Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The Internet is increasingly prominent in all walks of life, and Web connection is a key factor in social integration. The rise in life expectancy and quality of life mean that our active seniors now represent a growing sector in society. This study analyses what senior citizens use the Internet for and why, as well as the main benefits of its usage and the perceived obstacles of those who are non-users. The results derive from a questionnaire completed by senior citizens enrolled on university courses for older people, and they show that university seniors frequently connect to the Internet –daily or 2 or 3 times per week–, and use it mainly to look up facts, contact family and friends, for course work and to read the press. They consider the Internet easy to use but they could survive without it. For those who do not have access to the Internet, lack of knowledge about how to use it is the main barrier; yet they do not consider themselves incapable of learning how to use the Internet if they wished to do so. The data gathered from the survey challenge negative stereotypes of older people, and encourage us to modify our view of active seniors as disconnected from and incapable of using the Web and instead see their progress and motivation to learn as something highly positive.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The influence of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) is increasingly evident worldwide as they permeate all aspects of our lives, from interpersonal communication to education, politics, health and the economy. The arrival and consolidation of ICT in our daily lives is undoubtedly one of the most distinctive features of these times (Cabero & Aguaded, 2003), as evidenced by the interest in and recognition of ICT by international organizations ranging from the European Parliament and Council of Europe, UNESCO and the UN (Aguaded, 2009; 2010a; 2010b).

The most important of these ICT is the Internet, whose influence on society has been immense. Internet has caused a true social revolution with its widespread use. It has transformed the exchange of knowledge and information, enabling access to any resource anytime anywhere. Internet allows us to use multiple technologies to perform any number of tasks. We can talk and communicate, read, listen to music, watch films and television programmes; in short, it allows us to carry out a wide range of functions and activities. Internet also lets us adapt media that are often consumed passively, such as television, and manage them in a more active way. The user can now interact with such media and this interaction is limitless. But Internet is not just about information transmission; it has become a potent socialization tool, a disseminator of ideas and values (Fainholc, 2006; Xavier & Cabecinhas, 2000). And just as with television, cinema and videogames in their time (Núñez & Loscertales, 2008; Loscertales & Núñez, 2008; Carnagey, Anderson & Bushman, 2007), Internet arouses curiosity and concern regarding the values that can be propagated via the Web and the impact it has on society. It potentially offers benefits and drawbacks in equal measure, and the scientific community is not immune to such debate. To take just one example of scientific interest in the Internet, the prestigious Annual Review of Public Health journal has dedicated several issues to the effect of the Internet on health issues (Bargh & McKenna, 2004; Skitka & Sargis, 2006; Bennett & Glasgow, 2009; Strecher, 2007).

With the arrival of Internet, the main interest and concern of parents, professionals and society is the impact of the media in general and of the Internet in particular on children and young people (Villani, 2001). The influence of the Internet on the young has been analysed with some urgency as they are deemed to be the most vulnerable members of society. Numerous studies have tried to pinpoint the positive and negative effects of the Internet, and determine how young people use the Web (Livingstone & Helsper, 2010; Yang & Tung, 2007).

Although such attention is warranted as young people represent the future, this should not be at the expense of research into senior citizens and their attitude towards the Internet since they now represent an increasingly relevant sector of society. The number of senior citizens worldwide is on the rise, and in Spain they are already a considerable force in today’s society, and will be even more so in the future (IMSERSO, 2009).

The Internet can provide senior citizens with innumerable potential benefits, helping to promote creativity, writing, sociability, memory, to communicate more and learn things they were unable to study before, etc (Pavón, 2000). However, senior citizens tend to be stereotyped negatively as being less capable of performing activities in general (Cuddy, Norton & Fiske, 2005), an attitude that extends particularly to technology (Cutler, 2005).

Old age is frequently cited in relation to the digital divide, which is defined as the inequalities in Internet access and the extent to which it is used, knowledge of the Web and its technical properties, social support and the ability to evaluate the quality of information and the diversity of its uses (DiMaggio & al., 2001).

We believe we should not subscribe to a negative association between senior citizens and Internet use. This negative viewpoint tends to cling to old people when they are perceived as disabled, inactive or suffering from some form of cognitive deterioration (Sheets, 2005; Manna, Belchiorb, Tomitac & Kempd, 2005; Slegers, Van Boxtel & Jolles, 2009). Not all senior citizens are disabled or inactive. The rise in life expectancy and quality of life mean that more and more elderly people stay active for longer and continue to offer a lot to and receive from society. As Gatto & Tak (2008) point out, technological progress makes it essential to find out how senior citizens use these technologies, and the barriers and benefits they perceive in these technologies to be able to adapt them to their own needs. However, as we have already indicated, scientific research into senior citizens and new technology is insignificant when measured against output for young people (Selwyn, Gorard, Furlong & Madden, 2003) and has tended to concentrate on seniors who are inactive (Hernández-Encuentra, Pousada & Gómez-Zuñiga, 2009).

This is a study of active senior citizens enrolled on university courses for older people at the University of Sevilla as part of its Aula de la Experiencia (Classroom of Experience) programme.

The aim is to analyse what active senior citizens use the Internet for, what motivates them to use the Internet and the main benefits of its usage, as well as the obstacles encountered by those who do not use the Web.

2. Method

2.1. Procedure and participants

The study analysed 165 senior citizens enrolled at the University of Sevilla on the Aula de la Experiencia programme which was developed by the university with the backing of the Ministry of Equality and Social Welfare. This is a scientific-cultural and social programme aimed at people over 50, and is a good example of older people who want to keep active, having enrolled on a series of courses that promote scientific and cultural knowledge, and interpersonal relations among fellow students who are sufficiently motivated to sign up to the programme.

We enlisted the help of the university lecturers to distribute and gather in a questionnaire that the course participants completed, anonymously and voluntarily, regarding their use of new technologies.

Of the 165 participants in our study, 33.3 % were men and 66.7% were women. The average age was 62 with a standard deviation of 5.46. The majority of participants, 56.7%, were either married or lived with a partner, 22.6% were widowed and the rest were separated, 11%, or single, 9.7%.

