Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Foreign language ability, global awareness, and intercultural communication skills are increasingly recognized as essential dimensions of productive participation in the emerging economic, civic, political and social arenas of the 21st century. Consequently, these skills are being promoted more intentionally than ever across the spectrum of K16 education. This newly articulated set of objectives for today’s students implies a concomitant set of competencies in educators. These competencies have not traditionally been a focus of professional development efforts in the United States, and little is known about how best to cultivate these competencies in educators. These competencies can be understood in terms of Byram’s (1997) model of intercultural communicative competence (ICC). The principles of ICC development point to online learning as a potentially powerful lever in cultivating teachers’ own competencies in this arena. A review of studies of intercultural learning, technologically-mediated intercultural learning and online teacher professional development is offered to suggest how these three domains might overlap. A synthesis of the findings across these literatures suggests a set of principles and educational design features to promote the building of teachers’ intercultural competencies. A key finding reveals the unique affordances of networked technologies in online learning opportunities to support the development of intercultural competencies in teachers across all subject areas.

Download the PDF version

==== 1. Introduction

In the United States, foreign language ability, global awareness, and intercultural communication skills are increasingly recognized as essential dimensions of productive participation in the emerging economic, civic, political and social arenas of the 21st century, and the call to promote these capacities in today’s students has been sounded across the spectrum of K16 and higher education, as well as cross-sector organizations concerned with competitiveness in the global economy (American Council on Education, 2007; Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2009). This newly articulated set of expectations for today’s students implies a set of parallel competencies in K16 educators, but little attention has been paid to articulating these competencies for teachers or imagining how to promote them. The most comprehensive understanding of teachers’ skills in this arena derives, not surprisingly, from the field of foreign language education, which has been promoting intercultural learning for over a century. Professional preparation documents, such as those prepared by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (2002), imagine teachers who are capable of engaging sophisticated and nuanced interactional, interpretive and analytical skills when interacting with members of foreign cultures, conducting cultural investigations, and encountering cultural artifacts or information, as well as capable of designing educational opportunities that promote similar competencies in students. Conceptual writings about culture in the language classroom affirm the knowledge, skills and dispositions explicated in these professional documents (Byram, Nichols & Stevens, 2001; Fox & Diaz-Greenberg, 2006; Kramsch, 2003). While intended as a description of language teachers, this portrait readily applies to teachers of any content area in this global, mobile and multilingual world.

As envisioned, then, teachers who are capable of promoting intercultural competencies possess knowledge of cultures that is deep, deliberate, and constantly evolving, and this knowledge is used in the service of complex communicative and reflective tasks. Teachers are critical, inquisitive and self-aware, and their dispositions reflect a flexible orientation toward the nature of knowledge and experience. They tolerate uncertainty because they are skilled in the process of broadening their perspectives through deliberate investigation of cultural texts and experiences. Byram’s (1997) model of «intercultural communicative competence» (ICC) sufficiently encapsulates the capacities expected of effective teachers in this domain by integrating the skills and knowledge required for sophisticated learning about cultures with the dispositions, metacognition and self-awareness required to employ those skills and knowledge in a meaningful way. This model of intercultural competency will be used in this article as a useful proxy for the skills that teachers need in order to develop students as self- and globally-aware, interculturally sensitive, multilingual participants in global societies.

1.1. The promise of online learning for developing ICC (intercultural communicative competence) in teachers

The few existent studies on culture and teachers reveal that they may lack the skills and sense of purpose to teach towards this outcome. Many teachers question the value of targeting culturally-related objectives, have little experience conducting rigorous cultural explorations (Sercu, 2005), or doubt their preparedness to teach in-depth cultural content (Sercu, Mendez & Castro, 2005). Professional development for teachers must adopt a more sophisticated approach that better addresses the skills in culture and pedagogy that teachers require. Online learning may offer teachers a unique way to meet their professional development needs in the area of ICC. For starters, it could offer a logistically and financially appealing alternative to intercultural travel programs by facilitating teachers’ interactions with teachers from other cultures and countries. Beyond overcoming logistical hurdles, online teacher professional development, is increasingly being recognized as a powerful context for teacher learning. Studies of innovations on online TPD (teacher professional development), suggest that online learning can offer teachers opportunities to participate in a professional community, engage in reflective dialog, and build knowledge collectively (Barnett & al., 2002; Wiske & al., 2006). These mechanisms for interaction and community-formation have been widely acknowledged to be effective levers in achieving meaningful, durable impacts of professional development (Hawley & Valli, 1999; Wilson & Berne, 1999). Furthermore, online learning would offer teachers the opportunity to practice and engage their intercultural communication skills within the very technologically-mediated environments that increasingly pervade every sector of our societal participation. It stands to reason that teachers would do well to learn in ways that replicate and reflect the communicative contexts that their students inhabit, indeed the very contexts in which students will apply their emergent intercultural competence.

2. Material and methods

The remainder of this article articulates an analytic framework to guide the development of opportunities for teachers to develop intercultural competence through the incorporation of online learning. It represents the intersection between a seldom-targeted set of skills (intercultural competence), a context (teacher professional development) and a medium (online), all for a specific audience (teachers-as-learners). Little empirical literature investigates this unique intersection; therefore, the following framework integrates key principles from a study of empirical literatures that addresses one dimension or a subset of the dimensions articulated above: intercultural learning, technologically-mediated intercultural learning and online teacher professional development.

3. Results3.1. Intercultural learning

A review of conceptual work on cultural learning models and study abroad research reveals a consensus about the fundamental principles underlying effective learning that leads to ICC (intercultural communicative competence). First, learners must have contact with the non-native culture under investigation; they must be exposed to authentic cultural products and intercultural interactions, and these interactions should take place in the second language (Lo Bianco, Liddicoat & Crozet, 1999). Learners must actively reflect on their experiences with the non-native culture in order to learn from them. Both experiential and conceptual learning are advocated (Lange, 2003); this combination engages affect and cognition, another essential component of intercultural learning (Byram, 1997). ICC development is recognized as a developmental process that requires time and multiple cycles of learning (Byram & al., 2001; Lange, 2003; Levy, 2007). Many scholars advocate explicit cultural comparisons (Byram, 1997; Lange, 2003). Opportunities for reflection, discussion with peers from both cultures, negotiation of cultural meanings and revisiting prior conceptions are considered fundamental (Lange, 2003; Levy, 2007; Lo Bianco & al., 1999).

The above-mentioned processes are rigorous, time-consuming, logistically difficult, and potentially contentious. Cultural information and artifacts are not always readily available in local learning contexts. Regular, sustained contact with members of non-native cultures can be difficult to find and orchestrate. Furthermore, productive discussions and reflections do not simply result automatically from the provision of opportunities for intercultural interaction (De Nooy & Hanna, 2003). They require deliberate cultivation. Finally, we don’t naturally see ourselves as cultural beings; because we are immersed in our own culture, we remain unconscious of it and can project our frame of reference onto others (Kramsch, 1993).

3.2. Technologically-mediated intercultural learning

The careful design of learning experiences that address the demands and challenges of ICC development would seem to benefit from the smart incorporation of networked technologies. The most obvious advantages are the bridging of geographic distances to connect learners from different backgrounds, as well as the access to examples of abundant sources of cultural content. The following summary includes a discussion of the educational design features that have been shown to promote ICC-related outcomes and the contributions of the Internet and networked communications to enhance those strategies. Consistent with trends in FL (foreign language) education research, the vast majority of these studies occurred in traditional undergraduate language classes (not teacher preparation or professional development) that practiced some form of telecollaboration, in which two classrooms collaborate for mutual linguistic and cultural learning. Findings are presented in terms of relevant categories of Byram’s model of ICC (intercultural communicative competence), with acknowledgement that the categories themselves are fluid, and learning gains often overlap distinct categories.

