Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This research aims to portray the way young adult people interact with news and how their consumption is affected by advertising and personal data sharing. 'Digital News Report Spain 2018', a questionnaire on the consumption of digital media undertaken by a national panel of 2,023 Internet users, is used as a main source. Among the users mentioned, there were 293 young people from 25 to 34 years old who belong to the Millennial generation. Data from this report was completed with a qualitative study in which two focus groups were held, featuring people of that age frame residing in Navarre. The paper concludes that young adult people are generally interested in news, which they access mainly via mobile devices. Their interest grows when the content affects them directly, but also if they empathize with the topic. On the other hand, their familiar background and social routines shape the way they receive information. Young adult people still make use of traditional media, although they consider it ideologically biased. Advertising is something annoying, although they generally have little knowledge and even less intention to use ad-blockers. Finally, their review of the personalized services is negative, but they tend to give away personal data to media if this facilitates their news access.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and current scenario

In today’s media ecosystem, in which traditional and digital media coexist and complement one another, it is important to understand the changes that are taking place in people’s usage habits and preferences with regard to information. This is particularly important for those groups that have grown up in “a context that is saturated with relational technologies and digital communication” (Buckingham & Martínez, 2013).

The primary objective of this study is to describe how young people in the 25-34 age group interact with news when using mobile media, the extent to which their consumption is conditioned by the presence of advertising, and whether they are concerned about privacy. These young people are members of the so-called millennial generation because they have reached adulthood in the early years of the 21st century (Dimock, 2018). Their commercial potential is of great interest to media outlets and advertisers.

Our initial framework is provided by the bibliography on the subject, complemented by data from the 2018 Digital News Report Spain. This report was coordinated by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford. This online questionnaire offers insights into the consumption of digital news in Spain by Internet users who accessed the news in the previous month (Reuters, 2018).

However, this initial literature review needs to be complemented with the addition of a qualitative study to explain the motives underlying the behaviour observed. To do this, we set up two group discussions involving young adults from Navarre. Their media usage is described beforehand and is based on the Media Audience Study produced by the Centre for Research and Opinion Polling (CIES, 2018).

By reviewing the literature and quantitative secondary sources, and conducting our own qualitative study, we will be able to gain a better understanding of the perception and behaviour of the people in this age group with regard to news, advertising and privacy.

1.1. Communication, mobile media and information consumption

Today, the increasing importance of mobile devices is abundantly clear, to the extent that their presence in everyday life is now taken for granted (Ling, 2012). However, as with other digital technologies, we should bear in mind that there is a “double articulation” (Silverstone & Hirsch, 1992). On the one hand, mobile devices are material objects that serve as a means of communication through which their owners are connected to the world and to other users. On the other hand, they are also cultural objects whose ubiquitous connectivity and omnipresence intimately link them to their users’ daily lives, identities and social relations. Consequently, they are not only technological meta-devices with multiple functions; they also have a symbolic dimension, which gives them new social meanings based on interaction with others.

The possibilities offered by mobile communication, which frees us from the constraints of physical proximity and spatial immobility (Geser, 2004), have brought about a reconfiguration of our relationship with space and time (Ling & Campbell, 2009). Mobility is, therefore, a disruptive factor, as it introduces new paradigms into the consumption of culture and media : this consumption is no longer restricted to the domestic space and increasingly occurs in public spaces and/or during transit, thereby making spatiality a key contextual factor in the consumption experience (Peters, 2015).

The social, cultural and technological phenomenon of communication using mobile devices also presents generational differences (Ghersetti & Westlund, 2018). A large part of the study focuses on millennials, a “generation tied to their smartphones” (Mihailidis, 2014). Their phones play a key role in their daily interactions and peer socialization and enable a form of consumption that is transient, immediate, mobile and specialized (Noguera Vivo, 2018; Van Damme, Courtois, Verbrugge, & de-Marez, 2015).

With regard to patterns of information consumption, mobile devices have certain peculiarities in comparison to other platforms (Struckmann & Karnowski, 2016; Wolf & Schnauber, 2015). The consumption of news is characterized by certain habitual and heightened tendencies, such as checking, sharing, scanning, clicking and “snacking” on information (Costera Meijer & Groot Kormelink, 2015). The fact that users always carry their mobile devices with them makes it more likely that they will consume news throughout the day. Sometimes news is consumed almost unconsciously, or without specific intent. Moreover, this consumption can occur in parallel with other activities and within time intervals that are normally closed to traditional media : namely, the various interstices that form part of our daily routines (Dimmick, Feaster, & Hoplamazian, 2011).