2.2. Materials

An ad-hoc questionnaire that was voluntary and anonymous was used to obtain information on Internet use. We adapted the questionnaire in line with the recommendations of certain authors who had previously gathered data from older people, by using a larger font size (14 point) and greater spacing to make the document clearer to read (Boechler, Foth, & Watchorn, 2007). The questionnaire was designed to collect data on the following:

a) Socio-demographic information: the questionnaire asked the participant to state age, gender, civil status and educational qualifications.

b) Familiarity with the Internet. Certain indicators were used to collect information on participants’ familiarity with the Internet, such as whether they used the Internet or not, the time spent per day on the computer and the Internet, if they had an Internet connection at home, what device they used to connect to the Internet and how frequently they used it, how they learnt to use the Internet, a self-assessment of their knowledge of the Internet, how they rate the Internet as a source of information (main source, secondary but important, secondary but unimportant, Internet not used as a source of information), whether Internet usage reduces the time spent on other activities, if they use it to search for information on health issues, to look up and communicate with friends, or if they had ever been so absorbed on the Internet that they had lost all sense of time.

c) The benefits of and motivation for using the Internet. To know how senior citizens perceive the benefits of the Internet and their reasons for using it, we asked them to grade 11 variables on a 5-point scale ranging in opinion from total agreement to total disagreement. Examples of these indicators include: I find the Internet easy to use; Internet helps me to keep up-to-date; I have made new friends on the Internet; I like the anonymity of the Web; I cannot imagine my life without the Internet.

d) To know what senior citizens use the Internet for, we asked them to grade 25 indicators on a 4-point scale of responses: daily, weekly, monthly, never. Examples of these indicators include: e-mail, chat rooms, information search, music and film downloads, online banking, reading newspapers, discussion boards, phone calls.

e) The obstacles faced by those who do not use the Internet. To know the obstacles faced by non-Internet users, we asked the non-users to rate 16 indicators on a 5-point scale ranging in opinion from total agreement to total disagreement. These indicators include: I am not interested in the Internet or it does not motivate me; I am too young or too old to use the Internet; I don’t know how to use the Internet; I don’t have access to Internet at home.

3. Results

Descriptive analyses and the Chi square test were used to analyse the results.

3.1. Familiarity with the Internet

Of those surveyed for familiarity with the Internet, 64.4% defined themselves as users while 35.6% said they were non-users. The users stated they had started using a computer before venturing onto the Internet. They had been using a computer for an average of 12.01 years and the Internet for 7.88 years, and 100% of users had an Internet connection at home. Connection to the Internet in 98% of cases was via a computer, with link-up by mobile phone, television, personal digital assistant (PDA) and video game consoles negligible. Chi square test analysis showed that users connected to the Internet every day or two or three times a week (? = 96.580; p<.001), based on four possible responses (every day, two or three times a week, once a month, never). When asked about how they had learnt to use the Internet (self-taught, family, courses, friends, others) the results showed that the family followed by self-taught as the most common factors (? = 54.701; p<.001). Most participants’ self-assessment of their computer knowledge (beginner, average user, advanced, expert) was either beginner or average user (? = 72.601; p<.001). The Internet was classified as a secondary but important source of information (? = 102.789; p<.001) by those polled, from four possible options: main source, secondary but important, secondary but not important, I don’t use Internet as a source of information. In terms of information search, 68.2% used the Internet to read up on health issues. When questioned about personal contact, 54.6% said they used the Internet to keep in touch with family members, followed by friends or colleagues (31.8%), while 13.6% stated that they did not use the Web to communicate with people. The seniors were asked whether Internet usage reduced time spent on other activities (friends, sleeping, work, studying, television, sports, family, radio, reading the press, other activities), of which television followed by sleeping were cited as losing out to Web use (? = 112.326; p<.001). The participants were also asked about the sensation of losing all sense of time when on the Internet (hardly ever, sometimes, quite often, almost always); 61.1% said they had hardly ever experienced losing all sense of time when on the Internet and 35.6% said they had sometimes lost all sense of time.

3.2. Benefits of or motivations for using Internet

Those surveyed declared that, in terms of the main benefits of the Internet and their motivations for using it, they found the Internet to be a useful tool that helped keep them up-to-date and that it was easy to use. However, they insisted that they could live without it. They also stated that they did not use the Internet to meet new people or to find people with similar interests or concerns; neither did they believe it was easier to express themselves via the Internet rather than speaking face-to-face. They were not comfortable with the anonymity of the Web, and had issues with Internet privacy (? = 513.416; p<.001).

3.3. What do they use the Internet for?

The results show that the participants use the Internet principally to search for information, then to check e-mails, for course work, to read the press and to navigate for no particular reason and, to a lesser extent, to share photos and for online banking (? = 974.406; p<.001). The users send an average of 15.83 e-mails a week and receive 27.71.

3.4. Internet’s non-users

The results were statistically significant for those participants in the survey who stated that they did not use the Internet, in terms of the obstacles they face as non-users (? = 569.373; p<.001). They stated that their non-use of the Internet was not due to old age, or to the lack of time or because they were in bad health. Nor did they attribute their non-use to being unaware of what the Internet could be used for, or to the difficulty in finding a place to use the Internet. They said they had no home access to Internet and did not know how to use it, although they considered themselves capable of learning how to use the Internet if they put their minds to it.

4. Discussion

The aim of this study was to analyse the use made by active senior citizens of the Internet and to know what they considered to be the main benefits of and their motivations for using the Web, as well as the obstacles faced by non-users. For this study, we recruited senior citizens who had enrolled on university courses specifically for older people, and we now present the main conclusions from the results obtained from the data.

We note that the Internet users already had previous knowledge of computers, which was a significant factor in leading them to use the Web especially as virtually all the survey participants used their computers to connect to the Internet at home, with no other devices cited. As Hernández, Pousada and Gómez (2009) have shown, older people prefer to use a device for the specific reason it was purchased; for example, a phone to make and receive calls, a television to watch programmes and Internet connection only via the computer. However, we believe this attitude could change once the user becomes familiar with various devices and the new functions they were designed to be used for. All participants had Internet connection at home and generally used it once a day or several times a week. They first learnt to use the Internet through family members or taught themselves. The family seems to have played a key role in encouraging these new users and in helping them to adapt to Internet use. The results clearly show that they do not use the Web to start new social relationships but to connect with family and friends. The Internet is viewed as a tool that helps them keep in touch. Scientific literature has frequently cited Internet use as contributing to social isolation (Nie, 2001). Our results show that Internet use among older people does not lead to social isolation rather it allows these users to communicate with family and friends. This is supported by their response to whether Internet use deprived them of time spent on other activities; the participants stated that their use of the Internet did not mean a reduction in time spent with family or friends, only less time spent watching television or sleeping.

