Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This work investigates the relationships between community radio and their audiences in the Department of Nariño, Colombia, considering Latin American and European experiences, and participation as a key element for social sustainability. The aim is to investigate whether the participation of citizens in the production, diffusion and radio management has been supported or not. Methodologically, we follow a mixed design that combined the results of two questionnaires: one, applied to 632 people from eleven municipalities; and the second, to eleven directors of communal stations. This was complemented with information provided by eleven groups composed of radio broadcasters, publishers and producers. One key finding within the audiences is that they recognize a radio station as a tool to enhance sociocultural dynamics in the region. As to the directors of stations, it was found that they didn't encourage active participation with communities. It seems that the absence of active and critical participation on the part of the audiences is due to an organizational and radio production model that mirrors the commercial one. In conclusion, these factors have limited the construction of democratic relations between communal broadcasters and their audiences; and especially, reduced the possibilities for citizens to participate as valid interlocutors in a local communicational project.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

With technological advances, access to media information is increasingly simple, versatile and interactive. It is therefore becoming less relevant to talk about audiences from the media singularity and the polarity of actors in the informational model. In recent years, citizens, converted into audiences, participate in intensive exchanges and complex media relations through personalized virtual devices and other digital resources. A huge cluster of massive information is available that is getting closer to our intimate spaces every day, while the intimate has densified the massive scenarios of interactions. Media, mediations and mediators tend to confuse their places of enunciation, to understand each other and look for a new meaning. It is therefore necessary to investigate the relations between media and audiences. This is because of the doubts raised about themselves “Has it finished?... are the audience’s time finishing?” (Orozco, Navarro, & García, 2012: 68), or perhaps its existence is an artifice that is part of the logic of the market of information and publicity (Castells, 2011).

At the dawn of democratic contexts of information and communication, Cloutier (1973) concerned himself with the EMIREC, a term that was retaken and worked by Latin American communication researchers (Kaplún, 1997; Beltrán, 1981) to name a two-way dialogue function between emitters and receivers. Then the tension between producers and consumers was transformed, and more prominence was given to the audience. That is why they created qualifiers as active and passive audiences (Medina, Tamayo, & Rojas, 2010), Critical audiences (Camacho, 2005) and creative audiences (Talens, 2011); and in recent times, with the omnipresence of the Internet and social networks, the notion of prosumers is imposed. This was initially worked by Toffler and McLuhan (Sánchez & Contreras, 2012), where audiences are considered to be producers and consumers of media content at the same time.

At the heart of these tensions has been the ideal for democratizing the word, media and communications with the idea that it would encourage a more democratic society (Beltrán, 2016; López, 2005) from a Latin American perspective. Also some experiences in community media in Europe and Latin America (Martínez, Mayoke, & Tamarit, 2012) coincide in the appropriation of media and communicative processes achieved by experiences of communities, beyond legal recognition. In this sense, initiatives of the community, free and university media in Spain are highlighted (Collado, 2008). These are motivated by social movements, non-profit organizations, and from an inclusive radio approach (Garcia, 2017), constituting what has been called the third Sector of communication in France and Spain (Ortiz, 2014), which also highlights experiences of university radios (Aguaded & Martin-Pena, 2014).

Parallel to these processes, a hegemony has been developing among the mercantile logic of the mass media and the global technological developments (Martín-Barbero, 2000) that have transformed this ideal in local versions of radio production where they articulate, indiscriminately, elements of the commercial media with their own cultural expressions and contents. Recent audience studies seem to be located in the conditions of a globalized, convergent, interconnected and trans mediated world (Lazo & Gabelas, 2016; Padilla & al., 2011), which shows how citizens are more active in their use of technologies. Bonilla believes that many of these studies have lost their political dimension when they stop seeing audiences as interlocutors and understand them as media receivers (2011). Thus, Padilla discusses the differences between being citizens and being audiences in a relationship charged by a mediated, political public sphere, and said author concludes that audiences tend to orient their media practices more towards communities of belonging and less towards political communities (2012). Other reviews distinguish between traditional audiences, social audiences and prosumers (Quintas & Gonzalez, 2014).

The emergence of community radio in Colombia has been linked to a set of political conditions such as the transformation and adoption of a new Political Constitution in the year 1991. Additional factors are related to the worsening of the armed social conflict, characterized as long-standing violence and dating from the beginning of the narco-trafficking phenomenon (Osses, 2015).

In the context of the second half of the end of the twentieth century, we see the appearance of the first regulations on community radio and those of public interest. From this moment on, the licenses for a first group of 564 community-based broadcasters are gestated. These were born with little institutional support and an incipient orientation to materialize their social function.

It is significant that the description of the community remains on a typology of radio stations legally recognised by the government of Colombia. Firstly, this is because it establishes a difference with private commercial radio stations in terms of their nature and mission objectives. Secondly, this was done because the opportunity to consolidate democratic processes of information and communication from the local is still latent.

The Ministry of Information and Communications Technologies of Colombia conceives community Sound Broadcasting as: a participatory and pluralistic public service, aimed at satisfying the needs of communication in the municipality or coverage area, facilitating the exercise of the right to information and the participation of its inhabitants through radio programs that promote social development, peaceful coexistence, democratic values, the construction of citizenship and the strengthening of cultural and social identities (Min TIC, 2017).

Thus this ministry does not carry out processes of accompaniment or follow-up; rather it only limits its functions to demand the fulfillment of technical and legal requirements. Meanwhile the Ministry of Culture focuses its efforts on the promotion of the production of contents through the Direction of Communications. And so, the idea of building democratic communication projects remains as a basis for the management of participatory practices from the plurality of their expressions and in articulation with those who lead media and local experiences, so that they can guarantee real possibilities of expression, dialogue, exchange and discussion of content, produced and disseminated, from the needs and aspirations of the citizens.

2. Material and methods

This article derives from the project “Challenges and limitation of sustainability that faced the community broadcasters affiliated to the Sindamanoy network of the Department of Nariño”, executed in agreement between the Mariana University and the UNAD during the years 2014 to 2016.

Based on the information collected, results are presented that respond to the objective of identifying the perceptions, preferences and needs of audience participation in community broadcasters. This objective is aimed at establishing how the role of audiences in social sustainability affects, as one of the key dimensions, the integral sustainability of these radio stations (Gumucio-Dagron, 2005). It is supposed that a community radio station is consolidated if the citizens, as audiences, validate, legitimize and contribute to the local communicative project.

The study was conceived from a mixed design (Creswell, 2013; Greene, 2006) based on a sample of 632 people surveyed and eleven directors of community stations affiliated to the Sindamanoy network of the Department of Nariño, Colombia. This was complemented by a simultaneous triangulation (Morse, 1991). This was the result of eleven focal groups, composed of radio broadcasters and radio producers, whose perceptions were consolidated by a SWOT matrix (Martínez & Ortega, 2016), in the first phase of the project.

The Department of Nariño is located in the south of Colombia on the border with Ecuador. Most of its population consists of small landlholding farmings integrated by indigenous people, black communities and peasants. For the study, the community radio stations of the municipalities of Pupiales, Sandoná, Leiva, Mallama, Consacá, San Lorenzo, Gualmatán, Samaniego, Guaitarilla, Tuquerres and Funes were selected. The selection was made on the basis of reciprocity criteria, between researchers and investigated people, from a sense of trust, understanding, agreement and Sensibility (Sandín, 2000); A second criterion was the geographical location of the radio stations; and a third criterion took into account its active link to the network of broadcasters. The population of the audience was formed by men and women over 14 years-old who met the requirements of: 1) To have lived the last three years in one of the selected municipalities; 2) to have been a listener to one of the selected stations, thus we are within a group of active audiences of the radio stations (Medina, Tamayo, & Rojas, 2010). The sample design was organized by conglomerates equivalent to 0.3 of the population; and the selection was made by equal quotas of gender in each municipality. For the application of the survey, we opted for a simple random sampling system, depleting the two above-mentioned requirements. The surveys were applied between May 2014 and February 2015 at the head of each municipality and its environs, through direct interview. The gathering of information was achieved with the support of a team of pollsters, previously trained, and that gave the information for tabulation and analysis. The pollsters adopted the strategy of a verbal informed consent prior to each interview.

The questionnaire consisted of 26 questions that were divided into two large groups: from question 1 to 8, demographically characterized to the population; from 9 onwards, priority was given to the category of social sustainability, namely the relationship between community radio stations and their audiences. To classify or group the type of questions, the following categories were used: access to the medium; media consumption frequencies; reception and programming preferences; knowledge about the community environment and participation in the Community radio station. The information was organized in a tabulation and analysis matrix. This was done with the support of the SPSS program in frequency tables. The descriptive analysis was made based on frequencies of response options that were consolidated in percentages compared to the inside of each question, which prioritized those that allowed one to respond to the objective of this work.