Information that is consumed using mobile devices and apps may have been accessed via alerts and notifications. This transforms media exposure into something that is not always planned by the user, and to which he/she pays only partial attention. In temporal terms, and to borrow the musical metaphor of Dholakia and others (2014), in contrast to the languid, continuous legato of other platforms, consumption on mobile devices is more staccato, comprised of brief and intermittent episodes that serve to provide “flashes” of information.

However, the “news snacking” that characterizes the use of mobile devices is a habit that may also have negative consequences (Molyneux, 2018). Unlike deeper, more unhurried forms of consumption, the academic literature has linked “snacking” (albeit in the form of television channel surfing or “news grazing”) to a more limited awareness of public affairs and a lower level of civic engagement (Bennett, Rhine, & Flickinger 2008; Morris & Forgette, 2007).

1.2. Traits and trends in news consumption

Several studies have indicated that young people take a positive approach to news and like to stay informed (Costera, 2007; Casero-Ripollés, 2012). However, their patterns of consumption are changing, becoming more mobile and social (Yuste, 2015). They are characterized by casual or incidental access via social networks and quick, online “scanning”, with traditional media only accessed in order to verify and expand information (García Jiménez, Tur-Viñes & Pastor, 2018).

This development is corroborated by data from the 2018 Digital News Report Spain. Spaniards in the 25-34 age group demonstrate a high level of interest in news: of the 293 users surveyed, 32% and 48% were “extremely interested” or “very interested” in the news, respectively. These percentages are not significantly different to those for other age groups, with the exception of those over the age of 55, from whom 58% were “very interested” in the news.

With regard to the use of news sources, social media (69%), newspaper websites (54%), television programmes (50%) and print media (44%) were the predominant access routes. Although the 25-34 age group has not abandoned traditional media, Hermida and others (2012) argue that social media has become a key space for sharing, recommending and personalizing the dissemination of news, as well as simply serving as a news source. According to the Reuters Institute report, 45% of young adults access news through social networks. Other significant access routes include the search engines of specific news-oriented websites (45%), direct access via the websites of media outlets (36%), and keyword searches for a specific news story (33%).

In terms of devices, mobile phones have become young people’s main gateway to the digital ecosystem. The 2018 Digital News Report Spain confirms the findings of other studies (AIMC, 2018; Fundación Telefónica, 2017) that 97% of users in the 25-34 age group recognize that mobile devices are the main gateway for accessing news. Additionally, however, 69% of users in this group still consume news via desktop or laptop computers.

1.3. Interaction with advertising and management of privacy

Regarding advertising investment in Spain (Infoadex, 2018), Internet advertising has consolidated its second-place ranking, behind only traditional media (29%). Sádaba and Sánchez-Blanco (2018) argue that its growth is due to widespread Internet use, automation, format innovations and the need to generate new sources of income.

In terms of its relationship to news consumption, Internet advertising is viewed by many users as a “toll” that must be paid in order to access content. Moreover, although advertising is a naturally occurring element within the new ecosystem, it is often seen as negative because of how it grows indiscriminately and interrupts the browsing experience (Gálvez, 2017). This has led many users to take steps to block advertisements.

The practice of ad-blocking is no longer restricted to a minority of users, especially in the age group with which this study is concerned. Gálvez (2017) asserts that 59% of Internet users over the age of 14 are aware of ad-blockers and that 28% use them regularly. For users in the 25-34 age group, these figures increase to 73% and 45%, respectively. With regard to their reasons for doing so, more than 90% of users said that they blocked advertising to prevent loss of data speed, avoid unpleasant advertisements, and avoid the risk of getting a virus.

These usage figures are reasonably similar to those that appear in the aforementioned quantitative study. According to the 2018 Digital News Report Spain, 51% of users in the 25-34 age group have downloaded an ad-blocker at least once. This makes them the most frequent users of ad-blocking software. Some 42% are using ad-blockers currently: mostly on their computers (89%), and to a much lesser extent on their tablets (27%) and mobile phones (25%).

Although these users do have concerns about privacy, they still provide information in order to access services or simply to share things (Evens & Van Damme, 2016; Lee, 2016). Their willingness to share information depends on three factors: what they will receive in exchange, the extent to which they trust the company in question, and how personal the shared information is (Woodnutt, 2018). Those who are concerned about privacy take steps such as deleting their browser history, using temporary user names or email addresses, deleting apps, and adjusting the privacy settings on their devices (Lee, 2016; Meeker, 2018).