It is noteworthy that the Internet was not used to join discussion boards to exchange opinions with other likeminded citizens. This is an area that could be promoted further since virtual communities can be of support to and have a positive effect on those who take part (Katz, Rice & Aspden, 2001; Ellison, Steinfield & Lampe, 2007).

Another interesting fact was that the Internet was considered an important but secondary source of news and learning. The participants stated that the Web enabled them to keep up-to-date and that they used the Internet to search for information, for course work, to read the press and also to navigate for no particular reason. We think that this motivation to use the Web as a learning and information tool is highly positive since the Internet allows the user to access a vast and wide range of information. However, we believe there is a greater need than ever for media literacy instruction to enable this type of user to filter information more critically on the Web. This is particularly relevant in light of the fact that a large majority of those polled stated that they use the Internet to search for information on health (Tse, Choi & Leung, 2008) although the quality of information often varies (Morahan, 2004). Hence, the need for instruction in media literacy, especially in matters of health, to enable the user to evaluate the credibility of the information found and to help the user to search more diligently.

Older people use the Internet primarily to look for information and, to a lesser extent, to read and send e-mails, for course work, to read the press and navigate for no particular reason, to share photos and for online banking. We believe that they use that latter type of functions less because of worries over anonymity and privacy on the Internet, especially with regard to online financial transactions, a common concern cited by the majority of those surveyed (Suh & Han, 2003). We think this concern will diminish as online security increases and the users become more familiar with the Web. As regards privacy, this is a distinctive feature of the Internet, but also highly controversial in generating both positive and negative effects (Christopherson, 2007). As previously mentioned in terms of improving the user’s ability to screen information on the Web, instruction in media literacy can enable the user to distinguish between contexts and to weigh up the advantages and drawbacks of anonymity and privacy, and to use the Internet with a greater sense of security for transactions and interactions on the Web. Our study also deals with elderly non-users of the Internet whose numbers are still significant. However, it is important to point out that they do not attribute their non-user status to age or ill health but to not knowing how to use the Internet and having no connection. They consider that they would be able to learn how to use the Internet if they decided to do so. It seems that they only need a gentle push to get started. This is very important because, as we state in the introduction, older people are negatively stereotyped in terms of their ability to use technology (Cutler, 2005).

The fact that older people are optimistic about their ability to learn and that they do not consider age to be a barrier should help to break down the stereotype that links old age to incapability. We agree with Rodríguez (2008) in that old age is a stage in life that nobody prepares us for, and for which it is necessary to find and affirm different behaviours to the traditional stereotypes of senior citizens when using technology. We believe that the data in our study reveal that active senior citizens do not see themselves as conforming to this negative stereotype.

Future research could focus on comparing various age groups with similar inactivity and disability levels to determine if the negligible Internet use seen among inactive older people is also found in data on younger people in a similar situation.

In sum, we wish to highlight the vital importance of the Internet as a tool that generates social inclusion; Internet outsides are unable to take advantage of its myriad possibilities which leads to social exclusion and marginalization. Senior citizens are an important sector in today’s and tomorrow’s society, so their participation in the information society is crucial. The positive effects of their access to and usage of the Internet are many, both for them as individuals and for society at large. This study shows what senior citizens use the Internet for and why, and the main obstacles that hinder non-users. We find that senior citizens are optimistic and motivated, in that many already use the Internet, while non-users feel they are capable of learning how to use it if they chose to. As members of society, we have a shared responsibility to help those who already use the Internet to make the most out of it, and instruct them on functions and areas which they can explore to expand their knowledge. We are also bound to give those non-users that initial push to get them started.

References

Aguaded, J.I. (2009). El Parlamento Europeo apuesta por la alfabetización mediática. Comunicar, 32; 7-8.

Aguaded, J.I. (2010a). La Unión Europea dictamina una nueva Recomendación sobre alfabetización mediática en el entorno digital en Europa. Comunicar, 34; 7-8.

Aguaded, J.I. (2010b). La formación en grados y posgrados para la alfabetización mediática. Comunicar, 35; 7-8.

Bargh, J.A. & McKenna, K.Y. (2004). The Internet and Social Life. Annual Review of Psychology, 55; 573-590.

Bennett, G.G. & Glasgow, R.E. (2009). The Delivery of Public Health Interventions Via the Internet: Actualizing their Potential. Annual Review of Public Health, 30; 273-292.

Boechler, P.M., Foth, D. & Watchorn, R. (2007). Educational Technology Research with Older Adults: Ad-justments in Protocol. Materials, and Procedures. Educational Gerontology, 33; 221-235.

Cabero, J. & Aguaded, J.I. (2003). Presentación: tecnologías en la era de la globalización. Comunicar, 21; 12-14.

Carnagey, N.L; Anderson, C.A. & Bushman, B.J. (2007). The Effect of Video Game Violence on Physiological Desensitization to Real-life Violence. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 43; 489-496.

Christopherson, K.M. (2007). The Positive and Negative Implications of Anonymity in Internet Social Interac-tions: ‘On the Internet, Nobody Knows You’re a Dog’. Computers in Human Behavior, 23; 3.038-3.056.

Cuddy, A.J.; Norton, M.I. & Fiske, S.T. (2005). This Old Stereotype: The Pervasiveness and Persistence of the Elderly Stereotype. Journal of Social Issues, 61; 267-285.

Cutler, S.F. (2005). Ageism and Technology. Generations, 29; 67-72.

DiMaggio, P.; Hargittai, E.; Neuman, W.R. & Robinson, J.P. (2001). Social Implications of the Internet. Annual Review of Sociology, 27; 307-336.

Ellison, N.B.; Steinfield, C. & Lampe, C. (2007). The Benefits of Facebook ‘Friends’: Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12; 1143-1168.

Fainholc, B. (2006). La lectura crítica en Internet: evaluación y aplicación de sus recursos. Comunicar, 26; 155-162.

Gatto, S.L. & Tak, S.H. (2008). Computer, Internet and E-mail Use among Older Adults: Benefits and Barriers. Educational Gerontology, 34; 800-811.

Hernández, E; Pousada, M. & Gomez, B. (2009). ICT and Older People: beyond Usability. Educational Ge-rontology, 35; 226-245.

IMSERSO (2009). Las personas mayores en España. Informe 2008. Madrid: Ministerio de Sanidad y Política Social: Instituto de Mayores y Servicios Sociales

Katz, J.E.; Rice, R.E. & Aspden, P. (2001). The Internet, 1995-2000: Access, Civic Involvement and Social In-teraction. The American Behavioral Scientist, 45; 405-419.