In addition to straightforward cultural information, knowledge about discourse, communication processes, and cultural variety has been cultivated through Internet-based learning. In just one example, Osuna (2000) found that the abundance of text, video, and audio resources on the Internet helped students to build deep understandings about cultural topics. Technology facilitated knowledge construction by providing abundant resources and examples of language, culture and discourse, a finding echoed in many studies (Furstenberg & al., 2001; O'Dowd, 2003, 2007; Ware & Kramsch, 2005).

Two main stories emerged from studies that showed gains in skills of interpreting and relating (Bauer & al., 2006; Furstenberg & al., 2001; O'Dowd, 2006; Osuna, 2000; Schneider & von der Emde, 2006). First, students who used the Internet to build cultural knowledge or who participated in tele-collaborations with C2 members from another culture benefitted from having access to multiple and contradictory views. Second, time for deliberation and reflection promoted learning from the various cultural viewpoints represented. Given the importance of cultural comparisons and reflection for intercultural learning, this finding hardly surprises. What bears mention is how the pace of asynchronous communications like email and online discussion boards supported the reflection process. For example, in O’Dowd’s (2006) study of a German-American partnership, students used email to compose thoughtful, in-depth descriptions of their own culture for their tele-collaborators, which stimulated reflection and sustained dialog throughout the semester. The author argues that such deliberation would be unlikely to occur in synchronous communication, where reactions are necessarily more immediate. Together these studies confirm the importance of creating opportunities for reflection and dialog on multiple cultural perspectives, while highlighting the advantage that asynchronous communications can lend to the reflective dialog process.

Intercultural tele-collaborations provided opportunities for students to practice and improve their skills of discovery and interaction. Students’ innate possession of these skills varied significantly; while some students may be naturally predisposed to enact and maintain an ethnographic stance during intercultural dialog, many are not (Bauer & al., 2006; Belz & Muller-Hartmann, 2003; Furstenberg & al., 2001; Hanna & de Nooy, 2003; O'Dowd, 2003, 2006). These skills become even more important in networked communication, where many interactions lack the nonverbal signals that promote understanding (Schneider & von der Emde, 2006). Belz and Muller-Hartmann (2003) found that even professors who are committed to goals of intercultural learning might display ethnocentrism under the stress of real-world tasks, such as tele-collaborating to coordinate an exchange for their students’ benefit. Promoting these skills is paramount to the ICC learning enterprise. In email exchanges, Bauer & al. (2006), O’Dowd (2003), and Schneider and von der Emde (2006) discovered associations between the written characteristics of an ethnographic stance (such as requests for personal perspectives or encouragement to write more) and gains in cultural awareness and perspective-shifting. Conversely, an absence of an ethnographic approach often led to miscommunication, tension, or disengagement (O'Dowd, 2003; Schneider & von der Emde, 2006; Ware & Kramsch, 2005).

Together, these studies suggest that learners might benefit from several design features: explicit instruction in how to communicate respectfully and ethnographically, opportunities to study both satisfying and dissatisfying communications, and periodic self-assessments to appraise one’s skills in conducting intercultural inquiry. The archival nature of technologically-mediated communication would facilitate these processes and afford students the access and time to reflect thoughtfully on communications, to compose appropriate messages, and to process emotional reactions to potentially contentious writings from others. However, the technologies that facilitate these interactions cannot be assumed to embody universal «cultures-of-use» (Thorne, 2003); technologies’ purposes and use can differ according to cultural context and, consequently, constrain communication. Shih and Cifuentes (2003) argue that the invisibility of the culture-of-use of the technology indicates a need for explicit instruction in these potential obstacles to communication, in other words, to treat the context for communication as an object of study.

In most of the tele-collaborations, increased cultural understanding generated students’ curiosity and openness to further exploration, which in turn promoted their continued engagement in a process of cultural discovery. Conversely, attitudes of favorability were undermined by interactions that somehow went wrong, which fortified negative stereotypes and/or built resistance to further intercultural learning (Bauer & al., 2006; O'Dowd, 2003; Shih & Cifuentes, 2003; Ware & Kramsch, 2005).

O’Dowd (2003) and Schneider and von der Emde (2006) discovered the importance of careful topic selection (Spanish bullfighting and school violence, respectively) in exciting students’ interests and passion, motivating them to explain carefully and rigorously their perspectives. Grappling in writing with those explanations increased their metacognitive and critical awareness of culture by showing them the difficulty of articulating tacit cultural beliefs. In a cautionary tale about the potential downside of emotional topics, Ware and Kramsch (2005) found that, in the absence of an ethnographic stance to ground discussions of the American military presence in Germany, some German-American email collaborations deteriorated due to students’ insufficient communicative skills for negotiating conflicting perspectives on the topic. However, these miscommunications or conflicts can foster development of metacognition and cultural awareness if the incidents are interrogated, especially via close analysis of textual interactions (Belz, 2003; Schneider & von der Emde, 2006). Schneider and von der Emde (2006) advocate including ICC models like Byram’s (1997) as explicit course content to help students consider their lived experiences in relation to formal knowledge on the topic.

In addition to archiving public miscommunications, asynchronous communication and its pace seem to offer support for metacognitive development about the process of communication. An additional benefit of archived online communication is that it allows conflict analysis to occur long after the emotions of the encounter have dissipated.

Additional design considerations are offered by studies of the Cultura Project, a highly structured, carefully sequenced approach to ICC development that has generated durable gains across multiple dimensions of ICC (Bauer & al., 2006; Furstenberg & al., 2001). First, it begins with rigorous exploration of the self before the students share this exploration with tele-collaborators and compare their findings with formal texts such as films or readings. The authors argue that, through this iterative cycle of revisiting and revising cultural understandings against an increasingly complex landscape, students gradually build their understanding and communication skills over time. Second, such a process relies on a highly competent instructor to guide students through the delicate processes of interpreting contradictory perspectives, synthesizing information, refraining from judgment, and developing rich points of inquiry. The teacher must model the intercultural inquiry process herself, in part by positioning herself as co-learner, co-investigator, and co-ethnographer.

3.3. Online teacher professional development

A fairly robust set of design guidelines for ICC development can be based simply on findings from the prior sections. This section offers useful refinements and degrees of emphasis within this emerging set of design considerations that focus on the unique needs of teachers-as-learners, given that teachers’ ultimate objective is to be able to promote intercultural competencies in students.

There is a great deal of overlap between the online intercultural learning studies and the online TPD studies (teacher professional development), not only about how networked technologies support such mechanisms as public dialog, reflection, and metacognition, but also regarding the challenges of promoting sufficient depth and engagement in those processes to advance understanding (Barnett & al., 2002; Celentin, 2007). To a degree, overlap in findings between these bodies of literature should be expected, since the basic principles of ICC development and teacher development themselves greatly overlap. In their articulation of principles for effective teacher professional development, for example, Lieberman and Wood (2001) describe essentials of teacher learning that strongly mirror those that have been discussed herein as conducive to ICC development. The following table, in comparing those essentials, illustrates the synergy between them, including details related to interaction between primary cultures (C1) and secondary cultures (C2).


Draft Content 316155286-26611-es004.jpg

Other guidelines or models for adult or teacher learning converge around these ideas. Eraut (1994) highlights how, for adults in the professions (including teaching), traditional academic learning results in few changes to practices and beliefs if there is no concomitant opportunity for real-world application of that learning. For developing professional competencies, practicing knowledge (doing) and acquiring knowledge (learning) are the same thing. Eraut’s idea of doing-as-learning recalls Byram’s (1997) suggestion that much of learning ICC is simply having the chance to practice it. Effective online TPD programs for educators have enacted this doing-as-learning equation by teaching (as explicit content) and modeling (in course design and delivery) the targeted pedagogical skills, giving teachers the chance to experience a technique and reflect on it from two vantage points, that of learner and teacher (Dooly, 2007; Muller-Hartmann, 2006).

Of particular note are two programs related to culture, the first being Dooly’s (2007: 70) study of international English teachers-in-training, who co-designed lesson plans in intercultural groupings. By undergoing the task of negotiating norms of participation in their lesson plan groups, they developed an understanding of how that process happens. As they gained insight into the role of the learner in intercultural telecollaboration, they gradually shifted their perspective about the role of the facilitator, becoming «more aware of their role in determining the process, thus lessening their expectations of the teacher as knowledge facilitator».

