Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Download the PDF version

Resumen

Basic Education in Mexico faces growing challenges arising from the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). However, formal education requires a critical and contextualized awareness that rescues the experiences of students to resignify adverse situations, while emphasizing resilience from learning ecologies. The objective of this document is to account for the ubiquitous learning acquired by nine distance education, secondary students in a rural context of Hidalgo, Mexico and the benefits of raising awareness of their own learning ecology. Emphasis is placed on the resignifying process that emerged through the different communication channels. The study presents results of a case approached with a mixed methodology, by means of a phenomenological, multisource, quantitative and qualitative information triangulation with hermeneutic analysis, organized in three stages, by means of a questionnaire, semi-structured interviews, focal groups and the use of Google Classroom. The hermeneutic analysis of autobiographies and the use of technological resources boosted the personal analysis of experiences generating learning that may be invisible in formal education, but which might empower the students’ critical thinking, collaboration and autonomy to become aware of their own learning and the scope of their social contribution throughout their lives.

Resumen

La Educación Básica en México contempla desafíos crecientes a los que se enfrenta mediante el uso de Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación (TIC). Sin embargo, en la educación formal se requiere detonar una toma de conciencia crítica y contextualizada que rescate las experiencias del estudiantado para resignificar situaciones adversas, así como dar importancia a la resiliencia a partir de las ecologías del aprendizaje. El objetivo de este documento es dar cuenta de los aprendizajes ubicuos que adquirieron nueve estudiantes de telesecundaria en un contexto rural de Hidalgo y los beneficios de la concienciación de la propia ecología del aprendizaje. Se hace énfasis en el proceso de resignificación que emergió a través de las diferentes aristas de comunicación. El estudio presenta resultados de un caso abordado con una metodología mixta por medio de una triangulación de información multifuente, cuantitativa y cualitativa fenomenológica con análisis hermenéutico, organizada en tres etapas, mediante un cuestionario, entrevistas semiestructuradas, grupos focales y uso de la plataforma Google Classroom. El análisis hermenéutico de las autobiografías y el uso de recursos tecnológicos potenció el análisis personal de experiencias generadoras de aprendizajes quizá invisibles en la educación formal, pero que pueden empoderar el pensamiento crítico, la colaboración y autonomía del estudiantado para la toma de conciencia de sus propios aprendizajes y el alcance de su aportación social a lo largo de su vida.

Keywords

Resilience, learning ecologies, ubiquitous learning, lifelong learning, students, awareness, resignifying, adverse situations

Palabras clave

Resiliencia, ecologías del aprendizaje, aprendizaje ubicuo, aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida, estudiantes, concienciación, resignificar, situaciones adversas

Introduction

Within the framework for action under the 2030 Agenda, the United Nations (UN) has endorsed the need for children and young people to adopt flexible skills and competencies that will be useful throughout their lives, considering a world in need of greater sustainability and interdependence based on knowledge and ICTs (Delors, 1996; Beltrán, 2015; UNESCO, 2016). This implies the need to research and listen to people's possibilities and experiences, assuming the style and control of individual learning processes derived from a variety of formal and informal contexts, as well as the different elements that make up learning ecologies, understood as the basis for future educational models according to the context and characteristics of current knowledge: chaotic, interdisciplinary and emerging (Siemens, 2007; González-Sanmamed, Sangrá, Souto-Seijo, & Estévez, 2018).

In this context, new paths are required that elucidate different approaches to communicate with students in contexts with diffuse horizons, characterized by economic and social disadvantages. It is therefore important to promote awareness of the ecologies of resilient learning in order for adolescents to clarify their potential and strengthen the construction of their identity (Barron, 2006).

Resilience, interwoven with ICTs, can become a means and a capability that people develop to cope with adversity in hostile environments, as well as a mechanism for integration with technological progress that triggers options for adaptation and restoration of past experiences.

There has been little research on the link between resilience and ICTs (Mark, Al-Ani, & Semaan, 2009). While the first resilience studies focused on the characteristics of people, protective factors, resilient tutors and community resilience (Werner & Smith, 1992; Rutter, 1993; Munist, Suárez, Krauskopf, & Silber, 2007; Vanistendael & Lecomte, 2002; Forés & Grané, 2012; Simpson, 2014; Henderson & Milstein, 2003; Truebridge, 2016; Clará, 2017), it is now necessary for the student body to become aware of the “process by which the developing person acquires a broader conception of the ecological environment” (Bronfenbrenner, 1977: 523) to configure their own ecology of resilient learning in adverse situations.

In this sense, Barron (2006: 196) defines learning ecologies as "the set of contexts found in physical or virtual spaces that provide learning opportunities. Each context comprises a unique configuration of activities, material resources, personal relationships and the interactions that arise from them. The case study analysis provides evidence of the potential benefits of students’ awareness of their own learning ecology.

In this way, new ubiquitous dynamics are generated through the connectivity achieved through the Google Classroom platform as a bridge for integration in the use of ICTs and for the socialization of adverse and important situations for students, which transcend the school context and often go unnoticed in formal education (Buckingham, 2007; Burbules, 2014a). The concept of resilient learning ecologies, articulated with the ubiquity provided by the Google Classroom platform, was a catalyst between the social context and resilient learning in distance secondary education (Barron, 2006; Santos-Caamaño, González-Sanmamed, & Muñoz, 2018).

The case study is conducted within a rural community in the municipality of Zapotlán de Juárez, Hidalgo, with a wide cultural diversity and little attention to disadvantaged youth. The population is transient, as entire families migrate to the United States or Mexico City. In rural contexts, there are institutions known as "telesecundarias", characterized by classrooms equipped with televisions, computer equipment and video-projectors; however, few have Internet. The educational model is integrated by the teacher, television classes and support materials.

Due to the environment where they operate, they face other types of problems, such as the scarce support for life projects, the recovery of values and the needs of adolescents. In spite of the social and school conditions of this context, there are students who, without economic and family support, successfully finish their studies, which led to the research question: how can the development of resilience be analyzed from the ecologies of learning in “telesecundaria” students?

Materials and methods

Due to the complexity of the studied variables, this research was approached from a mixed multi-reference analysis, as suggested by Ardoino (1991: 173) "from different angles, apparently different, not reducible to each other", although complementary in terms of achieving the objectives. The phenomenological design focused on the individual subjective experience of participants in order to explore the meaning, structure and essence of an experience lived by the student body in relation to the development of their resilient learning ecology, from a perspective that argues the specific character of human reality, while making it irreducible to the categories of physical reality analysis (Taylor & Bogdan, 2000). As an alternative for analysis, the phenomenological approach proposes the categories of subject, subjectivity and significance. This research focused on the voice of the student body reflected in different moments from its inner self and experience.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/7c8c9081-9eae-4ec6-a7b2-666c908c1931/image/9c6ff572-0076-4692-9ad3-36edf7143a1a-ueng-04-01.png


According to Álvarez-Gayou (2003) and Hernández, Fernández and Baptista (2006), phenomenology is based on the following premises: the aim is to describe and understand phenomena from the point of view of each participant and from the perspective built collectively. It is based on the analysis of specific discourse and themes, as well as on the search for their possible meanings. Consequently, an exploratory analysis was necessary to identify students who lived adverse situations, by first identifying perceptions and actions that they considered pertinent and significant to confront them, facilitating the direction of research efforts based on that reality.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/7c8c9081-9eae-4ec6-a7b2-666c908c1931/image/ee90c50a-3005-4016-b896-63a0543ad17a-ueng-04-02.png


Table 1 contemplates the integration of hermeneutics to enhance insights into the diversity of conditions and lifestyles from a perspective of present and past. Studies by Sandoval (2002) and Taylor and Bogdan (2000) point out that this perspective seeks a personal understanding of the motives and beliefs behind people's actions, as well as an understanding of facts through descriptive data and the analysis of spoken or written words.

The hermeneutic method was implemented during the process of analysis and narration of the stories, in order to identify critical phases or adverse situations as core elements for the awareness of resilient learning ecologies (Bolívar, Domingo, & Fernández, 2001).

Stages of research

The research stages were organized around the complexity of identifying students with resilient characteristics and the subjectivity of the variables. The sample was taken from third year groups of a rural “telesecundaria”. The first phase began with 111 students, the second one with 18 and the last one closed with nine students (Table 1). Each phase of the study was a sieve that allowed an approach to personal realities in the configuration of resilient learning ecologies for the last nine students.

As shown on Table 2, the challenge during the exploratory stage was to identify third-year “telesecundaria” students with adverse experiences who were willing to analyze them and share them confidentially in order to begin the study of the resilience variable. The intervention stage began with the use of the Google Classroom platform, which integrated written materials, videos and images related to resilience variables and learning ecologies. The Focus Group (FG) technique was applied in person. The closing stage was developed in two scenarios: formal and informal, to raise awareness of the ecology of resilient learning for the student, considering the ubiquitous environment variable. In the formal stage, semi-structured in-depth oral interviews were applied. In the informal setting, Google Classroom was used as a bridge between spoken and written language for the students' analysis and reflection process while writing their autobiographical stories.