Livingstone, S. & Helsper, E. (2010). Balancing Opportunities and risks in Teenagers’ Use of the Internet: the Role of Online Skills and Internet Self-efficacy. New Media & Society, 12; 309-329.

Loscertales, F. & Núñez, T. (2008). Ver cine en TV: una ventana a la socialización familiar. Comunicar, 31; 137-143.

Manna, W.C.; Belchiorb, P.; Tomitac, M.R. & Kempd, B.J. (2005). Computer Use by Middle-aged and Older Adults with Disabilities. Technology and Disability, 17; 1-9.

Morahan, J.M. (2004). How Internet Users Find, Evaluate and Use Online Health Information: A Cross-Cultural Review. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 7; 497-510.

Nie, N.H. (2001). Sociability, Interpersonal Relations and the Internet: Reconciling Conflicting Findings. American Behavioral Scientist, 45; 420-435.

Núñez, T. & Loscertales (2008). El cine de animación visto en casa: dibujos animados y TV. Comunicar, 31; 757-763.

Pavón, F. (2000). Tecnologías avanzadas: nuevos retos de comunicación para los mayores. Comunicar, 15; 133-139.

Rodríguez-Vázquez, F.M. (2008). TV y mayores: ¿educar o deseducar? Comunicar, 31; 287-291.

Selwyn, N.; Gorard, S.; Furlong, J. & Madden, L. (2003). Older Adults’ Use of Information and Communica-tions Technology in Everyday Life. Ageing and Society, 23; 561-582.

Sheets, D.J. (2005). Aging with Disabilities: Ageism and More. Generations, 29; 37-41.

Skitka, L.J. & Sargis, E.G. (2006). The Internet as psychological laboratory. Annual Review of Psychology, 57; 529-55.

Slegers, K.; Van Boxtel, M.P. & Jolles, J. (2009). The Efficiency of Using Everyday Technological Devices by Older Adults: the Role of Cognitive Functions. Ageing and Society, 29; 309-325.

Strecher, V. (2007). Internet Methods for Delivering Behavioral and Health-related Interventions (eHealth). Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 3; 53-76.

Suh, B. & Han, I. (2003). The Impact of Customer Trust and Perception of Security Control on the Acceptance of Electronic Commerce. International Journal of Electronic Commerce, 7; 135-161.

Tse, M.M.; Choi, K.Y. & Leung, R.S. (2008). E-Health for Older People: the Use of Technology in Health Promotion. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 11; 475-479.

Villani, S. (2001). Impact of Media on Children and Adolescents: A 10-year Review of the Research. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 40; 392-401.

Xavier, P. & Cabecinhas, R. (2000). Learning about Social Psychology by Researching on Computer Mediated Communication. IAMCR 2000 Conference. Singapore Proceedings. (https://repositorium.sdum.uminho.pt/-handle/1822/1006) (02/10/2010).

Yang, S.C. & Tung, C. (2007). Comparison of Internet Addicts and Non-addicts in Taiwanese High School. Computers in Human Behavior, 23; 79-96.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Hoy día la relevancia de Internet es cada vez mayor en todos los ámbitos. Participar en la misma es fundamental para estar integrados socialmente. El aumento de la esperanza y la calidad de vida conllevan que los mayores activos supongan un volumen significativo de la población. En este trabajo se analiza el uso que personas mayores activas realizan de Internet, así como los principales beneficios o motivaciones de su utilización, y las barreras que encuentran aquéllos que no la utilizan. Se administró un cuestionario a personas inscritas en programas universitarios de mayores. Los resultados muestran que estos mayores universitarios se conectan a Internet frecuentemente, a diario o entre dos o tres veces por semana. Se destaca la relevancia de Internet para estar actualizados, contactar con la familia y los amigos, el uso académico, y consultar la prensa. La consideran fácil de utilizar aunque afirman que podrían vivir sin ella. Por otro lado, para los que no acceden a Internet no saber utilizarla es una de las principales barreras, si bien las personas que no la utilizan consideran que serían capaces de aprender. En su conjunto los datos animan a romper estereotipos negativos sobre los mayores y a no considerar a los mayores activos como personas incapaces o desconectadas de la Red sino a valorar positivamente los avances que realizan y la motivación por aprender.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La importancia de las tecnologías de la información y de la comunicación (TIC) es cada vez mayor a nivel mundial y tiene repercusiones en todos los aspectos de la vida, desde la comunicación interpersonal, a la educación, pasando por la política, salud y, la economía. La irrupción de las TIC en la vida cotidiana es, sin duda, una de las notas más distintivas de nuestra época (Cabero & Aguaded, 2003). Buena prueba de la relevancia de las mismas es el interés y reconocimiento que han suscitado en diversos organismos internacionales tales como el Parlamento Europeo, la UNESCO, el Consejo de Europa, y la ONU (Aguaded, 2009; 2010a; 2010b).

Entre las diversas TIC, Internet adquiere un papel muy destacado y de gran influencia en la sociedad. Internet ha supuesto una verdadera revolución social y se ha popularizado su uso. Internet ha modificado el intercambio de información y conocimientos sobre la base de que se puede acceder a cualquier recurso en cualquier momento y desde cualquier lugar. Mediante Internet podemos realizar gran parte de las actividades que nos facilitaban otras tecnologías. De este modo, podemos hablar y comunicarnos, leer, escuchar música, ver televisión y películas, en definitiva, permite desarrollar un amplio abanico de actividades y funciones. Internet ofrece además la posibilidad de combinar cierta pasividad característica de otros medios como la televisión, con la implicación y el desarrollo de un papel más activo e interactivo por parte del usuario, interactividad cuyo límite solo lo pone él mismo. Internet no se limita a la mera transmisión de información, sino que se convierte además en un potente elemento socializador, transmisor de ideas, y valores (Fainholc, 2006; Xavier & Cabecinhas, 2000). Es lógico, por tanto, que al igual que ocurrió con otros medios como la TV, el cine, o los videojuegos (Núñez & Loscertales, 2008; Loscertales & Núñez, 2008; Carnagey, Anderson & Bushman, 2007) Internet suscite inquietud e interés acerca de los valores que se transmiten mediante la misma y el impacto que tiene en la sociedad. Potencialmente, puede ofrecer tantas virtudes y beneficios como posibles efectos perjudiciales por lo que la comunidad científica no ha permanecido ajena a la misma. Una muestra, del interés científico que ha adquirido Internet la encontramos en el hecho de que una de las revistas más prestigiosas en diversas disciplinas como es el Annual Review ha dedicado varias publicaciones recientes a esta temática (Bargh & McKenna, 2004; Skitka & Sargis, 2006; Bennett & Glasgow, 2009; Strecher, 2007).

