discrete time-limited set of actions without sacrificing their understanding of the complexity of the broader issue and the collective nature of public work is one that most service-learning programs must grapple with.

Another challenge for service-learning in schools is that the desire to have students exercise their rights of participation as citizens who have valid needs and priorities tend to conflict with a school environment that more frequently emphasizes the hierarchical relationship between adults and students (Kohfeldt & al., 2011). Youth and adults both hold these expectations of hierarchy, and thus when youth are invited to take a more active role in setting goals and deciding on activities, it can be challenging for both sides (O’Donoghue, 2006). Youth may lack the experience or confidence needed to define and articulate their perspective (Kirshner, 2006).

4. Can new media help?

Developments in new media over the last 20+ years have brought about new possibilities and new challenges for participation in civic and political life. We are increasingly relying on networked technologies in both our private and public lives. Whether we are finding and sharing information, building and maintaining social networks, sharing an opinion, or raising money, new media is more and more frequently the tool that enables and organizes our civic and political activities. This is particularly true among youth, who, for example, are more likely to interact with friends daily via text (54%) than they are face-to-face (33%) and more likely to get news online (82%) than through any other format (14-66%). New Media have become central to how we engage in a range of political activities (Zikhur, 2010).

As technology has becomes ubiquitous, questions emerge about whether this implies changes in who participates and what effective participation looks like. For example, research has begun to focus on whether varied aspects of internet participation are related to greater political activity (Neuman, Bimber & Hindman, 2011) and questions such as whether the rise of digital networks increases the likelihood that youth will be recruited into political activity (Schlozman, Verba & Brady, 2010) or provide alternative pathways to political participation (Rice, Moffett, & Madupalli, 2012). Additionally, studies are beginning to focus systematically on how youth and adults are using media and social networks to stay informed about social and political issues and connect to civic and political institutions (Smith, 2010) as well as to engage in activism (Earl & Kimport, 2010). Little attention has been paid, however, to systematic study of the pedagogical implications for civic educators. In particular there is a need for greater articulation of how educators and youth can best tap the affordances of new media or how they are currently doing so. In the section below, we examine how digital media might support the goals of experiential civic education and potentially play a role in helping educators address some of the central challenges for experiential educators.

5. Service-Learning in the digital age

Up to this point we have noted both the power and the challenges of using service-learning as a strategy for supporting youth civic engagement. Below, we discuss how new media may support, challenge or raise questions about some of the more critical elements of the practice of service-learning.

5.1. Designing and connecting to authentic learning environments

As noted earlier, a central challenge of service-learning is to engage youth in short-term action with a clear purpose in a way that it informs their understanding of how to engage with complex social issues rather than simplifies their vision of engagement. The role of teachers in service-learning is to facilitate access for youth to seriously engage in defining and addressing civic issues and to use their curricular learning to do so, which can take a great deal of scaffolding and a great deal of teacher time.

5.1.1. Supporting practice – New media and scaffolding engagement with social issues

Non-profits and game designers have begun to develop a variety of strategies for supporting this sort of engagement.

• Web Resources: The Living Toolkit. Web resources like www.dosomething.org and www.generationon.org provide the equivalent of an electronic toolkit by creating series of steps for students wishing to engage in action. Students can log on and are invited to explore a variety of issues to discover what they might care about, provided with examples of projects and links to resources, and given a series of steps to walk through to address their issues. This model is not dramatically different than what might happen in a classroom service-learning project without digital media, but provides a set of organized and curated resources for teachers and students to draw on with the advantage that it is a live and continually updated resources.

• Games as practice or models for conceptualizing civic problems and civic action. Social issues can be incredibly complex – in most cases multiple institutions and people acting over many years feed into the problems we face today. New media educators have increasingly been thinking about how to use games and virtual worlds to help young people think systematically about complex issues and to experiment with different courses of action. They argue that this can provide scaffolding and low-risk experimentation as a tool for thinking about how to engage with complex social issues. For example, Squire (2008) has experimented with integrating popular games, like Civilization, into the curriculum to facilitate youth thinking about the structure of society and the relationship between different sectors of society. A number of serious games exist currently to help youth think about social issues. For example, Fate of the World (http://fateoftheworld.net), asks players to address global climate change through a series of simulated policy decisions to see how their actions might help or hurt climate change.

• Using games and virtual worlds to scaffold engagement with complex issues. In addition to using games to learn about complex issues and experiment with different outcomes, designers have also begun experimenting with ways that games and virtual worlds can be used to help youth move from simulation and experimentation to connect to real world action. For example, Quest Atlantis, created by Barab and colleagues at the University of Indiana is an immersive, persistent virtual world with a narrative in which youth must engage in missions to save the dying world of Atlantis (dying environmentally, economically, culturally). The narrative story of Atlantis and the virtual world introduces students to virtual solutions to abstract problems, but then, in partnership with classrooms, students engage activities to identify and address similar problems in their own communities. This strategy takes advantage of the narrative story and experimentation affordances of gaming as a back-ground to support youth thinking about social action.

5.1.2. New considerations – What counts as authentic problems and authentic action?

As youth are increasingly spending time online, what happens online matters more for their quality of life and material conditions. This raises questions about what it means to meet «authentic» community needs and what counts as «authentic» action. For example, if, as we know, 97% of US youth play video games, and as some suggest, hate speech is a persistent presence in networked gaming, do efforts to raise awareness about and address hate speech in gaming (as the GAMBIT (http://gambit.mit.edu/projects/hatespeech.php) hate speech project does) count as meeting an authentic community need? Similarly, if a class identifies a problem in their community but addresses the problem completely through virtual means – posting awareness raising facts on social network sites and linking their networks to raise funds for a cause, send letters to elected officials and broadcast media, etc. This may not look very much like community service, but may actually be as effective for addressing social issues as many face-to-face service projects.

5.2. Building community and connecting to movements

Another critical element of service-learning identified earlier is its potential to help students build a sense of connection to a broader community and to ongoing efforts to address social issues. However, this can be challenging when the service-learning is confined to a specific setting (school) and a specific time period (semester or year).

5.2.1. Supporting practice – connecting the social dots with social networks and maps

One of the most accessible and most striking affordances of networked technology is the ability to bridge connections between time and space. Consider the following:

• Mapping as Community Building. Activists, environmentalists and educators are increasingly taking advantage of mobile technology and online interactive mapping and data visualization software to connect individual activities to a larger whole. For example, Citizen Science (http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/category/learning-methods) programs encourage individuals to contribute data observations from their communities (pictures of wildlife, specific plants, etc.) to broader efforts to track climate change. Youth engaged in such activities have a chance to see how their individual acts of data collection can help inform the broader conversation about climate change. Mapping has also been used to build and maintain coalitions. For example, Chicago youth with the support of Open Youth Networks created OurMap of Environmental Justice (http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=h&source=embed&msa=0&msid=103647195530581788559.00044b66339217a3e2538&ll=41.83913,-87.718105&spn=0.022381,0.036478) to draw attention to how they are impacted by environmental racism in their community, to identify assets in their community, and to «build a stronger and more vibrant environmental justice movement».

• Connecting to online youth leadership communities. A number of sites have emerged to connect youth nationally, globally, and across issues. Taking it Global (www.tigweb.org/) serves as an online resource and online community for youth and a space for «youth interested in global issues and creating positive social change». The site serves as a space for youth, educators, and organizations around the globe to access resources, share stories and information, engage in discussions, and to collaborate. Sites like this provide a structure for classrooms and organizations engaged in service-learning or organizing to connect their work to a broader, global dialogue about addressing social issues.

• Using social network sites to maintain community. Programs are increasingly using digital technology to create online spaces where youth can organize their work together. Free, commercially available tools, like Google Sites can be used to post updates and resources, plan activities, stay in contact, record discussions and decisions. The persistence of this form of communication and the ability for the entire group to access and interact with each others’ work, can, when done well, support the emergence of community in ways that episodic sharing back may not. Furthermore, as students move into and out of classrooms, these kinds of sites allow them to see the work that has come before them and that begins after they have left.