Finally, a phenomenological validation was performed through a methodological triangulation, to ascertain the participants’ sociocultural reality from the perspective of the social actors in their life trajectory (Bronfembrenner, 1976).

Instruments and procedures

In order to identify students with resilient characteristics, a 65-item questionnaire incorporating the following factors was applied: impulse control, frustration tolerance, assertiveness, self-esteem, empathy, expressing emotions, prospective attitude, self-awareness and responsibility (Melillo, 2001). A four-point Likert scale was used: 1) it is the responsibility of others; 2) it is not my responsibility; 3) I am responsible; 4) I can solve it.

In the second stage, and in order to initiate an exchange of opinions regarding "what can be done in the face of adversity?", the use of the Google Classroom platform tools, as well as messages and document submissions made it possible to socialize videos with narratives of characters such as Rita Levi Montalcini and Mario Capecchi to connect with stories of people who lived through adversity, faced it and learned from it by becoming aware of their own potential.

The FG technique was also used to exchange experiences of adverse situations and their different ways of dealing with them. The reading and question guide for the FG were written on the basis of contributions from Grotberg (2006), Melillo (2001), Barron (2006), and González-Sanmamed, Sangrà, Souto-Seijo and Estévez (2018). The technique began with an introductory reading of learning ecologies and resilience, followed by the trigger question "what can be done in the face of adversity?" The full cycle of the FG consisted of an opening, climax and closing. During the opening, informed consent information and presentation dynamics among the participants were important; at the climax, the most useful information for the study was identified; and during the closing, consensual conclusions were formulated.

Finally, in the third stage, semi-structured interviews were conducted, starting orally and ending in writing through Google Classroom, to identify critical incidents as adverse situations, as well as the learning obtained through them (Bolívar, Domingo, & Fernández, 2001). The autobiography is a means of inventing the self and what the life of the person will be (Bolívar, 1999), in which hermeneutics and storytelling enable the understanding of the psychological complexity comprising individuals’ conflicts and dilemmas in their lives (Bolívar, 2002).

Results

Resilient learning ecologies were identified on the basis of the ubiquitous environment, which promoted networked learning through the Google Classroom platform, which denotes the importance of the use of ICTs in education as a means for students to identify what, how, where and why they should learn (González-Sanmamed, Sangrá, Souto-Seijo, & Estévez, 2018).

In the exploratory study, during the first stage of the study, the sample consisted of 111 “telesecundaria” students with an age range between 13 and 14 years, out of whom 18 students with resilient characteristics were identified to further research the variables in the next stage. The application of the questionnaire, validated with a Cronbach Alpha of 0.91, enabled the exploration of particularities of the rural context, profiling risks and resilient characteristics.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/7c8c9081-9eae-4ec6-a7b2-666c908c1931/image/37a9380d-f466-4fd0-af53-82556a6a3ba5-ueng-04-03.png


In terms of their parents' education level, it went from secondary to baccalaureate, with fathers working in different trades and mothers as homemakers. The number of members per family ranges from four to five. Students reported having personal, family and school-related problems (Table 3). On the other hand, preliminary indicators were found on the ecology of learning that denote fundamental capacities for life, such as factors of responsibility, assertiveness, expression of emotions, self-awareness and impulse control, characteristic of resilient people.

Table 3 presents the most relevant results that outlined the context in which the 111 “telesecundaria” students generate learning. It should be noted that one of the main risk factors they face is personal risk, such as distraction (37.4%). On the other hand, one of the most frequent protective factors was responsibility (55%).


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/7c8c9081-9eae-4ec6-a7b2-666c908c1931/image/d4a89c09-7a3e-4eb6-b5e7-ac419488ce08-ueng-04-04.png



In the second stage of research, the use of the Google Classroom platform strengthened the interaction between students through shared messages and documents. The 18 participating students experienced adverse situations that they faced using their own resources, thus confirming that resilience, beyond just enduring a traumatic situation, consists of rebuilding and committing to a new life dynamic.

Vanistendael and Lecomte (2006) assert that the notion of meaning in life is very important, to the point of being a vital need for people. The bond and meaning are basic foundations of resilience that emerged within the ecology of “telesecundaria” students’ learning, by working collaboratively in the analysis of their adverse situations in a barrier-free space, which went from the formal to the informal.

Table 4 presents extracts from the statements selected through axial coding in which categories and indicators were identified to find a meaning that ultimately reflected a certain trend and was verified through the consensual participation of students (Álvarez-Gayou, 2003). In both Google Classroom and FG, risk factors, resilient characteristics, sources of resilience, learning mediators and the identification of nine students emerged to deepen the hermeneutic analysis.

Table 4 also presents a selection of relevant responses shared by 18 students through Google Classroom and face-to-face during FG to the question "what can be done about adversity?" In their analysis, they realized that they were experiencing similar family problems, perceived in a particular way according to each person's experience. As mentioned above, the population is transient and mostly tends to migrate, which causes imbalances and dysfunctions in family dynamics, thereby affecting “telesecundaria” students’ learning.

The use of Google Classroom enabled significant online learning, as students felt at ease, barrier-free and with time to express their thoughts and emotions in writing. This ICT system established peer-to-peer trust and empowerment by validating their potential and identifying sources of resilience and learning who supported the process of resignifying an adverse situation as a learning opportunity.

As for FG, interaction between students was generated in an atmosphere of trust and respect, where Rita Levi's and Mario Capecchi's life stories, the sources of resilience and the learning mediators led to reflection and awareness of the elements that supported the resignification of an adverse situation into a learning opportunity.

The language used in both formal and informal environments demonstrated the importance of interacting with people through different media such as television, Google Classroom, Facebook and WhatsApp, used as affective bonds between students to generate resilient learning in a dynamic process between student and media.

The results obtained in the exploration and intervention stages laid the groundwork for a close-up approach to the subjectivity of the nine “telesecundaria” students, who shared their autobiographies orally, through semi-structured interviews, and in writing using Google Classroom. Thus, a ubiquitous environment was configured where barriers were broken down between the formal space of the “telesecundaria” and the informal realm of the student's personal and family space.

The hermeneutics analysis framework (Table 5) allowed a "hermeneutic encounter" where dialogue was possible between the horizon of understanding and life experience, transcending space and time benchmarks (Sandoval, 2002). The autobiographical analysis was performed through a participatory interpretation of the student, which allowed each of the nine participants to configure their own ecologies of resilient learning in a context tempered by problematic economic situations, parents with low levels of schooling and employment and, for the most part, with little stability. There was also a double perspective of present and past hermeneutic analysis.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/7c8c9081-9eae-4ec6-a7b2-666c908c1931/image/0bcd839b-705f-4e22-9911-638504474b98-ueng-04-05.png


Given this, Table 5 shows that the main risk factors reported by high school students arose in the family, such as infidelity, alcoholism, illness, abuse and economic hardships. The acceptability of the selected extracts had to meet two conditions: 1) that the student explain all available relevant information (if any important significance was excluded or diffusely reconstructed, the interpretation was not considered); 2) that the interpretation proposed was the most plausible to explain the events experienced (Sandoval, 2002).

The use of Google Classroom allowed the students to narrate their autobiography in the first person, which led to a complex process of self-analysis and reflection where they were involved in a critical way. The process of construction of the autobiographies was conducted through successive online and face-to-face approaches, with the aim of accompanying the process in a meaningful way. They highlighted the changes or turns undergone by the subjects. These changes are called "critical incidents" according to Bolívar (1999). It can be argued that one of the features that identify autobiographical narratives or stories is their experiential character. The students recounted situations that they remembered and interpreted, regularly related to other actors in different spaces, which shaped their own ecology of resilient learning.

The validation of the information was carried out through a methodological triangulation aimed at documenting and contrasting multisource information (Denzin, 1989). The filters used to identify resilient students contained socio-demographic data, risk factors and resilient characteristics that were consistent throughout the three research stages. Subsequently, the sample was modified.

Discussion and conclusions

In the study, the results show the complexity of the social fabric in which a group of “telesecundaria” students develop, which generates a challenge for education. The result analysis reflects the importance of considering the personal experience of the student body, with the objective of consolidating learning that strengthens their sense of life and autonomy. This implies a paradigm shift in the development of communicative strategies to create spaces and conditions where students become aware of the importance of their own learning ecology, empower their resilient experience in which they were able to face adversity, and express their thoughts and emotions (Sangrá, 2005; Maina & González, 2016; Rodríguez, González, García, Arias, & Arias, 2016; Burbules, 2012; 2014a; Rodríguez, Cabrera, Zorrilla, & Yot, 2018).

The periphery of the research was the reality described from the students' subjectivity, reflecting their own awareness of the ecology of resilient learning in a ubiquitous environment. Proof of this are the extracts of their interactions in the Google Classroom platform: "I realize that the greatest achievement so far, is to be writing this, because I have a hard time talking about myself, and it is because of my little brother that I want to improve and it is because of him that I do everything". This inner voice realizes that oral and written stories in ubiquitous environments stimulate narrative reflection and resignification through a collaborative interaction that proved to be a tool that enhances the accompaniment of students to express their voice, not yet legitimized in some school environments, which leads to an empowerment of the hybridization between the subjective and the social (Phillippi & Avendaño, 2011).