The 2016 Digital News Report Spain also explored this particular question (Reuters Institute, 2016). Specifically, it asked whether users were concerned that receiving personalized news might present a greater threat to their privacy. Spain had the third-highest percentage of respondents (54%) who stated that they shared that particular concern (Portilla, 2018). Moreover, the level of concern grew with age: amongst users in the 25-34 age group, 53% stated that they were concerned about their privacy; a similar percentage to the one for Spaniards as a whole (54%).

2. Materials and methods

Having reviewed the literature and the quantitative data mentioned above, we obtained an overview of how young people interact with news and advertising and the extent to which they are concerned about privacy. However, the following questions require further exploration:

• Why do young adults take an interest in news?

• Do they trust the traditional media for information on current affairs or do they use a diversity of sources and access routes?

• How do young adults use their devices to access news?

• What is their view on advertising? Are they aware of and/or do they use ad-blockers?

• If giving personal data is required to access news, which data are they willing to provide, and why?

In order to answer these questions, we need a qualitative study that will enable us to gain an understanding of real-world attitudes through an analysis of the discourse that this type of research generates. The study will involve particular individuals representing the 25-34 age group in Navarre who have accessed digital news, so they may be compared to the same age group within the 2018 Digital News Report Spain.

We will use the focus group technique, as it offers a greater range of approaches and focal points than if we had interviewed each individual separately.

Focus groups are a habitual feature of the qualitative methodology, as they make it possible to discern the attitudes and motivations of a particular social group and enable researchers to extract generalized principles from individual interactions (Báez & Pérez de Tudela, 2007).

As Navarre is the focal point for this study, we will first present the data on media consumption in Navarre for young people in the 25-34 age group. We will then present the results of the qualitative study, based on the participants’ perceptions of their information consumption.

2.1. Media and young audiences in Navarre

According to the Media Audience Study, in 2017 Navarre was home to 73,500 people aged 25-34, from whom 72,640 (99%) had previously accessed the Internet at one time or another.

This group consumes media in all its forms. In terms of accessing online newspapers, the group also stands out from other age brackets, in light of the fact that 53% stated they had read an online newspaper the day prior to the study.

The most common digital media outlets accessed by Internet users aged 25-34 in Navarre were diariodenavarra.es (17%) and marca.com (11%). In terms of traditional media, 16% read the print version of Diario de Navarra, 10% listen to Europa FM Navarra and 16% watch Antena 3 channel. Another noteworthy statistic is that 65% of the participants had logged in to Facebook the day prior to the study.

Consequently, the ways in which young adults in Navarre consume news media are of interest to this study and justify the inclusion of this group in the qualitative study of how young people make use of media and devices, their attitudes towards advertising and privacy, and the reasons underlying their behaviour with regard to news.

2.2. Methodology

The study involved two focus groups made up of young people who lived in Navarre, aged between 25-34, and consumed digital news with a local or Navarre-oriented focus, in any format.

CIES, a company specializing in research studies and opinion polls, helped us design the methodology, recruit the participants and carry out the fieldwork. The focus groups met in separate successive sessions (at 5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.) on Thursday 22 February 2018. Each discussion lasted two hours. There were a total of 16 participants, eight in each group, with an equal gender split (i.e., 50% women and 50% men). The mean age of the participants was 28.5.

The groups discussed five major topics: news consumption, the degree of interest in local news and media, digital media consumption, use of social networks, and advertising and personal data. The use of mobile devices was a particularly noteworthy part of the discussion.

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Interest in news

Given the scope of the study, young people are more interested in the news when they can relate to its content or when it affects them directly. In the focus groups, several participants agreed that it is important to “know what’s going on the world” (male, 26) and “what’s happening from day to day” (female, 34). These positions corroborated the quantitative data.

In order to explore their motives further, participants were asked about the types of the news story that interested them most. The groups made a distinction between general news and specific news. In terms of general news, several people said they were interested in social issues, cultural programs and local events “that [they] relate to” (female, 25; male, 31). Local sports content was also consumed on a recurring basis. In terms of news related to specific interests, one participant (male, 29) said he was particularly interested in information that affected him “directly”.

On the whole, participants took a greater interest in the news concerning their more immediate circle or the environment. News concerning institutional politics was of less interest to some participants. As one individual (male, 27) commented, “Political news is everywhere, but I don’t pay too much attention to it”. However, other participants habitually kept up with political news: “Although it makes my blood boil at times, I love to follow the political news, because I like to know what’s going on in the world and at home” (male, 30).