3. Analysis and results

Based on the proposed objective, the most relevant questions were prioritized for the categories of media perceptions, consumer preferences and citizen participation, which sought to identify a media trend in each of the responses in global percentages of all radio stations.


Martinez-Roa Ortega-Erazo 2018a-62680-en030.jpg

3.1. Media perceptions

The perceptions of citizens on an informative medium, as audiences, allow us to identify possible misconceptions related to their organisational nature, the meaning of their contents and the forms of relationship with society. Figure 1 shows citizens’ perception of the ideal nature of a community broadcaster. A 42.5% defines it as one that allows community participation, followed by a 35.3% that disseminates local interest information. Thirdly with 10.5% is the idea that has a varied programming. Two ratings below 5% consider that a community station is an information company or a media that makes social and institutional campaigns. Only 1.9% consider that it does not have an advertising pattern.

Another perception makes reference to the programming of the community radio medium. This emphasizes a trend of 53% that considers it varied, followed by a 26.7% that think it is interesting. The lowest values show that a 0.8% qualifies it unimportant. The perception of a varied and interesting programming gives community broadcasters an important recognition as a medium of local information, while only 0.9% think it is educational.


Martinez-Roa Ortega-Erazo 2018a-62680-en031.jpg

3.2. Consumption preferences

The temporal frequency of citizens’ media consumption, as shown in Figure 2, establishes that the radio continues to have a high daily preference (84.1%) competing very closely with television (82.4%), while the Internet occupies a third position (27%), and the written press (5.5%) is relegated. These results are related to two associated factors: 1) easy access and 2) listening as a historical-cultural practice. The internet is enjoying an emerging trend because of the expansive market of mobile and Internet services, along with the promotion of government programs for digital modernization in educational institutions and local government. The written press is declining because of the few printed copies that are distributed in municipal offices and public institutions of the municipalities. This contributes to the fact that more and more people access the websites of the big newspapers, radio and television newscasts.


Martinez-Roa Ortega-Erazo 2018a-62680-en032.jpg

In addition, a second question indicates that 40.3% of the people listen to the community radio station between seven and ten in the morning. After this time, the average percentage of listeners is between 16.7% and 18.4%. Most community broadcasters only transmit up to six or seven in the afternoon.

This emission strip corresponds to the work activities of many people in the countryside whose day begins between six and seven in the morning and ends between five and six in the afternoon.


Martinez-Roa Ortega-Erazo 2018a-62680-en033.jpg

Reasons underlying the consumption of community radio stations: it was possible to demonstrate, in Figure 3, that the highest percentage of respondents (30.9%) do so by musical programming; followed by a (24%) for the diversity of programming; and a third group (16.4%) prefers it because it is part of the community and can participate in it. This trend was observed in the radio stations of Sandoná, Gualmatán, Guatarilla and San Lorenzo, where their directors have encouraged methods of bringing people closer to the broadcaster’s programs. An intermediate group of listeners appears (between 4.4% and 7.7%) whose motivation is located in programs of information, opinion and of specialized subjects, with the exception of another group that, although they are within this percentage range, their option is inclined towards the presenters and disk jokeys.

3.3. Citizen participation

Survey respondents were asked about the reasons why they had contacted the station. Figure 4 shows that 46.6% did it to request a song, then 9.4% to comment on a topic. This is significant in a group of community broadcasters where the production of informative and opinion programs is scarce. There are other reasons (8.9%) that are not clear according to the proposed response option. The options for: Making a suggestion, a complaint, a critique of the broadcaster, and participating in a debate, were below 4.1%. This demonstrates the precarious access that citizens have to the community media to express their critical opinions, grievances and disagreements freely.

In the survey applied to the directors, they consider that asking for a song constitutes an effective form of participation in the radio station. This is corroborated with (93%) of answers for Yes, against 7% No, in the option by telephone calls as a way to participate with the staion.


Martinez-Roa Ortega-Erazo 2018a-62680-en034.jpg

Something similar happens with letters written with (80%) positive; and emails, chat, Facebook and Twitter with (73%). The lower percentages (60%) are in the participation in spaces of opinion and meetings with the work team of the station. This reflects a precarious opening for the organization of broadcasters to link citizens as active audiences in the production of programmes or in the management of other activities. It is clear that the directors and owners mark a clear distance with their audiences, similar to the traditional commercial radio model.

On the other hand, Figure 5 consolidates citizens’ responses to their possible participation in activities convened or organized by community broadcasters in the last year. Here it was evidenced that 62.2% had not participated in any activity. A second group of replies (between 5.7% and 7.5%) are related to participation in: bazaars, fairs or community or municipal festivals; sports, religious activities, environmental campaigns, cleanliness and public areas.

In accordance with the consultation of the directors and the discussion groups, many of these activities have been promoted by local institutions and organizations with the support of the broadcaster in its dissemination and promotion. The lowest percentages (less than 2.8%) were obtained in: cultural activities, control and monitoring, campaigns in critical situations or catastrophes, radio workshops and protests or mobilizations. These results were because the broadcaster never promoted this type of activity, and only in a small proportion of them were carried out.

It was also asked if citizens would be interested in participating in a listeners’ club. It was found that 45.3% would be willing, while 54.7% responded negatively. One last question was to establish whether citizens would be willing to support the community broadcaster in some way, and it was found that 36.1% opted for any of the above, 27.6% stated that it would do with voluntary work, 18.1% proposes programs, while only 1.1% would be willing to link directly to the radio station’s team. It is inferred from this that citizens do not accept the radio station as their own, and therefore they do not express a clear desire to support it. However, the second and third highest percentage, show a favorable tendency to want to support the radio station explicitly and directly, engaging in its dynamics of production of content, which confirms the need and opportunity to strengthen actions for promoting citizen participation in the community radio stations.

4. Discussion and conclusions

In 1994, for the first time the government of Colombia opened the possibility of legally recognizing the community broadcasters as an initiative that opened to a local radio conceived and produced from the communities. Twenty years after there are few studies in Colombia that realize what happened to these experiences, therefore, it is necessary to ask about their scope and limitations. This is important because of the relationship they have maintained with their audiences, and by how this relationship has allowed or not to set up a social sustainability.

At first glance, citizens associate community radio with two areas: participatory and dissemination of local information, and especially with the media visibility of microsocial life in the village, the countryside or the neighborhood. The participatory appears more as an ideal than as a fact. To the directors the sense of these community radio stations is assumed as the dissemination of local information. This is an appreciation that the discussion groups also share. Everyone agrees with the idea that the community radio station is the place where fragments of local history are shared with people and institutions are known to each other. The community radio station is considered to be a close and a very emotional medium.

Although for the citizens there is a collective feeling to reassess the local as a cultural and emotive place to find themselves, this does not correspond with the organizational dynamics and programming of the radio stations. The feeling of valuation by the local is closer to identifying with aesthetic-cultural and territorial-insitutional symbols than with political and social situations arisen from the needs and problems felt by the citizens. Perceptions of what defines a community radio station show a paradox between local, as the place that includes them socially and culturally; and the radio station, as a space that excludes community participation, but at the same time it is useful to the facts of community life.

In different ways, each one of the community radio stations has configured a sense of territorial belonging expressed in the valuation of the medium as relatively own and close to its realities. Beyond being considered a business organization It conceives as a space that disseminates, sporadically, some narratives of local life. Paradoxically, this perception of the radio station as an information company does not manage to be general in the citizens, while for directors and owners, the issue of economic sustainability and consolidate it as a company, is one of its main concerns. The production teams of community broadcasters, four to seven people, are linked to low salaries or voluntarily. The historical cause of the privatization of many of these community radio stations in Colombia is largely due to the way the Ministry of Communications allocated licensing concessions. The majority were given to individuals or families who, as part of a social organization, assumed the representativeness of the communities of a municipality and appropriated the radio station as a private medium.

Citizens prefer to listen to community broadcasters for their musical programming and some informative programs from early hours of the day. Nevertheless, in municipalities in the south and the center of the department have the option of listening to other radio stations of regional coverage. The musical preference, as a radio reception practice, is based on the way in which the listeners have traditionally been constituted in Colombia. The notion of the tradition of radio-listening comes very deliberately as a variable of great influence in the historical-cultural formation of the Colombian citizens, especially those who inhabit the rural sectors. Many learned to listen to the radio of the commercial models. It has built a collective imagination that considers as a “good radio station” to the one that offers a commercial music programming that the listeners like. Thus the musical genre has become the guideline for greater consumption of the commercial radio stations, which has been imitated by the community members.