The bridge generated between the formal and the informal made it possible to connect and exchange emotions, feelings, knowledge and experiences, in such a way that the relationship with others was gradually inked with confidence, security and awareness of the ecology of resilient learning in order to develop fundamental life skills that facilitate social and critical knowledge (Gutiérrez, 2012; Duke, Harper, & Johnston, 2013; Fernández & Anguita, 2015; Díez-Gutierrez & Díaz-Nafría, 2018).

Life projects as products of critical thinking in the student body emerged as fundamental pillars in the configuration of the ecology of resilient learning: "buying a house to live with my family, helping my grandmother and aunt with expenses, continuing to study for my loved ones and learning more". Aspects that are not regularly addressed in school contexts. The ability to organize words with clear meaning and meaning through verbal representations allows for the sharing of experienced images and emotions, in order to give them a meaning that can be communicated to make students feel like unique and valuable people. Learning to value the whys and wherefores of problematic situations gives firm support to the awareness of resilient learning ecologies (Maina & González, 2016; Herrera, 2013; Jiménez-Cortés, 2015; Peters & Romero, 2019).

The conclusion is that the Learning Ecologies framework supports the configuration of resilient learning. Jackson's (2013) proposal for shaping learning ecologies from an individual setting is considered, highlighting the personal context and the relationship with one' s environment in both virtual and physical settings, and integrating both process and purpose. In this sense, by understanding the support they have, such as the sources of resilience and the resources (Burbules, 2014b) on which they can rely for the acquisition of knowledge, people feel greater autonomy and security in the configuration of their own learning ecology.

In the discourse by the students, adverse situations were identified, which they perceived as a constant effect of abandonment and separation from their parents. This implies that learning, as a social construct in which internal elements and external factors converge in a dynamic process, can be triggered by the use of ICT to promote ubiquitous learning (Ladino, Santana, Martínez, Bejarano, & Cabrera, 2016; González-Sanmamed, Muñoz-Carril, & Santos-Caamaño, 2019).

The affective style acquired, and the sense attributed to the experienced situations constitute the mental capital that the student uses to face problems. Most of the participating adolescents displayed sensitivity to the contexts where they asserted their judgments and clarified the parameters within which their assertions were framed. Proof of this were their suggestions for other young people living in adverse situations: "don't lower your head, you're very important, work hard, problems don't last a hundred years". The comments reflect a continuous resignification process that fostered critical thinking, configuring their ecology of resilient learning in ubiquitous environments.

References

  1. ArdoinoJ, . 1991.El análisis multirreferencial. In: , ed. de l’education, sciences majeures. Actes de Journees d’etude tenues a l’occasion des 21 ans des sciences de l’education. Issy-les-Moulineaux, EAP, Colección Recherches et Sciences de l’Education &author=&publication_year= Sciences de l’education, sciences majeures. Actes de Journees d’etude tenues a l’occasion des 21 ans des sciences de l’education. Issy-les-Moulineaux, EAP, Colección Recherches et Sciences de l’Education .173-181
  2. J.Álvarez-Gayou,, . 2003. , ed. hacer investigación cualitativa: Fundamentos y metodología&author=&publication_year= Cómo hacer investigación cualitativa: Fundamentos y metodología.México: Paidós.
  3. BarronB, . 2006.and self-sustained learning as catalysts of development: A learning ecology perspective&author=Barron&publication_year= Interest and self-sustained learning as catalysts of development: A learning ecology perspective.Human Development 49(4):193-224
  4. Beltrán-LlavadoJ, . 2015.Educación a lo largo de la vida: Un horizonte de sentido. [Education throughout life: A horizon of meaning]Sinéctica 45:1-11
  5. BolívarA, DomingoJ, FernándezM, . 2001. , ed. investigación biográfico-narrativa en educación, enfoque y metodología&author=&publication_year= La investigación biográfico-narrativa en educación, enfoque y metodología.Madrid: La Muralla.
  6. BolívarA, . 1999.Enfoque narrativo versus explicativo del desarrollo moral. In: PérezE., MestreM., eds. moral y crecimiento personal. Su situación en el cambio de siglo&author=Pérez&publication_year= Psicología moral y crecimiento personal. Su situación en el cambio de siglo.Barcelona: Ariel. 85-101
  7. BolívarA, . 2002.De nobis ipsis silemus: Epistemología de la investigación biográfico-narrativa en educación.Revista Electrónica de Investigación Educativa 4(1):1-26
  8. BronfenbrennerU, . 1977.an experimental ecology of human development&author=Bronfenbrenner&publication_year= Toward an experimental ecology of human development.American Psychologist 32(7):513-531
  9. BurbulesN, . 2012.aprendizaje ubicuo y el futuro de la enseñanza&author=Burbules&publication_year= El aprendizaje ubicuo y el futuro de la enseñanza.Encounters/Encuentros/Rencontres on Education 13:3-14
  10. BurbulesN, . 2014.significados del aprendizaje ubicuo&author=Burbules&publication_year= Los significados del aprendizaje ubicuo.Archivos Analíticos de Políticas Educativas 22:1-7
  11. BurbulesN, . 2014.El aprendizaje ubicuo: Nuevos contextos, nuevos procesos.Entramados 1(1):131-135
  12. BuckinghamD, . 2007. , ed. technology: Children’s learning in the age of digital culture&author=&publication_year= Beyond technology: Children’s learning in the age of digital culture. Malden: Polity Press.
  13. Santos-CaamañoF J, González-SanmamedM, Muñoz-CarrilP C, . 2018.desarrollo de las ecologías del aprendizaje a través de herramientas en línea&author=Santos-Caamaño&publication_year= El desarrollo de las ecologías del aprendizaje a través de herramientas en línea.Revista Diálogo Educacional 18(56):128-148
  14. ClaráM, . 2017.resilience and meaning transformation: How teachers reappraise situations of adversity&author=Clará&publication_year= Teacher resilience and meaning transformation: How teachers reappraise situations of adversity.Teaching and Teacher Education 63:82-91
  15. DenzinN K, . 1989.of multiple triangulation. The research act: A theoretical introduction to sociological methods&author=&publication_year= Strategies of multiple triangulation. The research act: A theoretical introduction to sociological methods. New York: McGraw Hill.
  16. Díez-GutiérrezE, Díaz-NafríaJ, . 2018.learning ecologies for a critical cybercitizenship. [Ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo para la ciberciudadanía crítica&author=Díez-Gutiérrez&publication_year= Ubiquitous learning ecologies for a critical cybercitizenship. [Ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo para la ciberciudadanía crítica]]Comunicar 26(54):49-58
  17. DelorsJ, . 1996. , ed. educación encierra un tesoro&author=&publication_year= La educación encierra un tesoro.Madrid: UNESCO.
  18. DukeB, HarperG, JohnstonM, . 2013.Connectivism as a digital age learning theory.The International HETL Review. Special Issue4-13
  19. FernándezE, AnguitaR, . 2015.Ecologías del aprendizaje en contextos múltiples.Profesorado 19(2)
  20. ForésA, GranéJ, . 2012. , ed. resiliencia, crecer desde la adversidad&author=&publication_year= La resiliencia, crecer desde la adversidad.Barcelona: Plataforma.
  21. González-SanmamedM, SangràA, Souto-SeijoA, BlancoI E, . 2018.del aprendizaje en la era digital: Desafíos para la educación superior&author=González-Sanmamed&publication_year= Ecologías del aprendizaje en la era digital: Desafíos para la educación superior.Publicaciones 48(1):25-45
  22. González-SanmamedM, Muñoz-CarrilP C, Santos-CaamañoF J, . 2019.components of learning ecologies: A Delphi assessment&author=González-Sanmamed&publication_year= Key components of learning ecologies: A Delphi assessment.British Journal of Educational Technology 50(4)
  23. GrotbergE H, . 2006. , ed. resiliencia en el mundo de hoy. Cómo superar las adversidades&author=&publication_year= La resiliencia en el mundo de hoy. Cómo superar las adversidades.Madrid: Gedisa.
  24. GutiérrezL, . 2012.Conectivismo como teoría de aprendizaje: Conceptos, ideas, y posibles limitaciones.Revista de Educación y Tecnología 1:111-122
  25. HernándezR, FernándezC, BaptistaP, . 2006.de la investigación&author=&publication_year= Metodología de la investigación. México: McGraw Hill.
  26. HendersonN, MilsteinM, . 2003.en la escuela&author=&publication_year= Resiliencia en la escuela. Buenos Aires: Paidós.
  27. HerreraA, . 2013.adaptación del docente al nuevo contexto de ecologías de aprendizaje en el proceso formativo: La nueva misión del docente actual en Colombia&author=Herrera&publication_year= La adaptación del docente al nuevo contexto de ecologías de aprendizaje en el proceso formativo: La nueva misión del docente actual en Colombia.Escenarios 11(2):24-29
  28. JacksonN J, . 2013.The concept of learning ecologies. In: JacksonN., CooperB., eds. learning, education and personal development&author=Jackson&publication_year= Lifewide learning, education and personal development.1-21
  29. Jiménez-CortésR, . 2015.Aprendizaje ubicuo de las mujeres jóvenes en las redes sociales y su consciencia de aprendizaje.Prisma Social 15:180-221
  30. LadinoD, SantanaL, MartínezO, BejaranoP, CabreraD, . 2016.Ecología del aprendizaje como herramienta de innovación educativa en educación superior.Nuevas ideas en Informática Educativa 12:517-521
  31. MainaM, García-GonzálezI, . 2016.personal pedagogies through learning ecologies&author=Maina&publication_year= Articulating personal pedagogies through learning ecologies. In: GrosB., KinshukM.M., eds. future of ubiquitous learning: Learning designs for emerging pedagogies&author=Gros&publication_year= The future of ubiquitous learning: Learning designs for emerging pedagogies.Berlin: Springer. 73-94
  32. MarkG, Al-AniB, SemaanB, . 2009.through technology adoption: Merging the old and the new in Iraq&author=Mark&publication_year= Resilience through technology adoption: Merging the old and the new in Iraq. In: , ed. of the 27th International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems&author=&publication_year= Proceedings of the 27th International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.Boston: CHI ´09.
  33. MelilloA, . 2001.y educación&author=Melillo&publication_year= Resiliencia y educación. In: MelilloA., SuárezE., eds. Descubriendo las propias fortalezas&author=Melillo&publication_year= Resiliencia: Descubriendo las propias fortalezas.Buenos Aires: Paidós. 123-144
  34. MunistM, SuárezE, KrauskopfD, SilberT J, . 2007.y resiliencia&author=&publication_year= Adolescencia y resiliencia. Buenos Aires: Paidós.
  35. PetersM, RomeroM, . 2019.learning ecologies in online higher education: Students' engagement in the continuum between formal and informal learning&author=Peters&publication_year= Lifelong learning ecologies in online higher education: Students' engagement in the continuum between formal and informal learning.British Journal of Educational Technology 50(4):1729-1743
  36. PhillippiA, AvendañoC, . 2011.empowerment: narrative skills of the subjects. [Empoderamiento comunicacional: competencias narrativas de los sujetos&author=Phillippi&publication_year= Communicative empowerment: narrative skills of the subjects. [Empoderamiento comunicacional: competencias narrativas de los sujetos]]Comunicar 36:61-68
  37. RodríguezH, GonzálezG, GarcíaA, AriasV, AriasB, . 2016.Entornos comunicativos de aprendizaje: Coordenadas para comprender los procesos de aprendizaje y el CSCL.Profesorado 20(3):627-657
  38. RodríguezE, CabreraC, ZorrillaJ, YotC, . 2018. , ed. rueda y los rayos. Experiencias, tensiones y desafíos para generar nuevas ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo&author=&publication_year= La rueda y los rayos. Experiencias, tensiones y desafíos para generar nuevas ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo.Montevideo: Universidad ORT.
  39. RutterM, . 1993.some conceptual considerations&author=Rutter&publication_year= Resilience, some conceptual considerations.Journal of Adolescent Health 14(8):626-631
  40. SangràA, . 2005.Internet y los nuevos modelos de aprendizaje: Dónde está la innovación. In: , ed. Congresso Galaico-Portugués de Psicopedagogía, Universidade do Minho-Braga&author=&publication_year= VIII Congresso Galaico-Portugués de Psicopedagogía, Universidade do Minho-Braga.
  41. SandovalC A, . 2002. , ed. cualitativa: Especialización en teoría, métodos y técnicas de investigación social&author=&publication_year= Investigación cualitativa: Especialización en teoría, métodos y técnicas de investigación social.Bogotá: ARFO.
  42. SiemensG, . 2007.Creating a learning ecology in distributed environments&author=Siemens&publication_year= Connectivism: Creating a learning ecology in distributed environments.Didactics of microlearning: Concepts, discourses, and examples.
  43. SimpsonM G, . 2014.claves para generar resiliencia&author=&publication_year= 11 claves para generar resiliencia.
  44. TaylorS J, BogdanR, . 2000.a los métodos cualitativos de investigación&author=&publication_year= Introducción a los métodos cualitativos de investigación. Barcelona: Paidós.
  45. TruebridgeS, . 2016.It begins with beliefs&author=Truebridge&publication_year= Resilience: It begins with beliefs.Kappa Delta Pi Record 52(1):22-27
  46. UNESCO (Ed.). 2016.Declaración Incheon y marco de acción. Hacia una educación inclusiva y equitativa de calidad y un aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida para todos.
  47. VanistendaelS, LecomteJ, . 2006.y sentido de vida&author=Vanistendael&publication_year= Resiliencia y sentido de vida. In: MelilloA., SuarezE., RodríguezD., eds. y subjetividad. Los ciclos de la vida&author=Melillo&publication_year= Resiliencia y subjetividad. Los ciclos de la vida.Buenos Aires: Paidós. 91-101
  48. WernerE E, SmithR S, . 1992. , ed. the odds. High risks children from birth to adulthood&author=&publication_year= Overcoming the odds. High risks children from birth to adulthood. New York: Cornell University Press.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