The second is a rare study of an online program to enhance teachers’ capacity to teach ICC (intercultural communicative competence). Muller and Hartmann (2006) studied a unique two-tiered telecollaboration, in which one group of German English-teachers-in-training (the top tier) involved in a telecollaboration observed and studied a second telecollaboration between other German English-teachers-in-training and American German language students (the bottom tier). The top level group studied both the intercultural learning demonstrated in the exchange of the bottom tier and the pedagogy modeled within, all while experiencing their own telecollaboration. Through a series of design features that have emerged in this analysis (e.g., multiple instances of reflection, public dialog about academic and real-world knowledge, collaborative tasks, analysis of transcripts for miscommunications), the top level learners built their capacity to teach ICC. Having experienced and studied various dimensions of ICC development, including its logistical, pedagogical and social challenges, the teachers reported feeling empowered and capable of teaching ICC in their own classrooms.

Finally, Garrison and Anderson’s (2003) comprehensive and compelling model for adult e-Learning aligns well with the dimensions of effective TPD (teacher professional development) that were identified by Lieberman and Wood (2001) at the beginning of this section. The difference between the two frameworks is that Garrison and Anderson’s is a framework for e-Learning rather than face-to-face learning. Garrison and Anderson (2003) propose a highly specific model to guide engagement in e-Learning among adults. Briefly, this model promotes cycles of what they term practical inquiry. The term ‘practical’ refers to the importance of grounding learning in real-world events and lived experiences, a widely accepted tenet of adult learning (Kolb & Fry, 1975). ‘Inquiry’ encapsulates the ongoing, cyclical nature of knowledge development, in which adults engage in both individual reflection and collective negotiation of ideas, supported by the affordances of asynchronous technologically-mediated communication.

4. Discussion

The above studies offer ways of attending to the unique challenges that emerge when teachers are the learners in an educational experience designed to develop their intercultural competence. These include: incorporating practical applications of learning, such as the design of lesson plans in dialog with others; grounding all learning activities in reflective communities; inviting reflection from the dual perspectives of teacher and learner; drawing learners’ careful attention to the pedagogies that are modeled in the delivery of the professional development; and ensuring the collaboration of mindful facilitators whose participation models and cultivates a critical, reflective community.

Collectively, the studies of ICC development and of online TPD (teacher professional development) suggest a real synergy between technology, teacher-learners, effective teacher professional development, and the processes of ICC development. Teacher growth and ICC development both require the shifting of perspectives, which requires reflections on multiple and often contradictory experiences. Networked technologies seem a logical choice of medium for the way they display, juxtapose, and archive the language through which we communicate and learn, and the perspectives – cultural or pedagogical – that we reveal through that language. By facilitating intercultural interactions, providing mechanisms to support cycles of reflection and meta-reflection over time, and forcing attention to communicative and learning processes, networked technologies could effectively promote teachers’ ICC and related pedagogical capacity.

While this analysis has demonstrated a potent match between the affordances of technologies and the processes of ICC development, it has shown the equal importance of careful educational design choices and facilitation to assure that technology promotes rather than undermines the goals of ICC. Many ICC studies offered examples of learners that developed their ICC skills by engaging in experiences that forced them to surface their own views, look clearly at them, reflect on them individually, consider alternative perspectives in dialog with others, and revise ideas. Layers of deliberate, structured reflection on cultural information, perspectives and experiences, from the vantage points of learners and teachers, allowed program participants to distance from and evolve their beliefs. By studying the way intercultural communication unfolded, students became better intercultural learners. By studying the way that intercultural learning was orchestrated, teachers became better intercultural teachers.

4.1. Hypothesized principles of effective TPD (teacher professional development)

The previous sections described how three bodies of literature yield understandings about how teacher professional development could best promote the knowledge, skills and dispositions that characterize effective teachers of intercultural competencies. They also articulated (a) the propitious overlaps between the processes of ICC development and teacher development, (b) the benefits that could emerge from conducting ICC-related professional development online, and (c) insights about how online learning could support the facilitation of ICC and teacher development processes simultaneously.

Integration and synthesis of these discoveries suggests a set of beginning principles that this author argues should be incorporated into professional development opportunities for teachers that target the improvement in their intercultural competence as well as their ability to cultivate similar competencies in their students. Indeed, the teachers might be from any subject area, and the professional development might take any number of forms. The key is to find opportunities to build all teachers’ intercultural competencies, and to look for opportunities to integrate some form of ICC development into existing or new professional development opportunities. Whatever the format, organizing those TPD (Teacher professional development) opportunities – be they single activities, entire courses, or something else -- around the following principles would both respond to teachers’ needs for development in this area and maximize the unique benefits that online learning has to offer teacher-learners for the purposes of ICC development:

- Multiple perspectives: Teacher-learners should have opportunities to interact with abundant and varied cultural perspectives, representations, and representatives from one’s own and target culture(s).

- Reflective cycles: Teacher-learners should have opportunities to engage in deliberately orchestrated, multiple cycles of reflection over time, on both experiences and formal concepts related to culture, as well as pedagogies for the teaching of ICC.

- Ethnography: Teacher-learners should have opportunities to see, experience, learn about, and develop an ethnographic stance toward intercultural inquiry, including the opportunity to reflect on ethnographic stances enacted during the TPD itself.

- Metacognition: Teacher-learners should have opportunities to see, experience, learn about, and develop metacognition about intercultural learning, including the opportunity to reflect on their learning processes during the TPD itself.

- Technology: ICC-related online TPD should reflect, in its design, organization, and implementation, an awareness of the cultural dimensions of technologies and of communication. Furthermore, communications and learning activities should capitalize on technologies’ ability to provide access to various resources, time for reflection, archived communications, and peer-to-peer discussion and feedback.

====

References====

American Council on Education (2007). Annual Report. Washington, DC: American Council on Education.

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (Ed.) (2002). Program Standards for the Preparation of Foreign Language Teachers. (www.actfl.org/files/public/ACTFLNCATEStandardsRevised713.pdf) (06-04-11).

Barnett, M.; Keating, T. & al. (2002). Using Emerging Technologies to Help Bridge the Gap between University Theory and Classroom Practice: Challenges and Successes. School Science & Mathematics, 102 (6); 299-313.

Bauer, B.; deBenedette, L. & al. (2006). The Cultura Project. In Belz, J.A. & Thorne, S.L. (Eds.). Internet-mediated Intercultural Foreign Language Education. Boston: Thomson Heinle; 31-62.

Belz, J.A. & Muller-Hartmann, A. (2003). Teachers as Intercultural Learners: Negotiating German-American Telecollaboration along the Institutional Fault Line. Modern Language Journal, 87(1); 71-89.

Belz, J.A. (2003). Linguistic Perspectives on the Development of Intercultural Competence in Telecollaboration. Language Learning & Technology, 7(2); 68-117.

Byram, M. (1997). Teaching and Assessing Intercultural Communicative Competence. Clevedon, Philadelphia: Multilingual Matters.

Byram, M.; Nichols, A. & Stevens, D. (Eds.). (2001). Developing Intercultural Communicative Competence in Practice. Clevedon, England: Multilingual Matters.

Celentin, P. (2007). Online education: Analysis of Interaction and Knowledge Building Patterns Among Foreign Language Teachers. Journal of Distance Education, 21(3); 39-58.

De Nooy, J. & Hanna, B.E. (2003). Cultural Information Gathering by Australian Students in France. Language and Intercultural Communication, 3; 64-80.

Dooly, M. (2007). Joining forces: Promoting Metalinguistic Awareness through Computer-supported Colla-borative Learning. Language Awareness, 16(1); 57-74.

Eraut, M. (1994). Developing Professional Knowledge and Competence. Bristol, PA: Falmer Press.

Fox, R.K. & Diaz-Greenberg, R. (2006). Culture, Multiculturalism and Foreign/World Language Standards in U.S. Teacher Preparation Programs: Toward a Discourse of Dissonance. European Journal of Teacher Educa-tion, 29 (3); 401-422.