This referential effect or mirror action of the commercial model arose from the granting of the licenses of the Community stations to people and organizations. Their knowledge in production of radio programs was based on the commercial radio stations, since the scarce experiences of popular and alternative media in Latin America managed to be significant but invisible; Many were reviewed by academics and social organizations, but in essence they do not transcended their political sense to the community broadcasters in Colombia. This is explained by the global and neoliberal sociopolitical dynamics that were undermining critical thinking and liberal speeches that inspired social movements at the end of the cold war and throughout the late twentieth century.

Of the first radio speakers, journalists and radio producers in Colombia, including the community radio stations started as empirical, some had secondary school education. Some were technicians or teachers, and many of them learned the formats and ways of making the commercial radio. Some risked producing information, live broadcasts of sporting and cultural events, and a few explored the magazine format. The radio producers of the community radio were adjusting their formats, schedules and contents from the early morning to late afternoon, in such a way that they avoided the strong and expansive competition with the national channels of the commercial television, for many years they were positioned from noon the night. This strategy has enabled community broadcasters to achieve partial social sustainability with their audiences through a musical, informative, and little local-opinion program, implying that citizens choose to combine their preferences media consumption between local radio and national television.

The results make it possible to observe that the citizens participate passively in the station, which agrees with Ramírez (2014:122) in Chile, and García & Ávila (2009) in Ecuador, although there are stations in Nariño whose directors make efforts to promote participatory processes with their audience (Martínez & Ortega, 2017: 19). The audiences of the community stations in Nariño have gradually been assuming the dynamics of social audiences due to the gradual use of social networks to interact with the radio station. Therefore, efforts are required to foster spaces and dynamics whereby listeners are assumed as prosumers of community radio.

The community radio stations in Nariño do not achieve a local leadership that summons other social or cultural activities other than the ones of its programming. That is because of the absence of a political-social communication project that allows the articulation of efforts between those who run the radio stations and the organized communities. The incipient participation of the communities in these radio stations is due to four factors: first of all, to the connotation of private means as their directors and owners have conceived; Secondly, to the adoption of the commercial model in its organization and programming; Thirdly, by the incipient formation of citizens as radio producers and critical audiences; and fourthly, the lack of accompaniment mechanisms, monitoring and control over the mission of community radio stations.

The above questioned the appropriation of citizens with their community radio station, particularly when they were asked on how they would be willing to support or to link with it. Although these percentages are low, they become an opening opportunity to articulate and advance in the missionary spirit of community radio. This indicates that there is a lot of potential citizens who would be willing to participate and strengthen their programming from the sociocultural realities. This environment of estrangement between those who run the community stations in Nariño and their audiences has generated a relationship in which the citizens are excluded and the right to free expression is denied.

It is concluded that the community radio stations investigated have potential audiences (Medina, Tamayo, & Rojas, 2010) that have not been sufficiently used as interlocutors, producers and collaborators within a communicative project. This is due to the little community sense which the information practices and the social relations between the environment and the citizens have been assumed. On the other hand, there is also the lack of interest of the Colombian Government, in particular the Ministry of Information and Communications technologies, for the issues of social participation and democratization of the community media and citizens. This situation is similar to what happened in Argentina with the community broadcasters within the policies of communication and culture (Linares & al., 2017), as evidenced in the case of this study.

A second conclusion reveals how none of the community broadcasters has a community communicative project built collectively and from the needs of its citizens. This is owed to the improvisation of activities and short-term planning. A factor of great incidence, observed in the responses of directors and discussion groups, this organizational vertical scheme where decisions are concentrated in the head of a director (as the owner of the medium) and in other cases on the board of Directors, which coincides with the Mora study (2011).

A third conclusion of this work shows that, from the organizations and managers of the community broadcasters, a participation of citizens in their programming is not promoted, nor do they lead other social or community activities, which it generates a double relationship: on one side of proximity as listeners in front of its musical programming; and on the other hand distance in terms of actions of participation and social appropriation of the medium, conclusion that agrees with Rodriguez in relation to the lack of participation in the informative discourse of the community radio (2012). This confirms the fact that community broadcasters continue to orient themselves with a sense of private organization. This coincides with Padilla (2012), about the incipient link between being audiences and being citizens. Thus, the community on the radio is adopted as a label (Talens, 2011) little linked with its democratic, participatory and inclusive sense; In recent years, some Latin American countries have renewed their policy frameworks and communication policies (Sosa, 2016) and unequal advances in legislation and the right to communication (Gómez & Agerre, 2009); however, in Colombia there is still an outstanding profound change in this direction.

It is clear that the political commitment between the community and the citizen remains a pending issue in the radio stations investigated, which a structure of organization and production taken of the commercial reference is adopted, with some attempts to incorporate contents of the culture and events of local life. Communicative citizenship is not a practice of political significance through these community media (Rodriguez, 2009:18), nor does it recognize its inhabitants as interlocutors in the relation medium – audiences, which coincides with the study of Álvarez (2014) on the community radio stations in Valle de Aburra in the department of Antioquia in Colombia. The community broadcasters in this region of Colombia go through a moment of relative stagnation and redefinition of their political and social horizon. Recently they have advanced in the consolidation of the Sindamanoy network community radio stations of Nariño where they share democratizing, participatory and collective-building principles that try to materialize by articulating actions with the Communication System for Peace (SIPAZ) in Colombia, and AMARC at the global level.

Funding agency

Interinstitutional cooperation agreement signed between the Mariana University (UNIMAR) and Open University of Colombia (UNAD) for the development of the research project “Challenges and limitations of sustainability facing the community broadcasters affiliated to the Sindamanoy network of the Department of Nariño”, through the research groups “Desarrollo Humano y Social” from UNIMAR and “Fisura” from UNAD.

References

Aguaded, I., & Martín-Pena, D. (2014). Educomunicación y radios universitarias: Panorama internacional y perspectivas futuras. Chasqui, 124, 65-72. (https://goo.gl/U6TQEp).

Álvarez-Moreno, M.A. (2014). El desafío de las radios comunitarias. Anagramas, 6(12), 59-75. (https://goo.gl/1JBQyr).

Beltrán, L.R. (2006). La comunicación para el desarrollo en Latinoamérica: Un recuento de medio siglo. Anagramas, 4(8), 53-76. (https://goo.gl/VmtLK9).

Bonilla-Vélez, J.I. (2011). Re-visitando los estudios de recepción/ audiencias en Colombia. Comunicación y Sociedad, 16, 75-103. (https://goo.gl/QttSJ5).

Camacho, C.A. (2005). Democratización de la sociedad: Entre el derecho a la información y el ejercicio de la ciudadanía comunicativa. Punto Cero, 10(10), 28-36. (https://goo.gl/42WoXt).

Castell, M. (2011). Comunicación y poder. Madrid: Alianza.

Cloudier, J.C. (1973). The communication audio-scripto-visuelle. Communication et Langages, 19. Montreal: Presses Universitaires.

Collado-Campaña, F. (2008). La influencia de las radios y las televisiones comunitarias en la construcción de la ciudadanía. Ámbitos, 17, 209-224. (https://goo.gl/3Qbxzx).

Creswell, J.W. (2013). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

García, J.G. (2017). Transformaciones y aprendizajes de las radios comunitarias en España: Hacia un modelo de radio inclusiva. Disertaciones, 10(1), 30-41. https://doi.org/10.12804/revistas.urosario.edu.co/disertaciones/a.4535

García, N., & Ávila, C. (2016). Nuevos escenarios para la comunicación comunitaria: Oportunidades y amenazas a medios de comunicación y organizaciones de la sociedad civil a partir de la aplicación del nuevo marco regulatorio ecuatoriano. Palabra Clave, 19(1), 271-303. https://doi.org/10.5294/pacla.2016.19.1.11

Gómez, G., & Aguerre, C. (2009). Las mordazas invisibles. Nuevas y viejas barreras a la diversidad en la radiodifusión. Buenos Aires: Amarc-alc.

Greene, J.C. (2006). Toward a methodology of mixed methods social inquiry. Research in the Schools, 13(1), 93-98. (https://goo.gl/zTg2ST).

Gumucio-Dagron, A. (2005). Arte de equilibristas: la sostenibilidad de los medios de comunicación comunitarios. Punto Cero, 10(10), 6-19. (https://goo.gl/auqbYm).

Kaplún, M. (2002). Una pedagogía de la comunicación (el comunicador popular). La Habana: Caminos. (https://goo.gl/vw0G1b).

Lazo, C.M., & Gabelas, J.A. (2016). Comunicación digital: un modelo basado en el factor relacional. Barcelona: UOC.

Linares, A., Segura, M.S., Hidalgo, A.L., Kejval, L., Longo, V., Traversaro, N., & Vinelli, N. (2017). Brechas: La desigualdad en las políticas de fomento de medios comunitarios, otros medios e industrias culturales. Revista Latinoamericana de Ciencias de la Comunicación, 13(25). (https://goo.gl/xwGPmG).