Debido a la relevancia adquirida por la Red el interés y la preocupación fundamental de padres, madres, profesionales y la sociedad acerca de la influencia de los medios, en general, y de Internet en particular, ha sido acerca de su impacto sobre niños y adolescentes (Villani, 2001). Analizar la influencia de Internet en los más jóvenes ha resultado prioritario por ser estos el sector considerado, de antemano, como más vulnerable. De este modo, se ha intentado conocer tanto los efectos positivos o negativos que Internet pueda tener, como los usos que se realizan de la misma (Livingstone & Helsper, 2010; Yang & Tung, 2007).

Si bien la atención prestada por la investigación a los más jóvenes resulta fundamental, por representar éstos el futuro de la sociedad, no se debe descuidar el interés por las personas más mayores que representan un importante sector de la población actual. De hecho, la tasa de personas mayores se incrementa en todo el mundo, y en el caso particular de España su evolución representa un importante porcentaje no solo de la población actual sino también de la futura (IMSERSO, 2009).

En relación a las personas mayores son numerosos los beneficios potenciales que Internet puede aportar, tales como fomentar la creatividad, la escritura, la sociabilidad, la memoria, mejorar la comunicación, aprender cosas que no han podido aprender, etc. (Pavón, 2000). Sin embargo, existe la tendencia a tener un estereotipo negativo de las personas mayores, considerándolas como menos capacitadas para el desarrollo de cualquier actividad (Cuddy, Norton & Fiske, 2005). Este estereotipo se mantiene con gran fuerza en el ámbito de la tecnología (Cutler, 2005).

En efecto, la edad es un factor frecuentemente vinculado con la existencia de la brecha digital, entendiendo por brecha digital las desigualdades existentes en relación al acceso a Internet, al grado de su utilización, al conocimiento de la misma y de sus aspectos técnicos, al apoyo social, a la habilidad para valorar la calidad de la información y a la diversidad de usos (DiMaggio & al., 2001).

Consideramos que no debemos dejarnos llevar por una asociación negativa entre las personas mayores y la utilización de Internet. En cierta medida los aspectos negativos tienden a surgir con mayor facilidad si consideramos al mayor desde la perspectiva de la discapacidad, la inactividad o del deterioro cognitivo (Sheets, 2005; Manna, Belchiorb, Tomitac & Kempd, 2005; Slegers, Van Boxtel & Jolles, 2009). Sin embargo, no todas las personas mayores son personas ni discapacitadas ni inactivas. El incremento tanto en la esperanza como en la calidad de vida, favorece que cada vez haya más personas mayores que permanecen activas con mucho que seguir aportando a la sociedad y continuar recibiendo de ella. Como señalan Gatto y Tak (2008) el avance de la tecnología hace necesario conocer los usos que le dan los mayores, así como las barreras que perciben y sus beneficios para poder adaptarse y adecuar las intervenciones a esta población. No obstante, como señalábamos anteriormente, si bien los más jóvenes han recibido gran atención por parte de la investigación científica, el interés en las personas mayores ha sido más escaso (Selwyn, Gorard, Furlong & Madden, 2003) y frecuentemente ha tendido a centrarse en personas inactivas (Hernández-Encuentra, Pousada & Gómez-Zuñiga, 2009).

En este estudio nos centramos en personas mayores activas inscritas en los programas universitarios de mayores del Aula de la Experiencia de la Universidad de Sevilla.

El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar el uso que los mayores activos realizan de Internet, así como conocer los principales beneficios o motivaciones de su utilización, y las barreras que encuentran aquellos que no la utilizan.

2. Método

2.1. Procedimiento y participantes

Los participantes en el estudio fueron 165 personas mayores inscritas en el Aula de la Experiencia de la Universidad de Sevilla. El Aula de la Experiencia de la Universidad de Sevilla, es un programa desarrollado por la Universidad de Sevilla con el apoyo de la Consejería de Igualdad y Bienestar Social. Se trata de un programa de carácter científico-cultural y social destinado a las personas mayores de 50 años. Este programa se configura como un buen ejemplo de personas mayores que permanecen activas, ya que se inscriben voluntariamente en un organismo que promueve el conocimiento científico y cultural así como las relaciones interpersonales entre personas que acuden motivadas y libremente al aula.

Se solicitó la colaboración del profesorado de los centros universitarios de mayores, para administrar un cuestionario de forma anónima y voluntaria acerca del uso de las nuevas tecnologías.

De los 165 participantes en el estudio el 33,3 % son hombres y el 66,7% mujeres. La edad media es de 62 años con una desviación típica de 5,64. La mayor parte de los participantes se encuentran casados o viviendo con su pareja 56,7%, un 22,6% viudos, y el resto separados (11%) o solteros (9,7%).

2.2. Materiales

Para recabar la información acerca del uso de Internet se administró un cuestionario elaborado ad-hoc, anónimo, y voluntario. Siguiendo las indicaciones de algunos autores a la hora de recoger información de personas mayores adaptamos el mismo a las características de la esta población utilizando un tipo de letra más grande (14 puntos) y espaciando los ítems para aportar más claridad (Boechler, Foth & Watchorn, 2007). El cuestionario recaba información de los siguientes aspectos:

a) Información sociodemográfica. Se solicitan datos sociodemográficos tales como la edad, el género, el estado civil, o el nivel educativo.

b) Información acerca de su familiaridad con Internet. Se presentan indicadores para recabar información acerca de su familiaridad con Internet. Algunos ejemplos del tipo de información solicitada son los siguientes: si utilizan o no Internet, tiempo que hace que utilizan Internet y el ordenador, si tienen conexión en casa, frecuencia, y forma de conexión a la red, cómo han aprendido a utilizar Internet, valoración acerca de su conocimiento de informática, en qué medida consideran Internet como fuente de información (principal, secundaria pero importante, secundaria pero no importante, no uso Internet como fuente de información), si Internet le has reducido el tiempo dedicado a otras actividades, si la utilizan para buscar información acerca de temas relacionados con la salud, personas con las que contactan a través de Internet, si han perdido la noción del tiempo estando delante de Internet.

