Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This article aims to identify how digital public opinion was articulated on Twitter during the visit of the Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump to Mexico City in 2016 by invitation from the Mexican government, which was preceded by the threat to construct a border wall that Mexico would pay for. Using a mixed methodology made up of computational methods such as data mining and social network analysis combined with content analysis, the authors identify conversational patterns and the structures of the net-works formed, beginning with this event involving the foreign policy of both countries that share a long border. The authors study the digital media practices and emotional frameworks these social network users employed to involve themselves in the controversial visit, marked by complex political, cultural and historical relations. The analysis of 352,203 tweets in two languages (English and Spanish), those most used in the conversations, opened the door to an understanding as to how transnational public opinion is articulated in connective actions detonated by newsworthy events in distinct cultural contexts, as well as the emotional frameworks that permeated the conversation, whose palpable differences show that Twitter is not a homogeneous universe, but rather a set of universes co-determined by sociocultural context.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

“Donald Trump to visit Mexico after more than a year of Mocking It”, The New York Times front page announced on August 31, 2016 (Corasaniti & Ahmed, 2016). Candidate Donald Trump’s visit to Mexico, by invitation of President Enrique Peña Nieto, was considered an act of the Mexican government’s clumsiness by the international press (The Economist, 2016; Ahmed & Malkin, 2016), due to Trump’s disparaging comments, threatening throughout his campaign to build a border wall that would be paid for by Mexico. On the night of August 30, 2016, Mexicans learned from a tweet by the American candidate that Peña had invited him to visit the country. Twitter was the protagonist of the event since the Mexican primetime newscasts were getting off the air. Trump’s tweet was ratified by the Mexican presidency, and The Washington Post announced the information as breaking news. These were the sources of information available to the Mexican digital media, which were able to cover the eleventh-hour meeting, and the only input for a connective action to begin to be articulated on Twitter.

Bennett and Segerberg (2013) call “connective action” those various kinds of movements organized through networks whose flexibility facilitates participation in political life and constitutes the theoretical starting point of this research. To understand how public opinion was articulated during this connective action on Twitter, the authors identify patterns, actors, media practices and emotional frameworks with which users made sense of their agency with relation to this episode of Mexico–United States politics.

The following questions are posed: How was the connective action articulated by Trump’s visit? Who were the most influential actors, which were their communities, and what media practices facilitated their preeminence in this connective action? What emotional frameworks were used to make sense of the connective action?

The analysis corresponds to a period of four days: the day the visit was announced, the day of the visit, and the two following days in which the issue continued to be discussed.

1.1. Connective action and emotional frameworks

Before the visit, a reactive and affective (Papacharissi & Oliveira, 2012) reaction was articulated, as is characteristic of the Twitter public (Jungherr, 2015). This was a connective action that united users in a spontaneous and personalized way, giving shape to the news environment that characterizes this social network (Bruns & Burgess, 2012). The meeting formed community structures for Spanish-speaking and English-speaking users (Conover & al., 2011). These were reinforced by a testable experience of uses and gratifications, an approach employed by some researchers to understand how people use certain media to satisfy needs (Katz, Blumler, & Gurevitch, 1973; Jungherr, 2015; Chen, 2011; Parmelee & Bichard, 2011; Liu & al., 2010).

Beyond the uses, this article analyzes digital media practices (Couldry, 2012) and cultural resources, through which users gave meaning to their participation in this space of the public sphere. Twitter users joined the conversation through emotional frameworks, understood as the set of emotional filters socially constructed for the individual to understand and interpret the world (Goffman & Rodríguez, 2006).

For Mexicans, Trump’s visit was framed emotionally in a complex bilateral relationship between neighbors who, although sharing a border of 1,984 miles (3,193 kilometers) (International Boundary and Water Commission, 2018), have been defined as distant because of their economic and cultural differences (Riding, 2011). Between 1965 and 2015, 16.2 million immigrants left from Mexico to the United States (Krogstad, 2016). In the last 25 years, the United States has tightened immigration policy on its southern border to curb illegal immigration, reinforcing it in 2006 with the issuance of the Secure Fence Act. Even before Trump’s arrival in politics, differences over immigration had been settled through diplomatic channels.

1.2. Twitter as an extension of the political communication space

Twitter has been studied for its role in disseminating news and in constructing a transnational public agenda (Bruns & Burgess, 2012; Hermida, 2010). It has also been studied for its communicative possibilities as a facilitator in organizing multitudes (Bennett & Segerberg, 2013); for its conversational logic and for the affective load that is transferred from the individuality of the private sphere to the public sphere in flexible mobility, characteristic of citizen practice in time of networks (Ranie & Wellman, 2012; Hansen, 2011; Papacharissi, 2015). It has been studied as a mediator of reality, which offers the opportunity to know what is being said about politics (Jungherr, 2015).

Its public carries out news coverage (Hermida, 2010; Lotan & al., 2011) or monitoring of issues of interest (Deuze, 2008), a phenomenon analyzed by various researchers, who agree that Twitter more closely resembles informative media than social network (Kwak & al., 2010; Hermida, 2010; González-Bailón & al., 2011); a characteristic that makes it useful for mobilization and activism.

Twitter facilitates connections and sharing symbolic resources to the entire hybrid media environment that, according to Chadwick (2013), is made up of different platforms and actors with different levels of relationships, who post, share, negotiate meanings and select information in a continuous work of curating content permeated by diverse emotions.

The conversations are structured through different semantic conventions. Hashtags serve to organize the issues –of unease or support– and to stimulate participation in which people negotiate the meanings of actions (Jungherr, 2015). They allow the user to get in touch with audiences beyond their timeline –made up of those they follow– and makes the search for topics functional. According to Bruns and Burgess (2012), the discursive communities around the hashtags allow Twitter to be recognized as a network for dissemination and discussion of news topics.

Retweets contribute to the conversational ecology by replicating a user’s information and mixing it with opinion and testimony of participation, without necessarily agreeing (Boyd, Golder, & Lotan, 2010; Honey & Herring, 2009; Cha & al., 2010; Papacharissi & Oliveira, 2012). Mentions are another convention, considered a measure of influence –together with retweets and number of followers– that favor the viralization that characterizes Twitter.

Some studies consider structural factors of participating in the social network, such as connectivity. Mexico is an emerging economy, with broad swaths of its population not connected: 57.4% of Mexicans have Internet access (INEGI, 2016) and there are barely 9 million Twitter users in Mexico (Brandwatch, 2016). In the United States, 88.5% of the population has access to the Internet (Internet Live Stats, 2016), and there are 56.8 million Twitter users there (Statista, 2016).

2. Materials and methods

Using Twitter’s API, 352,203 tweets were captured between August 30 and September 2 through the following hashtags: #EPN, #Trump, #QuePeñaTrump #TrumpalmuseoMyT #TrumpInMexico, #Trumpen Mexico, #TrumpenMéxico #SrTrumpcontodorespeto and #Trumpnoeresbienvenido. The integration of a corpus by these semantic conventions leaves out part of the conversations, although it is an accessible way to capture unstructured data. The following communicative conventions were taken as categories of analysis: hashtags, mentions, retweets and the content of the conversation.

A mixed methodology focus was adopted. Data mining allowed the possibility of analyzing patterns of conversation frequency and intensity; this is a technique that helps to extract value from an unstructured database. The R program allowed the possibility of analyzing different semantic conventions in the tweets, actors and cultural resources quickly, which then, from sub-samples, were observed to analyze in a more focused way the profiles of intensive and influential actors and their digital media practices. The analysis of social networks, according to which a social environment is expressed in patterns and tendencies in agreement with the interrelation of actors, permitted the analysis of the structures configured in the conversations (Wasserman & Faust, 1994). To recognize the structures of the networks of influential actors, the program Gephi 8.2 was used.

To analyze the emotional framework, content analysis was chosen, a technique that allows for trustworthy and replicable inferences from texts in their context, to understand qualitative variables such as the emotions behind the tweets (Krippendorff, 1997). For the analysis, a sub-sample of 10,000 tweets was chosen randomly and divided into two languages (5,000 in English and 5,000 in Spanish).

3. Results

The visit was the object of multilingual conversations, with English and Spanish dominant without being able to determine territorial location, since not all users activate geolocation. From the sample of tweets analyzed using hashtags, 46% were written in Spanish and 54% in English; other languages such as French, German, and Arabic were identified, which speaks to a transnational conversation.