López-Vigil, J.I., & Barrientos, I. (2000). Manual urgente para radialistas apasionadas y apasionados. Quito: Artes Gráficas Silva.

Martín-Barbero, J. (2000). Las transformaciones del mapa cultural: una visión desde América Latina. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 26. (https://goo.gl/AgCEP2).

Martínez-Hermida M., Mayugo-Majó, C., & Tamarit-Rodríguez, A. (2012). Comunidad y comunicación: prácticas comunicativas y medios comunitarios en Europa y América Latina. XV Encuentro de Latinoamericanistas Españoles (pp. 499-513). Madrid: Trama. (https://goo.gl/WVYMqb).

Martínez-Roa, O.G., & Ortega, E.G. (2016). Desafíos de sostenibilidad de la radio comunitaria en Nariño en Colombia. Nexus Comunicación, 20, 6-21. https://doi.org/10.25100/nc.v0i20.1831

Medina-Valencia, A., Tamayo-Gómez C., & Rojas, I. (2010). Analizar audiencias, construir nuestros sueños. Manual metodológico para la medición y análisis local de las audiencias de las emisoras comunitarias en Colombia. Bogotá: MinTIC.

Ministerio de TIC (Ed.) (2017). Sector de radiodifusión Sonora en Colombia. (https://goo.gl/F98fRP).

Mora-Vizcaya, C.E. (2011). Formas de participación en las radios comunitarias habilitadas del Táchira: Estudio de campo. Disertaciones, 4(1), 6. (https://goo.gl/d5x7US).

Morse, J. (1991). Approaches to qualitative-quantitative methodological triangulation. Nursing Research, 40, 120-123. (https://goo.gl/2oxHjX).

Orozco, G., Navarro, E., & García, A. (2012). Educational challenges in times of mass self-communication: A dialogue among audience. [Desafíos educativos en tiempos de auto-comunicación masiva: La interlocución de las audiencias]. Comunicar, 38, 67-74. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-07

Ortiz-Sobrino, M.A. (2014). La radio como medio para la comunicación alternativa y la participación del Tercer Sector en España y Francia. Comunicación y Hombre, 25-36. (https://goo.gl/udswvi).

Osses Rivera, S.L. (2015). Cincuenta años de radio comunitaria en Colombia. Análisis socio-histórico (1945-1995). Revista General José María Córdova, 13(16), 263-28. (https://goo.gl/KVy22o).

Padilla, M.R. (2012). Dificultades en el vínculo entre el ser ciudadanos y audiencias. Derecho a Comunicar, 5, 29-45. (https://goo.gl/MSYsbN).

Padilla, M.R., Repoll, J.L., González D., Moreno, G., García, H., Franco, D., & Orozco G. (2011). México: La investigación de la recepción y sus audiencias. Hallazgos recientes y perspectivas. Análisis de recepción en América Latina: un recuento histórico con perspectivas a futuro. Quito: CIESPAL.

Quintas, N., & González, A. (2014). Active audiences: Social audience participation in television. [Audiencias activas: Participación de la audiencia social en la televisión]. Comunicar, 43, 83-90. https://doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-08

Ramírez, J.D. (2014). En Chile ¿radio comunitaria o ciudadana? Luciérnaga, 6(12), 118-126. (https://goo.gl/YmgmsF).

Rodríguez, C. (2009). De medios alternativos a medios ciudadanos: trayectoria teórica de un término. Folios, 21-22, 13-25. (http://goo.gl/ADUHs).

Rodríguez, C. (2012). Lo comunitario en la radio comunitaria: Análisis crítico del discurso en el lenguaje informativo utilizado por emisoras comunitarias (Tesis de Maestría). Bogotá: IECO, Universidad Nacional de Colombia. (https://goo.gl/9dVGDJ).

Sánchez-Carrero, J., & Contreras-Pulido, P. (2012). De cara al prosumidor. Producción y consumo empoderando a la ciudadanía 3.0. Icono 14, 10(3), 62- 84. https://doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v10i3.210

Sandín-Esteban, M.P. (2000). Criterios de validez en la investigación cualitativa: De la objetividad a la solidaridad. Revista de Investigación Educativa, 18(1), 223-242. (https://goo.gl/AD8rKp).

Sosa-Plata, G. (2016). Concentración de medios de comunicación, poder y nuevas legislaciones en América Latina. El Cotidiano, 17-30. (https://goo.gl/uk3moU).

Talens, C.I. (2011). ¿Ni indígena ni comunitaria? La radio indigenista en tiempos neoindigenistas. Comunicación y Sociedad, 15, 123-142. (https://goo.gl/DvrMJk).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El presente trabajo indaga sobre las relaciones entre las emisoras comunitarias y sus audiencias, en el Departamento de Nariño en Colombia, en el contexto de experiencias latinoamericanas y europeas, desde una perspectiva de participación, como elemento clave para la sostenibilidad social. Interesa observar cómo los ciudadanos se han propiciado o no de la producción, difusión y gestión radiofónica. Metodológicamente se trabajó desde un diseño mixto que trianguló los resultados de dos cuestionarios: uno, aplicado a una muestra de 632 personas de once municipios, y otro, a once directores de emisoras comunitarias. Esto se complementó con la información de once grupos focales integrados por locutores, editores y realizadores de radio. Uno de los hallazgos más relevantes, en las audiencias, fue el reconocer la emisora como un medio que puede potenciar dinámicas socioculturales en la región. Por su parte, en los directores, se encontró que han agenciado incipientes procesos de participación con las comunidades. Se infiere que existe una deficiente capacidad reflexiva y crítica en las audiencias, esto debido a que la mayoría de emisoras han adoptado el modelo organizativo y de producción de la radio comercial. Se concluye que estos factores han afectado la construcción de relaciones democráticas entre las audiencias y las emisoras comunitarias, y en especial, las posibilidades de participación de los ciudadanos como interlocutores válidos en un proyecto comunicativo.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Con los avances tecnológicos, el acceso a la información de los medios es cada vez más sencillo, versátil e interactivo, por ello cada vez resulta menos pertinente hablar de audiencias desde la singularidad mediática y la polaridad de actores en el modelo informacional. En los últimos años los ciudadanos, convertidos en audiencias, participan de intensivos intercambios y complejos relacionamientos con los medios a través de dispositivos virtuales personalizados y otros recursos digitales. Se tiene a disposición un enorme cúmulo de información masiva que está cada día más cerca de nuestros espacios íntimos, mientras lo íntimo densifica los escenarios masivos de las interacciones. Medios, mediaciones y mediadores tienden a confundir sus lugares de enunciación, a compenetrarse y resignificarse, por lo que se hace necesario indagar las relaciones entre medios y audiencias; esto, en razón a las dudas que se suscitan acerca de si «¿Se ha acabado… se está acabando el tiempo de las audiencias?» (Orozco, Navarro, & García, 2012: 68), o tal vez su existencia sea un artificio que hace parte de la lógica del mercado de la información y la publicidad (Castells, 2011).

En los albores de contextos democráticos de la información y la comunicación, Cloutier (1973) se refirió al EMIREC, término que fue retomado y trabajado por investigadores latinoamericanos de la comunicación (Kaplún, 1997; Beltrán, 1981) para denominar una función de diálogo en doble vía entre emisores y receptores. Luego la tensión entre productores y consumidores se fue transformando, y se otorgó un mayor protagonismo a las audiencias. Por ello se crearon calificativos como audiencias activas y pasivas (Medina, Tamayo, & Rojas, 2010), audiencias críticas (Camacho, 2005) y audiencias creativas (Talens, 2011); y en los últimos tiempos con la omnipresencia de Internet y las redes sociales se impone la noción de prosumidores, inicialmente trabajada por Toffler y McLuhan (Sánchez & Contreras, 2012), donde las audiencias se asumen a la vez como productoras y consumidoras de contenidos mediáticos.

En el corazón de estas tensiones ha estado el ideal por democratizar la palabra, los medios y las comunicaciones para democratizar la sociedad (Beltrán, 2016; López, 2005) desde una perspectiva latinoamericana. También algunas experiencias en medios comunitarios de Europa y América Latina (Martínez, Mayugo, & Tamarit, 2012) coinciden en la apropiación de medios y procesos comunicativos logrados por experiencias de comunidades, más allá de un reconocimiento legal. En este sentido se destacan iniciativas de los medios comunitarios, libres y universitarios en España (Collado, 2008), motivados por movimientos sociales, organizaciones sin ánimo de lucro, y desde un enfoque de radio inclusiva (García, 2017), constituyendo lo que se ha denominado el Tercer Sector de la Comunicación en Francia y España (Ortiz, 2014), dentro del cual se destacan además experiencias de las radios universitarias (Aguaded & Martin-Pena, 2014).