5.2.2. New considerations: Attending to the quality of online communities

Another affordance of new media is the potential to connect to communities not available in the physical space. For marginalized youth, who may feel alienated from their school or local community, digital networks can help them connect to like-minded people (Byrne, 2006) opening up the discussion of community beyond the geographic locality. However, one does not have to spend much time in the comments section of a YouTube video, a discussion board, or a networked game to realize that not all online networks lead to vibrant or healthy communities. Conversations can be fleeting or hostile. Feedback may or may not be relevant or helpful. Simply having technology doesn’t mean we use it well. We highlight the practices above because they are tools that can enhance the work that young people are doing and help them stay connected to each other, build community, etc. However, intentionality is important, and the practices we use to support healthy school and classroom communities may be different than those that support healthy online communities. Efforts like CommonSense Media’s (www.commonsensemedia.org) Digital Citizenship Curriculum (www.commonsensemedia.org/educators) provides a structure for teachers to work with students on creating healthy online communities in their own lives.

5.3. Supporting youth in expressing voice and making decisions

The third critical element we highlight is the importance of supporting youth in identifying and expressing their perspectives on social issues and in contributing substantively to decisions about how to address such issues.

5.3.1. Supporting practice – media production as a support for youth voice

While youth have long had opportunities to create media, advances in digital media have brought new capacity to produce and manipulate media and to reach an audience, both of which can support youth in discovering and expressing their point of view. Remixing and responding to existing media can be a mechanism for youth to explore their own point of view. Sharing media with others and receiving comments provides youth with an opportunity to feel as if someone is listening and their point of view is important.

Currently, there are a number of Youth Media resources dedicated to providing youth with the support and tools to articulate and draw attention to and amplify their experiences and the issues that are most relevant to their well-being. These programs focus not only on how to use new media tools – video, machinima, music, photography, graphic design, but how to use them effectively to reach an audience. As an example of one such effort, Adobe Youth Voices (http://youthvoices.adobe.com), a partnership of the Adobe Foundation and The Education Development Center, provides a number of curricular tools (http://youthvoices.adobe.com/essentials) for educators to support youth-led media production focused on a variety of civic and political issues (http://youthvoices.adobe.com/youth-media-gallery). The site not only provides the tools and support for production but seeks to build connections to an audience for youth products.

5.3.2. New Considerations. Building «counter-publics» in virtual worlds and online spaces

Noting the challenges of disrupting the tendency of youth and adults to default to norms of interaction that privilege adult authority, some scholars and practitioners have drawn attention to the creation of «counter-publics» where the norms of interaction are explicitly youth-focused as a strategy for helping youth develop their skills and confidence (O’Donoghue, 2006). Youth Leaders from Youth on Board, suggest several strategies for building healthy adult-youth relationships, one of which is for adults to step outside of their comfort zone and spend time with youth in their «space and turf». For some youth, their «turf» may include online communities they are already invested in or online communities built within the group where they are able to demonstrate greater expertise in certain technical skills than adults.

Some youth leadership organizations have experimented with using virtual worlds to create such spaces. For example, Barry Joseph documents how youth in the Teen Second Life could assert ownership and autonomy in their online community – designing spaces where they could meet (through their avatars), adding features to exhibits on social issues they were designing1. Because the area was open, teen-specific, and operating 24-7 in real time, youth were not in a physical space with adults, and adult control was secondary to expression, adult mentors in such a space are forced to think about how to work with teens on their terms.

5.4. Grappling with issues of justice and fairness

A final critical element of service-learning is that it engages youth in critical thinking about issues of justice and fairness. This requires that youth not only identify societal issues but that they consider questions of how the problem emerged and why it persists.

5.4.1. Supporting Practice: Using new media to discover and reframe narratives

New media has played an important role in helping youth engage in critical thinking about social issues for educators who work with youth in urban settings. Youth in these settings are keenly aware of issues that need to be addressed in their communities, but thinking through the structural factors that allow these issues to persist is a complicated endeavor for adults and youth alike. Media is a tool for both discovering and participating in the definition of social issues. When this activity is networked, it can becomes an exercise and grappling with differing perspectives on social issues.

For example, teacher, researcher, and blogger Antero Garcia turned a relatively routine lesson in which he assigned youth to re-tell a scene from Shakespeare into a lesson in critical analysis by putting the assignment in conversation with other youth productions. As described in his blog (www.theamericancrawl.com/?p=660) students’ discovery of videos of «Ghetto Shakespeare» on YouTube by students suburban settings raised a series of questions about how their community was being represented in the broader public. The posting of an alternative version within a socially networked space, then, became an act of engaging in dialogue about how their community is represented in the public sphere.

Youth organizers and youth media programs have long used media as a tool for youth to think about and help to shape how problems are framed and represented in the public eye as part of consideration of the structural factors that allow social problems to persist (Hosang, 2006). Digital networks enhance the capacity of youth to discover these narratives and to enter into conversation with others.

5.4.2. New considerations: Internet regulation issues as issues of justice and fairness

As youth spend more time online, the rules, regulations, and experiences associated with being online are becoming issues of public concern. One change that youth civic education may need to take into account is that the issues that concern the regulation of the internet are becoming issues of justice and fairness. For example, as the internet and new media tools are becoming critical tools for economic and social life, the issue of net neutrality is moving from the domain of internet innovators to being an issue of concern for the public more broadly. Control and ownership of infrastructure has important implications for who has access to these increasingly important tools of public engagement. For organizations who are working to amplify the voices of marginalized or under-represented groups like colorofchange.org working to preserve net neutrality is an important sphere of civic and political action.

Similarly, copyright and content control are becoming issues of public concern, as demonstrated by recent initiatives within the US Government to more forcefully regulate the circulation of copy-righted materials through the Stop Online Piracy Act and by the resulting widespread protests. Thus, thinking about access to the tools and materials of online life as an aspect of issues of social justice become a new consideration for service-learning.

6. Conclusion and implications

We have outlined a variety of ways that new media may be used in service of the goals of service-learning and experiential education and how new media may potentially raise new considerations for practice. We suggest that integration of new media into service-learning may help educators address some of the challenges of creating service-learning experiences that will most likely enhance youth civic development.

However, we suggest these approaches as areas for experimentation and study. The integration of new media into schools brings with it a number of risks and challenges, and we have yet to see any systematic studies of the effectiveness of these practices. What we are suggesting is more attention to how new media is currently being integrated into civic education and hoping to focus attention on the areas where we believe the role of technology can potentially make a difference.

Just as new media might enhance the ability of service-learning practitioners to connect youth to critical aspects of the authentic practice of civic engagement, there are risks as well. For example, we do not currently have sufficient research that tells us whether games genuinely support better understanding of complex social issues or whether they lead to important misconceptions or simplifications. If we are going to encourage youth to engage in online social networks, we also need to be very cautious in this practice – thinking about where they share their work or engage with other youth’s work (moderated spaces that regulate the tone of the community vs. open spaces), how they interact with other youth, what they share and whether they will be comfortable with their work having what Soep (2012) refers to as a «digital afterlife».

Given that the world where many youth are and will be enacting their citizenship is increasingly saturated with new media, it is critical to support youth ability to act effectively and responsibility in such a context. As an increasing number of teachers and youth mentors are beginning to integrate new media into their practice, the time is critical to begin more systematic study of what the impacts might be on youth and how we might most effectively support their civic development.

Acknowledgements

This article was adapted from the unpublished white paper Service and Activism in the Digital Age: Supporting Youth Engagement in Public Life, developed in collaboration with the Working Group on Service and Activism in the Digital Age http://dmlcentral.net/sites/dmlcentral/files/resource_files/sa.pdf. This work is supported by the Humanities, Arts, Science and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (UC Irvine). While much of the content reflects contributions from the Working Group, we bear full responsibility for the content presented here.

Notes

1 See Eulogy for Teen Second Life – Barry Joseph (http://business.treet.tv/shows/bpeducation/episodes/bpe2011-049).

References

Albanesi, C., Cicognani, & Zani, B. (2007). Sense of Community, Civic Engagement and Social Well-being in Italian Adolescents. Jour­nal Community Appl. Soc. Psychol., 17, 387-406. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/casp.903).

Barber, B. (1984). Strong Democracy: Participatory Politics for a New Age. Berkeley CA: University of California Press.

Billig, S., Brown, S. & Turnbull, J. (2008). Youth Voice. RMC Research Corporation. (www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/­do­w -n­­load/8312_youth_voice.pdf) (15-05-2011).