Connective actions on Twitter are usually detonated by external stimuli, but in this case, it was sparked from within the network, when at 9:33 pm EDT on August 30, 2016, Trump tweeted: “I have accepted the invitation of President Enrique Peña Nieto, of Mexico, and look very much forward to meeting him tomorrow”. Six minutes later, the Mexican presidency confirmed this. The connective action was activated within minutes, generating two tweets per minute until midnight. No traditional Mexican media published the scoop; the newspaper The Washington Post took care of that.

The most-watched television news in Mexico, TV Azteca, announced the news in the last five minutes of its transmission, while the Televisa network barely mentioned it. Mexican digital newspapers began to report on it around 10:00 pm CDT, taking the tweets as their source. Between 6:00 am and 9:00 am CDT on August 31, in Spanish 45 tweets per minute were registered, versus only 5 in English. The information dynamics for both samples had different behaviors, as can be observed in Figure 1.

The period with the greater color density indicates more tweets for each language; although messages in Spanish began around 8:00 am and lasted until after midnight, the moment of greatest intensity was 3:15 pm, whereas in English the greatest intensity occurred between 4:00 pm and 8:00 pm with more than 20,000 tweets per hour.

The climax of the visit corresponds to the greatest volume of tweets, which was in the afternoon of August 31, after the closed-door meeting when both politicians offered a joint message in which Peña gave a conciliatory speech. This contrasted with the collective imaginaries of Mexicans reflected on Twitter, who expected a confrontation with Trump, who at the beginning of his campaign had referred to Mexicans as criminals (Time, 2015).

During the live message, the Mexican presidency prohibited questions from the press, a common practice in Mexico but not in the United States, so journalists from CNN and ABC, respectively, interrupted to ask whether they had spoken about the border wall. Before Peña’s bewilderment, Trump asserted that they had spoken about the wall, but not about who would pay for it. In that moment, Twitter’s reactive profile was obvious as the flow of messages reached a rhythm of four tweets per second, an intensity that continued for several hours, confirming that the news-style environment in controversial events is articulated in a hybrid way – that is, on social networks and traditional media such as radio and television.

Faced with criticism for not responding to Trump, Peña resorted to Twitter hours later to clarify that he had indeed said that Mexico would not pay for the wall: “At the beginning of the conversation with Donald Trump, I made it clear that Mexico will not pay for the wall”. Twitter became a weapon to settle issues that could have been resolved using diplomacy (Figure 2).


Meneses et al 2018a-66318-en014.jpg

Upon his return to the United States, Trump gave a speech in Arizona reconfirming his conviction that Mexico should pay for the wall (Politico.com, 2016). For the international press, Peña had legitimized Trump’s threats against Mexico. This caused a drop in his popularity since 75% of Mexicans considered the visit to be unfavorable (AFP, 2016).


Meneses et al 2018a-66318-en015.jpg

On September 1, the conversation continued. The Mexican president sent a second tweet: “I repeat what I told you personally, Mr. Trump: Mexico would never pay for a wall. twitter.com/realdonaldtrum..”. He confirmed his tweet from the previous day, which would be refuted by the candidate, who in another tweet reaffirmed that Mexico would pay for the wall. For Republicans, it had been a triumph, while for the Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton the exchange of tweets showed that her opponent lied and had embarrassed the United States (Merica, 2016).

The most used hashtag in English and Spanish was #TrumpenMexico, while the volume was greater in English, 188,964 tweets versus 166,239 tweets in Spanish.

3.1. Intensive actors and digital media practices

Two sub-samples were taken, one of the users in Spanish and the other in English, to be able to identify the actors who used Twitter most intensively during this connective action.

The 20 users who tweeted the most about the issue were selected in each language, even though previous studies have shown that those who publish the most are not the most influential users (Cha & al., 2010; Wu & al., 2011; Bakshy & al., 2011). Their usage patterns were explored, as well as the digital practices through which they became connected to the visit. To analyze the frequency of the activity of the 20 most active users in each language (Table 1) an average was taken of the quantity of total tweets made by their accounts divided by the number of days since the creation of each account. In Spanish, the publications of the 20 most active users increased 80%, reaching an average of 105.9 tweets per day. For the 20 most active in English, activity increased 70%, reaching 121.35 tweets per day. The intensity of use confirms hypotheses regarding the reactive and temporal character of Twitter during controversial events.

Observing the time line of each user, it was detected that these were politically active users, which confirms that opinions on Twitter are not representative of public opinion, but it is a politicized public that reacts to political events, creating a news flow. The number of followers in the sub-sample of intensive users raged from 30 to 54,000 followers, which denotes a great variety of profiles. In comparing them, important differences were found in relation to their involvement: 85% of the most active users’ accounts in Spanish were anonymous, versus 45% of those in English, which coincides with previous studies that show a relationship between anonymity and accounts that emit the most tweets about polemic issues (Peddinti, Ross, & Cappos, 2014).


Meneses et al 2018a-66318-en016.jpg

Of the accounts in Spanish, 100% were adverse to both Peña and Trump and condemned the visit, coinciding with public opinion surveys carried out in Mexico (AFP, 2016). Among the accounts in English, a greater balance was found: 50% supported the Republican and the remaining 50% supported Hillary Clinton, which suggests that the intensity and practices of users were influenced by the presidential campaign.

3.2. Influential actors and communities of influence

Influence has been studied by social and cognitive sciences. The theory of diffusion signals that a minority of users, called influencers, can persuade others (Rogers, 2010) and establishes that when these reach a certain network, a chain reaction can be achieved at low cost. There are other factors that determine influence, such as the interpersonal relationship between users and their disposition (Watts & Dodds, 2007). Although there is no consensus on how to measure influence on Twitter, an analysis was carried out based on two variables:

• Direct influence. This is represented by the quantity of followers a determined user has.

• Retweet (RT) influence. This can be measured by the number of RT a user’s content generated.

There are studies that analyze the influence of mentions, measured by the number of times a determined user is mentioned to involve others in the conversation. In this case, the most-mentioned users were the two political leaders.

3.2.1. Direct influence

We chose the 20 users with the most followers in each language. We observed in both sub-samples that journalists, media, and performers were the influencers based on their number of followers. As can be seen in Table 2, in Spanish, influencers have fewer followers, probably because the number of users is substantially higher in the United States.

This finding reinforces the hypothesis previously explored in the literature, regarding influential personalities on social networks who are directly connected and can have high one-on-one interaction. In this action, few individuals served as nodes and conversational pivots. In the case of the Spanish-language sub-sample, only media, journalists and Mexican television personalities stand out, whereas in the English-language one media such as the French @France24 and the Canadian paper @TorontoStar stand out, but also a Mexican actress (@ADELAREGUERA) and a Mexican journalist residing in Los Angeles (@LeonKrauze), who tweet in English and Spanish. This intertwining of influential actors diffuses national borders and reaffirms Twitter’s transnational character.


Meneses et al 2018a-66318-en013.jpg

3.2.2. Retweet influence

The most retweeted users were not those who have the most followers (Table 3). For users in Spanish, opportunistic actors who inserted themselves into the political conversation for other ends, such as promotion, stand out, as in the case of a museum in Mexico City (@MuseoMyT). This is a characteristic of social networks that deserves further research.

In the network of RT in English, celebrities and a base of Trump supporters stood out, although we also observed Clinton supporters and mass media. Some of the pro-Trump accounts were suspended after the event, which suggests the use of bots, a phenomenon documented by experts who report that one-fifth of the Twitter conversation related to the election in the United States was conducted by bots (Bessi & Ferrara, 2016).


Meneses et al 2018a-66318-en012.jpg

Retweets represent the influence of a particular user beyond a one-on-one interaction, as those messages can reinforce an argument and have broad dissemination. The analysis of social networks combined with observation of the profiles of the actors who generated the most RT permitted a delineation of the communities that formed around them. These communities were formed from those nodes that were more densely connected among themselves than with the rest of the network.

In the English-language sub-sample, it was observed that the conversation was inscribed within the Republican and Democratic battle for the presidency. In the network in Spanish, four large communities were detected, with an actor standing out that was not directly connected to the issue, like the Museum of Memory and Tolerance in Mexico, which found an opportunity to get its message out using hashtags inviting Trump to visit the museum and which was the most retweeted node that articulated various communities around it:

• Mr. Trump: For you it’s free.

• Mr. Trump: Come on to remember that we are all equal.

3.3. Emotional frameworks and cultural contexts

Previous studies such as that of Hong, Convertino y Chi (2011) have found substantial cultural differences in the use of Twitter according to the linguistic community, which was corroborated.

This study does not aim to delve into the relationship between language and national identity. We assume, as Even-Zohar (1999), that language is only one part of the maximal cultural complexity in a world configured by migrations and cultural hybridizations such as those observed in Mexico and the United States.