Paralelo a estos procesos se fue gestando la hegemonía de la lógica mercantil de los medios masivos, junto a los desarrollos tecnológicos globales (Martín-Barbero, 2000) que han transformado este ideal en versiones locales de producción radiofónica donde se articulan, indiscriminadamente, elementos de los medios comerciales con expresiones y contenidos culturales propios. Recientes estudios sobre audiencias parecen ubicarse en las condiciones de un mundo globalizado, convergente, interconectado y transmediado (Lazo & Gabelas, 2016; Padilla & al., 2011) en el que se observa cómo los ciudadanos son más activos con el uso de las tecnologías. Bonilla considera que muchos de estos estudios han perdido su dimensión política cuando dejan de ver a las audiencias como interlocutoras y las vuelven a tratar como receptoras de los medios. Por su parte, Padilla pone en discusión las diferencias entre ser ciudadanos y ser audiencias en una relación dinamizada por una esfera pública política mediatizada, y concluye que las audiencias tienden a orientar sus prácticas mediáticas más hacia comunidades de pertenencia y menos hacia comunidades políticas. Otras revisiones distinguen las audiencias tradicionales, de las audiencias sociales y prosumidores (Quintas & González, 2014).

El surgimiento de la radio comunitaria en Colombia ha estado vinculado con un conjunto de condiciones políticas como la transformación y adopción de una nueva Constitución Política en el año 1991, así como hechos relacionados con el recrudecimiento del conflicto social armado, las violencias de larga data y el enraizamiento del fenómeno del narcotráfico (Osses, 2015). En este contexto, en la segunda mitad de finales del siglo XX, aparecen las primeras reglamentaciones sobre las radios comunitarias y las de interés público. A partir de este momento se gestan las licencias para un primer grupo de 564 emisoras comunitarias que nacen con poco apoyo institucional y una incipiente orientación para materializar su función social.

Es significativo el hecho de que persista el calificativo de comunitarias sobre una tipología de emisoras legalmente reconocidas por el gobierno de Colombia, en primer lugar porque se establece una diferencia con las emisoras comerciales de carácter privado en cuanto a su naturaleza y objetivos misionales; en segundo lugar, porque sigue latente la oportunidad de afianzar procesos democráticos de información y comunicación desde lo local.

El Ministerio de las Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones de Colombia (Min TIC) concibe la radiodifusión sonora comunitaria como: un servicio público participativo y pluralista, orientado a satisfacer necesidades de la comunicación en el municipio o área objeto de cubrimiento, facilitando el ejercicio del derecho a la información y la participación de sus habitantes a través de programas radiales que promuevan el desarrollo social, la convivencia pacífica, los valores democráticos, la construcción de ciudadanía y el fortalecimiento de las identidades culturales y sociales (Min TIC, 2017).

Postulado en torno al cual este Ministerio no realiza procesos de acompañamiento ni seguimiento, solo limita sus funciones a exigir el cumplimiento de requisitos técnicos y legales, mientras el Ministerio de Cultura enfoca sus esfuerzos a la promoción de la producción de contenidos a través de la Dirección de Comunicaciones. Y así, persiste la idea de construcción de proyectos de comunicación democrática como base de la gestión de prácticas participativas desde la pluralidad de sus expresiones y en articulación con quienes lideran medios y experiencias locales, de tal modo que puedan garantizar posibilidades reales de expresión, diálogo, intercambio y discusión de contenidos, producidos y difundidos, desde las necesidades y aspiraciones de los ciudadanos.

2. Material y métodos

El presente artículo se deriva del proyecto «Desafíos y limitaciones de sostenibilidad que enfrentan las emisoras comunitarias afiliadas a la red Sindamanoy del Departamento de Nariño», ejecutado en convenio entre la Universidad Mariana y la UNAD durante los años 2014 a 2016. Con base en la información recabada se presentan resultados que responden al objetivo de identificar las percepciones, preferencias y necesidades de participación de las audiencias en las emisoras comunitarias. Este objetivo se orienta a establecer cómo incide el papel de las audiencias en la sostenibilidad social, como una de las dimensiones claves para la sostenibilidad integral de estas emisoras (Gumucio-Dagron, 2005). Se considera que una emisora comunitaria se consolida como tal en la medida que los ciudadanos, en condición de audiencias, validan, legitiman y contribuyen al proyecto comunicativo local.

El estudio se concibió desde un diseño mixto (Creswell, 2013; Greene, 2006) con base en una muestra de 632 personas encuestadas y once directores de emisoras comunitarias afiliadas a la Red Sindamanoy del Departamento de Nariño, Colombia. Esto se complementó con una triangulación simultanea (Morse, 1991) resultado de once grupos focales, integrados por locutores y realizadores de radio, cuyas percepciones se consolidaron mediante una matriz DOFA (Martínez & Ortega, 2016), en la primera fase del proyecto.

El departamento de Nariño está ubicado al sur de Colombia en frontera con Ecuador. La mayor parte de su población tiene una vocación agropecuaria minifundista integrada por pueblos indígenas, comunidades negras y campesinos. Para el estudio se seleccionaron las emisoras comunitarias de los municipios de Pupiales, Sandoná, Leiva, Mallama, Consacá, San Lorenzo, Gualmatán, Samaniego, Guaitarilla, Tuquerres y Funes. La selección se hizo en base a criterios de reciprocidad, entre investigadores e investigados, a partir de un sentido de confianza, comprensión, acuerdo y sensibilidad (Sandín, 2000); un segundo criterio fue la ubicación geográfica de las emisoras; y un tercer criterio tuvo en cuenta su vinculación activa a la Red de Emisoras. El universo poblacional de las audiencias estuvo conformado por hombres y mujeres mayores de 14 años que cumplieron con los requisitos de: 1) Haber vivido los últimos tres años en uno de los de los municipios seleccionados; 2) Ser oyente de una de las emisoras seleccionadas, con lo que nos movimos dentro de un grupo de audiencias activas de las emisoras (Medina, Tamayo, & Rojas, 2010). El diseño de la muestra se organizó por conglomerados equivalentes al 0,3 de la población; y la selección se hizo por cuotas iguales de género en cada municipio. Para la aplicación de la encuesta se optó por un sistema de muestreo aleatorio simple, agotando los dos requisitos antes mencionados. Las encuestas se aplicaron entre mayo de 2014 y febrero de 2015 en la cabecera de cada municipio y sus alrededores, mediante entrevista directa. La recolección de información se logró con el apoyo de un equipo de encuestadores, capacitado previamente, y que entregó la información para tabulación y análisis. Los encuestadores adoptaron la estrategia del consentimiento informado verbal, previo a cada entrevista.

El cuestionario estuvo conformado por 26 preguntas que se dividieron en dos grandes grupos, de la pregunta 1 a la 8 se caracteriza demográficamente a la población; de la 9 en adelante se priorizaron teniendo en cuenta la categoría de sostenibilidad social, es decir, la relación entre las emisoras comunitarias y sus audiencias. Para clasificar o agrupar el tipo de preguntas se recurrió a las siguientes categorías: acceso al medio; frecuencias de consumo mediático; recepción y preferencias de programación; conocimientos sobre el medio comunitario y participación en la emisora comunitaria. La información se organizó en una matriz de tabulación y análisis, con el apoyo del programa SPSS en tablas de frecuencias. El análisis descriptivo se hizo con base en frecuencias de opciones de respuestas que se consolidaron en porcentajes comparativos al interior de cada pregunta, de las cuales se priorizaron las que permitieron responder al objetivo de este trabajo.

3. Análisis y resultados

Con base en el objetivo propuesto se priorizaron las preguntas con mayor relevancia para las categorías de percepciones mediáticas, preferencias de consumo y participación ciudadana, de las cuales se buscó identificar una tendencia media en cada una de las respuestas en porcentajes globales de todas las emisoras.

3.1. Percepciones mediáticas

Las percepciones de los ciudadanos sobre un medio informativo, en su condición de audiencias, permiten identificar posibles imaginarios relacionados con su naturaleza organizativa, el sentido de sus contenidos y las formas de relación con la sociedad. El Gráfico 1 muestra la percepción de los ciudadanos frente a la naturaleza ideal de una emisora comunitaria. Un 42,5% la define como aquella que permite la participación comunitaria, seguida de un 35,3% que difunde información de interés local; en tercer lugar con 10,5% está la idea de que es aquella que tiene una programación variada. Dos valoraciones inferiores al 5% consideran que una emisora comunitaria es una empresa de información o un medio que hace campañas sociales e institucionales. Solo el 1,9% consideran que es aquella que no cuenta con pauta publicitaria.


Martinez-Roa Ortega-Erazo 2018a-62680 ov-es030.jpg

Otra de las percepciones hace alusión a la programación del medio radial comunitario, donde se enfatiza una tendencia del 53% que la considera variada, seguida de un 26,7% que la ven interesante. Los valores más bajos muestran que un 0,8% la califica sin importancia. La percepción de una programación variada e interesante, le conceden a las emisoras comunitarias un reconocimiento importante como medio de información local, a la vez que solo un 0,9% piensa que es educativa.