Byrne, D. (2006). Public Discourse, Community Concerns, and Civic Engagement: Exploring Black Social networking traditions on Black­Planet.com. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), 319-340. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.­00­3­9­8­­.x).

Circle (2010). The Youth Vote in 2010, Voter Turnout by Age, 1974-2010. (www.civicyouth.org).

Cohen, C. & Kahne, J. (2012). Participatory Politics: New Media and Youth Political Action. (http://civicsurvey.org/YPP_Survey_­Report_FULL.pdf) (28-09-2012).

Cohen, C. (2010). Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics. New York: Oxford University Press.

Dewey, J. (1916). Democracy and Education. New York: The Free Press.

Earl, J., & Kimport, K. (2010). Changing the World One Web page at a time: Conceptualizing and Explaining Internet Activism. Mobilization: An International Journal, 15(4), 425-446.

Erikson, E. (1968). Identity: Youth in Crisis. New York: Norton.

Fredericks, L., Kaplan, E. & Zeisler, J. (2001). Integrating Youth Voice in Service-learning. Denver, CO, Education Commissions of the States, p1. (www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/23/67/2367.htm) (12-06-2012).

Gordon, H. & Taft, J. (2011). Rethinking Youth Political Socia­lization: Teenage Activists Talk Back. Youth & Society, 43(4), 1499-1527. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0044118X10386087).

Gould, J. (Ed.) (2011). Guardians of Democracy: The Civic Mission of Schools. (http://civicmissionofschools.org/site/documents/­ViewGuardianofDemocracy/view) (30-09-2012).

Hosang, D. (2006). Beyond Policy: Ideology, Race and the Reimagining of Youth. In S. Ginwright, P. Noguera, & J. Cam­ma­­rota (Eds.), Beyond Resistance! Youth Activism and Commu­nity Change. New York: Taylor Francis.

Jones, S., Segar, T. & Gasiorski, A. (2008). A double-edged Sword: College Student Perceptions of Required High School Ser­vice-learning. Michigan Journal of Community Service-learning, 15(1).

Kahne, J., Crow, D. & Lee, N.J. (2012). Different Pedagogy, Different Politics: High School Learning Opportunities and Youth Civic Engagement. Forthcoming in Political Psychology. (http://civicsurvey.org/Different%20Pedagogy.pdf) (30-09-2012).

Kirshner, B. (2006). Apprenticeship Learning in Youth Activism. In S. Ginwright, P. Noguera, & J. Cammarota (Eds.), Beyond Resistance! Youth Activism and Community Change. New York: Taylor Francis.

Kohfeldt, D., Chhun, L., Grace, S. & Langhout, R. (2011). Youth Empowerment in Context: Exploring Tensions in School-ba­sed yPAR. Am. J. Community Psychology, 47, 28-45 (http://dx.doi.org/­10.1007/s10464-010-9376-z).

Kwak, N., Shah, D. & Holbert, R. (2004). Connecting, Trusting, and Participating: The Direct and Interactive Effects of Social Asso­ciation. Political Research Quarterly, 57, 64. (http://dx.doi.org/­­­10.1177/106591290405700412).

McAdam, D. (1988). Freedom Summer. New York: Oxford Uni­versity Press.

Neuman, W.R., Bimber, B. & Hindman, M. (2011). The Internet and Four Dimensions of Citizenship. In L. Jacobs & R. Shapiro (Eds). The Oxford Handbook of American Public Opinion and the Media. Oxford Handbooks Online. (DOI:10.1093/oxfordhb/9780­199545636.003.0002).

O’Donoghue, J. (2006). «Taking Their Own Power»: Urban Youth, Community-based Youth Organizations, and Public Effica­cy. In S. Ginwright, P. Noguera & J. Cammarota (Eds.), Beyond Resistance! Youth Activism and Community Change. New York: Taylor Francis Group.

Rice, L., Moffett, K. & Madupalli, R. (2012). Campaign Related Social Networking and the Political Participation of College Students. Social Science Computer Review. (http://dx.doi.org/ 10.­11­77/0894439312455474).

Rogoff, B. (2003). The Cultural Nature of Human Development. Oxford: University Press.

Schlozman, K., Verba, S. & Brady, H. (2010). Weapon of the Strong? Participatory Inequality and the Internet. PS: Perspectives on Politics, 8, 487-509. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S15­375927­10­0­0­­­1210).

Smith, A. (2010). The Internet and Campaign 2010. A Report of the Pew Internet and American Life Project. (http://pewinternet.org/­Reports/2011/The-Internet-and-Campaign-2010.aspx) (12-06-2012).

Soep, E. (2012). The Digital Afterlife of Youth-made Media : Impli­cations for Media Literacy Education. Comunicar, 39. (DOI:­10.­3916/C38-2011-02-10).

Squire, K. (2008). Open-Ended Video Games: A Model for De­veloping Learning for the Interactive Age. In K. Salen (Ed). The Ecology of Games: Connecting Youth, Games, and Learning. Cam­bridge, MA: The MIT Press, 167-198 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1162/­dmal.9780262693646.167).

Westheimer, J. & Kahne, J. (2004). What Kind of Citizen? The Politics of Educating for Democracy. American Educational Re­search Journal, 41(2), 237-269.

Youniss, J. & Yates, M. (1997). Community Service and Social Responsibility. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Zikhur, K. (2010). Generations 2010. A Report of the Pew Internet and American Life Project. (www.pewinternet.org/Re­ports/2010/­Generations-2010/Trends/Online-news.aspx) (12-06-2012).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El aprendizaje-servicio es un método que se utiliza con frecuencia en la educación para la ciudadanía en los EEUU. Proporciona oportunidades a los jóvenes para definir y abordar las necesidades de la población, y al mismo tiempo, reflexionar sobre los conocimientos, habilidades y relaciones que requiere dicha tarea. De acuerdo con este enfoque, la educación para la ciudadanía democrática debe ayudar a los jóvenes a comprender que forman parte de una comunidad más amplia, fomentar su sentido de función y eficacia como agentes cívicos, y mejorar su capacidad para analizar cuestiones sociales y políticas, entendiéndose que estos resultados se consiguen de mejor forma si el aprendizaje es a través de la experiencia. Crear estas condiciones puede suponer un reto en el contexto escolar donde el alumnado suele estar apartado de la comunidad, muy controlado en sus actividades, y con un tiempo limitado para comprender las complejidades de ciertos temas. El presente artículo responde al papel creciente de los nuevos medios en la actividad cívica y política. Analiza específicamente cómo la integración de los nuevos medios en el servicio-aprendizaje puede facilitar o cuestionar los objetivos pedagógicos básicos de este enfoque de la educación cívica y las implicaciones para la práctica de fomentar la participación cívica de los jóvenes en los entornos escolares. Basándose en una revisión de los programas existentes y los resultados de estudios realizados, los autores muestran la forma en que nuevos medios pueden ser utilizados para apoyar los cuatro objetivos principales del aprendizaje-servicio: el diseño de entornos de aprendizaje auténtico, la creación de enlaces con la comunidad, apoyar la voz de los jóvenes y alentar la participación en cuestiones de justicia social.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

El retrato histórico de la participación ciudadana de los jóvenes estadounidenses sugiere que son capaces de una participación intensa y de liderazgo si las circunstancias son apropiadas, pero debido a las barreras que encuentran, tienen índices más bajos de participación global. Aunque los jóvenes han desempeñado papeles decisivos en distintos movimientos sociales, su participación en las vías normalmente disponibles para la participación ciudadana y política es relativamente baja. Las elecciones del 2008 demostraron la posibilidad de dinamizar a los jóvenes sobre la política, pero los estudios sugieren que esto sería más bien la excepción a la norma. Los resultados de estudios recientes muestran que los jóvenes menores de 25 años tienen una participación electoral inferior a la de los adultos (Circle, 2010), e incluso si se tienen en consideración diversos actos políticos, la mayoría de los jóvenes no son activos políticamente (Cohen & Kahne, 2012).