Resumen

La Educación Básica en México contempla desafíos crecientes a los que se enfrenta mediante el uso de Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación (TIC). Sin embargo, en la educación formal se requiere detonar una toma de conciencia crítica y contextualizada que rescate las experiencias del estudiantado para resignificar situaciones adversas, así como dar importancia a la resiliencia a partir de las ecologías del aprendizaje. El objetivo de este documento es dar cuenta de los aprendizajes ubicuos que adquirieron nueve estudiantes de telesecundaria en un contexto rural de Hidalgo y los beneficios de la concienciación de la propia ecología del aprendizaje. Se hace énfasis en el proceso de resignificación que emergió a través de las diferentes aristas de comunicación. El estudio presenta resultados de un caso abordado con una metodología mixta por medio de una triangulación de información multifuente, cuantitativa y cualitativa fenomenológica con análisis hermenéutico, organizada en tres etapas, mediante un cuestionario, entrevistas semiestructuradas, grupos focales y uso de la plataforma Google Classroom.El análisis hermenéutico de las autobiografías y el uso de recursos tecnológicos potenció el análisis personal de experiencias generadoras de aprendizajes quizá invisibles en la educación formal, pero que pueden empoderar el pensamiento crítico, la colaboración y autonomía del estudiantado para la toma de conciencia de sus propios aprendizajes y el alcance de su aportación social a lo largo de su vida.

ABSTRACT

Primary education in Mexico is facing a growing set of challenges that the government has tried to counteract through the use of communication technologies (ICT) in formal education. While these efforts provide support for students and educators, there remains a need for a renewed and contextualized awareness that will re-conceptualize the adverse experiences of students and the importance of resilience in the context of the learning environment. The objective of this document is to give an account of the learning acquired by nine telesecondary students in a rural area of Hidalgo and the student’s benefits of building awareness about the ecology of learning. The paper highlights the process of re-envisioning their experiences that emerged from the various points of views shared in discussion. The study was triangulated by quantitative and qualitative phenomenological and hermeneutical analyses. It was organized into three stages and employed a survey, semi-structured interviews, focus groups and use of the Google-Classroom platform. The hermeneutical analysis of autobiographies and the use of technological resources enhanced the personal analysis of the experiences of the participants. These experiences generated learning that may often be invisible in formal education but can empower critical thinking, collaboration and autonomy of students to become aware of their learning and the scope of their social contribution.

Palabras clave

Resiliencia, ecologías del aprendizaje, aprendizaje ubicuo, aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida, estudiantes, concienciación, resignificar, situaciones adversas

Keywords

Resilience, ecologies of learning, ubiquitous learning, lifelong learning, students, awareness, resignify, adverse situations

Introducción

En el marco de acción de la Agenda 2030, la Organización de las Naciones Unidas (ONU) ha refrendado que los niños y jóvenes deben adoptar aptitudes y competencias flexibles que sean útiles a lo largo de su vida, considerando un mundo que necesita mayor sostenibilidad e interdependencia basadas en el conocimiento y las TIC (Delors, 1996; Beltrán, 2015; UNESCO, 2016). Ello implica la necesidad de investigar y escuchar las posibilidades y experiencias de las personas, asumiendo el estilo y control de los procesos individuales de aprendizaje derivados de la variedad de contextos formales e informales, así como los diferentes elementos que configuran las ecologías del aprendizaje, entendidas como la base para los modelos educativos futuros de acuerdo con el contexto y las características del conocimiento actual: caótico, interdisciplinario y emergente (Siemens, 2007; González-Sanmamed, Sangrá, Souto-Seijo, & Estévez, 2018).

En este marco, se requieren nuevas veredas que lleven a dilucidar formas diferentes de comunicarse con el estudiantado en contextos con horizontes difusos, caracterizados por desventajas económicas y sociales. Entonces, cobra relevancia el fomento de la toma de conciencia sobre las ecologías del aprendizaje resiliente para que los adolescentes clarifiquen su potencial y fortalezcan la construcción de su identidad (Barron, 2006).