3.2. Preferencias de consumo

La frecuencia temporal sobre consumo de medios de los ciudadanos, como indica el Gráfico 2, establece que la radio sigue teniendo una alta preferencia diaria (84,1%) compitiendo muy de cerca con la televisión (82,4%), mientras Internet ocupa una tercera posición (27%), y quedando relegada la prensa escrita (5,5%). Estos resultados tienen relación con dos factores asociados: 1) el fácil acceso que se puede tener al medio y, 2) la escucha como práctica histórico-cultural. Internet se ubica en una tendencia emergente en razón al expansivo mercado de los servicios de telefonía móvil e Internet, y el impulso de programas gubernamentales de modernización digital en instituciones educativas y de gobierno local. La prensa escrita aparece con una tendencia decreciente en razón a los pocos ejemplares impresos que se distribuyen en alcaldías e instituciones públicas de los municipios. A esto se suma que cada vez más personas acceden a los sitios web de los grandes periódicos, noticieros radiales y de televisión.


Martinez-Roa Ortega-Erazo 2018a-62680 ov-es031.jpg

Complementariamente, una segunda pregunta nos indica que el 40,3% de las personas escuchan la emisora comunitaria entre las siete y diez de la mañana, mientras que después de esta hora el promedio de oyentes se sitúa entre el 16,7% y 18,4%. La mayoría de emisoras comunitarias solo emiten hasta 6-7 de la tarde. Esta franja de emisión se corresponde con las actividades laborales de muchas personas del campo cuya jornada se inicia entre 6-7 de la mañana, y termina entre 5-6 de la tarde.

Sobre las razones que subyacen al consumo de las emisoras comunitarias, se pudo evidenciar, en el Gráfico 3, que el porcentaje más alto de encuestados (30,9%) lo hacen por la programación musical, seguido de un 24% por la diversidad de la programación; y un tercer grupo (16,4%), la prefiere porque hace parte de la comunidad y puede participar en ella. Esta tendencia se observó en las emisoras de Sandoná, Gualmatán, Guatarilla y San Lorenzo, donde sus directores han impulsado dinámicas para acercar a las personas a los programas de la emisora. Aparece un grupo intermedio de oyentes entre 4,4% y 7,7%, cuya motivación se ubica en programas de información, opinión y de temas especializados, con excepción de otro grupo que, aunque están dentro de este rango porcentual, su opción se inclina hacia los presentadores y «disk jokeys».


Martinez-Roa Ortega-Erazo 2018a-62680 ov-es032.jpg

3.3. Participación ciudadana

A los encuestados se les preguntó sobre los motivos por los cuales se habían puesto en contacto con la emisora. En el Gráfico 4 se observa que el 46,6% lo hizo para solicitar una canción, seguidamente un 9,4% para opinar sobre un tema, esto último resulta significativo en un grupo de emisoras comunitarias donde la producción de programas informativos y de opinión es escasa. Existen otros motivos (8,9%) que no quedan claros por la opción de respuesta propuesta. Las opciones de: hacer una sugerencia, una denuncia, una crítica a la emisora, y participar en un debate, estuvieron por debajo del 4,1%. Esto evidencia el precario acceso que tienen los ciudadanos al medio comunitario para expresar libremente sus opiniones críticas, reclamos e inconformidades.


Martinez-Roa Ortega-Erazo 2018a-62680 ov-es033.jpg

En la encuesta aplicada a los directores, estos consideran que pedir una canción se constituye en una forma efectiva de participación en la emisora. Esto se corrobora con un 93% de respuestas por el sí, contra un 7% de no, en la opción por llamadas telefónicas como forma de participar en la emisora.

Algo similar sucede con las cartas escritas con un 80% positivo; y los correos electrónicos, el chat, facebook y twitter con un 73%. Los menores porcentajes (60%) están en la participación en espacios de opinión y reuniones con el equipo de trabajo de la emisora. Esto refleja una precaria apertura desde la organización de las emisoras para vincular a los ciudadanos como audiencias activas en la producción de programas o en la gestión de otras actividades. Es claro que los directores y propietarios demarcan una clara distancia con sus audiencias, similar al modelo de la radio comercial tradicional.

Por otro lado, el Gráfico 5 consolida las respuestas de los ciudadanos sobre su posible participación en actividades convocadas u organizadas por las emisoras comunitarias en el último año. Aquí se evidenció que el 62,2% no había participado de ninguna actividad. Un segundo grupo de respuestas, entre un 5,7% y 7,5%, están relacionadas con participación en: bazares, ferias o fiestas comunitarias o municipales; actividades deportivas, religiosas, y campañas de cuidado del medio ambiente, aseo y espacios públicos. De acuerdo con lo consultado a los directores y los grupos de discusión, muchas de estas actividades han sido impulsadas por instituciones y organizaciones locales con el apoyo de la emisora en su difusión y promoción. Los porcentajes más bajos (inferiores al 2,8%) se obtuvieron en: actividades culturales, de control y veedurías ciudadanas, campañas en situaciones críticas o de catástrofes, talleres de radio y marchas o movilizaciones. Estos resultados se deben, en la mayoría de los casos, a que la emisora nunca impulsó este tipo de actividades, y solo en una mínima proporción de ellas se llevaron a cabo.

Se indagó también por la posibilidad de que los ciudadanos estuvieran interesados en participar en un club de oyentes. Se encontró que un 45,3 % sí estaría dispuesto, mientras un 54,7% respondieron negativamente. Una última pregunta buscó establecer si los ciudadanos estarían dispuestos a apoyar la emisora comunitaria de alguna forma, frente a lo cual se encontró que un 36,1% optó por ninguna de las anteriores, un 27,6% manifestó que lo haría con trabajo voluntario, un 18,1% proponiendo programas, mientras que solo un 1,1% estaría dispuesto a vincularse directamente al equipo de la emisora. De esto se infiere, que los ciudadanos no asumen como propia la emisora, y por tanto no manifiestan una clara voluntad de apoyarla. Sin embargo, el segundo y tercer porcentaje más altos, muestran una tendencia favorable a querer apoyar la emisora de forma explícita y directa; es decir, involucrándose en su dinámica de producción de contenidos, lo que ratifica la necesidad y oportunidad de fortalecer acciones de apertura a la participación ciudadana en las emisoras comunitarias.


Martinez-Roa Ortega-Erazo 2018a-62680 ov-es034.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusiones

En el año 1994, por primera vez el gobierno de Colombia abre la posibilidad de reconocer legalmente a las emisoras comunitarias como una iniciativa que daba apertura a una radio local pensada y producida desde las comunidades. Transcurridos más de veinte años son pocos los estudios en Colombia que dan cuenta de lo sucedido con estas experiencias, por ello, se hace necesario preguntarse por sus alcances y limitaciones, pero en particular por la relación que han mantenido con sus audiencias, y por la forma en que esta relación ha permitido o no, configurar una sostenibilidad social.

Una primera percepción de los ciudadanos asocia la radio comunitaria con dos ámbitos: lo participativo y la difusión de información local, y en especial la visibilidad mediática de la vida microsocial en el pueblo, el campo o el vecindario. Lo participativo aparece más como un ideal que como algo de facto. Para los directores de estas emisoras el sentido de lo comunitario en la radio se asume como la difusión de información local, apreciación que también comparten los grupos de discusión. Todos coinciden en la idea de que la emisora comunitaria es el lugar donde pasan fragmentos de la historia local que comparten con personas e instituciones que se conocen entre sí. La emisora comunitaria se considera como un medio cercano y de gran carga emocional.

Aunque en los ciudadanos existe un sentimiento colectivo por revalorar lo local como lugar cultural y emotivo de encuentro con lo propio, esto no se corresponde con las dinámicas organizativas y la programación de las emisoras. El sentimiento de valoración por lo local está más cercano a identificarse con símbolos estético-culturales y territoriales institucionalizados, que con agenciamientos políticos y sociales surgidos de las necesidades y problemáticas sentidas por los ciudadanos. Las percepciones sobre lo que define a una emisora comunitaria evidencian una paradoja entre local, como el lugar que los incluye social y culturalmente; y la emisora, como un espacio que excluye la participación de la comunidad, pero a la vez se sirve de los hechos de la vida comunitaria.