Han surgido iniciativas vivenciales en la Educación para la Ciudadanía Democrática (ECD) en los Estados Unidos, en el marco de la Educación Ciudadana, como método eficaz para fomentar la participación ciudadana de los jóvenes (Gould, 2011). Este enfoque refuerza las teorías de democracia participativa (Dewey, 1916; Barber, 1984) y presupone que el objetivo final de la ECD es preparar a los jóvenes para trabajar con otras personas con el fin de identificar y abordar cuestiones de interés público a través de los canales gubernamentales formales y las asociaciones voluntarias informales. Se ha observado que «al facilitar oportunidades valiosas para que los alumnos apliquen lo que han aprendido en cuestiones que sean importantes para ellos, el aprendizaje-servicio, una metodología educativa que establece relaciones intencionales entre el plan de estudios académicos y el trabajo del alumnado en beneficio de la comunidad» (Gould, 2011: 29) conduce a diversos efectos cívicos y políticos (Kahne, Crow, & Lee, 2012).

Con el auge de los nuevos medios como conjunto de instrumentos y contextos cada vez más importante para la participación ciudadana, hay una necesidad igualmente creciente de comprender el impacto que van a tener los cambios en las redes sociales, el acceso a la información y la creación de medios, asociados a la mayor influencia de los nuevos medios, sobre lo que se consideran «buenas prácticas» en la educación para la ciudadanía. En el presente artículo, consideramos la forma en que la integración de los nuevos medios en el aprendizaje-servicio puede apoyar, ampliar, o transformar sus objetivos pedagógicos.

2. Aprendizaje-servicio: la educación cívica desde un enfoque vivencial

El aprendizaje-servicio surgió en la década de los 1990 como parte de un cambio hacia un enfoque vivencial, basado en proyectos, en la educación cívica, es decir, métodos que no implican la mera enseñanza de hechos referentes a la estructura y función del gobierno, y los derechos y normas de la ciudadanía, sino métodos dirigidos al diseño de experiencias de aprendizaje «auténtico». Las prioridades están basadas en tres supuestos: a) la democracia es una práctica social en la que las personas negocian, compiten y colaboran en la toma de decisiones sobre la manera en que se ha de priorizar y abordar asuntos de interés público (Dewey, 1916; Barber, 1984); b) el desarrollo de la identidad cívica es un proceso en el que se define el papel que cada uno desempeña en esta práctica social, y el papel primordial que tiene la práctica democrática para la autodefinición (Youniss & Yates, 1997); y c) la enseñanza debe incluir oportunidades para relacionar el aprendizaje de conocimientos y habilidades con las prácticas sociales en las que se van a aplicar (Dewey, 1916; Rogoff, 2003).

El término «experiencias de aprendizaje auténtico» se centra en el último supuesto. Por ejemplo, Rogoff (2003) hace una comparación entre el aprendizaje basado en la «participación intensa», en el que los jóvenes aprenden y cumplen tareas de creciente responsabilidad como parte de su inclusión en actividades adultas o en una comunidad de práctica madura, y la «enseñanza tipo cadena de montaje» en la que los jóvenes adquieren conocimientos y habilidades en bloques individuales muy delimitados, asignados por expertos, con el fin de prepararles para la práctica en la que se han de aplicar, sin estar en el contexto de la misma.

En el marco de la educación cívica, pedir a unos jóvenes que aprendan el procedimiento por el cual un proyecto de ley se convierta en ley, como uno de los muchos datos que tienen que memorizar para un examen, y porque en algún momento llegarán a votar y deben comprender el proceso, se podría caracterizar como «enseñanza tipo cadena de montaje». Por el contrario, si los jóvenes aprenden cómo un proyecto de ley se convierte en ley porque trabajan para impedir la aprobación de alguna ley, podría ser un ejemplo de aprendizaje a través de la «participación intensa». La virtud de este segundo enfoque es que proporciona una respuesta inmediata y convincente a la pregunta, «¿Por qué necesitamos saber esto?» Los jóvenes no solo tienen una motivación urgente e inmediata para aprender, porque tienen que cumplir una serie de tareas de responsabilización social, con consecuencias reales, también ven cómo su aprendizaje encaja en un conjunto de prácticas más amplio. Este enfoque supone ciertas ventajas que son de especial relevancia para el desarrollo cívico de los jóvenes. Además de proporcionarles oportunidades para: 1) participar en el aprendizaje auténtico para la participación ciudadana, existe una mayor probabilidad de que los proyectos de aprendizaje-servicio proporcionen más oportunidades a los jóvenes para 2) establecer contacto con movimientos comunitarios y sociales; 3) tener voz y voto en la toma de decisiones, y 4) abordar cuestiones de justicia y equidad. Estas prioridades surgieron de estudios que proponen que cada uno de estos focos es clave en el desarrollo de la identidad cívica.

De hecho, los estudios demuestran que sentirse como parte de la «historia» o «de algo más importante» es un factor de motivación importante para comprometerse con el activismo, y asimismo, con las formas sistémicas de participación (McAdam, 1988; Cohen, 2010). Existen estudios en los que se ha documentado una relación estrecha entre la confianza social (Kwak, Shah & Holbert, 2004) o el sentido de comunidad (Albanesi, Cicognani & Zani, 2007) y la participación cívica y política. Por tanto, los programas de aprendizaje-servicio funcionan de forma explícita para facilitar oportunidades a los jóvenes para crear una comunidad entre ellos, y formar parte de redes más amplias de personas que trabajan a favor del cambio, lo que, según los resultados de estudios, fomenta de forma positiva su identidad cívica en el futuro (Youniss & Yates, 1997).

Además, mientras la mayoría de los enfoques sobre la educación para la ciudadanía se basan en el supuesto de que se está preparando a los jóvenes para su papel futuro de adulto, los estudios sobre la identidad cívica sugieren que la adolescencia es un período crítico para su desarrollo, y por lo tanto, un período importante para involucrar a los jóvenes en actividades cívicas y políticas (Youniss & Yates, 1997). Lamentablemente, muchos jóvenes que se interesan por la política se quejan de que sus encuentros con adultos políticamente activos resultan decepcionantes: se les reciben con pocas expectativas sobre su compromiso y capacidad de contribuir (Gordon & Taft, 2011), cuestionando las posibilidades de que sigan con su interés hasta la edad adulta. Por el contrario, se considera una buena práctica dar prioridad a la «voz de los jóvenes», definida como «la inclusión de los jóvenes como parte significativa de la creación e implantación de oportunidades de servicio» (Fredericks, Kaplan & Zeisler, 2001). En el mejor de los casos, los programas de aprendizaje-servicio intentan proporcionar oportunidades a los jóvenes para aportar ideas, dar sus opiniones, y tomar decisiones durante todo el proceso de selección, diseño y evaluación de proyectos de servicios (Billig, Brown & Turnbull, 2008).

Por último, una de las razones para fomentar la participación ciudadana de los jóvenes es la creencia que las políticas e instituciones construidas por un público amplio y diverso tengan mayor probabilidad de ser justas y equitativas que aquellas que se construyan por una minoría selecta. Las cuestiones sobre cómo participar de manera que se fomente una democracia más justa y representativa no se resuelven fácilmente, y las personas tienen ideas muy diferentes sobre lo que son unos resultados justos y sobre la mejor forma de conseguirlos. Si los jóvenes van a participar de forma activa en la vida cívica y política, estas son las cuestiones que ellos mismos necesariamente tendrán que resolver. Durante la última etapa de la adolescencia y la primera etapa de la adultez, los jóvenes no solo tienen la capacidad, sino también la motivación, para reflexionar detenidamente sobre estas cuestiones (Erikson, 1968), y lo que posiblemente sea más importante, la preocupación por la justicia y la equidad puede ser un factor potente de motivación para la participación política. En el caso de muchos jóvenes, la relación entre los temas que son apremiantes para ellos y los detalles de la vida cívica y política no es obvia. Los estudiosos y practicantes del aprendizaje-servicio sugieren que resulta beneficioso para los jóvenes analizar y reflexionar sobre las condiciones estructurales y las fuerzas sociales que permiten la persistencia de los problemas que ellos intentan abordar (Westheimer & Kahne, 2004).

3. Retos de la educación cívica vivencial en el entorno escolar

Aunque el corpus de los estudios sobre el aprendizaje-servicio y otros enfoques vivenciales en la educación para la ciudadanía sugieren que diversos resultados son positivos, la integración de estos métodos en un entorno escolar típico puede suponer un reto. El poder del aprendizaje-servicio para fomentar la participación cívica de los jóvenes se debe al objetivo de involucrar a los jóvenes en la práctica auténtica de realizar trabajos cívicos, pero las normas y las estructuras de los centros educativos no favorecen necesariamente este tipo de práctica. La identificación y resolución de las necesidades públicas típicamente requieren plazos prolongados para su logro, implican una diversidad de conocimientos y habilidades, y se realizan en colaboración con diversos actores y socios. En comparación, la estructura de la enseñanza es de tal manera que los alumnos pasan un tiempo limitado con cada profesor y en cada asignatura. Además, las áreas de contenido están divididas y los centros educativos son estructuralmente y funcionalmente independientes de otros ámbitos de la vida comunitaria.