Meneses et al 2018a-66318-en010.jpg

Twitter is a transnational network in which users declare the language in which they write, so the conversation was divided into two clusters. To understand the meaning that users imparted upon the conversation and the emotional framework behind the connective action, a random sampling of 5,000 messages was taken for each language, and Twitter’s temporal narratives were analyzed using the following categories: taunt, support, rejection, surprise, and informative tweet. “Other” and “insufficient” were incorporated for difficult-to-categorize tweets, and “not related” for those that use the hashtag to talk about other issues.


Meneses et al 2018a-66318-en011.jpg

In the composite in English, the predominant posture was support of Trump. Some 40.60% applauded the episode and 24.22% disliked it (this category also included all the tweets that disparaged the politicians). Some 9.72% of the messages were categorized as taunts. The “Other” category, which had other intentions related to the issue of the visit, represented 10.68% in English and 3.66% in Spanish, as can be seen in Table 4. This category included messages to Clinton, both positive and negative. Some 7.18% were informative messages and live transmissions. In the English-language sample, an involvement permeated by electoral content was observed.

The sample in Spanish got involved with the visit in a different way: more than half of the tweets (59%) were messages of rejection or dislike related to the visit and against the politicians. The Spanish-speakers included taunts in the conversation (21.38%) with 1,069 tweets –versus 486 in English– recorded in this category. Only 30 supportive tweets were found (0.6%). It can be held that the emotional framework was permeated by Trump’s insults against Mexicans.

Some of the messages were accompanied by memes and graphic elements to ridicule the politicians, resources that were not used significantly in English. The use of grandiloquent words was detected as a recurring resource to express rejection, dislike and taunt – emotions that were dominant in this sample. These categories were followed by neutral or informative tweets, with 12% of messages not carrying connotation and that aimed to cite, give information or attach some news. Another phenomenon worthy of study is the messages mixing English and Spanish, of which 34 cases were found.

4. Discussion and conclusions

Massive data analysis offered a map of a phenomenon that occurred frenetically through an infinite number of variables, and the ability to correlate them with each other. With mixed techniques, a map of the conversation was drawn, and thanks to the focalization allowed by digital observation and content analysis the emotional frameworks behind this connective action were understood.

Bilingual content analysis allows the others to maintain that tweeting is a cultural practice in which contexts are intermixed and various worldviews are expressed. Hypotheses related to the affective reactions of the Twitter public before newsworthy events were reinforced, usually reactive based on emotional frameworks and from specific cultural and political contexts.

The cultural and political context is the determining factor for the meaning of the conversations, which requires context analysis for a full understanding of the dynamics of transnational digital communication, in which traditional media continue to play a relevant role. A challenge for future research is to improve using automated learning techniques, the processing of emotions in languages other than English; for this more studies on the role of emotions in contemporary politics are pertinent.

For now, there is a broad understanding generated from the Anglo-Saxon scientific world, but there is a need for studies from other cultural and linguistic contexts, especially from the sociopolitical reality of the so-called Global South. A bot analysis is pertinent to current studies, for which automatization is a necessary variable in political communication.

The analysis in English confirms that the visit was part of the US campaigns in which party machinery was clear in the intensive and influential users supporting Trump and Clinton, respectively. The social network analysis was useful to sustain this finding, since we found two well delineated clusters of followers of each candidate.

Thanks to the mixed methods, it was possible to ratify the influence of sociopolitical context on Twitter conversations. On the one hand, an action framed within the electoral context of the United States, in which immigration was a central issue, and on the other hand, the reactive and spontaneous character of users outraged by Trump’s xenophobic affronts.

In the Spanish-language connective action, the network was formed in a less centralized way. Here, many actors participated with different aims, which could be detected with the closeness allowed by digital observation, manifesting that public opinion on Twitter is not always driven by journalists, outraged people, bots or influential actors, but also by actors who find an opportunity to enter into and create a meta conversation in search of particular objectives, which complicates the study of digital public opinion.

Studies of conversations on the transnational scale that investigate the meeting points between different cultures and political context are necessary to strengthen hypotheses relating to echo chambers as a phenomenon characteristic of digital public opinion. The hypothesis touched upon in the literature about the lack of horizontality in social networks was reinforced; this action was tweeted about more in English, which could be due to the degree of connectivity and participative culture in each country, which leads to inequality in constructing an international agenda from social networks. This analysis can help to pose questions for future research about the risks of practicing politics on Twitter to settle controversies without the mediation of traditional media, as Trump did in his first year as president.

References

AFP (2016). Visita de Trump a México golpea la popularidad de Peña Nieto. El Economista. (https://goo.gl/DM8yeZ).

Ahmed, A., & Malkin, E. (2016). Mexicans Accuse President of ‘Historic Error’ in Welcoming Donald Trump. The New York Times, A17. (https://goo.gl/yb1Kbu).

Bakshy, E., Hofman, J.M., Mason, W.A., & Watts, D.J. (2011). Everyone’s an influencer: Quantifying influence on twitter. Proceedings of the fourth ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining (pp. 65-74). ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/1935826.1935845

Bennett, W.L., & Segerberg, A. (2013). The logic of connective action: Digital media and the personalization of contentious politics. Massachusetts: Cambridge University Press. (https://goo.gl/NxxV1Z).

Bessi, A., & Ferrara, E. (2016). Social bots distort the 2016 US presidential election online discussion. First Monday, 21(11), https://doi.org/10.5210/fm.v21i11.7090

Boyd, D., Golder, S., & Lotan, G. (2010). Tweet, tweet, retweet: Conversational aspects of retweeting on twitter. System Sciences (HICSS): 43rd Hawaii International Conference On (pp. 1-10). IEEE. https://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/HICSS.2010.412

Brandwatch. (2016). Estadísticas de TW. Brandwatch. (https://goo.gl/rhs3vv).

Bruns, A., & Burgess, J. (2012). Researching news discussion on Twitter: New methodologies. Journalism Studies, 13(5-6), 801-814.

Cha, M., Haddadi, H., Benevenuto, F., & Gummadi, P.K. (2010). Measuring user influence in twitter: The million follower fallacy. ICWSM, 10(10-17), 30. https://doi.org/10.1145/2897659.2897663

Chadwick, A. (2013). The hybrid media system: Politics and power. New York: Oxford University Press.

Chen, G.M. (2011). Tweet this: A uses and gratifications perspective on how active Twitter use gratifies a need to connect with others. Computers in Human Behavior, 27(2), 755-762. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2010.10.023

Conover, M., Ratkiewicz, J., Francisco, M.R., Gonçalves, B., Menczer, F., & Flammini, A. (2011). Political polarization on Twitter. ICWSM, 133, 89-96. (https://goo.gl/JFkQUD).

Corasaniti, N., & Ahmed, A. (2016). Donald Trump to visit Mexico after more than a year of mocking it. The New York Times, A1. (https://goo.gl/A9c5as).

Couldry, N. (2012). Media, society, world: Social theory and digital media practice. Cambridge: Polity. (https://goo.gl/dMkYYp).

Deuze, M. (2008). The changing context of news work: Liquid journalism for a monitorial citizenry. International Journal of Communication, 2, 18. (https://goo.gl/xR3Q7j).

Donald J. Trump [realDonaldTrump] (2016-08-30). I have accepted the invitation of President Enrique Pena Nieto, of Mexico, and look very much forward to meeting him tomorrow. [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/o3ieL6).

Donald J. Trump [realDonaldTrump] (2016-09-01). Mexico will pay for the wall! [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/KDfJ1i).

Enrique Peña-Nieto [EPN] (2016,1 de septiembre). Repito lo que le dije personalmente, Sr. Trump: México jamás pagaría por un muro. [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/vdYSa1).

Enrique Peña-Nieto [EPN] (2016-08-30). Al inicio de la conversación con Donald Trump dejé claro que México no pagará por el muro. [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/2qsQNX).

Even-Zohar, I. (1999). La posición de la literatura traducida en el polisistema literario. Teori´a de los Polisistemas, 1, 223-231. (https://goo.gl/E7cbxE).

Goffman, E., & Rodríguez, J.L. (2006). Frame analysis: Los marcos de la experiencia. Madrid: Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas.