c) Beneficios o motivaciones para utilizar Internet. Para conocer los beneficios o motivaciones para utilizar Internet se les pide que valoren su grado de acuerdo con 11 indicadores mediante una escala de 5 puntos que oscila desde totalmente de acuerdo a totalmente en desacuerdo. Algunos ejemplos de indicadores son los siguientes: «Internet me resulta útil, Internet me ayuda a estar actualizado»; «He conocido a nuevas personas gracias a Internet»; «Me gusta el anonimato de la red»; «No puedo imaginar la vida sin Internet».

d) Usos que realizan de Internet. Para conocer los usos que realizan de Internet se les pide que valoren el grado de utilización de 25 indicadores mediante la siguiente escala de 4 puntos: a diario, semanalmente, mensualmente, nunca. Algunos ejemplos de estos indicadores son los siguientes: correo electrónico, chatear, búsqueda de información, descargas de música y películas, banca on-line, leer prensa, participar en foros, hacer llamadas.

e) Barreras que encuentran las personas que no utilizan Internet. Para conocer las barreras que encuentran los que no utilizan Internet se les pide a aquellas personas que indican que no la utilizan que valoraren su grado de acuerdo con 16 indicadores mediante una escala de 5 puntos que oscila desde totalmente de acuerdo a totalmente en desacuerdo. Como ejemplo de estos indicadores podemos señalar: Internet no me interesa o no me motiva, soy muy joven o muy mayor para utilizar Internet, estoy enfermo y no puedo utilizar Internet, no sé usar Internet, no tengo acceso a Internet en casa.

3. Resultados

Para el análisis de resultados se realizaron análisis descriptivos y la prueba de Chi cuadrado.

3.1. Familiaridad con Internet

En relación a los datos referentes a la familiaridad con Internet el 64,4% de los participantes afirma que utiliza Internet frente a un 35,6% que declara no hacerlo. Aquellos que la utilizan comenzaron a emplear en primer lugar el ordenador y, posteriormente, Internet. De este modo llevan 12,01 años de media utilizando el ordenador y 7,88 años utilizando Internet. El 100% de los que la utilizan tienen conexión a Internet en casa. La forma de conexión en el 98% de los casos es mediante el ordenador quedando descartados otros dispositivos como el móvil, la televisión, agendas electrónicas y videoconsolas. Respecto a la frecuencia de conexión (con las siguientes opciones de respuesta: todos los días, 2 ó 3 veces por semana, una vez al mes, nunca) el análisis de Chi cuadrado muestra que utilizan Internet diariamente o de dos a tres veces por semana (? = 96,580; p<.001). En cuanto a cómo han aprendido a utilizar Internet (autoaprendizaje, familia, cursos, amigos, otros) los resultados indican que han aprendido a utilizar la Red principalmente mediante la familia, seguida del autoaprendizaje (? = 54,701; p<.001). La valoración que realizan de su conocimiento de informática (principiante, medio, avanzado, experto) es de un nivel medio o de principiante (? = 72,601; p<.001). Por lo que se refiere al grado en que consideran Internet como fuente de información (principal, secundaria pero importante, secundaria pero no importante, no uso Internet como fuente de información) la valoran como una fuente secundaria pero importante de información (? = 102,789; p<.001). El 68,2% ha utilizado Internet para buscar información relativa a temas relacionados con la salud. Respecto a las personas con las que más contacto mantienen por Internet la mayor parte se comunica con sus familiares (54,6%), seguido de amigos o compañeros (31,8%), el 13,6% afirma no utilizar Internet para contactar con otras personas. Al preguntar si Internet ha reducido el tiempo que dedican a alguna otra actividad (amigos, dormir, trabajo, estudios, televisión, deportes, familia, radio, prensa, otras actividades) señalan que la Red ha reducido el tiempo que dedican a ver la televisión, seguido del dedicado a dormir (? = 112,326; p<.001). Por lo que se refiere a si han perdido la noción del tiempo estando en Internet (casi nunca, algunas veces, bastantes veces, casi siempre) el 61,1% indica que no la ha perdido casi nunca y un 35,6% indica que la ha perdido algunas veces.

3.2. Beneficios, o motivaciones de la utilización Internet

Respecto a los principales beneficios o motivaciones de la utilización de Internet destacan que les resulta útil, que les ayuda a estar actualizados, y que la consideran que es fácil usar. No obstante, manifiestan que pueden imaginar su vida sin Internet. Por otro lado, no la destinan a conocer nuevas personas ni para encontrar gente con inquietudes similares; en la misma línea, no consideran que sea más fácil expresar algunas cosas por Internet en vez de cara a cara. No les gusta el anonimato de la Red y les preocupa la confidencialidad de la misma (? = 513,416; p<.001).

3.3. Usos que realizan de Internet

Los resultados acerca de los usos que realizan de Internet muestran que la utilizan fundamentalmente para buscar información, seguido del correo electrónico, el uso académico, la prensa, la navegación sin ningún propósito en particular, y en menor medida para compartir fotos y utilizar la banca on-line (? = 974,406; p<.001). Por lo que se refiere a la utilización del correo electrónico envían una media de 15,83 correos semanales y reciben como media 27,71.

3.4. Personas que no utilizan Internet

En relación a los participantes que no utilizan Internet se encuentran respuestas estadísticamente significativas en cuanto a las valoraciones acerca de las barreras para la no utilización (? = 569,373; p<.001). Destacan que la no utilización de Internet no se debe ni a que sean muy mayores, ni a falta de tiempo, ni a estar enfermos, tampoco lo atribuyen a no conocer cosas concretas para las que les pueda servir, ni a la dificultad de encontrar un sitio cercano para conectarse. Se muestra igualmente que no tienen acceso en casa, y que no saben utilizarla, aunque consideran que serían capaces de aprender si se lo propusieran.

4. Discusión

El objetivo de este estudio era analizar el uso que los mayores activos realizan de Internet, así como conocer los principales beneficios o motivaciones de su utilización, y las barreras que encuentran aquellos que no la utilizan. Para ello hemos trabajado con personas inscritas en programas universitarios de mayores. Analizamos en esta sección las principales conclusiones que se pueden extraer de los resultados.