De manera diferencial, cada una de las emisoras comunitarias ha configurado un sentido de pertenencia territorial expresado en la valoración del medio como relativamente propio y cercano a sus realidades, y que más allá de ser considerada una organización empresarial se concibe como un espacio que difunde, esporádicamente, algunas narrativas de la vida local. Paradójicamente, esta percepción de la emisora como empresa de información no logra ser general en los ciudadanos, mientras para directores y propietarios, el tema de la sostenibilidad económica y consolidarla como empresa, es una de sus principales preocupaciones. Los equipos de producción de las emisoras comunitarias, conformados entre cuatro y siete personas, son vinculados con bajos salarios o de manera voluntaria. La causa histórica de la privatización de muchas de estas emisoras comunitarias en Colombia se debe, en gran medida, a la forma como el Ministerio de Comunicaciones asignó las concesiones de las licencias. La mayoría fueron entregadas a personas particulares o familias quienes, mediante la conformación de una organización social de base, asumieron la representatividad de las comunidades de un municipio y se apropiaron de emisoras como medio privado.

Los ciudadanos prefieren escuchar las emisoras comunitarias por su programación musical y algunos programas informativos desde tempranas horas del día, aunque en municipios del sur y del centro del departamento tienen la opción de escuchar otras emisoras de cobertura regional. La preferencia musical, como práctica de recepción radiofónica, se sustenta en la forma como se han constituido tradicionalmente los radioescuchas en Colombia. La noción de tradición de radioescucha viene muy a propósito como una variable de gran incidencia en la formación histórico-cultural de los ciudadanos colombianos, especialmente quienes habitan los sectores rurales. Es decir, muchos aprendieron a escuchar la radio de los modelos comerciales. Y así se ha construido un imaginario colectivo que considera como una «buena emisora» a aquella que ofrece una programación de música comercial que gusta a los oyentes. Y en esta medida el género musical se ha convertido en la pauta de mayor consumo de las emisoras comerciales, lo cual ha sido imitado por las comunitarias.

Este efecto referencial o acción espejo del modelo comercial surgió a partir de la concesión de las licencias de las emisoras comunitarias a personas y organizaciones, cuyos conocimientos en producción de programas de radio se basó en el de las emisoras comerciales, ya que las escasas experiencias de medios populares y alternativos de América Latina lograron ser significativas pero invisibles. Muchas fueron reseñadas por académicos y organizaciones sociales pero en esencia no trascendieron su sentido político a las emisoras comunitarias en Colombia. Esto se explica por las dinámicas sociopolíticas globales y neoliberales que fueron minando el pensamiento crítico y los discursos liberadores que inspiraron los movimientos sociales al final de la guerra fría y a lo largo de finales del siglo XX.

Los primeros locutores, periodistas y productores de radio en Colombia, incluyendo los de la radio comunitaria, iniciaron como empíricos; algunos tenían formación como bachilleres, técnicos o docentes, muchos de ellos aprendieron los formatos y formas de hacer de la radio comercial. Algunos se arriesgaron a producir informativos, transmisiones en directo de eventos deportivos y culturales, y unos pocos exploraron el formato de revista. Los realizadores de la radio comunitaria fueron ajustando sus formatos, horarios y contenidos desde la madrugada y hasta el caer de la tarde, de tal manera que evitan la fuerte y expansiva competencia con los canales nacionales de la televisión comercial, que por muchos años se posicionaron de las franjas del medio día y la noche. Esta estrategia les ha permitido a las emisoras comunitarias lograr una sostenibilidad social parcial con sus audiencias mediante una programación musical, informativa y de poca opinión local, lo que implicó que los ciudadanos optaran por combinar sus preferencias de consumo mediático entre la radio local y la televisión nacional.

Los resultados permiten observar que los ciudadanos participan pasivamente en la emisora, lo cual concuerda con lo que plantean Ramírez (2014: 122) en Chile, y García y Ávila (2009) en Ecuador, aunque existen emisoras en Nariño cuyos directores hacen esfuerzos por promover procesos participativos con sus audiencias (Martínez & Ortega, 2017:19). Las audiencias de las emisoras comunitarias en Nariño poco a poco han ido asumiendo la dinámica de audiencias sociales por el uso gradual de redes sociales para interactuar con la emisora. Por ello, se requieren esfuerzos de formación y gestión social para propiciar espacios y dinámicas donde los oyentes se asuman como prosumidores de la radio comunitaria.

Las emisoras comunitarias en Nariño no logran un liderazgo local que convoque a otras actividades sociales o culturales diferentes a las propias de su programación, esto en razón a la ausencia de un proyecto político-social de comunicación que permita la articulación de esfuerzos entre quienes dirigen las emisoras y las comunidades organizadas. La incipiente participación de las comunidades en estas emisoras se debe a cuatro factores; en primer lugar, a la connotación de medio privado como las han concebido sus directores y propietarios; en segundo lugar, a la adopción del modelo comercial en su organización y programación; en tercer lugar, por la incipiente formación de ciudadanos como realizadores y audiencias crítica; y en cuarto lugar, a la inexistencia de mecanismos de acompañamiento, seguimiento y control sobre la misión de las radios comunitarias.

Lo anterior pone en entredicho la apropiación de los ciudadanos con su emisora comunitaria, particularmente cuando se les indagó sobre cómo estarían dispuestos a apoyarla o a vincularse con ella. Aunque estos porcentajes son bajos, se convierten en una oportunidad de apertura para articular voluntades y avanzar en el espíritu misional de la radio comunitaria. Esto indica que existe un potencial de ciudadanos que estarían dispuestos a participar y fortalecer su programación desde las realidades socioculturales. Este ambiente de distanciamiento entre quienes dirigen las emisoras comunitarias en Nariño y sus audiencias ha generado una relación en la que se excluye a los ciudadanos y se les niega el derecho a libre expresión.

Se concluye que las emisoras comunitarias indagadas cuentan con unas audiencias potenciales (Medina, Tamayo, & Rojas, 2010) que no han sido lo suficientemente aprovechadas como interlocutoras, productoras y colaboradoras dentro de un proyecto comunicativo; que se debe al poco sentido comunitario con que se ha asumido las prácticas informativas y las relaciones sociales entre el medio y los ciudadanos. Por otro lado, está también el desinterés del gobierno colombiano, en particular el Ministerio de las Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones, por los temas de participación social y democratización de los medios comunitarios y ciudadanos. Esta situación es similar a lo ocurrido en Argentina con las emisoras comunitarias dentro de las políticas de comunicación y cultura (Linares & al., 2017), como se evidencia en los casos de dicho estudio.

Una segunda conclusión deja al descubierto cómo ninguna de las emisoras comunitarias cuenta con un proyecto comunicativo comunitario construido colectivamente y desde las necesidades de sus ciudadanos. Esto ha tenido como consecuencia la improvisación de actividades y la planeación a corto plazo. Un factor de gran incidencia, observado en las respuestas de directores y grupos de discusión, es el esquema vertical organizativo donde las decisiones se concentran en cabeza de un director (como propietario del medio) y en otros casos en la Junta Directiva, lo cual coincide con el estudio de Mora (2011).

Una tercera conclusión de este trabajo evidencia que, desde las organizaciones y directivos de las emisoras comunitarias, no se promueve una participación de los ciudadanos en su programación, como tampoco lideran otras actividades sociales o comunitarias, lo que genera una doble relación: por un lado de cercanía como oyentes frente a su programación musical; y por otro de lejanía en cuanto a acciones de participación y apropiación social del medio, conclusión que concuerda con Rodríguez (2012) en relación con la carencia de participación en el discurso informativo de la radio comunitaria. Esto ratifica el hecho de que las emisoras comunitarias se siguen orientando con un sentido de organización privada. Lo que coincide con Padilla (2012), acerca del incipiente vínculo que se da entre el ser audiencias y ser ciudadanos. Y así, lo comunitario en la radio se adopta como una etiqueta (Talens, 2011) poco vinculada con su sentido democrático, participativo e incluyente; pese a que en los últimos años, algunos países de América Latina han renovado sus marcos normativos y políticas de comunicación (Sosa, 2016) y avances desiguales en legislación y derecho a la comunicación (Gómez & Agerre, 2009), mientras en Colombia aún está pendiente un cambio profundo en este sentido.

Queda claro que la apuesta política de lo comunitario y ciudadano, sigue siendo un asunto pendiente en las emisoras investigadas, en las cuales se adopta una estructura de organización y producción tomado del referente comercial, con algunos intentos por incorporar contenidos de la cultura y acontecimientos de la vida local. No se ejerce la ciudadanía comunicativa como práctica de significación política a través de estos medios comunitarios (Rodríguez, 2009: 18), como tampoco se reconoce a sus habitantes como interlocutores en la relación medio/audiencias, lo que coincide con el estudio de Álvarez (2014) sobre las emisoras comunitarias en el Valle de Aburra en el Departamento de Antioquia en Colombia. Las emisoras comunitarias en esta región de Colombia atraviesan por un momento de relativo estancamiento y redefinición de su horizonte político y social, y en los últimos tiempos avanzan en la consolidación de la Red Sindamanoy Emisoras Comunitarias de Nariño donde comparten principios democratizadores, participativos y de construcción colectiva que tratan de materializar articulando acciones con el Sistema de Comunicación para la Paz (SIPAZ) en Colombia, y AMARC a nivel mundial.