González-Bailón, S., Borge-Holthoefer, J., Rivero, A., & Moreno, Y. (2011). The dynamics of protest recruitment through an online network. Scientific Reports, 1, 197. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep00197

Hansen, L.K., Arvidsson, A., Nielsen, F.Å., Colleoni, E., & Etter, M. (2011). Good friends, bad news-affect and virality in Twitter. In Park J.J., Yang L.T., & Lee C. (Eds.), Future information technology. Communications in computer and information science future information technology (pp. 34-43). Berlin: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-22309-9_5

Hermida, A. (2010). Twittering the news: The emergence of ambient journalism. Journalism Practice, 4(3), 297-308. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512781003640703

Honey, C., & Herring, S.C. (2009). Beyond microblogging: Conversation and collaboration via Twitter. System Sciences, 2009. HICSS’09: 42nd Hawaii International Conference On (pp. 1-10). IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/hicss.2009.89

Hong, L., Convertino, G., & Chi, E.H. (2011). Language matters in Twitter: A large scale study. ICWSM. (https://goo.gl/7yN5Ku).

INEGI (Ed.) (2016). Estadísticas a propósito del día Mundial de Internet. (https://goo.gl/ed9Aet).

Internet Live Stats (Ed.) (2016). Internet live stats 2016. (https://goo.gl/3UQcZL).

Jungherr, A. (2015). Analyzing political communication with digital trace data. Switzerland: Springer. (https://goo.gl/8CWHZs).

Katz, E., Blumler, J.G., & Gurevitch, M. (1973). Uses and gratifications research. The Public Opinion Quarterly, 37(4), 509-523. https://doi.org/10.1086/268109

Krippendorff, K. (1997). Metodología de análisis de contenido. Teoría y práctica. Barcelona: Paidós.

Krogstad, J. (2016). 5 facts about Mexico and immigration to the U.S. Pêw Research. (https://goo.gl/eNZn3N).

Kwak, H., Lee, C., Park, H., & Moon, S. (2010). What is Twitter, a social network or a news media? Proceedings of the 19th international Conference on World Wide Web (pp. 591-600). Nueva York: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/1772690.1772751

Liu, I.L., Cheung, C.M., & Lee, M.K. (2010). Understanding Twitter usage: What drive people continue to Tweet. In PACIS, 92, 928-939. (https://goo.gl/fq2iZh).

Lotan, G., Graeff, E., Ananny, M., Gaffney, D., & Pearce, I. (2011). The Arab Spring, the revolutions were tweeted: Information flows during the 2011 Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions. International Journal of Communication, 5(31). (https://goo.gl/bX6Ebo).

Memoria y Tolerancia [MuseoMyT] (ed.) (2016-08-31). #SrTrumpConTodoRespeto, lo invitamos a que nos visite para recordar la historia y no la repita. #TrumpAlMuseoMyT [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/oVMDT2).

Memoria y Tolerancia [MuseoMyT] (Ed.) (2016-08-31). #SrTrumpConTodoRespeto, lo invitamos a que nos visite para recordar la historia y no la repita. #TrumpAlMuseoMyT [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/VJ3xB3).

Merica, D. (2016). Clinton: In Mexico ‘Trump just failed his first foreign test’. CNN. (https://goo.gl/fksyKB).

Papacharissi, Z. (2015). Affective publics: Sentiment, technology, and politics. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Papacharissi, Z., & Oliveira, M. (2012). Affective news and networked publics: The rhythms of news storytelling on# Egypt. Journal of Communication, 62(2), 266-282. https://doi.org/0.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01630.x

Parmelee, J.H., & Bichard, S.L. (2011). Politics and the Twitter revolution: How tweets influence the relationship between political leaders and the public. London: Lexington Books. (https://goo.gl/pmRtWH).

Peddinti, S.T., Ross, K.W., & Cappos, J. (2014). On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog: A Twitter case study of anonymity in social networks. Proceedings of the Second ACM Conference on Online Social Networks (pp. 83-94). Nueva York: ACM. (https://goo.gl/pAgVTL).

Politico (Ed.) (2016). Full text: Donald Trump immigration speech in Arizona. Político. (https://goo.gl/hLVjLK).

Presidencia México [PresidenciaMX] (2016-08-30). El Señor @realDonaldTrump ha aceptado esta invitación y se reunirá mañana en privado con el Presidente @EPN. [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/zFuPSF).

Riding, A. (2011). Distant neighbors: A portrait of the Mexicans. New York: Vintage Books. (https://goo.gl/WBMfJK).

Rogers, E.M. (2010). Diffusion of innovations. New York: Free Press. (https://goo.gl/tftE3J).

Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores (Ed.) (2016). Comercio México-Estados Unidos. (https://goo.gl/Qd3gBb).

Secure Fence Act (2006). Public Law 109-367 109th Congress. Congressional Record, US, 26th october 2006. (https://goo.gl/HjdUv8).

Statista (2016). Number of twitter users in the United States from 2014 to 2020 (in millions). Statista. (https://goo.gl/VVdzcg).

The Economist (Ed.) (2016). The unspeakable and the inexplicable. The Economist. (https://goo.gl/cMERzb).

Time (Ed.) (2015). Here’s Donald Trump’s Presidential announcement speech. Time. (https://goo.gl/2CRgBy).

Washington Post [WashingtonPost] (Ed.) (2016-08-30). Breaking: Trump considers meeting in Mexico with the country’s president ahead of wednesday immigration speech. [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/7WTsZ6).

Wasserman, S., & Faust, K. (1994). Social network analysis. Methods and applications. Cambridge University Press. (https://goo.gl/q2KgCM).

Watts, D.J., & Dodds, P.S. (2007). Influentials, networks, and public opinion formation. Journal of Consumer Research, 34(4), 441-458. https://doi.org/10.1086/518527

Wu, S., Hofman, J.M., Mason, W.A., & Watts, D.J. (2011). Who says what to whom on Twitter. Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on World Wide Web (pp. 705-714). Nueva York: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/1963405.1963504



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El presente artículo busca identificar cómo se articuló la opinión pública digital en la red social Twitter durante la visita del entonces candidato republicano Donald Trump a la Ciudad de México en el año 2016 por invitación del gobierno mexicano que fue precedida de la amenaza de construir un muro fronterizo que pagaría México. Mediante una metodología mixta compuesta por métodos computacionales tales como minería de datos y análisis de redes sociales combinado con análisis de contenido se identifican los patrones de la conversación y las estructuras de redes que se conformaron a partir de este acontecimiento de la política exterior de ambas naciones que comparten una extensa frontera. Se estudiaron las prácticas mediáticas digitales y los encuadres emocionales con los cuales los usuarios de esta red social se involucraron en la controversial visita marcada por una compleja relación política, cultural e histórica. El análisis de 352.203 tuits en dos idiomas (inglés y español), los más utilizados en las conversaciones, permitió comprender cómo se articula la opinión pública transnacional en acciones conectivas detonadas por eventos noticiosos en contextos culturales distintos, así como los encuadres emocionales que permearon la conversación, cuyas diferencias palpables demuestran que cuando se habla de Twitter no se trata de un universo homogéneo, sino de un conjunto de universos codeterminados por el contexto sociocultural.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

«Tras burlarse todo un año de los mexicanos, Trump visita hoy México», decía la primera plana de The New York Times el 31 de agosto de 2016 (Corasaniti & Ahmed, 2016). La visita del candidato Donald Trump a México por invitación del presidente Enrique Peña Nieto fue considerada como una torpeza del gobierno mexicano por la prensa internacional (The Economist, 2016; Ahmed & Malkin, 2016), debido a los comentarios despectivos de Trump, quien durante su campaña amenazó con construir un muro fronterizo que pagaría México.

La noche del 30 de agosto de 2016 los mexicanos se enteraron por un tuit del candidato estadounidense que había sido invitado por Peña a visitar el país. Twitter fue protagonista del evento, ya que los principales noticieros estaban por salir al aire. El tuit de Trump fue ratificado por la presidencia de México y el diario The Washington Post dio la información como nota de último momento. Estas fueron las fuentes de información de los medios digitales mexicanos que alcanzaron a dar cuenta de la intempestiva reunión y el único insumo para que se comenzara a articular una acción conectiva en Twitter.

Bennett y Segerberg (2013) denominan acciones conectivas a los diversos tipos de movilizaciones que se organizan en las redes cuya flexibilidad facilita la participación en la vida política y constituye el punto de partida teórico de la investigación. Para comprender cómo se articuló la opinión pública durante esta acción conectiva en Twitter, se identifican patrones, actores, prácticas mediáticas y encuadres emocionales con los cuales los usuarios dieron sentido a su agencia individual en relación con este episodio de la política México-Estados Unidos.