Por lo que se refiere a los mayores que utilizan Internet apreciamos en primer lugar que antes de comenzar a utilizarla se habían familiarizado e iniciado con el ordenador. La utilización y el conocimiento del mismo parece ser una condición necesaria para el uso de Internet, sobre todo teniendo en cuenta que la práctica totalidad se conecta mediante el ordenador quedando descartados otros dispositivos. En este sentido, como señalan Hernández, Pousada y Gómez (2009) parece que los mayores prefieren utilizar cada dispositivo para las funciones para las que han sido inicialmente diseñados, por ejemplo el teléfono para hacer y recibir llamadas, la televisión para ver programas, y la conexión a Internet solo mediante el ordenador. No obstante, consideramos que esta situación quizás pueda cambiar con la familiaridad con el uso de diversos dispositivos y las nuevas funciones para las que son diseñados. Todos tienen conexión a Internet en su casa, y en general la frecuencia de conexión es diaria o de varias veces en semana. El aprendizaje de Internet se ha producido fundamentalmente mediante la familia y el autoaprendizaje. La familia parece desempeñar, por tanto, un papel muy importante como elemento promotor, de apoyo y de adaptación. Hay que señalar que no utilizan la Red con una función generadora de nuevas relaciones sociales si bien sí la utilizan fundamentalmente para conectar con familia y amigos, por lo que parece ser una herramienta que ayuda a mantener las mismas. En este sentido, una de las inquietudes que ha existido en la literatura científica en torno a la utilización de Internet es si ésta contribuye a generar aislamiento social (Nie, 2001). Nuestros resultados muestran que la Red no genera aislamiento, sino que les permite contactar tanto con familiares como con amigos. Estos resultados se ven ratificados al preguntarles si Internet ha reducido el tiempo que dedican a otras actividades; en este caso, los participantes no manifiestan una reducción del tiempo dedicado a la familia o a los amigos, sino a la televisión y a dormir.

Resulta llamativo que Internet no es utilizado para participar en foros de personas con inquietudes similares. Éste es quizás un aspecto que se debería potenciar ya que las comunidades virtuales pueden tener un efecto positivo y de apoyo sobre las personas que las utilizan (Katz, Rice & Aspden, 2001; Ellison, Steinfield & Lampe, 2007).

Un dato muy relevante es la utilización de Internet como fuente formativa e informativa, siendo ésta considerada como una fuente secundaria pero importante de información. En este sentido manifiestan que la Red les permite estar actualizados, y destacan entre los usos que hacen de la misma la búsqueda de información, la actividad académica, la lectura de la prensa y también la navegación sin ningún propósito específico. Consideramos que esta motivación por la Red como herramienta formativa e informativa es un aspecto muy positivo ya que la Red favorece, sin duda, el acceso a gran cantidad de información. No obstante, debemos plantearnos la necesidad de una alfabetización mediática que favorezca una mirada crítica acerca de la información encontrada en la red. Esto resulta particularmente relevante, si tenemos presente que un gran porcentaje de ellos manifiesta haber utilizado la Red para buscar información sobre aspectos relacionados con la salud. Internet puede ser una herramienta de gran utilidad para facilitar información sobre temas relacionados con la salud (Tse, Choi & Leung, 2008) si bien la calidad de la información que encontramos puede ser muy variada (Morahan, 2004). Por ello, en particular para los temas relacionados con la salud, aunque no solo para éstos, consideramos necesaria una alfabetización mediática que ayude a valorar la información encontrada, así como a orientar la búsqueda de un modo activo y fiable.

Los mayores también utilizan Internet aunque en menor medida, en comparación con la búsqueda de información, el correo electrónico, el uso académico, la prensa o la navegación sin ningún propósito, para compartir fotos y utilizar la banca on-line. Quizás el hecho de que utilicen estas funciones en menor medida pueda estar relacionado con que sus principales preocupaciones acerca de Internet tengan que ver con el anonimato y la confidencialidad. En el caso concreto de las transacciones comerciales la confidencialidad suelen ser una de las preocupaciones habituales de la mayor parte de los usuarios (Suh & Han, 2003). Consideramos que en tanto que las seguridad en la Red avance y las personas se familiaricen con ella irán mitigándose estos temores. Respecto al anonimato, es una de las características distintivas de la Red y uno de sus elementos más controvertidos ya que puede tener tanto efectos positivos como negativos (Christopherson, 2007). Al igual que con la búsqueda de información entendemos que los procesos de alfabetización mediática pueden ayudar a distinguir contextos, y a valorar convenientemente las ventajas e inconvenientes del anonimato y de la confidencialidad así como a utilizar la Red con mayores garantías para las transacciones e interacciones que se realicen mediante la misma.

Respecto a aquellos mayores que no utilizan Internet tenemos que destacar que aún suponen un porcentaje importante, sin embargo es necesario enfatizar que ellos no atribuyen su falta de uso ni a la edad, ni a temas relacionados con la salud, sino a no saber utilizarla y a no tener conexión. Sin embargo, consideran que serían capaces de aprender a utilizarla si se propusieran hacerlo. Parece pues que lo que les hace falta es tan solo un pequeño empujoncito para lanzarse a utilizarla. Entendemos que esta información resulta particularmente relevante ya que, como señalábamos en la introducción, suele existir un estereotipo negativo acerca de las personas mayores, y el ámbito de la tecnología no es ajeno a ello (Cutler, 2005). El hecho de que los mayores se muestren optimistas acerca de su capacidad de aprendizaje y no consideren su edad como un factor limitante es un aspecto que ayuda a romper el estereotipo que vincula al mayor con la incapacidad. Coincidimos con Rodríguez (2008) cuando señala que al hacernos mayores se entra en una etapa de la vida para la que nadie nos prepara con anterioridad y en la que es necesaria buscar comportamientos diferentes a los estereotipos tradicionales de la tercera edad en relación a la tecnología. Entendemos que los datos de este estudio son una muestra evidente de que los mayores activos no se autoincluyen dentro de ese estereotipo.

La investigación futura podría comparar diversos grupos de edad con niveles similares de inactividad o discapacidad, de modo que se pueda contrastar si los datos relativos al escaso uso de mayores inactivos se reproducen en jóvenes que se encuentren en una situación similar.

A modo de resumen y reflexión final resaltamos que la importancia de Internet para la inclusión en la sociedad es vital; no participar en la misma puede aislar de muchas posibilidades y llevar como consecuencia a la exclusión y la marginalización social. Los mayores representan una parte importante tanto de la población actual como futura, por lo que su participación en la sociedad de la información resulta crucial. Son muchos los efectos positivos que su participación en la Red puede tener tanto para ellos como para la sociedad. En este estudio, hemos puesto de manifiesto los principales usos y motivaciones de los mayores activos para utilizar Internet, así como las principales barreras para aquéllos que no la utilizan. Encontramos mayores optimistas y motivados en el sentido de que unos ya utilizan la Red, y otros se ven con capacidad para aprender a usarla. Como miembros de la sociedad tenemos la responsabilidad compartida de promover que los que ya la utilizan saquen el mayor beneficio de la misma y extiendan las funciones y ámbitos para los que la usan, y respecto a los que no lo hacen aún, facilitarles ese pequeño pero necesario impulso para comenzar.