Apoyos

Convenio de cooperación interinstitucional suscrito entre la Universidad Mariana (UNIMAR) y la Universidad Nacional Abierta y a Distancia de Colombia (UNAD) para el desarrollo del proyecto de investigación «Desafíos y limitaciones de sostenibilidad que enfrentan las emisoras comunitarias afiliadas a la red Sindamanoy del Departamento de Nariño», a través de los grupos de investigación «Desarrollo Humano y Social» de la UNIMAR y «Fisura» de la UNAD.

Referencias

Aguaded, I., & Martín-Pena, D. (2014). Educomunicación y radios universitarias: Panorama internacional y perspectivas futuras. Chasqui, 124, 65-72. (https://goo.gl/U6TQEp).

Álvarez-Moreno, M.A. (2014). El desafío de las radios comunitarias. Anagramas, 6(12), 59-75. (https://goo.gl/1JBQyr).

Beltrán, L.R. (2006). La comunicación para el desarrollo en Latinoamérica: Un recuento de medio siglo. Anagramas, 4(8), 53-76. (https://goo.gl/VmtLK9).

Bonilla-Vélez, J.I. (2011). Re-visitando los estudios de recepción/ audiencias en Colombia. Comunicación y Sociedad, 16, 75-103. (https://goo.gl/QttSJ5).

Camacho, C.A. (2005). Democratización de la sociedad: Entre el derecho a la información y el ejercicio de la ciudadanía comunicativa. Punto Cero, 10(10), 28-36. (https://goo.gl/42WoXt).

Castell, M. (2011). Comunicación y poder. Madrid: Alianza.

Cloudier, J.C. (1973). The communication audio-scripto-visuelle. Communication et Langages, 19. Montreal: Presses Universitaires.

Collado-Campaña, F. (2008). La influencia de las radios y las televisiones comunitarias en la construcción de la ciudadanía. Ámbitos, 17, 209-224. (https://goo.gl/3Qbxzx).

Creswell, J.W. (2013). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

García, J.G. (2017). Transformaciones y aprendizajes de las radios comunitarias en España: Hacia un modelo de radio inclusiva. Disertaciones, 10(1), 30-41. https://doi.org/10.12804/revistas.urosario.edu.co/disertaciones/a.4535

García, N., & Ávila, C. (2016). Nuevos escenarios para la comunicación comunitaria: Oportunidades y amenazas a medios de comunicación y organizaciones de la sociedad civil a partir de la aplicación del nuevo marco regulatorio ecuatoriano. Palabra Clave, 19(1), 271-303. https://doi.org/10.5294/pacla.2016.19.1.11

Gómez, G., & Aguerre, C. (2009). Las mordazas invisibles. Nuevas y viejas barreras a la diversidad en la radiodifusión. Buenos Aires: Amarc-alc.

Greene, J.C. (2006). Toward a methodology of mixed methods social inquiry. Research in the Schools, 13(1), 93-98. (https://goo.gl/zTg2ST).

Gumucio-Dagron, A. (2005). Arte de equilibristas: la sostenibilidad de los medios de comunicación comunitarios. Punto Cero, 10(10), 6-19. (https://goo.gl/auqbYm).

Kaplún, M. (2002). Una pedagogía de la comunicación (el comunicador popular). La Habana: Caminos. (https://goo.gl/vw0G1b).

Lazo, C.M., & Gabelas, J.A. (2016). Comunicación digital: un modelo basado en el factor relacional. Barcelona: UOC.

Linares, A., Segura, M.S., Hidalgo, A.L., Kejval, L., Longo, V., Traversaro, N., & Vinelli, N. (2017). Brechas: La desigualdad en las políticas de fomento de medios comunitarios, otros medios e industrias culturales. Revista Latinoamericana de Ciencias de la Comunicación, 13(25). (https://goo.gl/xwGPmG).

López-Vigil, J.I., & Barrientos, I. (2000). Manual urgente para radialistas apasionadas y apasionados. Quito: Artes Gráficas Silva.

Martín-Barbero, J. (2000). Las transformaciones del mapa cultural: una visión desde América Latina. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 26. (https://goo.gl/AgCEP2).

Martínez-Hermida M., Mayugo-Majó, C., & Tamarit-Rodríguez, A. (2012). Comunidad y comunicación: prácticas comunicativas y medios comunitarios en Europa y América Latina. XV Encuentro de Latinoamericanistas Españoles (pp. 499-513). Madrid: Trama. (https://goo.gl/WVYMqb).

Martínez-Roa, O.G., & Ortega, E.G. (2016). Desafíos de sostenibilidad de la radio comunitaria en Nariño en Colombia. Nexus Comunicación, 20, 6-21. https://doi.org/10.25100/nc.v0i20.1831

Medina-Valencia, A., Tamayo-Gómez C., & Rojas, I. (2010). Analizar audiencias, construir nuestros sueños. Manual metodológico para la medición y análisis local de las audiencias de las emisoras comunitarias en Colombia. Bogotá: MinTIC.

Ministerio de TIC (Ed.) (2017). Sector de radiodifusión Sonora en Colombia. (https://goo.gl/F98fRP).

Mora-Vizcaya, C.E. (2011). Formas de participación en las radios comunitarias habilitadas del Táchira: Estudio de campo. Disertaciones, 4(1), 6. (https://goo.gl/d5x7US).

Morse, J. (1991). Approaches to qualitative-quantitative methodological triangulation. Nursing Research, 40, 120-123. (https://goo.gl/2oxHjX).

Orozco, G., Navarro, E., & García, A. (2012). Educational challenges in times of mass self-communication: A dialogue among audience. [Desafíos educativos en tiempos de auto-comunicación masiva: La interlocución de las audiencias]. Comunicar, 38, 67-74. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-07

Ortiz-Sobrino, M.A. (2014). La radio como medio para la comunicación alternativa y la participación del Tercer Sector en España y Francia. Comunicación y Hombre, 25-36. (https://goo.gl/udswvi).

Osses Rivera, S.L. (2015). Cincuenta años de radio comunitaria en Colombia. Análisis socio-histórico (1945-1995). Revista General José María Córdova, 13(16), 263-28. (https://goo.gl/KVy22o).

Padilla, M.R. (2012). Dificultades en el vínculo entre el ser ciudadanos y audiencias. Derecho a Comunicar, 5, 29-45. (https://goo.gl/MSYsbN).

Padilla, M.R., Repoll, J.L., González D., Moreno, G., García, H., Franco, D., & Orozco G. (2011). México: La investigación de la recepción y sus audiencias. Hallazgos recientes y perspectivas. Análisis de recepción en América Latina: un recuento histórico con perspectivas a futuro. Quito: CIESPAL.

Quintas, N., & González, A. (2014). Active audiences: Social audience participation in television. [Audiencias activas: Participación de la audiencia social en la televisión]. Comunicar, 43, 83-90. https://doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-08

Ramírez, J.D. (2014). En Chile ¿radio comunitaria o ciudadana? Luciérnaga, 6(12), 118-126. (https://goo.gl/YmgmsF).

Rodríguez, C. (2009). De medios alternativos a medios ciudadanos: trayectoria teórica de un término. Folios, 21-22, 13-25. (http://goo.gl/ADUHs).

Rodríguez, C. (2012). Lo comunitario en la radio comunitaria: Análisis crítico del discurso en el lenguaje informativo utilizado por emisoras comunitarias (Tesis de Maestría). Bogotá: IECO, Universidad Nacional de Colombia. (https://goo.gl/9dVGDJ).

Sánchez-Carrero, J., & Contreras-Pulido, P. (2012). De cara al prosumidor. Producción y consumo empoderando a la ciudadanía 3.0. Icono 14, 10(3), 62- 84. https://doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v10i3.210

Sandín-Esteban, M.P. (2000). Criterios de validez en la investigación cualitativa: De la objetividad a la solidaridad. Revista de Investigación Educativa, 18(1), 223-242. (https://goo.gl/AD8rKp).

Sosa-Plata, G. (2016). Concentración de medios de comunicación, poder y nuevas legislaciones en América Latina. El Cotidiano, 17-30. (https://goo.gl/uk3moU).

Talens, C.I. (2011). ¿Ni indígena ni comunitaria? La radio indigenista en tiempos neoindigenistas. Comunicación y Sociedad, 15, 123-142. (https://goo.gl/DvrMJk).

Back to Top
GET PDF

Document information

Published on 31/12/17
Accepted on 31/12/17
Submitted on 31/12/17

Volume 26, Issue 1, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C54-2018-08
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 2
Views 18
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?