La resiliencia, imbricada con las TIC, puede llegar a ser un medio y una capacidad que desarrollen las personas para hacer frente a las adversidades en entornos hostiles, así como un mecanismo de integración al avance tecnológico que detone opciones de adaptación y restauración de experiencias pasadas.

Son pocas las investigaciones que se han realizado sobre la vinculación entre la resiliencia y las TIC (Mark, Al-Ani, & Semaan, 2009). Si bien los primeros estudios de resiliencia se centraron en las características de las personas, factores protectores, tutores resilientes y la resiliencia comunitaria (Werner & Smith, 1992; Rutter, 1993; Munist, Suárez, Krauskopf, & Silber, 2007; Vanistendael & Lecomte, 2002; Forés & Grané, 2012; Simpson, 2014; Henderson & Milstein, 2003; Truebridge, 2016; Clará, 2017), actualmente es necesario que el estudiantado tome conciencia del «proceso por el cual la persona en desarrollo adquiere una concepción del ambiente ecológico más amplia» (Bronfenbrenner, 1977: 523) para configurar su propia ecología de aprendizaje resiliente ante situaciones adversas.

En este sentido, Barron (2006: 196) define las ecologías de aprendizaje como «el conjunto de contextos hallados en espacios físicos o virtuales que proporcionan oportunidades de aprendizaje. Cada contexto comprende una configuración única de actividades, recursos materiales, relaciones personales y las interacciones que surgen de ellos». El análisis del caso estudiado da evidencia de los beneficios potenciales de la concienciación de los estudiantes de su propia ecología del aprendizaje.

De esta forma, se generan nuevas dinámicas ubicuas por medio de la conectividad alcanzada a través de la plataforma Google Classroom como puente de integración al uso de las TIC y de socialización de situaciones adversas e importantes para los estudiantes, que rebasan el contexto escolar y que frecuentemente pasan desapercibidas en la educación formal (Buckingham, 2007; Burbules, 2014a). El concepto de ecologías del aprendizaje resiliente articulado con la ubicuidad que proporcionó la plataforma Google Classroom fue un catalizador entre el contexto social y el aprendizaje resiliente en telesecundaria (Barron, 2006; Santos-Caamaño, González-Sanmamed, & Muñoz, 2018).

El caso de estudio se localiza en una comunidad rural del municipio de Zapotlán de Juárez, Hidalgo, con una amplia diversidad cultural y escasa atención a jóvenes en situación de desventaja. La población es flotante, puesto que hay familias enteras que emigran a Estados Unidos o a la Ciudad de México. En los contextos rurales se encuentran instituciones denominadas telesecundarias, caracterizadas por habilitar las aulas con televisores, equipo de cómputo y vídeo-proyectores; sin embargo, pocas cuentan con Internet. El modelo educativo se integra por el profesor, las clases en televisión y materiales de apoyo.

Debido al medio en el que se encuentran, enfrentan otro tipo de problemas, como el escaso fomento a proyectos de vida, rescate de valores y necesidades de los adolescentes.A pesar de las condiciones sociales y escolares de este contexto, hay alumnos que sin soporte económico y familiar concluyen exitosamente sus estudios, lo cual llevó a la pregunta de investigación: ¿cómo analizar el desarrollo de la resiliencia desde las ecologías del aprendizaje en estudiantes de telesecundaria?

Materiales y métodos

Por la complejidad de las variables a estudiar, esta investigación se abordó desde un análisis mixto multirreferencial, como lo sugiere Ardoino (1991: 173) «desde distintos ángulos, aparentemente diferentes, no reductibles unos a otros», aunque sí complementarios para el alcance de los objetivos. El diseño fenomenológico se enfocó en la experiencia individual subjetiva de los participantes con el objeto de investigar el significado, estructura y esencia de una experiencia vivida por el estudiantado respecto al desarrollo de su ecología de aprendizaje resiliente, y desde una mirada que argumenta el carácter específico de la realidad humana, al mismo tiempo que la hace irreductible a las categorías de análisis de la realidad física (Taylor & Bogdan, 2000). Como alternativa para el análisis, la orientación fenomenológica propone las categorías de sujeto, subjetividad y significación. Esta investigación se centró en la voz del estudiantado reflejada en diferentes momentos desde su interioridad y experiencia.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/2d56a4b7-7514-4d71-b7ac-dc010b0e8fa9/image/b63c7a85-12bc-4b93-b971-0ecb001ebca2-u04-00.png


De acuerdo con Álvarez-Gayou (2003) y Hernández, Fernández y Baptista (2006), la fenomenología se fundamenta en las siguientes premisas: se pretenden describir y entender los fenómenos desde el punto de vista de cada participante y desde la perspectiva construida colectivamente. Se basa en el análisis de discursos y temas específicos, así como en la búsqueda de sus posibles significados. En consecuencia, se requirió el análisis exploratorio para identificar a estudiantes que vivieron situaciones adversas mediante una primera identificación de percepciones y acciones que consideraron pertinentes y significativas para enfrentarlas, facilitando la orientación de los esfuerzos investigativos con base en esa realidad.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/2d56a4b7-7514-4d71-b7ac-dc010b0e8fa9/image/df8f2725-4650-4500-8233-8b6e51683c09-u04-01.png


En la Tabla 1 se contempla la integración de la hermenéutica, a fin de incrementar el entendimiento de observar diversidad de condiciones y estilos de vida sobre una perspectiva de presente y pasado. Sandoval (2002) y Taylor y Bogdan (2000) señalan que esta perspectiva busca a nivel personal la comprensión de los motivos y creencias existentes detrás de las acciones de las personas, así como la comprensión de los hechos por medio de datos descriptivos y análisis de palabras habladas o escritas. El método hermenéutico se aplicó durante el proceso de análisis y narración de los relatos, con el fin de identificar las fases críticas o situaciones adversas como elementos medulares para la concienciación de las ecologías de aprendizajes resilientes (Bolívar, Domingo, & Fernández, 2001).

Etapas de investigación

Las etapas de investigación se organizaron a partir de la complejidad para identificar a estudiantes con características resilientes y la subjetividad de las variables. La muestra se tomó de grupos de tercer año de una telesecundaria en contexto rural. La primera etapa se inició con 111, la segunda con 18 y la última se cerró con nueve estudiantes (Tabla 1). Cada trama de la investigación fue un tamiz que permitió el acercamiento a la realidad personal en la configuración de la ecología del aprendizaje resiliente de los nueve últimos estudiantes.

Como se muestra en la Tabla 2, en la etapa exploratoria el desafío fue identificar estudiantes de tercer grado de telesecundaria con experiencias adversas que tuvieran la voluntad de analizarlas y compartirlas de forma confidencial para iniciar la investigación de la variable resiliencia. La etapa de intervención se inició con el uso de la plataforma Google Classroom, en la que se integraron materiales escritos, vídeos e imágenes relacionados con las variables de resiliencia y ecologías del aprendizaje. De forma presencial se aplicó la técnica de Grupo Focal (GF). La etapa de cierre se desarrolló en dos escenarios: formal e informal, para incidir en la concienciación de la ecología del aprendizaje resiliente del estudiantado, considerando la variable ambiente ubicuo. En el formal se aplicaron entrevistas semiestructuradas orales en profundidad. En el informal, Google Classroom se utilizó como puente entre lo oral y lo escrito para el proceso de análisis y reflexión de los estudiantes al escribir sus relatos autobiográficos.

Por último, se realizó una «validación fenomenológica» a través de una triangulación metodológica para conocer la realidad sociocultural desde la perspectiva de los actores sociales en su trayectoria de vida (Bronfembrenner, 1976).

Instrumentos y procedimientos

Para la identificación de estudiantes con características resilientes se aplicó un cuestionario de 65 ítems que integró los factores: control de impulsos, tolerancia a la frustración, asertividad, autoestima, empatía, expresión de emociones, actitud prospectiva, autoconocimiento y responsabilidad (Melillo, 2001). La opción de respuesta fue de tipo Likert con cuatro opciones: 1) es responsabilidad de otros; 2) no es mi responsabilidad; 3) soy responsable; 4) puedo solucionarlo.

En la segunda etapa y, con objeto de iniciar un intercambio de opiniones respecto a «¿qué se puede hacer frente a la adversidad?», el uso de las herramientas de la plataforma Google Classroom, así como los mensajes y envíos de documentos posibilitó la socialización de vídeos con narrativas de personajes como Rita Levi Montalcini y Mario Capecchi para conectar con historias de personas que vivieron adversidad, la enfrentaron y aprendieron de ella al tomar conciencia de su propio potencial.