Se plantearon las siguientes preguntas: ¿Cómo se articuló la acción conectiva por la visita de Trump? ¿Quiénes fueron los actores más influyentes, cuáles sus comunidades y qué prácticas mediáticas facilitaron su preminencia en esta acción conectiva? ¿Qué encuadres emocionales fueron usados para dar sentido a la acción conectiva?

El análisis corresponde a un periodo de cuatro días: el día del anuncio de la visita, el día de la visita y los dos días posteriores en que se seguía conversando del tema.

1.1. Acción conectiva y encuadres emocionales

Ante la visita se articuló una reacción afectiva (Papacharissi & Oliveira, 2012) y reactiva como es característica de los públicos de Twitter (Jungherr, 2015). Se trató de una acción conectiva que unió a los usuarios de forma espontánea y personalizada dando forma al ambiente noticioso que caracteriza a esta red social (Bruns & Burgess, 2012). La reunión conformó estructuras de comunidad para usuarios hispanoparlantes y angloparlantes (Conover & al., 2011). Estas fueron reforzadas por una probable experiencia de usos y gratificaciones, enfoque abordado por algunos investigadores para comprender cómo la gente usa determinados medios para satisfacer necesidades (Katz, Blumler, & Gurevitch, 1973; Jungherr, 2015; Chen, 2011; Parmelee & Bichard, 2011; Liu & al., 2010).

Más allá de los usos, en este artículo se analizan las prácticas mediáticas digitales (Couldry, 2012) y los recursos culturales, mediante los cuales los usuarios dieron sentido a su participación en este espacio de la esfera pública. Los usuarios de Twitter se unieron a la conversación mediante encuadres emocionales por los que se entiende al conjunto de filtros emocionales construidos socialmente para que el individuo comprenda e interprete el mundo (Goffman & Rodríguez, 2006).

Para los mexicanos la visita de Trump fue encuadrada emocionalmente en una relación bilateral compleja entre vecinos que, si bien comparten una frontera de 3.175 kilómetros, han sido definidos como distantes por sus diferencias económicas y culturales (Riding, 2011). Entre 1965 y 2015 salieron de México hacia Estados Unidos 16.2 millones de inmigrantes (Krogstad, 2016). En los últimos 25 años Estados Unidos ha endurecido su política migratoria en la frontera sur para frenar la inmigración ilegal y la reforzó en 2006 con la expedición de la Secure Fence Act. Hasta la llegada de Trump a la política, las diferencias sobre la inmigración habían sido dirimidas por la vía diplomática.

1.2. Twitter como ampliación del espacio de comunicación política

Twitter ha sido estudiado por su papel para diseminar noticias y para la construcción de una agenda pública de carácter transnacional (Bruns & Burgess, 2012; Hermida, 2010). También como habilitadora para la organización de las multitudes por sus posibilidades comunicativas (Bennett & Segerberg, 2013); por su lógica conversacional y por la carga afectiva que se traslada desde la individualidad de la esfera privada hacia la esfera pública en una movilidad flexible, característica del ejercicio ciudadano en tiempos de redes (Ranie & Wellman, 2012; Hansen, 2011; Papacharissi, 2015). Se ha indagado como mediadora de la realidad que da la oportunidad de conocer lo que se comenta sobre la política (Jungherr, 2015).

Sus públicos realizan coberturas de tipo noticioso (Hermida, 2010; Lotan & al., 2011) o monitorial cuando hay temas que son de interés (Deuze, 2008), fenómeno analizado por diversos investigadores, quienes coinciden que Twitter es más parecido a un medio informativo que a una red social (Kwak & al., 2010; Hermida, 2010; González-Bailón & al., 2011); característica que lo vuelve útil para la movilización y el activismo.

Twitter facilita las conexiones y el compartir recursos simbólicos a todo el ambiente mediático híbrido que, según Chadwick (2013), está compuesto por diversas plataformas y por actores con diferentes niveles de relaciones, que postean, comparten, negocian significados y seleccionan la información en una labor continua de curación de contenidos permeados por emociones diversas.

Las conversaciones se estructuran a través de diferentes convenciones semánticas. Los hashtags sirven para organizar los temas –de malestar o apoyo– y para estimular la participación en la cual la gente negocia los significados de la acción (Jungherr, 2015). Permiten al usuario entrar en contacto con públicos más allá de su línea de tiempo –compuesta por quienes sigue– y hace funcional la búsqueda de temas. De acuerdo con Bruns y Burgess (2012), las comunidades discursivas alrededor de los hashtags permiten que Twitter sea reconocida como una red de difusión y discusión de temas noticiosos.

Los retuits contribuyen a la ecología conversacional al replicar la información de un usuario, mezclarlo con alguna opinión y testimonio de participación, sin que necesariamente exprese que se está de acuerdo (Boyd, Golder, & Lotan, 2010; Honey & Herring, 2009; Cha & al., 2010; Papacharissi & Oliveira, 2012). Otra convención son las menciones consideradas como medida de influencia -junto con los retuits y el número de seguidores- que favorecen la viralización que caracteriza a Twitter.

Algunas investigaciones contemplan factores estructurales para la participación en la red social como la conectividad. México es una economía emergente con amplias franjas de población desconectada: 57,4% de los mexicanos tiene acceso a Internet (INEGI, 2016) y apenas hay 9 millones de usuarios de Twitter (Brandwatch, 2016). En Estados Unidos 88,5% de la población tiene acceso a Internet (Internet Live Stats, 2016) y hay 56,8 millones de usuarios de Twitter (Statista, 2016).

2. Materiales y método

Se capturaron mediante la API de Twitter, 352.203 tuits entre el 30 de agosto y el 2 de septiembre a través de los siguientes hashtags: #EPN, #Trump, #QuePeñaTrump #TrumpalmuseoMyT #TrumpInMexico, #TrumpenMexico, #TrumpenMéxico #SrTrumpcontodorespeto y #Trumpnoeresbienvenido. La integración de un corpus a través de estas convenciones semánticas deja fuera parte de las conversaciones, aunque es una forma de captura accesible de datos desestructurados. Se tomaron como categorías de análisis las siguientes convenciones comunicativas: hashtags, menciones, retuits y el contenido de la conversación.

Se adoptó un enfoque metodológico mixto que permitió analizar las variables de la investigación. La minería de datos posibilitó analizar patrones de frecuencia e intensidad de las conversaciones; es una técnica que facilita extraer valor de una base de datos desestructurada. El programa R facilitó analizar distintas convenciones semánticas de los tuits, actores y recursos culturales de forma rápida que luego, a partir de submuestras, fueron observados para analizar de manera más focalizada los perfiles de actores intensivos, influyentes y sus prácticas mediáticas digitales. El análisis de redes sociales, de acuerdo al cual un ambiente social se expresa en patrones y tendencias de acuerdo a la interrelación de los actores, permitió analizar las estructuras que se configuraron en las conversaciones (Wasserman & Faust, 1994). Para conocer las estructuras de las redes de actores influyentes se usó el programa Gephi 8.2.

Para analizar el encuadre emocional se optó por el análisis de contenido, técnica que permite hacer inferencias confiables y replicables de los textos en su contexto para conocer variables cualitativas como las emociones detrás de los tuits (Krippendorf, 1997). Para el análisis se tomó una submuestra de 10.000 tuits de manera aleatoria y se dividió en dos idiomas (5.000 en inglés y 5.000 en español).

3. Análisis de resultados

La visita fue objeto de conversaciones multilingües con predominio del inglés y español sin que se pueda suponer su ubicación territorial ya que no todos los usuarios activan la geolocalización. De la muestra de tuits analizados a través de los hashtags, 46% estaban escritos en español y 54% en inglés; se identificaron otras lenguas como francés, alemán y árabe, lo cual da cuenta de una conversación de carácter transnacional.

Las acciones conectivas en Twitter generalmente son detonadas por estímulos externos, pero en este caso fue desde la red cuando a las 21:33 horas del 30 de agosto de 2016, Trump tuiteó: «He aceptado la invitación del presidente Peña Nieto, de México y espero verlo mañana». Seis minutos después lo confirmó la presidencia mexicana. La acción conectiva se activó en minutos cuando comenzaron a generarse dos tuits cada 60 segundos hasta la medianoche. Ningún medio mexicano tradicional dio la primicia, de lo cual se encargó el diario «The Washington Post».

El noticiero de televisión más visto en México, el de TV Azteca, dio la noticia en los últimos cinco minutos de transmisión, en tanto el de la cadena Televisa apenas lo informó. Los periódicos digitales mexicanos comenzaron a informar cerca de las 21:00 horas, tomando los tuits como fuente informativa. Entre las 6:00 y las 9:00 horas del 31 de agosto se registraban 45 tuits en español por minuto y solo cinco en inglés. Las dinámicas de información para ambas muestras tuvieron diferentes comportamientos, como se observa en la Figura 1.