Furstenberg, G.; Levet, S. & al. (2001). Giving a Virtual Voice to the Silent Language of Culture: The Culture Project. Language Learning & Technology, 5(1); 55-102.

Garrison, D.R. & Anderson, T. (2003). E-learning in the 21st Century: A Framework for Research and Practice. London: Routledge Falmer.

Hanna, B.E. & de Nooy, J. (2003). A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum: Electronic Discussion and Foreign Language Learning. Language Learning & Technology, 7(1); 71-85.

Hawley, W. & Valli, L. (1999). The Essentials for Effective Professional Development: A new Consensus. In Darling-Hammond, L. & Sykes, G. (Eds.). Teaching as the Learning Profession: Handbook of Policy and Practice. San Francisco: Jossey Bass; 127-150.

Kolb, D.A. & Fry, R. (1975). Toward an Applied Theory of Experiential Learning. In Cooper, C. (Ed.). Theories of Group Process. London: John Wiley; 33-57.

Kramsch, C. (1993). Context and Culture in Language Teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Kramsch, C. (2003). Teaching Language along the Cultural Faultline. In Lange, D.L. & Paige, R.M. (Eds.). Cul-ture as the Core: Perspectives on Culture in Second Language Learning. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Pub-lishing; 19-35.

Lange, D.L. (2003). Implications of Theory and Research in Second Language Classrooms, in Lange, D.L. & Paige, R.M. (Eds.). Culture as the Core: Perspectives on Culture in Second Language Learning. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing; 271-336.

Levy, M. (2007). Culture, Culture Learning and new Technologies: Towards a Pedagogical Framework. Lan-guage Learning & Technology, 11(2); 104-127.

Lieberman, A. & Wood, D. (2001). When Teachers Write: Of Networks and Learning. In Lieberman, A. & Miller, L. (Eds.). Teachers Caught in the Action: Professional Development that Matters. New York: Teachers College Press; 174-187.

Lo Bianco, J. Liddicoat, A.J. & Crozet, C. (Eds.). (1999). Striving for the Third Place: Intercultural Competence through Language Education. Melbourne: Language Australia.

Muller-Hartmann, A. (2006). Learning How to Teach Intercultural Communicative Competence via Telecolla-boration: A Model for Language Teacher Education. In Belz, J.A. & Thorne, S.L. (Eds.). Internet-Mediated Intercultural Foreign Language Education. Boston: Thomson Heinle; 63-84.

O'Dowd, R. (2003). Understanding the «Other Side»: Intercultural Learning in a Spanish-English E-mail Exchange. Language Learning & Technology, 7(2); 118-144.

O'Dowd, R. (2006). The Use of Videoconferencing and E-mail as Mediators of Intercultural Student Ethnogra-phy. In Belz, J.A. & Thorne, S.L. (Eds.). Internet-mediated Intercultural Foreign Language Education. Boston: Thomson Heinle; 86-120.

O'Dowd, R. (2007). Evaluating the Outcomes of Online Intercultural Exchange. ELT Journal: English Language Teachers Journal, 61(2); 144-152.

Osuna, M. (2000). Promoting Foreign Culture Acquisition via the Internet in a Sociocultural Context. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 22(3); 323-345.

Partnership for 21st Century Skills (2009). P21 Framework Definitions. Tucson, AZ: The Partnership for 21st Century Skills.

Schneider, J. & Von der Emde, S. (2006). Conflicts in Cyberspace: From Communication Breakdown to Inter-cultural Dialogue in Online Collaborations. In Belz, J.A. & Thorne, S.L. (Eds.). Internet-mediated Intercultural Foreign Language Education. Boston: Thomson Heinle; 178-206.

Sercu, L. (Ed.). (2005). Foreign Language Teachers and Intercultural Competence. Clevedon, England: Multi-lingual Matters.

Sercu, L.; Méndez, M. & Castro, P. (2005). Culture Learning from a Constructivist Perspective: An Investigation of Spanish Foreign Language Teachers' Views. Language and Education, 19(6); 483-495.

Shih, Y.C.D. & Cifuentes, L. (2003). Taiwanese Intercultural Phenomena and Issues in a United States-Taiwan Telecommunications Partnership. Educational Technology, Research & Development, 51(3); 82-90.

Thorne, S.L. (2003). Artifacts and Cultures-of-use in Intercultural Communication. Language Learning & Tech-nology, 7(2); 38-67.

Ware, P.D. & Kramsch, C. (2005). Toward an Intercultural Stance: Teaching German and English through tele-collaboration. Modern Language Journal, 89(2); 190-205.

Wilson, S. M. & Berne, J. (1999). Teacher Learning and the Acquisition of Professional Knowledge: An Exami-nation of Research on Contemporary Professional Development. Review of Research in Education, 24; 173-209.

Wiske, M.S.; Perkins, D. & Eddy Spicer, D. (2006). Piaget Goes Digital: Negotiating Accommodation of Practice to Principles. In Dede, C. (Ed.). Online Professional Development for Teachers: Emerging Models and Methods. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press; 49-68.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La competencia en lenguas extranjeras, la conciencia global y la comunicación intercultural están cada vez más reconocidas como aspectos esenciales de la participación productiva en el ámbito económico, cívico, político y social del siglo XXI. Como consecuencia, la promoción internacional de estas competencias adquiere una importancia única en el espectro de la educación infantil, básica y secundaria en Estados Unidos. El conjunto de nuevos objetivos para estudiantes de hoy implica el desarrollo de nuevas competencias entre docentes que no han sido contempladas hasta ahora en las iniciativas de desarrollo profesional llevadas a cabo en Estados Unidos, y poco se sabe sobre la adquisición de estas competencias entre educadores. Estas competencias pueden entenderse según el modelo de competencia comunicativa intercultural de Byram (1997), cuyos principios de desarrollo se basan en señalar el aprendizaje on-line como una herramienta eficaz para la adquisición de competencias entre docentes. En este artículo se presenta el análisis de varios estudios sobre el aprendizaje intercultural; aprendizaje intercultural y tecnología; y el desarrollo profesional on-line de profesores, con el fin de plantear la posibilidad de las tres dimensiones. En suma, se nos ofrece una serie de principios sobre el diseño educativo que promueven la construcción de estas competencias interculturales en los profesores, entre los que destaca la evidencia de que las tecnologías en red aplicadas al aprendizaje on-line poseen aspectos únicos para desarrollar las competencias interculturales en todas las áreas.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

==== 1. Introducción

En Estados Unidos, la competencia en lenguas extranjeras, la conciencia global y la comunicación intercultural adquieren cada vez más importancia como dimensiones esenciales de la participación productiva en el ámbito de la economía, la política o la sociedad del siglo XXI, y la necesidad de promocionar estas competencias se ha extendido en la educación básica y superior, y también en organizaciones trasversales relacionadas con la competitividad en la economía global (American Council on Education, 2007; Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2009). Estas nuevas expectativas implican una serie de competencias paralelas en los docentes, pero hasta la fecha no se han puesto en práctica formas de articular éstas o promoverlas. La noción más próxima procede del área educativa de lenguas extranjeras, que promueve el aprendizaje intercultural desde hace un siglo. Documentos de preparación profesional, como los del «American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages» (2002), describen a docentes dotados de competencias sofisticadas, interpretativas y analíticas para interactuar con miembros de otras culturas, dirigiendo investigaciones culturales y recopilando información. Docentes capaces de diseñar oportunidades educativas que promuevan competencias similares en los estudiantes. Los estudios sobre lengua y cultura en el aula reafirman el conocimiento, las destrezas y disposiciones detalladas en estos documentos (Byram, Nichols & Stevens, 2001; Fox & Diaz-Greenberg, 2006; Kramsch, 2003). Aunque estas descripciones fueron diseñadas para profesores de idiomas, esta descripción puede aplicarse directamente a profesores de cualquier ámbito en este mundo global, móvil y multilingüe.