Asimismo, se utilizó la técnica de GF para intercambiar experiencias de situaciones adversas y sus diferentes formas de enfrentarlas. La lectura y guía de preguntas para el GF se redactaron basadas en las aportaciones de Grotberg (2006), Melillo (2001), Barron (2006), y González-Sanmamed, Sangrà, Souto-Seijo y Estévez (2018). Se dio inicio a la técnica con la lectura introductoria de las ecologías de aprendizaje y la resiliencia, y posteriormente se planteó la pregunta detonadora «¿qué se puede hacer frente a la adversidad?». El ciclo de duración del GF consistió en una apertura, clímax y cierre. En la apertura fue importante el consentimiento informado y la dinámica de presentación entre los participantes, en el clímax se identificó la información más útil para la investigación y en el cierre se dio forma a conclusiones consensuadas.

Por último, en la tercera etapa se realizaron entrevistas semiestructuradas que iniciaron de forma oral y concluyeron por escrito mediante Google Classroom, para identificar incidentes críticos como situaciones adversas, así como el aprendizaje obtenido a través de estas (Bolívar, Domingo, & Fernández, 2001). La autobiografía es un medio de inventar el propio yo y lo que será la vida de la persona (Bolívar, 1999), en el que la hermenéutica-narrativa permite la comprensión de la complejidad psicológica que los individuos hacen de los conflictos y los dilemas en sus vidas (Bolívar, 2002).

Resultados

La ecología del aprendizaje resiliente se identificó sobre la base del ambiente ubicuo, que potenció el aprendizaje en red mediante la plataforma Google Classroom, lo cual denota la importancia del uso de las TIC en la educación como un medio para que el estudiantado identifique qué, cómo, dónde y para qué aprender (González-Sanmamed, Sangrá, Souto-Seijo, & Estévez, 2018).

En el estudio exploratorio, primera etapa de la investigación, la muestra se conformó por 111 estudiantes de telesecundaria con un rango de edad entre 13 y 14 años, de los cuales se identificaron 18 con características resilientes para investigar más a fondo las variables en la siguiente etapa. La aplicación del cuestionario, validado con un Alpha de Cronbach de 0,91, permitió explorar las particularidades del contexto rural, perfilar riesgos y características resilientes.

La escolaridad de los progenitores del estudiantado correspondió al nivel de secundaria y preparatoria: los padres trabajan en diferentes oficios y las madres como amas de casa. El número de miembros por familia fluctúa de cuatro a cinco personas. Los estudiantes refirieron tener situaciones problemáticas personales, familiares y escolares (Tabla 3). Por otra parte, se encontraron indicadores preliminares sobre la ecología del aprendizaje que denotan capacidades fundamentales para la vida, como son los factores de responsabilidad, asertividad, expresión de emociones, autoconocimiento y control de impulsos, propias de personas resilientes.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/2d56a4b7-7514-4d71-b7ac-dc010b0e8fa9/image/4f3cdc59-0f99-4814-b3b9-f1b881a971fd-u04-03.png


En la Tabla 3 se presentan los resultados más relevantes que delinearon el marco del contexto en el que generan aprendizajes los 111 estudiantes de telesecundaria. Se resalta que uno de los principales factores de riesgo que enfrentan son los personales, como la distracción (37,4%). Por otra parte, uno de los factores protectores con mayor frecuencia fue la responsabilidad (55%).

Asimismo, las fuentes interactivas de resiliencia propuestas por Grotberg (2006) dieron soporte al análisis y sistematización de los diversos factores señalados como constituyentes de apoyos externos («Yo tengo») que promueven el aprendizaje resiliente; la fuerza interior («Yo soy») que se desarrolla a través del tiempo y sostiene a aquellos que se encuentran frente a alguna adversidad; y por último los factores interpersonales («Yo puedo»), entendidos como la capacidad para solucionar problemas que llevan a la persona a enfrentar la adversidad. La fuente de resiliencia más importante fue ser una persona que se respeta a sí misma y a los demás. Los mediadores que apoyan su aprendizaje en las situaciones problemáticas son la televisión, Internet, la computadora y las personas.

En la segunda etapa de investigación, el uso de la plataforma Google Classroom fortaleció la interacción entre los estudiantes a través de mensajes y documentos compartidos. Los 18 estudiantes vivieron situaciones adversas que enfrentan desde sus propios recursos, confirmando así que la resiliencia, más allá del hecho de soportar una situación traumática, consiste en reconstruirse y comprometerse con una nueva dinámica de vida. Vanistendael y Lecomte (2006) afirman que la noción de sentido de vida tiene mucha importancia, hasta el punto de constituir una necesidad vital para las personas. El vínculo y el sentido son fundamentos básicos de la resiliencia que surgieron dentro de la ecología del aprendizaje del estudiantado de telesecundaria al trabajar de forma colaborativa en el análisis de sus situaciones adversas en un espacio sin barreras, que fue de lo formal a lo informal.

En la Tabla 4 se presentan extractos de los discursos seleccionados mediante una codificación axial en la que se identificaron categorías e indicadores para encontrar un sentido que, en última instancia, reflejó cierta tendencia y se verificó por medio de la participación consensuada de los estudiantes (Álvarez-Gayou, 2003). Tanto en Google Classroom como en el GF emergieron los factores de riesgo, las características resilientes, fuentes de resiliencia, los mediadores de aprendizaje y la identificación de nueve estudiantes para profundizar el análisis hermenéutico.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/2d56a4b7-7514-4d71-b7ac-dc010b0e8fa9/image/5b08c9ca-94f9-4b45-9057-e7f594f3029f-u04-04.png


La Tabla 4 presenta una selección de respuestas relevantes que compartieron 18 estudiantes a través de Google Classroom y de manera presencial en el GF a la pregunta «¿qué se puede hacer frente a la adversidad?». En su análisis, se dieron cuenta de que viven problemas familiares similares, percibidos de forma particular según la experiencia de cada persona. Y es que, como se mencionó anteriormente, la población es fluctuante y tiende mayormente a migrar, lo que provoca desequilibrio y disfuncionalidad en la dinámica familiar y por ende repercute en el aprendizaje de los estudiantes de telesecundaria.

El uso de la plataforma Google Classroom permitió el aprendizaje significativo en red, pues los estudiantes se sintieron libres, sin barreras y con tiempo para expresar sus pensamientos y emociones de forma escrita. Este sistema TIC fortaleció la confianza entre pares, además de propiciar su empoderamiento al refrendar su potencial con la identificación de las fuentes de resiliencia y mediadores de aprendizajes que apoyaron la resignificación de una situación adversa al convertirla en una oportunidad de aprendizaje.

En cuanto al GF, la interacción entre los estudiantes se generó en un ambiente de confianza y de respeto, donde las historias de vida de Rita Levi y Mario Capecchi, las fuentes de resiliencia y los mediadores de aprendizaje llevaron a la reflexión y toma de conciencia de los elementos que dieron soporte a la resignificación de una situación adversa para convertirla en una oportunidad de aprendizaje.

El lenguaje utilizado en los ambientes formal e informal evidenció la importancia de la interacción con las personas a través de diferentes medios como la televisión, la plataforma Google Classroom, Facebook y WhatsApp, empleados como vínculos afectivos de los estudiantes para generar aprendizajes resilientes en un proceso dinámico entre estudiante y medio.

Los resultados obtenidos en las etapas de exploración y de intervención sentaron las bases para que, en la de cierre, se diera un mayor acercamiento a la subjetividad de los nueve estudiantes de telesecundaria, que compartieron sus autobiografías de forma oral, por medio de entrevistas semiestructuradas, y por escrito en la plataforma Google Classroom. De este modo, se configuró un ambiente ubicuo en el que se rompieron barreras entre el espacio formal de la telesecundaria y lo informal del espacio personal y familiar del estudiante.

El marco de análisis de la hermenéutica (Tabla 5) permitió un «encuentro hermenéutico» donde se posibilitó el diálogo entre el horizonte de entendimiento y la experiencia vital, trascendiendo los referentes de espacio y tiempo (Sandoval, 2002). El análisis de las autobiografías se realizó mediante una interpretación participativa del estudiante, lo cual permitió que cada uno de los nueve configurara sus propias ecologías de aprendizaje resiliente en un contexto matizado por situaciones económicas problemáticas, padres de familia con niveles de escolaridad y empleo bajos y, en su mayoría, con poca estabilidad. También se contó con una perspectiva doble de presente y pasado del análisis hermenéutico.


https://typeset-prod-media-server.s3.amazonaws.com/article_uploads/2d56a4b7-7514-4d71-b7ac-dc010b0e8fa9/image/999d6099-375a-438b-ab94-4579d26468d1-u04-05.png


Dado lo anterior, se puede observar en la Tabla 5 que los principales factores de riesgo relatados por los estudiantes de telesecundaria surgieron en la familia, como infidelidad, alcoholismo, enfermedad, maltrato y escasez económica. La aceptabilidad de los extractos seleccionados tuvo que cumplir dos condiciones: 1) que el estudiante explicara toda la información relevante disponible (si alguna significación importante era excluida o difusamente reconstruida, la interpretación no era considerada); 2) que la interpretación planteada fuera la más plausible para explicar los eventos vividos (Sandoval, 2002).