La zona horaria con mayor densidad de color indica que hubo más tuits para cada idioma, aunque los mensajes en español comenzaron cerca de las 8:00 horas y duraron hasta pasada la media noche, el momento de mayor intensidad es a las 15:15 horas, mientras en inglés la mayor intensidad se presentó de las 16:00 a las 20:00 con más de 20.000 tuits por hora.

Al momento de clímax de la visita corresponde el mayor volumen de tuits y fue la tarde del 31 de agosto, luego de la reunión a puerta cerrada cuando ambos políticos ofrecieron un mensaje conjunto en el cual Peña pronunció un discurso conciliador. Este contrastó con el imaginario colectivo de los mexicanos reflejado en Twitter que esperaba un enfrentamiento con Trump, quien en los inicios de su campaña se refirió a los mexicanos como delincuentes (Time, 2015).

En el mensaje transmitido en vivo, la presidencia mexicana prohibió preguntas de la prensa, una práctica común en México, no así en Estados Unidos, por lo que periodistas de las cadenas CNN y ABC, respectivamente, interrumpieron para preguntar si habían hablado del muro fronterizo. Ante el desconcierto de Peña, Trump aseveró que habían hablado del muro, pero no de quién lo pagaría. En ese momento el perfil reactivo de Twitter fue patente ya que el flujo de mensajes corría a un ritmo de cuatro tuits por segundo, intensidad que se prolongó por varias horas confirmando que el ambiente noticioso en eventos controversiales se articula de manera híbrida, es decir, redes sociales y medios tradicionales como la radio y la televisión.


Meneses et al 2018a-66318 ov-es010.jpg

Ante las críticas por no responder a Trump, Peña recurrió horas más tarde a Twitter para aclarar que sí había dicho que México no pagaría por el muro. Twitter se convertía en un arma para dirimir asuntos que podrían haberse resuelto mediante la diplomacia (Figura 2).


Meneses et al 2018a-66318 ov-es011.jpg

A su regreso a Estados Unidos, Trump pronunció en Arizona un discurso que ratificó su convicción de que México debería pagar por el muro (Politico.com, 2016). Para la prensa internacional, Peña había legitimado las amenazas de Trump en contra de México. Este hecho causó una baja en su popularidad ya que 75% de los mexicanos consideró a la visita como inconveniente (AFP, 2016).

El 1 de septiembre, la conversación continuaba. El presidente mexicano envío un segundo tuit ratificando el del día anterior, el cual sería refutado por el candidato quien en otro tuit reafirmó que México pagaría el muro. Para los republicanos había sido un triunfo, en tanto que para la candidata demócrata Hillary Clinton el intercambio de tuits demostraba que su contrincante mentía y había avergonzado a Estados Unidos (Merica, 2016).

El hashtag de mayor uso en inglés y español fue #TrumpenMexico en tanto que el volumen fue mayor en inglés, 188.964 tuits contra 166.239 tuits en español.

3.1. Actores intensivos y prácticas mediáticas digitales

Se tomaron dos submuestras, una de usuarios en español y la otra en inglés que permitiera identificar a los actores que hicieron el uso más intensivo de Twitter durante esta acción conectiva.

Se seleccionaron a los 20 usuarios que más tuitearon sobre el tema por cada idioma, si bien se ha demostrado en estudios previos que quienes publican más no son los usuarios más influyentes (Cha & al., 2010; Wu & al., 2011; Bakshy & al., 2011). Se indagaron sus patrones de uso, así como las prácticas digitales a partir de las cuales se vincularon con la visita. Para analizar la frecuencia en la actividad de los 20 usuarios más activos en cada idioma (Tabla 1) se promedió la cantidad de tuits totales registrados en su cuenta y se dividió entre el número de días desde la creación de cada cuenta. En español las publicaciones de los 20 más activos aumentó 80% alcanzando un promedio de 105.9 tuits al día. Para los 20 más activos en inglés, la actividad aumentó en un 70%, alcanzando 121.35 tuits al día. La intensidad de uso confirma hipótesis relativas al carácter reactivo y temporal de Twitter ante acontecimientos controversiales.


Meneses et al 2018a-66318 ov-es012.jpg

Al observar la línea del tiempo de cada usuario se detectó que se trata de usuarios políticamente activos, lo que lleva a ratificar que la opinión en Twitter no es representativa de la opinión pública, se trata de públicos politizados que reaccionan ante eventos políticos creando un flujo noticioso. El número de seguidores en la submuestra de usuarios intensivos osciló entre los 30 y los 54.000 seguidores lo cual denota una gran variedad de perfiles. Al compararlas se encontraron diferencias importantes en relación con sus prácticas de involucramiento: 85% de las cuentas de los usuarios más activos en español eran anónimas, contra 45% de las cuentas en inglés, lo cual coincide con estudios previos que demuestran una relación entre el anonimato con las cuentas que más tuits emiten sobre asuntos polémicos (Peddinti, Ross, & Cappos, 2014).

De las cuentas en español, 100% fueron adversas tanto a Peña como a Trump y reprobaron la visita en coincidencia con estudios demoscópicos realizados en México (AFP, 2016). En las cuentas en inglés se encontró mayor balance, 50% apoyaban al republicano y el 50% restante a Hillary Clinton, con lo cual se sugiere que la intensidad y las prácticas de los usuarios estuvieron influenciadas por la campaña presidencial.

3.2. Actores influyentes y comunidades de influencia

La influencia ha sido estudiada por las ciencias sociales y cognitivas. La teoría de la difusión señala que una minoría de usuarios, llamados influyentes, pueden persuadir a otros (Rogers, 2010) y establece que cuando estos alcanzan una determinada red, se puede lograr una reacción en cadena a un bajo costo. Existen otros factores que determinan la influencia, como la relación interpersonal entre usuarios y su disposición (Watts & Dodds, 2007). Si bien no hay un consenso para la medición de influencia en Twitter, se realizó un análisis basado en dos variables:

• Influencia directa. Se representa por la cantidad de seguidores que tenga un determinado usuario.

• Influencia de retuits (RT). Se puede medir a través del número de RT que generó el contenido de un usuario.

Hay estudios que analizan la influencia de menciones que se mide a través del número de veces que determinado usuario se mencionó para involucrar a otros en la conversación. En este caso los usuarios más mencionados fueron los dos líderes políticos.

3.2.1. Influencia directa

Seleccionamos los 20 usuarios con más seguidores en cada idioma. Observamos en ambas submuestras que periodistas, medios y personas del espectáculo fueron los influyentes por su número de seguidores. Como se puede ver en la Tabla 2 en español los influyentes registran menos seguidores probablemente por el número de usuarios que es sustancialmente superior en Estados Unidos.


Meneses et al 2018a-66318 ov-es013.jpg

Con este hallazgo se refuerza la hipótesis previamente explorada en la literatura acerca de los personajes influyentes en las redes sociales quienes están directamente conectados y pueden tener una alta interacción uno a uno. En esta acción fueron pocos quienes sirvieron de nodos y pivote de la conversación. En el caso de la submuestra en español destacan únicamente medios, periodistas y personajes de la televisión mexicanos, en tanto que en la de inglés sobresalen medios como el francés @France24 y el diario canadiense @TorontoStar pero también una actriz mexicana (@adelareguera) y un periodista mexicano afincado en Los Angeles (@LeonKrauze) que tuitean en inglés y español. Este entrecruzamiento de actores influyentes diluye fronteras nacionales y reafirma el carácter transnacional de Twitter.

3.2.2. Influencia de retuits

Los usuarios más retuiteados no fueron los que más seguidores tienen (Tabla 3). Para los usuarios en español destacan actores oportunistas que se integraron a la conversación política para otros fines, como la promoción, este fue el caso de un museo de la Ciudad de México (@MuseoMyT); una característica de las redes sociales que merece ser explorada.


Meneses et al 2018a-66318 ov-es014.jpg

En la red de RT en inglés destacaron celebridades y una base de apoyo a Trump, aunque también observamos a seguidores de Clinton y a medios de comunicación. Algunas de las cuentas pro Trump fueron suspendidas pasado el evento, lo cual sugiere la utilización de bots, fenómeno documentado por expertos para quienes una quinta parte de la conversación en Twitter relacionada con las elecciones de Estados Unidos estuvo conducida por estos (Bessi & Ferrara, 2016).