Entre los retos que surgen con frecuencia en los programas de aprendizaje-servicio está la tendencia de optar por actividades de servicio funcionales o simplistas, por ejemplo, demostraciones cortas para fomentar la concienciación sobre alguna cuestión, y no requieren la colaboración con socios comunitarios ni la dedicación de mucho tiempo para analizar los problemas sociales complejos (Jones, Segar, & Gasiorski, 2008). Aunque se puede comprender que esta situación se debe a la necesidad de adaptarse a la presión que típicamente existe en los centros educativos en cuanto a tiempo y recursos, hay un riesgo de que los alumnos adopten modelos de ciudadanía excesivamente simplistas (Westheimer & Kahne, 2004). La cuestión de cómo lograr un equilibrio entre la necesidad de involucrar a los alumnos en una serie de acciones individuales con tiempo limitado sin sacrificar su comprensión de la complejidad de la cuestión más amplia, y la naturaleza colectiva del trabajo público, es un tema que la mayoría de los programas de aprendizaje-servicio tienen que resolver.

Otro reto para el aprendizaje-servicio en las escuelas es que el deseo de dejar a los alumnos ejercer sus derechos de participación como ciudadanos con necesidades y prioridades válidas tiende a estar en conflicto con un entorno escolar que en la mayoría de los casos enfatiza la relación jerárquica entre los adultos y los estudiantes (Kohfeldt & al, 2011). Tanto los jóvenes como los adultos tienen estas expectativas de jerarquía y en consecuencia cuando se les invitan a adoptar un papel más activo en la fijación de metas y a decidir sobre las actividades, puede resultar difícil para ambas partes (O’Donoghue, 2006). Los jóvenes pueden carecer de la experiencia o confianza necesaria para definir y expresar sus perspectivas (Kirshner, 2006).

4. ¿Pueden servir de ayuda los medios nuevos?

La evolución de los medios nuevos más allá de los últimos veinte años ha traído nuevas posibilidades y nuevos retos para la participación en la vida cívica y política. Dependemos cada vez más de las tecnologías en red, tanto en nuestra vida privada como en la vida pública. Tanto si buscamos y compartimos información, creamos y mantenemos redes sociales, compartimos opiniones, o intentamos recaudar fondos, los nuevos medios se convierten cada vez más en el instrumento que facilita y organiza nuestras actividades ciudadanas y políticas; especialmente entre los jóvenes, los cuales tienen mayores probabilidades, por ejemplo, de tener interacciones diarias con amigos a través de mensajes de texto (54%) que presenciales (33%), y de leer las noticias en línea (82%) que en cualquier otro formato (14-66%). Los nuevos medios se han convertido en el eje de la forma en que participamos en una diversidad de actividades políticas (Zikhur, 2010).

En la medida en que la tecnología se hace ubicua, surgen preguntas sobre si esto conlleva cambios en quiénes participan y en qué consiste la participación eficaz. Por ejemplo, los estudios empiezan a centrarse en la posible existencia de una relación entre distintos aspectos de la participación en Internet y una actividad política más intensa (Neuman, Bimber & Hindman, 2011) y en preguntar si el auge de las redes digitales incrementa la probabilidad de que los jóvenes sean captados para la actividad política (Schlozman, Verba & Brady, 2010) o si proporciona vías alternativas hacia la participación política (Rice, Moffett, & Madupalli, 2012). Asimismo, los estudios empiezan a centrarse sistemáticamente en la forma en que los jóvenes y los adultos utilizan los medios y las redes sociales para mantenerse informados sobre cuestiones sociales y políticas y relacionarse con instituciones cívicas y políticas (Smith, 2010) además de practicar el activismo (Earl & Kimport, 2010). No obstante, se ha prestado escasa atención al estudio sistemático de las implicaciones pedagógicas para los educadores cívicos. Sobre todo, existe la necesidad de una mejor articulación de la manera en que los educadores y los jóvenes puedan aprovechar mejor los nuevos medios o sobre cómo lo están haciendo actualmente. En la sección siguiente, examinamos cómo los medios digitales pueden ayudar a conseguir los objetivos de la educación cívica vivencial y potencialmente contribuir a ayudar a los educadores a abordar algunos de los retos principales a los que se enfrentan los educadores vivenciales.

5. Aprendizaje-servicio en la era digital

Hasta ahora hemos hablado del poder y de los retos del aprendizaje-servicio como estrategia de apoyo para la participación ciudadana de los jóvenes. A continuación hablamos de cómo los nuevos medios pueden apoyar, cuestionar o plantear dudas sobre algunos de los elementos más críticos de la práctica del aprendizaje-servicio.

5.1. Diseñar y conectarse con entornos de aprendizaje auténtico

Tal y como hemos apuntado, un reto fundamental del aprendizaje-servicio consiste en involucrar a los jóvenes en actuaciones a corto plazo con un objetivo claro, de manera que fomente su conocimiento sobre la forma de participar en cuestiones sociales complejas, en lugar de simplificar su visión de la participación. El papel de los docentes en el aprendizaje-servicio es el de facilitar el acceso a los jóvenes para que participen realmente en la identificación y abordaje de temas cívicos, y apliquen su aprendizaje curricular con este fin, lo que puede requerir mucho andamiaje y mucho tiempo por parte del profesorado.

5.1.1. Práctica de apoyo: participación encuestiones sociales a través de los nuevos medios y del andamiaje

Asociaciones no lucrativas y diseñadores de juegos han empezado a desarrollar una serie de estrategias para apoyar esta forma de participación:

• Recursos en la Red: Conjunto de herramientas en tiempo real. Los recursos de Internet, como www.dosomething.org y www.generationon.org, proporcionan el equivalente de un conjunto de herramientas electrónicas mediante la creación de una serie de pasos a seguir por los alumnos que deseen participar en alguna acción. Los alumnos pueden entrar en su cuenta e informarse sobre diversos temas para descubrir los que más les puedan preocupar. Hay ejemplos de proyectos, y enlaces a distintos recursos. Se indican los pasos a seguir para abordar las cuestiones de su interés. El modelo no es especialmente diferente a lo que ocurriría en un proyecto sobre al aprendizaje-servicio que se realizase sin medios digitales, pero en este caso, se proporciona un conjunto de recursos organizados y gestionados para ser utilizado por docentes y alumnos, con la ventaja de que dichos recursos son en tiempo real y se actualizan de forma constante.

• Juegos para la práctica o como modelos para la conceptualización de los problemas cívicos y la para acción cívica. Los temas sociales pueden ser increíblemente complejos; en la mayoría de los casos, un gran número de instituciones y personas han estado contribuyendo durante muchos años a los problemas a los que nos enfrentamos actualmente. Los educadores que trabajan con los nuevos medios han estado pensando cada vez más en cómo utilizar los juegos y los mundos virtuales para ayudar a los jóvenes a pensar de forma sistemática sobre temas complejos, y a experimentar con distintas formas de acción. Sostienen que así se puede aportar el andamiaje y la experimentación de bajo riesgo como herramienta para pensar en cómo participar en cuestiones sociales complejas. Por ejemplo, Squire (2008) ha experimentado con la integración de juegos populares, como Civilization, en el plan de estudios para fomentar que los jóvenes piensen sobre la estructura de la sociedad, y la relación entre los distintos sectores de la misma. Actualmente, existen varios juegos serios que ayudan a los jóvenes a pensar en cuestiones sociales. Por ejemplo, en el juego Fate of the World (http://fateoftheworld.net), los jugadores tienen que abordar la cuestión del cambio climático mundial a través de una serie de simulaciones de decisiones políticas para comprobar el impacto favorable o desfavorable que pudiesen tener sus decisiones sobre el cambio climático.