El uso de Google Classroom permitió al estudiante llevar a cabo la narración de su autobiografía en primera persona, lo cual derivó en un proceso complejo de autoanálisis y reflexión donde se vio involucrado de una manera crítica. El proceso de construcción de las autobiografías se efectuó a través de aproximaciones sucesivas presenciales y en línea, con el objetivo de acompañar dicho proceso de forma significativa. Destacaron los cambios o giros de la trayectoria vivida por los sujetos. Estos giros o cambios reciben el nombre de «incidentes críticos» según Bolívar (1999). Se puede afirmar que uno de los rasgos que identifican a las narrativas o relatos autobiográficos es su carácter experiencial. El estudiante narró situaciones recordadas e interpretadas, relacionadas regularmente con otros actores en diferentes espacios, lo cual configuró su propia ecología del aprendizaje resiliente.

La validación de la información se llevó a cabo mediante una triangulación metodológica orientada a documentar y contrastar información multifuente (Denzin, 1989). Para ello, se desarrolló una concordancia de la información en las diferentes etapas del proceso metodológico, puesto que los filtros empleados para identificar a los estudiantes resilientes presentaron datos sociodemográficos, factores de riesgo y características resilientes constantes en las tres etapas de la investigación. Posteriormente la muestra se modificó.

Discusión y conclusiones

En la investigación realizada, los resultados dan cuenta de la complejidad del entramado social en el que se desarrolla un grupo de estudiantes de telesecundaria, lo que genera un desafío para la educación. El análisis de los resultados refleja la importancia de considerar la experiencia personal del estudiantado, con el objetivo de consolidar aprendizajes que fortalezcan su sentido de vida y autonomía. Ello implica un cambio de paradigma en el desarrollo de estrategias comunicativas para crear espacios y condiciones donde los estudiantes tomen conciencia de la importancia de su propia ecología del aprendizaje, empoderen su experiencia resiliente en la que pudieron enfrentar adversidades, y expresen sus pensamientos y emociones (Sangrá, 2005; Maina & González, 2016; Rodríguez, González, García, Arias, & Arias, 2016; Burbules, 2012; 2014a; Rodríguez, Cabrera, Zorrilla, & Yot, 2018).

La periferia de la investigación fue la realidad descrita desde la subjetividad de los estudiantes, reflejo de la concienciación de su propia ecología del aprendizaje resiliente en un ambiente ubicuo. Muestra de ello son los extractos emitidos durante su interacción en la plataforma Google Classroom: «me doy cuenta que el mayor logro hasta ahora es estar escribiendo esto, porque me cuesta mucho trabajo hablar de mí, y es por mi hermanito que quiero mejorar y es por él que hago todo». Esta voz interior da cuenta de que los relatos orales y escritos en ambientes ubicuos estimulan la reflexión narrativa y resignificación mediante una interacción colaborativa que mostró ser un medio que potencializa el acompañamiento de los estudiantes para expresar su voz, aún no legitimada en algunos ambientes escolares, lo que conlleva a un empoderamiento de hibridación entre lo subjetivo y lo social (Phillippi & Avendaño, 2011).

El puente generado entre lo formal y lo informal permitió conectar e intercambiar emociones, sentimientos, conocimientos y experiencias, de tal forma que la relación con los otros paulatinamente se entintó de confianza, seguridad y conciencia de la ecología de los aprendizajes resilientes para desarrollar capacidades fundamentales para la vida que faciliten un conocimiento social y crítico (Gutiérrez, 2012; Duke, Harper, & Johnston, 2013; Fernández & Anguita, 2015; Díez-Gutierrez & Díaz-Nafría, 2018).

El proyecto de vida como producto del pensamiento crítico en el estudiantado emergió como pilar fundamental en la configuración de la ecología del aprendizaje resiliente: «comprar una casa para vivir con mi familia, ayudar a mi abuela y tía en los gastos, seguir estudiando para mis seres queridos y aprender más». Aspectos que regularmente no se abordan en los contextos escolares. La capacidad de poder organizar las palabras con sentido y significado claro mediante representaciones verbales, permiten compartir imágenes y emociones experimentadas, a fin de darles un sentido que pueda ser comunicado para hacer sentir a los estudiantes como personas únicas y valiosas. Aprender a valorar los porqués y paraqués de las situaciones problemáticas da un soporte firme a la toma de conciencia de las ecologías de aprendizajes resilientes (Maina & González, 2016; Herrera, 2013; Jiménez-Cortés, 2015; Peters & Romero, 2019).

Se concluye que el marco de las ecologías de aprendizaje da soporte a la configuración del aprendizaje resiliente, al considerar la propuesta de Jackson (2013) respecto a la conformación de las ecologías del aprendizaje desde un ámbito individual, donde resalta el contexto personal y la relación que se mantiene con el contexto en entornos tanto virtuales como físicos, e integrando tanto el proceso como el propósito. En este sentido, al comprender el soporte con el que cuentan, como son las fuentes de resiliencia y los medios (Burbules, 2014b) en los que se pueden apoyar para la adquisición de conocimientos, las personas sienten una mayor autonomía y seguridad en la configuración de su propia ecología del aprendizaje.

En los discursos elaborados por los estudiantes se identificaron las situaciones adversas que percibieron como una constante del efecto de abandono y de la separación de sus padres. Al ser capaces de reconocer, describir y analizar situaciones adversas, se hizo evidente la cualidad de ser auto-correctivos, lo que implica que el aprendizaje como constructo social en el que convergen elementos internos y factores externos en un proceso dinámico puede detonarse con el uso de las TIC y promover aprendizajes ubicuos (Ladino, Santana, Martínez, Bejarano, & Cabrera, 2016; González-Sanmamed, Muñoz-Carril, & Santos-Caamaño, 2019).

El estilo afectivo adquirido y el sentido atribuido a las situaciones vividas constituyen el capital mental que el estudiante utiliza para enfrentar los problemas. Los adolescentes, en su mayoría, mostraron sensibilidad al contexto en el que afirmaron sus juicios y clarificaron los parámetros en los que se enmarcaron sus afirmaciones. Muestra de ello fueron sus sugerencias para otros jóvenes que viven situaciones adversas: «no bajes la cabeza, eres súper importante, esfuérzate, los problemas no duran cien años». Los comentarios reflejan un proceso continuo de resignificación que facilitó el pensamiento crítico, lo cual les configuró su ecología de aprendizaje resiliente en ambientes ubicuos.