Hemos observado que los docentes capacitados para la promoción de competencias interculturales poseen un amplio conocimiento cultural, reflexivo y en evolución constante, al servicio de tareas comunicativas complejas y reflexivas. Los docentes son críticos, inquisitivos y conscientes, y sus disposiciones reflejan una orientación flexible hacia la naturaleza del conocimiento y la experiencia. Toleran la incertidumbre porque están preparados para ampliar sus perspectivas a través de la investigación de textos y experiencias culturales. El modelo de competencia intercultural de Byram (1997) engloba las capacidades ideales en docentes integrando las competencias y el conocimiento requerido para el aprendizaje eficaz de cultura con las disposiciones, la metacognición y la conciencia requerida para emplearlas de forma significativa. Este modelo de competencia intercultural se emplea en este artículo como representación de las competencias que precisan los docentes para desarrollar la conciencia propia y global de los estudiantes, haciéndolos sensibles a la interculturalidad y participantes multilingües en sociedades globales.

1.1. Posibilidades del aprendizaje on-line en el desarrollo de la competencia intercultural entre docentes

La escasez de estudios sobre docentes y cuestiones culturales es una muestra inequívoca de la falta de competencias y objetivos al respecto. Algunos docentes plantean la utilidad de estos objetivos entroncados con aspectos culturales, o que tienen poca experiencia en la dirección de exploraciones rigurosas y culturales (Sercu, 2005) o dudan de su preparación para enseñar en profundidad contenidos culturales (Sercu, Mendez & Castro, 2005). El desarrollo profesional docente debe adoptar un enfoque más sofisticado que se adapte mejor a las competencias que requieren los docentes en cuestiones culturales y pedagógicas, y el aprendizaje on-line ofrece una vía única para satisfacer estas necesidades. Para los que empiezan, podría ofrecer una alternativa atractiva en términos logísticos y financieros a los desplazamientos, facilitando la interacción del profesor con otros profesionales de otros países y culturas. Sobrepasando estas barreras logísticas, el desarrollo profesional docente en línea puede convertirse en un contexto eficaz para el aprendizaje docente. Los estudios sobre innovación en el campo del desarrollo profesional docente presentan el aprendizaje on-line como una vía para la participación en la comunidad profesional, la participación en el diálogo y la reflexión y la construcción colectiva del conocimiento (Barnett & al., 2002; Wiske & al., 2006). Estos mecanismos para la interacción y la formación colaborativa han resultado efectivos en la consecución de impactos significativos y duraderos en el desarrollo profesional (Hawley & Valli, 1999; Wilson & Berne, 1999). Además, el aprendizaje on-line ofrece la oportunidad de practicar e implicarse dentro de medios tecnológicos, cada vez más presentes en todos los sectores de participación social. Todo esto parece indicar que sería apropiado que los docentes adquirieran formas de reflejar los contextos comunicativos que rodean a sus estudiantes, pues al fin y al cabo es en esos contextos donde aplicarán su competencia intercultural emergente.

2. Materiales y métodos

En este artículo se presenta un marco analítico para guiar el desarrollo de oportunidades docentes en materia de competencia intercultural a través de la incorporación del aprendizaje on-line. Se pretende representar la intersección entre este conjunto de competencias inexploradas (competencia intercultural), un contexto (desarrollo profesional docente) y un medio (la Red); todo ello dirigido a un público específico (profesores en su papel de aprendices). Existen muy pocos estudios que investiguen esta intersección única y, por ello, el siguiente marco integra principios clave extraídos de un estudio de literatura empírica que incluye una dimensión o subconjunto de dimensiones expresadas con anterioridad: aprendizaje intercultural, aprendizaje intercultural basado en la tecnología y desarrollo profesional docente en línea.

3. Resultados3.1. Aprendizaje intercultural

Si revisamos el trabajo conceptual sobre los modelos de aprendizaje cultural y las investigaciones llevadas a cabo en otros países, llegamos a la conclusión de que existe un consenso en los principios fundamentales del aprendizaje efectivo que conducen a la competencia comunicativa intercultural (de ahora en adelante, CCI). En primer lugar, los aprendices han de tomar contacto con la cultura meta, exponiéndose a productos culturales auténticos y a interacciones interculturales en la segunda lengua (Lo Bianco, Liddicoat & Crozet, 1999). Es necesario reflexionar sobre la experiencia para poder aprender de ella, y postular el aprendizaje conceptual y el experimental (Lange, 2003). De esta combinación se extrae la cognición, componente esencial del aprendizaje intercultural (Byram, 1997). El desarrollo de la CCI se reconoce como un proceso que requiere tiempo y varios ciclos de aprendizaje (Byram & al., 2001; Lange, 2003; Levy, 2007). Algunos expertos apuestan por comparaciones culturales explícitas (Byram, 1997; Lange, 2003). Se consideran fundamentales las oportunidades de reflexión, el debate entre representantes de ambas culturas, la negociación de significados culturales y la revisión de conceptos tradicionales (Lange, 2003; Levy, 2007; Lo Bianco & al., 1999).

Los procesos mencionados son rigurosos, requieren tiempo, implican dificultades logísticas y son potencialmente polémicos. La información cultural no se encuentra siempre disponible en contextos locales de aprendizaje. El contacto regular y sostenido con miembros de otras culturas puede resultar difícil de establecer y manejar. Además, los debates y reflexiones productivas no surgen de forma automática (De Nooy & Hanna, 2003) y requieren una dedicación específica. Por otra parte, cabe señalar que, al estar inmersos en nuestra propia cultura, no acostumbramos a identificarnos a nosotros mismos como seres culturales, y podemos trasladar de forma inconsciente nuestros marcos de referencia a otros (Kramsch, 1993).

3.2. Aprendizaje intercultural y tecnologías

El diseño de experiencias de aprendizaje en respuesta a las necesidades de la CCI (competencia comunicativa intercultural) puede verse beneficiado por la incorporación de las tecnologías en red, y las ventajas más evidentes son quizás la eliminación de barreras geográficas y el acceso a fuentes de distinto contenido cultural. El siguiente resumen trata sobre el debate en torno a una propuesta de diseño educativo para la promoción de la competencia comunicativa intercultural (CCI), incluyendo la contribución de Internet y las comunicaciones en red para el diseño de estrategias. En consonancia con las tendencias de la investigación en educación en lenguas extranjeras (FL), la mayoría de estos estudios se llevan a cabo en clases de idiomas que se imparten según el modelo tradicional (sin preparación docente ni desarrollo profesional), practicando formas de tele-colaboración entre clases para el aprendizaje lingüístico y cultural. Los resultados se presentan agrupados por categorías según el modelo de CCI de Byram, partiendo de la idea de que estas categorías son flexibles, y que los objetivos de aprendizaje a menudo coinciden en varias de las categorías.

Además de la información cultural, en el aprendizaje on-line se han cultivado el análisis del discurso, los procesos de comunicación y la variedad cultural. En un caso, Osuna (2000) detectó que la abundancia de texto, vídeo y recursos de audio en Internet ayudaban a los estudiantes a adquirir un amplio conocimiento cultural. La construcción de este conocimiento gracias a los recursos y ejemplos de lengua que se aportan es un hecho constatado en numerosos estudios (Furstenberg & al., 2001; O'Dowd, 2003, 2007; Ware & Kramsch, 2005).