• El uso de los juegos y los mundos virtuales para proporcionar un andamiaje para la participación en cuestiones complejas. Además de usar los juegos para aprender sobre temas complejos y experimentar con distintos resultados, los diseñadores también han empezado a experimentar con las formas en que los juegos y los mundos virtuales puedan ser utilizados para ayudar a los jóvenes a pasarse de la simulación y experimentación, a relacionarse con acciones en el mundo real. Por ejemplo, Quest Atlantis, que fue creado por Barab y compañeros de la Universidad de Indiana, es un mundo virtual inmersivo y persistente con una narrativa en la que los jóvenes tienen que participar en misiones para salvar el mundo agonizante de Atlántida (que se extingue en términos medioambientales, económicos y culturalmente). La historia narrativa de Atlántida y el mundo virtual presentan soluciones virtuales a los alumnos para resolver problemas abstractos, pero posteriormente, en asociación con las aulas, los alumnos participan en actividades para detectar y abordar problemas similares en sus propias comunidades. Esta estrategia aprovecha la historia narrativa y las potencialidades experimentales de los juegos como base para fomentar que los jóvenes piensen en la acción social.

5.1.2. Nuevas consideraciones: ¿Qué se puede denominar problema auténtico y acción auténtica?

A medida que los jóvenes pasan más tiempo conectados, lo que ocurre en línea adquiere mayor importancia para su calidad de vida y condiciones materiales. Esto plantea ciertas preguntas sobre lo que significa responder a las necesidades «auténticas» de la comunidad y lo que se considera acción «auténtica». Por ejemplo, si, tal y como sabemos, el 97% de los jóvenes estadounidenses utilizan videojuegos, y de acuerdo con algunas propuestas, el lenguaje del odio está presente de forma persistente en los juegos en red, ¿las apuestas para fomentar la concienciación sobre el lenguaje del odio en los videojuegos y el abordaje del mismo –por ejemplo, como en el caso del proyecto GAMBIT (http://gambit.mit.edu/projects/hatespeech.php) sobre el lenguaje del odio–, se consideran una respuesta a una necesidad auténtica de la comunidad? Ocurre lo mismo si una clase identifica un problema en su comunidad y abordan el problema exclusivamente a través de los medios virtuales: publicando los hechos para fomentar la concienciación sobre el problema en páginas de las redes sociales; poniendo enlaces en sus redes para generar fondos para una causa; enviando cartas a representantes electos y a los medios de difusión, etc. Posiblemente esto no se parezca mucho al servicio comunitario, pero realmente puede ser tan eficaz en la resolución de cuestiones sociales como muchos proyectos de servicio presenciales.

5.2. Construir una comunidad y relacionarse con movimientos

Otro elemento crucial del aprendizaje-servicio que fue identificado anteriormente es la posibilidad de ayudar a los alumnos a construir un sentido de pertenencia a una comunidad más amplia y a trabajos que ya están en marcha para abordar cuestiones sociales. No obstante, esto puede ser difícil si se realiza el aprendizaje-servicio en un entorno concreto (el escolar) y en un período delimitado (semestre o año).

5.2.1. Práctica de apoyo: conectar los puntos sociales con redes sociales y mapas

Una de las potencialidades más accesibles y más sorprendentes de la tecnología de redes es su capacidad de formar puentes de conexión entre el tiempo y el espacio. Consideremos lo siguiente:

• Mapas para la construcción de comunidades. Los activistas, ecologistas y educadores aprovechan cada vez más la tecnología móvil, los mapas interactivos en línea, y los programas de visualización de datos, para conectar las actividades individuales con un todo mayor. Por ejemplo, los programas de Citizen Science (http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/category/learning-methods) alientan a las personas a aportar datos de observación de sus comunidades (fotografías de especies silvestres, plantas específicas, etc.) a iniciativas más grandes dedicadas al seguimiento del cambio climático. Los jóvenes que participen en este tipo de actividades tienen la posibilidad de ver cómo sus acciones personales de recopilación de datos pueden aportar información al debate más amplio sobre el cambio climático. También se han utilizado mapas para crear y mantener coaliciones. Por ejemplo, jóvenes de Chicago, con el apoyo de Open Youth Networks, crearon OurMap of Environmental Justice (http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=h&source=embed&msa=0&msid=103647195530581788559.00044b66339217a3e2538&ll=41.83913,-87.718105&spn=0.022381,0.036478) para llamar la atención sobre cómo se ven afectados por el racismo medioambiental en su comunidad, para identificar los activos presentes en su comunidad, y para «construir un movimiento de justicia medioambiental más sólido y más activo».

• Conectar con las comunidades de liderazgo juvenil en línea. Ha surgido una serie de sitios para conectar a los jóvenes nacionalmente, mundialmente, y temáticamente. Taking it Global (www.tigweb.org/) actúa como recurso en línea y como comunidad en línea para los jóvenes y como espacio para «jóvenes interesados en temas mundiales y en la creación de cambios sociales positivos». El sitio sirve como espacio donde los jóvenes, educadores y organizaciones en todo el mundo puedan acceder a recursos, compartir experiencias e información, participar en debates, y colaborar. Los sitios de este tipo proporcionan una estructura para las aulas y organizaciones comprometidas con el aprendizaje-servicio o que se preparan para conectar su trabajo a un diálogo mundial más amplio sobre la forma de abordar las cuestiones sociales.

• Uso de las redes sociales para mantener la comunidad. Los programas utilizan cada vez más la tecnología digital para crear espacios en la Red donde los jóvenes pueden organizar su trabajo de forma conjunta. Existen herramientas gratuitas, como Google Sites, que se pueden utilizar para publicar noticias y recursos, planificar actividades, mantenerse en contacto, y dejar constancia de debates y decisiones. La persistencia de esta forma de comunicación y la posibilidad de que todo el grupo pueda tener acceso a –e interacción con– el trabajo de cada uno, siempre que se haga de forma acertada, pueden fomentar la emergencia de una comunidad en formas que no son posibles si el contacto es intermitente. Además, teniendo en cuenta que los alumnos cambien de aula, los sitios de este tipo les permiten ver el trabajo que se ha realizado antes de que ellos se conecten y el que haya comenzado después desconectarse.

5.2.2. Nuevas consideraciones: prestar atención a la calidad de las comunidades en línea

Otra potencialidad de los nuevos medios es la posibilidad de conectar con comunidades que no estén disponibles en el espacio físico. En el caso de jóvenes marginados que pudiesen sentirse enajenados de su comunidad local o escolar, las redes digitales pueden ayudarles a relacionarse con personas de ideas afines (Byrne, 2006), lo que nos conduce al debate sobre la comunidad más allá del lugar geográfico. No obstante, no hace falta dedicar mucho tiempo a leer la sección de comentarios de algún vídeo en YouTube, foros de debate, o en juegos en red, para darse cuenta de que no todas las redes en línea conducen a comunidades dinámicas o apropiadas. Las conversaciones pueden ser breves u hostiles; las respuestas no siempre son relevantes o útiles. El simple hecho de disponer de tecnología no significa que hagamos un buen uso de ella. Hemos destacado estas prácticas porque son herramientas que pueden mejorar el trabajo que realizan los jóvenes, y ayudarles a mantenerse en contacto entre ellos, crear una comunidad, etc. De todos modos, la intencionalidad es importante y las prácticas que utilizamos para apoyar las comunidades escolares y de clase pueden diferirse de aquellas que fomenten las comunidades sólidas en línea. Las iniciativas como la Digital Citizenship Curriculum (www.commonsensemedia.org/educators) de CommonSense Media (www.commonsensemedia.org) proporciona una estructura para que los docentes trabajen con los alumnos en la creación de comunidades sólidas en línea en sus propias vidas.

5.3. Fomentar que los jóvenes expresen sus opiniones y tomen decisiones

El tercer elemento crítico que queremos destacar es la importancia de apoyar a los jóvenes en la identificación y expresión de sus perspectivas sobre temas sociales y en su aportación sustantiva a las decisiones sobre cómo abordar estos problemas.

5.3.1. Práctica de apoyo: creación de medios para fomentar que se oiga la voz de los jóvenes

Aunque los jóvenes han tenido oportunidades para crear medios desde hace tiempo ya, los avances en los medios digitales han supuesto una capacidad nueva para producir y manipular los medios, y para llegar al público, dos hechos que pueden ayudar a los jóvenes a descubrir y expresar su punto de vista. La recreación y retroalimentación de los medios existentes puede ser un mecanismo para que los jóvenes indaguen sus propias opiniones. Compartir los medios con otros y recibir comentarios proporciona a los jóvenes una oportunidad de sentir que alguien les escucha y que su opinión es importante.