References

  1. ArdoinoJ, . 1991.El análisis multirreferencial. In: , ed. de l’education, sciences majeures. Actes de Journees d’etude tenues a l’occasion des 21 ans des sciences de l’education. Issy-les-Moulineaux, EAP, Colección Recherches et Sciences de l’Education&author=&publication_year= Sciences de l’education, sciences majeures. Actes de Journees d’etude tenues a l’occasion des 21 ans des sciences de l’education. Issy-les-Moulineaux, EAP, Colección Recherches et Sciences de l’Education.173-181
  2. J.Álvarez-Gayou,, . 2003. , ed. hacer investigación cualitativa: Fundamentos y metodología&author=&publication_year= Cómo hacer investigación cualitativa: Fundamentos y metodología.México: Paidós.
  3. BarronB, . 2006.and self-sustained learning as catalysts of development: A learning ecology perspective&author=Barron&publication_year= Interest and self-sustained learning as catalysts of development: A learning ecology perspective.Human Development 49(4):193-224
  4. Beltrán-LlavadoJ, . 2015.Educación a lo largo de la vida: Un horizonte de sentido. [Education throughout life: A horizon of meaning]Sinéctica 45:1-11
  5. BolívarA, DomingoJ, FernándezM, . 2001. , ed. investigación biográfico-narrativa en educación, enfoque y metodología&author=&publication_year= La investigación biográfico-narrativa en educación, enfoque y metodología.Madrid: La Muralla.
  6. BolívarA, . 1999.Enfoque narrativo versus explicativo del desarrollo moral. In: PérezE., MestreM., eds. moral y crecimiento personal. Su situación en el cambio de siglo&author=Pérez&publication_year= Psicología moral y crecimiento personal. Su situación en el cambio de siglo.Barcelona: Ariel. 85-101
  7. BolívarA, . 2002.De nobis ipsis silemus: Epistemología de la investigación biográfico-narrativa en educación.Revista Electrónica de Investigación Educativa 4(1):1-26
  8. BronfenbrennerU, . 1977.an experimental ecology of human development&author=Bronfenbrenner&publication_year= Toward an experimental ecology of human development.American Psychologist 32(7):513-531
  9. BurbulesN, . 2012.aprendizaje ubicuo y el futuro de la enseñanza&author=Burbules&publication_year= El aprendizaje ubicuo y el futuro de la enseñanza.Encounters/Encuentros/Rencontres on Education 13:3-14
  10. BurbulesN, . 2014.significados del aprendizaje ubicuo&author=Burbules&publication_year= Los significados del aprendizaje ubicuo.Archivos Analíticos de Políticas Educativas 22:1-7
  11. BurbulesN, . 2014.El aprendizaje ubicuo: Nuevos contextos, nuevos procesos.Entramados 1(1):131-135
  12. BuckinghamD, . 2007. , ed. technology: Children’s learning in the age of digital culture&author=&publication_year= Beyond technology: Children’s learning in the age of digital culture. Malden: Polity Press.
  13. Santos-CaamañoF J, González-SanmamedM, Muñoz-CarrilP C, . 2018.desarrollo de las ecologías del aprendizaje a través de herramientas en línea&author=Santos-Caamaño&publication_year= El desarrollo de las ecologías del aprendizaje a través de herramientas en línea.Revista Diálogo Educacional 18(56):128-148
  14. ClaráM, . 2017.resilience and meaning transformation: How teachers reappraise situations of adversity&author=Clará&publication_year= Teacher resilience and meaning transformation: How teachers reappraise situations of adversity.Teaching and Teacher Education 63:82-91
  15. DenzinN K, . 1989.of multiple triangulation. The research act: A theoretical introduction to sociological methods&author=&publication_year= Strategies of multiple triangulation. The research act: A theoretical introduction to sociological methods. New York: McGraw Hill.
  16. Díez-GutiérrezE, Díaz-NafríaJ, . 2018.learning ecologies for a critical cybercitizenship. [Ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo para la ciberciudadanía crítica&author=Díez-Gutiérrez&publication_year= Ubiquitous learning ecologies for a critical cybercitizenship. [Ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo para la ciberciudadanía crítica]]Comunicar 26(54):49-58
  17. DelorsJ, . 1996. , ed. educación encierra un tesoro&author=&publication_year= La educación encierra un tesoro.Madrid: UNESCO.
  18. DukeB, HarperG, JohnstonM, . 2013.Connectivism as a digital age learning theory.The International HETL. Review. Special Issue4-13
  19. FernándezE, AnguitaR, . 2015.Ecologías del aprendizaje en contextos múltiples.Profesorado 19(2)
  20. ForésA, GranéJ, . 2012. , ed. resiliencia, crecer desde la adversidad&author=&publication_year= La resiliencia, crecer desde la adversidad.Barcelona: Plataforma.
  21. González-SanmamedM, SangràA, Souto-SeijoA, BlancoI E, . 2018.del aprendizaje en la era digital: Desafíos para la educación superior&author=González-Sanmamed&publication_year= Ecologías del aprendizaje en la era digital: Desafíos para la educación superior.Publicaciones 48(1):25-45
  22. González-SanmamedM, Muñoz-CarrilP C, Santos-CaamañoF J, . 2019.components of learning ecologies: A Delphi assessment&author=González-Sanmamed&publication_year= Key components of learning ecologies: A Delphi assessment.British Journal of Educational Technology 50(4)
  23. GrotbergE H, . 2006. , ed. resiliencia en el mundo de hoy. Cómo superar las adversidades&author=&publication_year= La resiliencia en el mundo de hoy. Cómo superar las adversidades.Madrid: Gedisa.
  24. GutiérrezL, . 2012.Conectivismo como teoría de aprendizaje: Conceptos, ideas, y posibles limitaciones.Revista de Educación y Tecnología 1:111-122
  25. HernándezR, FernándezC, BaptistaP, . 2006.de la investigación&author=&publication_year= Metodología de la investigación. México: McGraw Hill.
  26. HendersonN, MilsteinM, . 2003.en la escuela&author=&publication_year= Resiliencia en la escuela. Buenos Aires: Paidós.
  27. HerreraA, . 2013.adaptación del docente al nuevo contexto de ecologías de aprendizaje en el proceso formativo: La nueva misión del docente actual en Colombia&author=Herrera&publication_year= La adaptación del docente al nuevo contexto de ecologías de aprendizaje en el proceso formativo: La nueva misión del docente actual en Colombia.Escenarios 11(2):24-29
  28. JacksonN J, . 2013.concept of learning ecologies&author=Jackson&publication_year= The concept of learning ecologies. In: JacksonN., CooperB., eds. learning, education and personal development&author=Jackson&publication_year= Lifewide learning, education and personal development.1-21
  29. Jiménez-CortésR, . 2015.Aprendizaje ubicuo de las mujeres jóvenes en las redes sociales y su consciencia de aprendizaje.Prisma Social 15:180-221
  30. LadinoD, SantanaL, MartínezO, BejaranoP, CabreraD, . 2016.Ecología del aprendizaje como herramienta de innovación educativa en educación superior.Nuevas ideas en Informática Educativa 12:517-521
  31. MainaM, García-GonzálezI, . 2016.personal pedagogies through learning ecologies&author=Maina&publication_year= Articulating personal pedagogies through learning ecologies. In: GrosB., KinshukM.M., eds. future of ubiquitous learning: Learning designs for emerging pedagogies&author=Gros&publication_year= The future of ubiquitous learning: Learning designs for emerging pedagogies.Berlin: Springer. 73-94
  32. MarkG, Al-AniB, SemaanB, . 2009.through technology adoption: Merging the old and the new in Iraq&author=Mark&publication_year= Resilience through technology adoption: Merging the old and the new in Iraq. In: , ed. of the 27th International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems&author=&publication_year= Proceedings of the 27th International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.Boston: CHI ´09.
  33. MelilloA, . 2001.y educación&author=Melillo&publication_year= Resiliencia y educación. In: MelilloA., SuárezE., eds. Descubriendo las propias fortalezas&author=Melillo&publication_year= Resiliencia: Descubriendo las propias fortalezas.Buenos Aires: Paidós. 123-144
  34. MunistM, SuárezE, KrauskopfD, SilberT J, . 2007.y resiliencia&author=&publication_year= Adolescencia y resiliencia. Buenos Aires: Paidós.
  35. PetersM, RomeroM, . 2019.learning ecologies in online higher education: Students' engagement in the continuum between formal and informal learning&author=Peters&publication_year= Lifelong learning ecologies in online higher education: Students' engagement in the continuum between formal and informal learning.British Journal of Educational Technology 50(4):1729-1743
  36. PhillippiA, AvendañoC, . 2011.empowerment: Narrative skills of the subjects. [Empoderamiento comunicacional: competencias narrativas de los sujetos&author=Phillippi&publication_year= Communicative empowerment: Narrative skills of the subjects. [Empoderamiento comunicacional: competencias narrativas de los sujetos]]Comunicar 36:61-68
  37. RodríguezH, GonzálezG, GarcíaA, AriasV, AriasB, . 2016.Entornos comunicativos de aprendizaje: Coordenadas para comprender los procesos de aprendizaje y el CSCL.Profesorado 20(3):627-657
  38. RodríguezE, CabreraC, ZorrillaJ, YotC, . 2018.La rueda y los rayos. Experiencias, tensiones y desafíos para generar nuevas ecologías de aprendizaje ubicuo.Montevideo: Universidad ORT
  39. RutterM, . 1993.some conceptual considerations&author=Rutter&publication_year= Resilience, some conceptual considerations.Journal of Adolescent Health 14(8):626-631
  40. SangràA, . 2005.Internet y los nuevos modelos de aprendizaje: Dónde está la innovación. In: , ed. Congresso Galaico-Portugués de Psicopedagogía, Universidade do Minho-Braga&author=&publication_year= VIII Congresso Galaico-Portugués de Psicopedagogía, Universidade do Minho-Braga.
  41. SandovalC A, . 2002. , ed. cualitativa: Especialización en teoría, métodos y técnicas de investigación social&author=&publication_year= Investigación cualitativa: Especialización en teoría, métodos y técnicas de investigación social.Bogotá: ARFO.
  42. SiemensG, . 2007.Creating a learning ecology in distributed environments&author=Siemens&publication_year= Connectivism: Creating a learning ecology in distributed environments. In: HugT., ed. of microlearning: Concepts, discourses, and examples &author=Hug&publication_year= Didactics of microlearning: Concepts, discourses, and examples .Münster: WaxmannVerlag. 53-68
  43. SimpsonM G, . 2014.claves para generar resiliencia&author=&publication_year= 11 claves para generar resiliencia.
  44. TaylorS J, BogdanR, . 2000.a los métodos cualitativos de investigación&author=&publication_year= Introducción a los métodos cualitativos de investigación. Barcelona: Paidós.
  45. TruebridgeS, . 2016.It begins with beliefs&author=Truebridge&publication_year= Resilience: It begins with beliefs.Kappa Delta Pi Record 52:22-27
  46. UNESCO (Ed.). 2016.Declaración Incheon y marco de acción. Hacia una educación inclusiva y equitativa de calidad y un aprendizaje a lo largo de la vida para todos.
  47. VanistendaelS, LecomteJ, . 2006.y sentido de vida&author=Vanistendael&publication_year= Resiliencia y sentido de vida.Resiliencia y subjetividad. Los ciclos de la vida.
  48. WernerE E, SmithR S, . 1992. , ed. the odds. High risks children from birth to adulthood&author=&publication_year= Overcoming the odds. High risks children from birth to adulthood. New York: Cornell University Press.
Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/19
Accepted on 31/12/19
Submitted on 31/12/19

Volume 28, Issue 1, 2020
DOI: 10.3916/C62-2020-04
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 43
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?