Los retuits representan la influencia de cierto usuario más allá de una interacción uno a uno, pues los mensajes pueden reforzar un argumento y tener amplia difusión. El análisis de redes sociales combinado con observación de los perfiles de los actores que generaron más RT permitió delinear las comunidades que se conformaron alrededor de estos. Dichas comunidades se formaron a partir de aquellos nodos que estuvieron más densamente conectados entre sí que con el resto de la red.

En la submuestra en inglés se observó que la conversación se inscribió en la batalla republicana y demócrata por la presidencia. En la red en español se detectaron cuatro grandes comunidades destacando un actor no vinculado directamente al tema como el museo Memoria y Tolerancia de México que encontró una oportunidad para colocar su mensaje a través de hashtags que invitaban a Trump a visitarlo y que fue el nodo más retuiteado que articuló diversas comunidades a su alrededor.

3.3. Encuadres emocionales y contextos culturales

Estudios previos como el de Hong, Convertino y Chi (2011) han encontrado diferencias culturales sustanciales en el uso de Twitter de acuerdo con la comunidad lingüística, lo cual fue corroborado.

Esta no pretende ser una indagación sobre la relación entre lengua e identidad nacional. Asumimos, como Even-Zohar (1999), que la lengua es solo una parte de la complejidad cultural máxime en un mundo configurado por migraciones e hibridaciones culturales como las observadas en México y Estados Unidos.

Twitter es una red transnacional en la que los usuarios declaran el idioma en el que escriben por lo que la conversación se dividió en dos clusters. Para entender el sentido que los usuarios dieron a la conversación y el encuadre emocional detrás de la acción conectiva se realizó un muestreo aleatorio de 5.000 mensajes por cada idioma y se analizaron las narrativas temporales de Twitter bajo las siguientes categorías: burla, apoyo, repudio, sorpresa y tuit informativo. Se incorporaron «otro» e «insuficiente» para los tuis de difícil categorización y «no relacionado» para los que usan el hashtag para hablar de otros asuntos.


Meneses et al 2018a-66318 ov-es015.jpg

En el conglomerado en inglés la postura predominante fue de apoyo a Trump. Un 40,60% aplaudieron este episodio y 24,22% lo vieron con desagrado (aquí se catalogaron todos los tuits que desprestigiaban a los políticos). Un 9,72% de los mensajes se tipificaron como burla y como otros a cualquier otra intención relacionada al tema de la visita. Como puede verse en la Tabla 4, esta categoría representó un 10,68% en inglés y 3,66% en español. Aquí se clasificaron los mensajes hacia Clinton, tanto los positivos como los negativos. Un 7,18% fueron mensajes informativos y transmisiones en vivo. En la muestra en inglés se observó un involucramiento permeado por la contienda electoral.


Meneses et al 2018a-66318 ov-es016.jpg

El conglomerado en español se involucró con la visita de otra forma: más de la mitad de los tuits (59%) fueron mensajes de repudio o desagrado en relación a la visita y en contra los políticos. Los hispanoparlantes se vincularon con burla en la conversación (21,38%), ya que de 1.069 tuits -contra 486 en inglés- se catalogaron bajo esta categoría. Solo se encontraron 30 tuits de apoyo (0,6%). Se puede sostener que el encuadre emocional estuvo permeado por los insultos de Trump en contra de los mexicanos.

Algunos de los mensajes estuvieron acompañados por memes y elementos gráficos para ridiculizar a los políticos, recursos que no se utilizaron significativamente en inglés. Se detectó el uso de palabras altisonantes como recurso recurrente para expresar repudio, desagrado y burla -emociones dominantes en este conglomerado-. A estas categorías les siguieron los tuits neutrales o informativos, con 12% de mensajes que no llevaban una connotación y que buscaban citar, dar datos o ligar alguna noticia. Se encontraron 34 casos de mensajes donde se mezcla el inglés con el español, un fenómeno que merece ser estudiado.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

La analítica de datos masivos permitió contar con un mapeo de un fenómeno que aconteció de forma frenética a través de infinidad de variables y correlacionarlas entre sí. Con técnicas mixtas se obtuvo un mapa de la conversación y gracias a la focalización que permite la observación digital y el análisis de contenido se comprendieron los encuadres emocionales detrás de esta acción conectiva.

El análisis de contenido bilingüe permite sostener que tuitear es una práctica cultural en la que se entremezclan contextos y se expresan diversas formas de ver el mundo. Se reforzaron hipótesis relativas a las reacciones afectivas de los públicos de Twitter ante eventos noticiosos, usualmente reactivos a partir de encuadres emocionales y de contextos culturales y políticos específicos.

El contexto cultural y político es factor determinante del sentido de las conversaciones, lo cual obliga a realizar análisis por contexto para un pleno entendimiento de las dinámicas de la comunicación digital transnacional en las cuales los medios tradicionales continúan teniendo un papel relevante. La investigación tiene como reto perfeccionar con técnicas de aprendizaje automatizado el procesamiento de sentimientos en otros idiomas diferentes al inglés, por lo cual son pertinentes más estudios sobre el papel de las emociones en la política contemporánea.

Por ahora hay un amplio conocimiento generado desde el mundo científico anglosajón, pero hacen falta estudios desde otros contextos culturales y lingüísticos, sobre todo desde la realidad sociopolítica del denominado sur-global. Un análisis de bots es más que pertinente en los actuales estudios para los cuales la automatización constituye una variable imprescindible de la comunicación política.

El análisis en inglés constata que la visita fue parte de las campañas en Estados Unidos en las cuales la maquinaria partidista fue patente en los usuarios intensivos e influyentes afines a Trump y a Clinton respectivamente. El análisis de redes sociales fue útil para sostener este hallazgo ya que encontramos dos clusters bien delineados de seguidores de ambos candidatos.

Gracias a la mezcla de métodos se pudo ratificar la influencia del contexto sociopolítico en las conversaciones de Twitter. Por un lado, una acción enmarcada en la contienda electoral de Estados Unidos en que la inmigración fue tema central y por el otro una de carácter reactivo y espontáneo de usuarios indignados ante los desplantes xenófobos de Trump.

En la acción conectiva en español, la red se conformó de manera más descentralizada. En esta participaron muchos actores con distintos fines que se pudieron detectar con la mirada cercana que permite la observación digital, con lo cual queda de manifiesto que la opinión pública en Twitter no siempre es conducida por periodistas, indignados, bots o actores influyentes, sino también por actores que encuentran una oportunidad para entrar y conformar una meta de conversación en busca de objetivos particulares lo cual complejiza el estudio de la opinión pública digital.

Son pertinentes estudios de conversaciones a escala transnacional que indaguen los puntos de encuentro entre culturas y contextos políticos diferentes para dar solidez a las hipótesis relativas a las cámaras de eco como fenómeno característico de la opinión pública digital. Se reforzó la hipótesis abordada en la literatura sobre la falta de horizontalidad en la red social; esta fue una acción más tuiteada en inglés lo cual puede tener su causa en el grado de conectividad y cultura participativa de cada país lo que conduce a un desequilibrio en la construcción de la agenda internacional a partir de las redes sociales. Este análisis puede ayudar a plantear preguntas para investigaciones futuras sobre los riesgos de hacer política en Twitter para dirimir controversias sin la mediación de los medios tradicionales, como lo hizo Trump en su primer año en la presidencia.

Referencias

AFP (2016). Visita de Trump a México golpea la popularidad de Peña Nieto. El Economista. (https://goo.gl/DM8yeZ).

Ahmed, A., & Malkin, E. (2016). Mexicans Accuse President of ‘Historic Error’ in Welcoming Donald Trump. The New York Times, A17. (https://goo.gl/yb1Kbu).

Bakshy, E., Hofman, J.M., Mason, W.A., & Watts, D.J. (2011). Everyone’s an influencer: Quantifying influence on twitter. Proceedings of the fourth ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining (pp. 65-74). ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/1935826.1935845

Bennett, W.L., & Segerberg, A. (2013). The logic of connective action: Digital media and the personalization of contentious politics. Massachusetts: Cambridge University Press. (https://goo.gl/NxxV1Z).

Bessi, A., & Ferrara, E. (2016). Social bots distort the 2016 US presidential election online discussion. First Monday, 21(11), https://doi.org/10.5210/fm.v21i11.7090

Boyd, D., Golder, S., & Lotan, G. (2010). Tweet, tweet, retweet: Conversational aspects of retweeting on twitter. System Sciences (HICSS): 43rd Hawaii International Conference On (pp. 1-10). IEEE. https://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/HICSS.2010.412

Brandwatch. (2016). Estadísticas de TW. Brandwatch. (https://goo.gl/rhs3vv).