Actualmente, hay varios recursos de Youth Media pensados para ofrecer a los jóvenes el apoyo y las herramientas para articular, llamar la atención y amplificar sus experiencias y las cuestiones que sean más relevantes para su bienestar. Estos programas no se centran solo en la forma de emplear las nuevas herramientas mediáticas como el vídeo, machinima, música, fotografía, diseño gráfico, sino también en la forma eficaz de utilizarlos para llegar al público. Un ejemplo de una iniciativa de esta naturaleza es la de Adobe Youth Voices (http://youthvoices.adobe.com), una asociación constituida entre la Fundación Adobe y el Centro para el Desarrollo Educativo, que proporciona diversas herramientas curriculares (http://youthvoices.adobe.com/essentials) dirigidas a educadores con el fin de apoyar la producción de medios, liderada por jóvenes y centrada en una serie de cuestiones cívicas y políticas (http://youthvoices.adobe.com/youth-media-gallery). Además de proporcionar las herramientas y apoyo para la producción, este sitio también intenta establecer conexiones con el público destinatario de productos para jóvenes.

5.3.2. Nuevas consideraciones: la construcción de «contrapúblicos» en los mundos virtuales y espacios on-line

Teniendo en cuenta los retos para modificar esta tendencia de los jóvenes y los adultos a recurrir por defecto a las normas de interacción que legitima la autoridad adulta, algunos estudiosos y practicantes han llamado la atención sobre la creación de «contrapúblicos», donde las normas de interacción se centran explícitamente en los jóvenes, como estrategia para fomentar el desarrollo de competencias y la confianza de los jóvenes (O’Donoghue, 2006). Los líderes de iniciativas para jóvenes de la organización Youth on Board proponen diversas estrategias para forjar relaciones favorables entre los adultos y los jóvenes; una de estas estrategias consiste en que los adultos salgan de su terreno conocido a pasar tiempo con los jóvenes en su «espacio y territorio».

Para algunos jóvenes, su «territorio» puede abarcar comunidades en red a las que ya pertenecen, o comunidades en red que se han creado entre el grupo y en las que pueden demostrarse más expertos en determinadas habilidades técnicas que los adultos. Algunas organizaciones de liderazgo juvenil han probado el uso de mundos virtuales para crear espacios de este tipo. Por ejemplo, Barry Joseph ha documentado la forma en que los jóvenes en Teen Second Life pudieron reivindicar la propiedad y autonomía en su comunidad en red, diseñando espacios donde podían reunirse (a través de sus avatares) y añadiendo contenido a las exposiciones sobre temas sociales que estaban diseñando1. Al tratarse de un espacio abierto, específico para adolescentes, que funcionaba en tiempo real las 24 horas del día, los siete días de la semana, los jóvenes no se encontraban en un espacio físico con adultos; como el control adulto era secundario a la expresión, los mentores adultos en un espacio de estas características se ven obligados a pensar en la forma de trabajar con los adolescentes en los términos establecidos por estos.

5.4. Abordar cuestiones de justicia y equidad

Un último elemento crítico del aprendizaje-servicio es que involucra a los jóvenes en el pensamiento crítico sobre cuestiones de justicia y equidad. Para esto, los jóvenes no solo identifican los problemas sociales sino además plantean cómo surgió el problema y por qué persiste.

5.4.1. Práctica de apoyo: utilizar los nuevos medios para descubrir y replantear narrativas

Para los educadores que trabajan con jóvenes en entornos urbanos, los nuevos medios han contribuido de forma significativa a fomentar la participación de los jóvenes en el pensamiento crítico sobre cuestiones sociales. Los jóvenes de estos entornos son totalmente conscientes de los problemas a abordar en sus comunidades pero, aún así, pensar detenidamente en los factores estructurales que permiten que estos problemas sigan existiendo es un esfuerzo complicado, tanto para jóvenes como adultos. Los medios representan una herramienta para descubrir y participar en la definición de los problemas sociales; cuando esta actividad se hace en red, puede convertirse en un ejercicio de abordaje de los problemas sociales desde distintas perspectivas.

Por ejemplo, Antero García, profesor, investigador y bloguero, convirtió una clase relativamente rutinaria, en la que pidió a los jóvenes recrear una escena de Shakespeare, en una clase de análisis crítico, al conectar la tarea con producciones realizadas por otros jóvenes. Tal y como describe en su blog, (www.theamericancrawl.com/?p=660), cuando sus alumnos descubrieron los vídeos de «Ghetto Shakespeare» colgados en YouTube por alumnos de zonas periféricas, se plantearon una serie de preguntas sobre la forma en que se estaba representando su comunidad a un público amplio. La publicación de una versión alternativa en un espacio de las redes sociales se convirtió entonces en un acto de participación en un diálogo sobre cómo se representaba su comunidad en el ámbito público.

Desde hace mucho tiempo, los jóvenes organizadores y los programas de medios para jóvenes han utilizado los medios como herramienta para que los jóvenes deliberen sobre, y contribuyan a, definir la forma en que se plantean y representan los problemas ante el público, como parte de la consideración sobre los factores estructurales que permiten que dichos problemas sociales persistan (Hosang, 2006). Las redes digitales fomentan la capacidad de los jóvenes para descubrir estas narrativas y entablar conversaciones con otras personas.

5.4.2. Nuevas consideraciones: cuestiones de regulación de Internet como cuestiones de justicia y equidad

A medida que los jóvenes pasan más tiempo conectados a la Red, las normas, reglas y experiencias asociadas con estar en línea empiezan a ser temas de preocupación pública. Uno de los cambios que posiblemente se tenga que tener en cuenta en la enseñanza de los jóvenes es que las cuestiones relacionadas con la regulación de Internet empiezan a considerarse cuestiones de justicia y equidad. Por ejemplo, en la medida en que Internet y las herramientas de los nuevos medios se convierten en instrumentos esenciales para la vida social y económica, la cuestión de la neutralidad de la Red pasa de ser dominio de los innovadores de Internet a ser una cuestión preocupante para el público en general. El control y la propiedad de la infraestructura tiene implicaciones significativas para aquellos que tengan acceso a estas herramientas cada vez más importantes para la participación pública. Para las organizaciones que trabajan para hacer oír las voces de los grupos marginados o infrarrepresentados, por ejemplo, colorofchange.org, trabajar para conservar la neutralidad de la Red es un ámbito importante de acción cívica y política.

Asimismo, el control sobre el contenido y los derechos de autor empiezan a ser temas de preocupación pública, tal y como demuestran las iniciativas recientes del gobierno estadounidense para regular de forma más estricta la diseminación de material con derechos de autor a través de una ley para impedir la piratería en la Red, y las subsiguientes protestas generalizadas al respecto. Por tanto, considerar el acceso a las herramientas y materiales de la vida en línea como un aspecto de cuestiones relacionadas con la justicia social puede llegar a ser una nueva consideración a tener en cuenta en el aprendizaje-servicio.

6. Conclusiones e implicaciones

Hemos explicado a grandes rasgos las diversas maneras en que los nuevos medios pueden utilizarse para lograr los objetivos del aprendizaje-servicio y la enseñanza vivencial, y cómo los nuevos medios posiblemente planteen nuevas consideraciones para su práctica. Sugerimos que la integración de los nuevos medios en el aprendizaje-servicio puede ayudar a educadores a abordar algunos de los retos a los que se enfrentan a la hora de crear experiencias de aprendizaje-servicio que tengan más posibilidades de fomentar el desarrollo cívico de los jóvenes.

No obstante, sugerimos estos enfoques como áreas para la experimentación y estudio. La integración de los nuevos medios en los centros educativos conlleva una serie de riesgos y retos, y todavía no disponemos de estudios sistemáticos sobre la eficacia de estas prácticas. Lo que proponemos es que se preste más atención a la forma en que los nuevos medios actualmente se están integrando en la educación para la ciudadanía, y esperamos que se centre la atención en aquellas áreas en las que opinamos que el papel de la tecnología posiblemente conlleve un cambio notable.