Hay dos casos incluidos en estudios que muestran claramente los beneficios de las destrezas interpretativa y de relación (Bauer & al., 2006; Furstenberg & al., 2001; O'Dowd, 2006; Osuna, 2000; Schneider & Von der Emde, 2006). En primer lugar, los estudiantes que utilizaron Internet para construir conocimiento cultural y participaron en colaboraciones a distancia con miembros de otra cultura (C2), tuvieron acceso a opiniones múltiples y contradictorias. En segundo lugar, el tiempo de reflexión motivó el aprendizaje desde los diversos puntos de vista representados. Teniendo en cuenta la importancia de las comparaciones culturales y la reflexión sobre el aprendizaje intercultural, este hallazgo no fue muy destacable. Lo que sí merece mención es cómo, a pesar del ritmo irregular de la comunicación on-line, se mantuvo el proceso de reflexión. Por ejemplo, en el estudio presentado por O’Dowd (2006), los estudiantes usaban el correo electrónico para componer descripciones detalladas de su propia cultura para sus tele-colaboradores, estimulando así la reflexión y el diálogo sostenido a lo largo del semestre. El autor afirma que esta reflexión no sería posible en casos de comunicación sincrónica, pues las respuestas son más inmediatas. Estos estudios confirman la importancia de crear oportunidades para la reflexión y el diálogo en múltiples perspectivas culturales, al tiempo que destacan la ventaja de la comunicación asíncrona en el proceso del diálogo reflexivo.

Las tele-colaboraciones interculturales proporcionaron oportunidades para practicar y mejorar las destrezas de los estudiantes en términos de descubrimiento e interacción. La posesión innata de estas destrezas varió de forma significativa: algunos estudiantes estaban naturalmente predispuestos a mantener una postura etnográfica durante el diálogo, otros no (Bauer & al., 2006; Belz & Muller-Hartmann, 2003; Furstenberg & al., 2001; Hanna & de Nooy, 2003; O'Dowd, 2003, 2006). Estas destrezas adquirieron una mayor relevancia en la comunicación en red, donde algunas interacciones no contaban con signos no verbales que facilitan el entendimiento (Schneider & Von der Emde, 2006). Belz y Muller-Hartmann (2003) constataron que incluso los docentes más comprometidos con los objetivos del aprendizaje intercultural muestran a veces rasgos de etnocentrismo en situaciones de estrés o en contextos del mundo real, por ejemplo, en la tele-colaboración para coordinar intercambios para sus estudiantes. Promover estas destrezas es esencial para el aprendizaje de la competencia comunicativa intercultural (CCI). En el intercambio de correos electrónicos, Bauer & al. (2006), O’Dowd (2003), y Schneider y Von der Emde (2006) descubrieron asociaciones entre las características de una postura etnográfica (solicitar perspectivas personales, incitar a escribir más) y los beneficios en la conciencia cultural y el cambio de perspectiva. Por el contrario, la ausencia de un enfoque etnográfico condujo a menudo a la falta de comunicación, a la tensión o la falta de participación (O'Dowd, 2003; Schneider & Von der Emde, 2006; Ware & Kramsch, 2005).

En conjunto, estos estudios sugieren que los aprendices pueden beneficiarse de factores como la instrucción explícita para hacer un uso respetuoso y etnográfico de la comunicación, de oportunidades para estudiar comunicaciones satisfactorias y no satisfactorias y de autoevaluaciones periódicas de las propias destrezas, llevando a cabo de este modo el análisis cultural. La naturaleza archivística de la comunicación a través de la tecnología facilitaría estos procesos y proporcionaría a los estudiantes el acceso y el tiempo necesario para reflexionar sobre la comunicación, enseñándoles a componer mensajes apropiados y a procesar reacciones emocionales a las producciones de otros. Sin embargo, estas tecnologías no pueden abarcar «culturas de uso» universales (Thorne, 2003); la finalidad y el uso de estas tecnologías puede diferir en función del contexto cultural y, como consecuencia, limitar la comunicación. Shih y Cifuentes (2003) argumentan que la invisibilidad de la cultura de uso de la tecnología implica la necesidad de instrucción explícita en estos obstáculos potenciales para la comunicación, o en otras palabras, para tratar el contexto de la comunicación como objeto de estudio.

En la mayoría de los casos de tele-colaboración el creciente entendimiento cultural despertó la curiosidad y la apertura de los estudiantes, promoviendo la participación constante en un proceso de descubrimiento cultural. Por el contrario, las actitudes más favorables se vieron socavadas por interacciones que por algún motivo no funcionaron, reforzando en estos casos los estereotipos negativos y creando resistencia hacia un desarrollo posterior del aprendizaje intercultural (Bauer & al., 2006; O'Dowd, 2003; Shih & Cifuentes, 2003; Ware & Kramsch, 2005).

O’Dowd (2003) y Schneider y Von der Emde (2006) descubrieron la importancia de la selección cuidadosa de temas (los toros en España y la violencia escolar, respectivamente) a la hora de despertar el interés entre los estudiantes motivándoles a explicar con rigor y atención sus propias perspectivas. Poniendo por escrito estas explicaciones, aumentó su conciencia metacognitiva y crítica de la cultura, haciéndoles conscientes de la dificultad de articular creencias culturales tácitas. Ware y Kramsch (2005) constatan y advierten del potencial de temas con cierta carga emocional. En ausencia de una postura etnográfica para contextualizar el debate sobre la presencia militar americana en Alemania, algunas colaboraciones por correo electrónico entre americanos e ingleses se deterioraron por falta de destrezas comunicativas. Esta carencia afectó a la negociación de perspectivas conflictivas, pero puede servir de ejemplo para fomentar el desarrollo de la metacognición y la conciencia cultural si se estudian atentamente las interacciones textuales (Belz, 2003; Schneider & Von der Emde, 2006). Schneider y Von der Emde (2006) defienden la inclusión de los modelos de competencia comunicativa intercultural (CCI) como los de Byram (1997) como contenido explícito para ayudar a los estudiantes a reflexionar sobre sus experiencias en relación con el conocimiento formal del tema.

Además de archivar los errores de comunicación públicos, la comunicación asíncrona y su ritmo de funcionamiento parecen apoyar el desarrollo metacognitivo del proceso de comunicación. Un beneficio adicional de esta comunicación es que permite el análisis de conflictos después de que las emociones se hayan disipado.

En algunos estudios sobre «Cultura Project» se analizan consideraciones adicionales sobre el diseño de estrategias. «Cultura Project» es un enfoque bien estructurado y secuenciado al desarrollo de la CCI (competencia comunicativa intercultural) que ha logrado progresos duraderos en múltiples dimensiones de la CCI (Bauer & al., 2006; Furstenberg & al., 2001). En primer lugar, se presenta una exploración rigurosa del individuo que posteriormente los estudiantes comparten con sus tele-colaboradores, contrastando sus resultados con textos formales, como películas o textos escritos. Los autores afirman que, a través de esta revisión del entendimiento cultural en complejo contexto que los rodea, los estudiantes configuran al mismo tiempo sus destrezas comunicativas y su conocimiento cultural. Estos procesos se apoyan en la figura de un instructor competente, que guía a los estudiantes a través de los procesos de interpretación de esas perspectivas contradictorias que surgen, sintetizando información, absteniéndose de juicios y desarrollando nuevas líneas y cuestiones para el análisis. El docente debe modelar su proceso de análisis intercultural posicionándose como co-aprendiz, co-investigador y co-etnógrafo.

3.3. Desarrollo profesional docente on-line (DPD online)

A partir de los hallazgos constatados en los apartados anteriores, podría establecerse un conjunto de pautas para el desarrollo de la competencia comunicativa intercultural (CCI). En este apartado se presentan algunas apreciaciones útiles para el conjunto de propuestas de diseño, centradas en las necesidades de los docentes como aprendices, teniendo en cuenta que el objetivo último de los docentes es estar capacitados para promover las competencias interculturales en los estudiantes.

Hay un alto grado de coincidencia entre los estudios sobre aprendizaje intercultural on-line y los estudios sobre el desarrollo profesional docente; no sólo coinciden en afirmar la utilidad de las tecnologías en red como mecanismos para el diálogo público, la reflexión y la metacognición, sino también en lo que respecta a los retos que plantea la implicación en estos procesos de entendimiento a niveles avanzados (Barnett & al., 2002; Celentin, 2007). En cierto modo, esta conexión es predecible teniendo en cuenta que los principios básicos de desarrollo de la CCI se solapan entre sí. En la articulación de estos principios, Lieberman y Wood (2001) describen cuestiones esenciales del aprendizaje docente, similares a las que se han discutido en este artículo. La siguiente tabla ilustra la sinergia entre ellas.