Bruns, A., & Burgess, J. (2012). Researching news discussion on Twitter: New methodologies. Journalism Studies, 13(5-6), 801-814.

Cha, M., Haddadi, H., Benevenuto, F., & Gummadi, P.K. (2010). Measuring user influence in twitter: The million follower fallacy. ICWSM, 10(10-17), 30. https://doi.org/10.1145/2897659.2897663

Chadwick, A. (2013). The hybrid media system: Politics and power. New York: Oxford University Press.

Chen, G.M. (2011). Tweet this: A uses and gratifications perspective on how active Twitter use gratifies a need to connect with others. Computers in Human Behavior, 27(2), 755-762. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2010.10.023

Conover, M., Ratkiewicz, J., Francisco, M.R., Gonçalves, B., Menczer, F., & Flammini, A. (2011). Political polarization on Twitter. ICWSM, 133, 89-96. (https://goo.gl/JFkQUD).

Corasaniti, N., & Ahmed, A. (2016). Donald Trump to visit Mexico after more than a year of mocking it. The New York Times, A1. (https://goo.gl/A9c5as).

Couldry, N. (2012). Media, society, world: Social theory and digital media practice. Cambridge: Polity. (https://goo.gl/dMkYYp).

Deuze, M. (2008). The changing context of news work: Liquid journalism for a monitorial citizenry. International Journal of Communication, 2, 18. (https://goo.gl/xR3Q7j).

Donald J. Trump [realDonaldTrump] (2016-08-30). I have accepted the invitation of President Enrique Pena Nieto, of Mexico, and look very much forward to meeting him tomorrow. [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/o3ieL6).

Donald J. Trump [realDonaldTrump] (2016-09-01). Mexico will pay for the wall! [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/KDfJ1i).

Enrique Peña-Nieto [EPN] (2016,1 de septiembre). Repito lo que le dije personalmente, Sr. Trump: México jamás pagaría por un muro. [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/vdYSa1).

Enrique Peña-Nieto [EPN] (2016-08-30). Al inicio de la conversación con Donald Trump dejé claro que México no pagará por el muro. [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/2qsQNX).

Even-Zohar, I. (1999). La posición de la literatura traducida en el polisistema literario. Teori´a de los Polisistemas, 1, 223-231. (https://goo.gl/E7cbxE).

Goffman, E., & Rodríguez, J.L. (2006). Frame analysis: Los marcos de la experiencia. Madrid: Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas.

González-Bailón, S., Borge-Holthoefer, J., Rivero, A., & Moreno, Y. (2011). The dynamics of protest recruitment through an online network. Scientific Reports, 1, 197. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep00197

Hansen, L.K., Arvidsson, A., Nielsen, F.Å., Colleoni, E., & Etter, M. (2011). Good friends, bad news-affect and virality in Twitter. In Park J.J., Yang L.T., & Lee C. (Eds.), Future information technology. Communications in computer and information science future information technology (pp. 34-43). Berlin: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-22309-9_5

Hermida, A. (2010). Twittering the news: The emergence of ambient journalism. Journalism Practice, 4(3), 297-308. https://doi.org/10.1080/17512781003640703

Honey, C., & Herring, S.C. (2009). Beyond microblogging: Conversation and collaboration via Twitter. System Sciences, 2009. HICSS’09: 42nd Hawaii International Conference On (pp. 1-10). IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/hicss.2009.89

Hong, L., Convertino, G., & Chi, E.H. (2011). Language matters in Twitter: A large scale study. ICWSM. (https://goo.gl/7yN5Ku).

INEGI (Ed.) (2016). Estadísticas a propósito del día Mundial de Internet. (https://goo.gl/ed9Aet).

Internet Live Stats (Ed.) (2016). Internet live stats 2016. (https://goo.gl/3UQcZL).

Jungherr, A. (2015). Analyzing political communication with digital trace data. Switzerland: Springer. (https://goo.gl/8CWHZs).

Katz, E., Blumler, J.G., & Gurevitch, M. (1973). Uses and gratifications research. The Public Opinion Quarterly, 37(4), 509-523. https://doi.org/10.1086/268109

Krippendorff, K. (1997). Metodología de análisis de contenido. Teoría y práctica. Barcelona: Paidós.

Krogstad, J. (2016). 5 facts about Mexico and immigration to the U.S. Pêw Research. (https://goo.gl/eNZn3N).

Kwak, H., Lee, C., Park, H., & Moon, S. (2010). What is Twitter, a social network or a news media? Proceedings of the 19th international Conference on World Wide Web (pp. 591-600). Nueva York: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/1772690.1772751

Liu, I.L., Cheung, C.M., & Lee, M.K. (2010). Understanding Twitter usage: What drive people continue to Tweet. In PACIS, 92, 928-939. (https://goo.gl/fq2iZh).

Lotan, G., Graeff, E., Ananny, M., Gaffney, D., & Pearce, I. (2011). The Arab Spring, the revolutions were tweeted: Information flows during the 2011 Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions. International Journal of Communication, 5(31). (https://goo.gl/bX6Ebo).

Memoria y Tolerancia [MuseoMyT] (ed.) (2016-08-31). #SrTrumpConTodoRespeto, lo invitamos a que nos visite para recordar la historia y no la repita. #TrumpAlMuseoMyT [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/oVMDT2).

Memoria y Tolerancia [MuseoMyT] (Ed.) (2016-08-31). #SrTrumpConTodoRespeto, lo invitamos a que nos visite para recordar la historia y no la repita. #TrumpAlMuseoMyT [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/VJ3xB3).

Merica, D. (2016). Clinton: In Mexico ‘Trump just failed his first foreign test’. CNN. (https://goo.gl/fksyKB).

Papacharissi, Z. (2015). Affective publics: Sentiment, technology, and politics. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Papacharissi, Z., & Oliveira, M. (2012). Affective news and networked publics: The rhythms of news storytelling on# Egypt. Journal of Communication, 62(2), 266-282. https://doi.org/0.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01630.x

Parmelee, J.H., & Bichard, S.L. (2011). Politics and the Twitter revolution: How tweets influence the relationship between political leaders and the public. London: Lexington Books. (https://goo.gl/pmRtWH).

Peddinti, S.T., Ross, K.W., & Cappos, J. (2014). On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog: A Twitter case study of anonymity in social networks. Proceedings of the Second ACM Conference on Online Social Networks (pp. 83-94). Nueva York: ACM. (https://goo.gl/pAgVTL).

Politico (Ed.) (2016). Full text: Donald Trump immigration speech in Arizona. Político. (https://goo.gl/hLVjLK).

Presidencia México [PresidenciaMX] (2016-08-30). El Señor @realDonaldTrump ha aceptado esta invitación y se reunirá mañana en privado con el Presidente @EPN. [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/zFuPSF).

Riding, A. (2011). Distant neighbors: A portrait of the Mexicans. New York: Vintage Books. (https://goo.gl/WBMfJK).

Rogers, E.M. (2010). Diffusion of innovations. New York: Free Press. (https://goo.gl/tftE3J).

Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores (Ed.) (2016). Comercio México-Estados Unidos. (https://goo.gl/Qd3gBb).

Secure Fence Act (2006). Public Law 109-367 109th Congress. Congressional Record, US, 26th october 2006. (https://goo.gl/HjdUv8).

Statista (2016). Number of twitter users in the United States from 2014 to 2020 (in millions). Statista. (https://goo.gl/VVdzcg).

The Economist (Ed.) (2016). The unspeakable and the inexplicable. The Economist. (https://goo.gl/cMERzb).

Time (Ed.) (2015). Here’s Donald Trump’s Presidential announcement speech. Time. (https://goo.gl/2CRgBy).

Washington Post [WashingtonPost] (Ed.) (2016-08-30). Breaking: Trump considers meeting in Mexico with the country’s president ahead of wednesday immigration speech. [Tweet]. (https://goo.gl/7WTsZ6).

Wasserman, S., & Faust, K. (1994). Social network analysis. Methods and applications. Cambridge University Press. (https://goo.gl/q2KgCM).

Watts, D.J., & Dodds, P.S. (2007). Influentials, networks, and public opinion formation. Journal of Consumer Research, 34(4), 441-458. https://doi.org/10.1086/518527

Wu, S., Hofman, J.M., Mason, W.A., & Watts, D.J. (2011). Who says what to whom on Twitter. Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on World Wide Web (pp. 705-714). Nueva York: ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/1963405.1963504

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/18
Accepted on 31/03/18
Submitted on 31/03/18

Volume 26, Issue 1, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C55-2018-04
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 2
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?