De la misma manera en que los nuevos medios pueden mejorar la capacidad de los profesionales del aprendizaje-servicio a conectar a los jóvenes con los aspectos críticos de la práctica auténtica de participación ciudadana, también existen riesgos. Por ejemplo, no tenemos estudios suficientes que nos indiquen si los juegos realmente fomentan una comprensión mejor de temas sociales complejos, o si conducen a ideas significativamente falsas o simplificadas. Si vamos a alentar a los jóvenes a participar en redes sociales en línea, también tenemos que ser cautelosos al respecto y pensar en los sitios donde van a compartir su trabajo o participar en el trabajo de otros jóvenes (espacios moderados en los que se regulan las pautas de la comunidad, comparado con espacios abiertos), en cómo son sus interacciones con otros jóvenes, en lo que están compartiendo, y si se van a sentir cómodos con lo que Soep (2012) define como la «huella digital» de su trabajo.

Teniendo en cuenta que el mundo en el que muchos de los jóvenes ejercen o ejercerán su ciudadanía está cada vez más saturado de los nuevos medios, se hace imprescindible fomentar la capacidad de los jóvenes para actuar de forma eficaz y responsable en un contexto así. Considerando, asimismo, que muchos docentes y mentores de jóvenes empiezan a integrar los nuevos medios en sus prácticas, es un momento decisivo para iniciar un estudio más sistemático sobre sus posibles impactos sobre los jóvenes, y sobre la forma en que podemos apoyar de manera eficaz su desarrollo ciudadano.

Agradecimientos

El presente artículo ha sido adaptado del libro blanco inédito titulado «Servicio y activismo en la era digital: Fomentando la participación de los jóvenes en la vida pública», preparado en colaboración con el Grupo de Trabajo sobre Servicio y Activismo en la Era Digital http://dmlcentral.net/sites/dmlcentral/files/resource_files/sa.pdf. El presente trabajo tiene el apoyo de la red Humanities, Arts, Science and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (UC Irvine). Aunque gran parte del contenido del presente refleja las aportaciones del Grupo de Trabajo, nosotros somos plenamente responsables del contenido de este artículo.

Notas

1 Véase Eulogy for Teen Second Life, Barry Joseph: http://business.treet.tv/shows/bpeducation/episodes/bpe2011-049.

Referencias

Albanesi, C., Cicognani, & Zani, B. (2007). Sense of Community, Civic Engagement and Social Well-being in Italian Adolescents. Jour­nal Community Appl. Soc. Psychol., 17, 387-406. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/casp.903).

Barber, B. (1984). Strong Democracy: Participatory Politics for a New Age. Berkeley CA: University of California Press.

Billig, S., Brown, S. & Turnbull, J. (2008). Youth Voice. RMC Research Corporation. (www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/­do­w -n­­load/8312_youth_voice.pdf) (15-05-2011).

Byrne, D. (2006). Public Discourse, Community Concerns, and Civic Engagement: Exploring Black Social networking traditions on Black­Planet.com. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), 319-340. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.­00­3­9­8­­.x).

Circle (2010). The Youth Vote in 2010, Voter Turnout by Age, 1974-2010. (www.civicyouth.org).

Cohen, C. & Kahne, J. (2012). Participatory Politics: New Media and Youth Political Action. (http://civicsurvey.org/YPP_Survey_­Report_FULL.pdf) (28-09-2012).

Cohen, C. (2010). Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics. New York: Oxford University Press.

Dewey, J. (1916). Democracy and Education. New York: The Free Press.

Earl, J., & Kimport, K. (2010). Changing the World One Web page at a time: Conceptualizing and Explaining Internet Activism. Mobilization: An International Journal, 15(4), 425-446.

Erikson, E. (1968). Identity: Youth in Crisis. New York: Norton.

Fredericks, L., Kaplan, E. & Zeisler, J. (2001). Integrating Youth Voice in Service-learning. Denver, CO, Education Commissions of the States, p1. (www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/23/67/2367.htm) (12-06-2012).

Gordon, H. & Taft, J. (2011). Rethinking Youth Political Socia­lization: Teenage Activists Talk Back. Youth & Society, 43(4), 1499-1527. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0044118X10386087).

Gould, J. (Ed.) (2011). Guardians of Democracy: The Civic Mission of Schools. (http://civicmissionofschools.org/site/documents/­ViewGuardianofDemocracy/view) (30-09-2012).

Hosang, D. (2006). Beyond Policy: Ideology, Race and the Reimagining of Youth. In S. Ginwright, P. Noguera, & J. Cam­ma­­rota (Eds.), Beyond Resistance! Youth Activism and Commu­nity Change. New York: Taylor Francis.

Jones, S., Segar, T. & Gasiorski, A. (2008). A double-edged Sword: College Student Perceptions of Required High School Ser­vice-learning. Michigan Journal of Community Service-learning, 15(1).

Kahne, J., Crow, D. & Lee, N.J. (2012). Different Pedagogy, Different Politics: High School Learning Opportunities and Youth Civic Engagement. Forthcoming in Political Psychology. (http://civicsurvey.org/Different%20Pedagogy.pdf) (30-09-2012).

Kirshner, B. (2006). Apprenticeship Learning in Youth Activism. In S. Ginwright, P. Noguera, & J. Cammarota (Eds.), Beyond Resistance! Youth Activism and Community Change. New York: Taylor Francis.

Kohfeldt, D., Chhun, L., Grace, S. & Langhout, R. (2011). Youth Empowerment in Context: Exploring Tensions in School-ba­sed yPAR. Am. J. Community Psychology, 47, 28-45 (http://dx.doi.org/­10.1007/s10464-010-9376-z).

Kwak, N., Shah, D. & Holbert, R. (2004). Connecting, Trusting, and Participating: The Direct and Interactive Effects of Social Asso­ciation. Political Research Quarterly, 57, 64. (http://dx.doi.org/­­­10.1177/106591290405700412).

McAdam, D. (1988). Freedom Summer. New York: Oxford Uni­versity Press.

Neuman, W.R., Bimber, B. & Hindman, M. (2011). The Internet and Four Dimensions of Citizenship. In L. Jacobs & R. Shapiro (Eds). The Oxford Handbook of American Public Opinion and the Media. Oxford Handbooks Online. (DOI:10.1093/oxfordhb/9780­199545636.003.0002).

O’Donoghue, J. (2006). «Taking Their Own Power»: Urban Youth, Community-based Youth Organizations, and Public Effica­cy. In S. Ginwright, P. Noguera & J. Cammarota (Eds.), Beyond Resistance! Youth Activism and Community Change. New York: Taylor Francis Group.

Rice, L., Moffett, K. & Madupalli, R. (2012). Campaign Related Social Networking and the Political Participation of College Students. Social Science Computer Review. (http://dx.doi.org/ 10.­11­77/0894439312455474).

Rogoff, B. (2003). The Cultural Nature of Human Development. Oxford: University Press.

Schlozman, K., Verba, S. & Brady, H. (2010). Weapon of the Strong? Participatory Inequality and the Internet. PS: Perspectives on Politics, 8, 487-509. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S15­375927­10­0­0­­­1210).

Smith, A. (2010). The Internet and Campaign 2010. A Report of the Pew Internet and American Life Project. (http://pewinternet.org/­Reports/2011/The-Internet-and-Campaign-2010.aspx) (12-06-2012).

Soep, E. (2012). The Digital Afterlife of Youth-made Media : Impli­cations for Media Literacy Education. Comunicar, 39. (DOI:­10.­3916/C38-2011-02-10).

Squire, K. (2008). Open-Ended Video Games: A Model for De­veloping Learning for the Interactive Age. In K. Salen (Ed). The Ecology of Games: Connecting Youth, Games, and Learning. Cam­bridge, MA: The MIT Press, 167-198 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1162/­dmal.9780262693646.167).

Westheimer, J. & Kahne, J. (2004). What Kind of Citizen? The Politics of Educating for Democracy. American Educational Re­search Journal, 41(2), 237-269.

Youniss, J. & Yates, M. (1997). Community Service and Social Responsibility. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Zikhur, K. (2010). Generations 2010. A Report of the Pew Internet and American Life Project. (www.pewinternet.org/Re­ports/2010/­Generations-2010/Trends/Online-news.aspx) (12-06-2012).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 28/02/13
Accepted on 28/02/13
Submitted on 28/02/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C40-2013-02-10
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 9
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?