Referencias

Aguaded, J.I. (2009). El Parlamento Europeo apuesta por la alfabetización mediática. Comunicar, 32; 7-8.

Aguaded, J.I. (2010a). La Unión Europea dictamina una nueva Recomendación sobre alfabetización mediática en el entorno digital en Europa. Comunicar, 34; 7-8.

Aguaded, J.I. (2010b). La formación en grados y posgrados para la alfabetización mediática. Comunicar, 35; 7-8.

Bargh, J.A. & McKenna, K.Y. (2004). The Internet and Social Life. Annual Review of Psychology, 55; 573-590.

Bennett, G.G. & Glasgow, R.E. (2009). The Delivery of Public Health Interventions Via the Internet: Actualizing their Potential. Annual Review of Public Health, 30; 273-292.

Boechler, P.M., Foth, D. & Watchorn, R. (2007). Educational Technology Research with Older Adults: Ad-justments in Protocol. Materials, and Procedures. Educational Gerontology, 33; 221-235.

Cabero, J. & Aguaded, J.I. (2003). Presentación: tecnologías en la era de la globalización. Comunicar, 21; 12-14.

Carnagey, N.L; Anderson, C.A. & Bushman, B.J. (2007). The Effect of Video Game Violence on Physiological Desensitization to Real-life Violence. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 43; 489-496.

Christopherson, K.M. (2007). The Positive and Negative Implications of Anonymity in Internet Social Interac-tions: ‘On the Internet, Nobody Knows You’re a Dog’. Computers in Human Behavior, 23; 3.038-3.056.

Cuddy, A.J.; Norton, M.I. & Fiske, S.T. (2005). This Old Stereotype: The Pervasiveness and Persistence of the Elderly Stereotype. Journal of Social Issues, 61; 267-285.

Cutler, S.F. (2005). Ageism and Technology. Generations, 29; 67-72.

DiMaggio, P.; Hargittai, E.; Neuman, W.R. & Robinson, J.P. (2001). Social Implications of the Internet. Annual Review of Sociology, 27; 307-336.

Ellison, N.B.; Steinfield, C. & Lampe, C. (2007). The Benefits of Facebook ‘Friends’: Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12; 1143-1168.

Fainholc, B. (2006). La lectura crítica en Internet: evaluación y aplicación de sus recursos. Comunicar, 26; 155-162.

Gatto, S.L. & Tak, S.H. (2008). Computer, Internet and E-mail Use among Older Adults: Benefits and Barriers. Educational Gerontology, 34; 800-811.

Hernández, E; Pousada, M. & Gomez, B. (2009). ICT and Older People: beyond Usability. Educational Ge-rontology, 35; 226-245.

IMSERSO (2009). Las personas mayores en España. Informe 2008. Madrid: Ministerio de Sanidad y Política Social: Instituto de Mayores y Servicios Sociales

Katz, J.E.; Rice, R.E. & Aspden, P. (2001). The Internet, 1995-2000: Access, Civic Involvement and Social In-teraction. The American Behavioral Scientist, 45; 405-419.

Livingstone, S. & Helsper, E. (2010). Balancing Opportunities and risks in Teenagers’ Use of the Internet: the Role of Online Skills and Internet Self-efficacy. New Media & Society, 12; 309-329.

Loscertales, F. & Núñez, T. (2008). Ver cine en TV: una ventana a la socialización familiar. Comunicar, 31; 137-143.

Manna, W.C.; Belchiorb, P.; Tomitac, M.R. & Kempd, B.J. (2005). Computer Use by Middle-aged and Older Adults with Disabilities. Technology and Disability, 17; 1-9.

Morahan, J.M. (2004). How Internet Users Find, Evaluate and Use Online Health Information: A Cross-Cultural Review. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 7; 497-510.

Nie, N.H. (2001). Sociability, Interpersonal Relations and the Internet: Reconciling Conflicting Findings. American Behavioral Scientist, 45; 420-435.

Núñez, T. & Loscertales (2008). El cine de animación visto en casa: dibujos animados y TV. Comunicar, 31; 757-763.

Pavón, F. (2000). Tecnologías avanzadas: nuevos retos de comunicación para los mayores. Comunicar, 15; 133-139.

Rodríguez-Vázquez, F.M. (2008). TV y mayores: ¿educar o deseducar? Comunicar, 31; 287-291.

Selwyn, N.; Gorard, S.; Furlong, J. & Madden, L. (2003). Older Adults’ Use of Information and Communica-tions Technology in Everyday Life. Ageing and Society, 23; 561-582.

Sheets, D.J. (2005). Aging with Disabilities: Ageism and More. Generations, 29; 37-41.

Skitka, L.J. & Sargis, E.G. (2006). The Internet as psychological laboratory. Annual Review of Psychology, 57; 529-55.

Slegers, K.; Van Boxtel, M.P. & Jolles, J. (2009). The Efficiency of Using Everyday Technological Devices by Older Adults: the Role of Cognitive Functions. Ageing and Society, 29; 309-325.

Strecher, V. (2007). Internet Methods for Delivering Behavioral and Health-related Interventions (eHealth). Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 3; 53-76.

Suh, B. & Han, I. (2003). The Impact of Customer Trust and Perception of Security Control on the Acceptance of Electronic Commerce. International Journal of Electronic Commerce, 7; 135-161.

Tse, M.M.; Choi, K.Y. & Leung, R.S. (2008). E-Health for Older People: the Use of Technology in Health Promotion. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 11; 475-479.

Villani, S. (2001). Impact of Media on Children and Adolescents: A 10-year Review of the Research. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 40; 392-401.

Xavier, P. & Cabecinhas, R. (2000). Learning about Social Psychology by Researching on Computer Mediated Communication. IAMCR 2000 Conference. Singapore Proceedings. (https://repositorium.sdum.uminho.pt/-handle/1822/1006) (02/10/2010).

Yang, S.C. & Tung, C. (2007). Comparison of Internet Addicts and Non-addicts in Taiwanese High School. Computers in Human Behavior, 23; 79-96.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/11
Accepted on 30/09/11
Submitted on 30/09/11

Volume 19, Issue 2, 2011
DOI: 10.3916/C37-2011-02-09
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 13
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?