Draft Content 316155286-26611 ov-es004.jpg

Existen otras pautas o modelos para el aprendizaje docente adulto que convergen con estas ideas. Eraut (1994) destaca cómo el aprendizaje tradicional en el desarrollo profesional de adultos aporta pocos cambios en la práctica si no se conceden oportunidades de aplicación en el mundo real. Para el desarrollo de competencias profesionales, la práctica y la adquisición de conocimiento son la misma cosa. La idea de simultaneidad de ambos conceptos presentada por Eraut evoca el planteamiento de Byram (1997): la mayor parte del aprendizaje de la competencia comunicativa intercultural consiste en tener oportunidades de ponerlo en práctica. Los programas de desarrollo profesional docente han asumido esta ecuación enseñando (como contenido explícito) y modelando (diseño y producción) las destrezas pedagógicas deseadas, proporcionando la oportunidad de experimentar la técnica y reflexionar desde dos perspectivas: la del aprendiz y la del docente (Dooly, 2007; Muller-Hartmann, 2006).

Hay dos programas relacionados con la cultura que merecen ser mencionados. El primero es el estudio de Dooly (2007: 70) sobre formación de profesores internacionales de inglés. En este programa se codiseñaron programaciones en grupos interculturales. Al tiempo que negociaban las normas de participación, desarrollaron un análisis paralelo sobre el proceso. A medida que aumentaba el conocimiento sobre el papel del aprendiz en la tele-colaboración intercultural, cambiaron su perspectiva sobre el papel del moderador, siendo «más conscientes de su papel en la determinación del proceso, reduciendo las expectativas sobre el docente como moderador del conocimiento».

En el segundo estudio se analiza un programa on-line diseñado para mejorar la capacidad docente para enseñar la competencia comunicativa intercultural. Muller y Hartmann (2006) analizaron una tele-colaboración a dos niveles en la que un grupo de profesores alemanes en proceso de formación para convertirse en profesores de inglés, participaron en una tele-colaboración observada y estudiada por un segundo grupo de tele-colaboración formado también por profesores alemanes de inglés y estudiantes americanos y alemanes. El primer grupo analizó el aprendizaje intercultural surgido del intercambio del segundo grupo y la pedagogía que se modeló en el mismo, al tiempo que experimentaban su propia tele-colaboración. A través de una serie de aspectos surgidos de este análisis (varios ejemplos de reflexión, diálogo público sobre conocimiento académico y extra académico, tareas colaborativas, análisis de transcripciones para analizar errores de comunicación), los aprendices del primer grupo configuraron su capacidad para enseñar la competencia comunicativa intercultural (CCI). Después de haber experimentado y analizado varias dimensiones del desarrollo de la CCI, incluyendo las dificultades logísticas, pedagógicas y sociales, los docentes afirmaron sentirse capacitados para enseñar la CCI en el aula.

Finalmente, encontramos el modelo de Garrison y Anderson’s (2003), que encaja con las dimensiones de desarrollo profesional docente identificadas por Lieberman y Wood (2001) y recogidas al principio de este apartado. La diferencia entre los dos modelos reside en que el de Garrison y Anderson está orientado al e-learning en lugar del aprendizaje presencial. Garrison y Anderson’s (2003) proponen un modelo muy específico para guiar la participación de los adultos en el e-learning. De forma breve, este modelo promueve ciclos de lo que denominan investigación práctica. El término «práctico» se refiere a la importancia de contextualizar el aprendizaje en acontecimientos y experiencias del mundo real, un principio ampliamente aceptado en la formación de adultos (Kolb & Fry, 1975). El término ‘investigación’ engloba la naturaleza cíclica del desarrollo del conocimiento. Los adultos participan en la reflexión individual y colectiva de ideas, apoyadas por las posibilidades de la comunicación asíncrona y la tecnología.

4. Debate

Los estudios descritos en los apartados anteriores ofrecen a los docentes formas de afrontar los retos que se plantean en la experiencia educativa del desarrollo de su competencia intercultural. Entre estos retos, están la incorporación de aplicaciones prácticas de aprendizaje, como el diseño de programaciones en diálogo con otros, la contextualización de las actividades de aprendizaje en comunidades de reflexión, invitar a la reflexión sobre la dualidad de perspectivas de profesor y alumno, centrando la atención de los alumnos en las pedagogías modeladas sobre la implantación del desarrollo profesional y asegurar la colaboración de moderadores, cuyos modelos de participación contribuyan a crear comunidades críticas y reflexivas.

De forma colectiva, los estudios sobre el desarrollo de la CCI y del desarrollo profesional docente on-line plantean una sinergia entre tecnología, profesor-alumno, desarrollo profesional efectivo y los procesos de desarrollo de la CCI. La expansión docente y el desarrollo de CCI requieren un cambio de perspectiva y un análisis de múltiples experiencias, a menudo contradictorias. Las tecnologías en red se presentan como una elección adecuada para mediar la presentación yuxtaposición y el almacenamiento del lenguaje a través del cual nos comunicamos y aprendemos, y las perspectivas culturales o pedagógicas, que revelamos a través del lenguaje. Estas tecnologías podrían promover de forma efectiva la CCI entre docentes y las capacidades pedagógicas asociadas si facilitamos las interacciones interculturales, proporcionando mecanismos para apoyar los ciclos de reflexión y meta reflexión durante el proceso, dirigiendo la atención hacia los procesos comunicativos y de aprendizaje.

Este análisis ha puesto de relieve que existe una relación entre las posibilidades de la tecnología y los procesos de desarrollo de la CCI, valorando la importancia de un detallado diseño educativo y la facilitación para asegurar que la tecnología conduce efectivamente al logro de los objetivos de la CCI.

4.1. Hipótesis sobre desarrollo profesional docente

En los apartados anteriores se ha descrito cómo tres corrientes de la literatura arrojan ideas sobre el desarrollo profesional docente y la promoción del conocimiento, las destrezas y disposiciones que caracterizan al modelo competente de docente en materia de competencia intercultural. También se han descrito: a) Las coincidencias favorables entre los procesos de desarrollo de la CCI y el desarrollo docente; b) Los beneficios que podrían obtenerse a partir del desarrollo profesional docente en relación con la CCI; c) Ideas sobre cómo puede en aprendizaje on-line facilitar la adquisición de la CCI y los procesos de desarrollo docente simultáneamente.

La integración y el análisis de estas conclusiones plantean un conjunto inicial de principios que podrían incorporarse a las oportunidades de desarrollo profesional dirigidas a la mejora de su competencia intercultural y a la habilidad para cultivar competencias similares en sus estudiantes. Cabe señalar que los docentes pueden pertenecer a cualquier área, y que el desarrollo profesional puede adquirir múltiples formas. La clave está en localizar oportunidades para construir estas competencias interculturales, buscando la forma de integrar alguna forma de CCI en las oportunidades de desarrollo profesional existentes o en las nuevas que se proyecten. Independientemente del formato, la organización de estas oportunidades de desarrollo profesional, de acuerdo a estos principios, respondería a las necesidades detectadas y maximizaría los beneficios que el aprendizaje on-line puede aportar a profesores y alumnos:

- Perspectivas: Profesores y alumnos deben tener la oportunidad de interactuar con perspectivas culturales variadas y abundantes, representaciones y representantes de la cultura propia y la cultura meta.

- Ciclos de reflexión: Profesores y alumnos deben tener la oportunidad de participar en ciclos de reflexión coordinados y organizados durante el proceso, experimentando ambas perspectivas y los conceptos formales relacionados con la cultura, así como las pedagogías para la enseñanza de la CCI.

- Etnografía: Profesores y alumnos deben tener la oportunidad de observar, experimentar, aprender y desarrollar posturas etnográficas hacia el análisis intercultural, reflexionando sobre las posturas durante el proceso mismo de desarrollo profesional.

- Metacognición: Profesores y alumnos deben tener la oportunidad de observar, experimentar, aprender y desarrollar la metacognición sobre el aprendizaje intercultural, incluyendo la reflexión sobre los procesos de aprendizaje durante el proceso de desarrollo profesional.

- Tecnología: el desarrollo profesional docente relacionado con la CCI debe reflejar en su diseño, organización e implantación una conciencia que englobe las distintas dimensiones de las tecnologías y la comunicación. Además, las actividades comunicativas y de aprendizaje deben capitalizar la habilidad tecnológica para promover el acceso a varios recursos, tiempo para la reflexión, el almacenamiento de comunicación, así como debates y comentarios sobre los procesos.

====

Referencias====

American Council on Education (2007). Annual Report. Washington, DC: American Council on Education.

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (Ed.) (2002). Program Standards for the Preparation of Foreign Language Teachers. (www.actfl.org/files/public/ACTFLNCATEStandardsRevised713.pdf) (06-04-11).

Barnett, M.; Keating, T. & al. (2002). Using Emerging Technologies to Help Bridge the Gap between University Theory and Classroom Practice: Challenges and Successes. School Science & Mathematics, 102 (6); 299-313.

Bauer, B.; deBenedette, L. & al. (2006). The Cultura Project. In Belz, J.A. & Thorne, S.L. (Eds.). Internet-mediated Intercultural Foreign Language Education. Boston: Thomson Heinle; 31-62.

Belz, J.A. & Muller-Hartmann, A. (2003). Teachers as Intercultural Learners: Negotiating German-American Telecollaboration along the Institutional Fault Line. Modern Language Journal, 87(1); 71-89.

Belz, J.A. (2003). Linguistic Perspectives on the Development of Intercultural Competence in Telecollaboration. Language Learning & Technology, 7(2); 68-117.

Byram, M. (1997). Teaching and Assessing Intercultural Communicative Competence. Clevedon, Philadelphia: Multilingual Matters.

Byram, M.; Nichols, A. & Stevens, D. (Eds.). (2001). Developing Intercultural Communicative Competence in Practice. Clevedon, England: Multilingual Matters.

Celentin, P. (2007). Online education: Analysis of Interaction and Knowledge Building Patterns Among Foreign Language Teachers. Journal of Distance Education, 21(3); 39-58.

De Nooy, J. & Hanna, B.E. (2003). Cultural Information Gathering by Australian Students in France. Language and Intercultural Communication, 3; 64-80.

Dooly, M. (2007). Joining forces: Promoting Metalinguistic Awareness through Computer-supported Colla-borative Learning. Language Awareness, 16(1); 57-74.

Eraut, M. (1994). Developing Professional Knowledge and Competence. Bristol, PA: Falmer Press.

Fox, R.K. & Diaz-Greenberg, R. (2006). Culture, Multiculturalism and Foreign/World Language Standards in U.S. Teacher Preparation Programs: Toward a Discourse of Dissonance. European Journal of Teacher Educa-tion, 29 (3); 401-422.

Furstenberg, G.; Levet, S. & al. (2001). Giving a Virtual Voice to the Silent Language of Culture: The Culture Project. Language Learning & Technology, 5(1); 55-102.

Garrison, D.R. & Anderson, T. (2003). E-learning in the 21st Century: A Framework for Research and Practice. London: Routledge Falmer.

Hanna, B.E. & de Nooy, J. (2003). A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum: Electronic Discussion and Foreign Language Learning. Language Learning & Technology, 7(1); 71-85.

Hawley, W. & Valli, L. (1999). The Essentials for Effective Professional Development: A new Consensus. In Darling-Hammond, L. & Sykes, G. (Eds.). Teaching as the Learning Profession: Handbook of Policy and Practice. San Francisco: Jossey Bass; 127-150.

Kolb, D.A. & Fry, R. (1975). Toward an Applied Theory of Experiential Learning. In Cooper, C. (Ed.). Theories of Group Process. London: John Wiley; 33-57.

Kramsch, C. (1993). Context and Culture in Language Teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Kramsch, C. (2003). Teaching Language along the Cultural Faultline. In Lange, D.L. & Paige, R.M. (Eds.). Cul-ture as the Core: Perspectives on Culture in Second Language Learning. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Pub-lishing; 19-35.

Lange, D.L. (2003). Implications of Theory and Research in Second Language Classrooms, in Lange, D.L. & Paige, R.M. (Eds.). Culture as the Core: Perspectives on Culture in Second Language Learning. Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing; 271-336.

Levy, M. (2007). Culture, Culture Learning and new Technologies: Towards a Pedagogical Framework. Lan-guage Learning & Technology, 11(2); 104-127.

Lieberman, A. & Wood, D. (2001). When Teachers Write: Of Networks and Learning. In Lieberman, A. & Miller, L. (Eds.). Teachers Caught in the Action: Professional Development that Matters. New York: Teachers College Press; 174-187.

Lo Bianco, J. Liddicoat, A.J. & Crozet, C. (Eds.). (1999). Striving for the Third Place: Intercultural Competence through Language Education. Melbourne: Language Australia.

Muller-Hartmann, A. (2006). Learning How to Teach Intercultural Communicative Competence via Telecolla-boration: A Model for Language Teacher Education. In Belz, J.A. & Thorne, S.L. (Eds.). Internet-Mediated Intercultural Foreign Language Education. Boston: Thomson Heinle; 63-84.

O'Dowd, R. (2003). Understanding the «Other Side»: Intercultural Learning in a Spanish-English E-mail Exchange. Language Learning & Technology, 7(2); 118-144.

O'Dowd, R. (2006). The Use of Videoconferencing and E-mail as Mediators of Intercultural Student Ethnogra-phy. In Belz, J.A. & Thorne, S.L. (Eds.). Internet-mediated Intercultural Foreign Language Education. Boston: Thomson Heinle; 86-120.

O'Dowd, R. (2007). Evaluating the Outcomes of Online Intercultural Exchange. ELT Journal: English Language Teachers Journal, 61(2); 144-152.

Osuna, M. (2000). Promoting Foreign Culture Acquisition via the Internet in a Sociocultural Context. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 22(3); 323-345.

Partnership for 21st Century Skills (2009). P21 Framework Definitions. Tucson, AZ: The Partnership for 21st Century Skills.

Schneider, J. & Von der Emde, S. (2006). Conflicts in Cyberspace: From Communication Breakdown to Inter-cultural Dialogue in Online Collaborations. In Belz, J.A. & Thorne, S.L. (Eds.). Internet-mediated Intercultural Foreign Language Education. Boston: Thomson Heinle; 178-206.

Sercu, L. (Ed.). (2005). Foreign Language Teachers and Intercultural Competence. Clevedon, England: Multi-lingual Matters.

Sercu, L.; Méndez, M. & Castro, P. (2005). Culture Learning from a Constructivist Perspective: An Investigation of Spanish Foreign Language Teachers' Views. Language and Education, 19(6); 483-495.

Shih, Y.C.D. & Cifuentes, L. (2003). Taiwanese Intercultural Phenomena and Issues in a United States-Taiwan Telecommunications Partnership. Educational Technology, Research & Development, 51(3); 82-90.

Thorne, S.L. (2003). Artifacts and Cultures-of-use in Intercultural Communication. Language Learning & Tech-nology, 7(2); 38-67.

Ware, P.D. & Kramsch, C. (2005). Toward an Intercultural Stance: Teaching German and English through tele-collaboration. Modern Language Journal, 89(2); 190-205.

Wilson, S. M. & Berne, J. (1999). Teacher Learning and the Acquisition of Professional Knowledge: An Exami-nation of Research on Contemporary Professional Development. Review of Research in Education, 24; 173-209.

Wiske, M.S.; Perkins, D. & Eddy Spicer, D. (2006). Piaget Goes Digital: Negotiating Accommodation of Practice to Principles. In Dede, C. (Ed.). Online Professional Development for Teachers: Emerging Models and Methods. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press; 49-68.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 29/02/12
Accepted on 29/02/12
Submitted on 29/02/12

Volume 20, Issue 1, 2012
DOI: 10.3916/C38-2012-02-04
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 12
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?