With regard to news content, we discovered another relevant factor that has a bearing on consumption: namely, the saturation that occurs when content is repeated as a result of the fact that media outlets have no further information to provide. According to one participant (male, 29), this saturation reflects the fact that certain news stories become “trendy” and therefore cause him to lose interest.

3.2. Information sources used

The quantitative study revealed that social media, media websites and television were the three news sources most frequently accessed by young people in the 25 -34 age group. Print media was relegated to the fourth position. However, when we explored this question in the focus groups, the results were somewhat contradictory. The traditional print-media brands maintained their prestige, while television was described as “sensationalist” and social media had as many detractors as it did defenders.

Nonetheless, the majority of participants said that they accessed digital media more often than traditional media because the former offered immediate access, more news stories, a broader range of perspectives and, in the words of one participant (female, 33), “more freedom to choose”. If the participants happened to pick up a traditional magazine or newspaper, they would read it; otherwise, they would not. For this same reason, the traditional print-media brands the participants consumed depended on the habits of their family members, ease of access, and ideology. Some participants read newspapers because they were available at their family home: “I tend to read the paper because my parents have it delivered to our home” (female, 27). For others, reading the newspaper was an everyday habit linked to other activities: “I read the paper while I am having a coffee. I get my first glance at the news every morning in the café” (female, 34).

In general, local radio was used as a form of accompaniment. No one in the group used it as their primary source of information. Although approximately half of the participants watched television news, this trend appears to be decreasing, as three people stated that they did not watch television at all. However, for news with wide-ranging scope and impact, some did turn to the television. In the words of one participant (male, 34), “Video is the most spectacular and often the most dramatic format”.

Those who defended social networks as a source of information valued their immediacy and range of perspectives, in comparison to the local press, which one participant (male, 31) described as “politicized and polarized”. Another participant (male, 30) argued that “on social networks, you can follow many different media outlets, which means you will always have a complete range of perspectives”. Some of the participants accessed local news via social networks (especially Facebook), received recommendations from contacts via WhatsApp, and followed events as they unfolded via Twitter. Instagram was praised as a source of sports news. Among the detractors of social media, some said they generally avoided social networks as a source of local news because they found them untrustworthy, had difficulty in establishing their credibility, and found it necessary to verify the source. “I don’t like how social networks operate”, said one participant (female, 27). “They manipulate everything”, replied another (female, 25). However, other participants pointed out that social networks play an important role in “finding out about breaking news” (male, 29).

3.3. Access routes

Although it is not easy to identify common patterns of consumption, the participants said that they accessed news via media websites (whether directly or via search engines) and social networks; Facebook and Twitter in particular.

With regard to the latter, much of the information that was accessed originated from official media accounts that some of the participants had chosen to follow. However, news stories also appeared frequently on participants’ timelines because they were posted there by their contacts. As one participant (female, 27) described it, “Suddenly, you’ll see a news story that someone has shared”. Some of the participants also said they found it difficult to distinguish the source of information: “[On Facebook] I follow lots of different things, and sometimes I get a little lost as to where something comes from” (female, 24).

This consumption, therefore, constitutes an “accidental exposure” to news, given that the users in question come across the information while they are online for other reasons, rather than deliberately searching for news. As one participant (female, 24) remarked, “News tends to come at you from all sides. News stories usually come to me, and if one of them piques my interest, I look up more information about it”. This dynamic also extends to messaging services such as WhatsApp, which the groups cited on numerous occasions as a means of discovering news.

Moreover, access routes for news are conditioned by the urgency of the story in question and its geographical scope. Usually, the participants first found out about breaking local or regional news via WhatsApp, particularly through groups they participated in with their families and friends. To find out more, some of the participants would then access local media outlets or look up information using Google or social networks. In any case, the participants agreed that it was necessary to verify the information that they received and that the traditional media remained more credible. When the news story in question was national or international in its scope, the range of media outlets accessed by the participants became larger and was extended to include those that could dedicate more resources to news coverage.

Finally, the groups drew attention to the fact that, although their digital consumption is fragmented, it remains constant throughout the day and is arranged around temporal interstices. “I follow Diario de Navarra on all of the social networks. I check the feeds every day to see if they have been refreshed and if there are any new stories. I check them every three hours or so”, commented one participant (male, 25).

3.4. Device preference

In line with the data presented in the 2018 Digital News Report Spain, the focus groups reinforced the fact that mobile phones, followed by computers, are the devices most frequently used by young adults to access news. Information consumption “almost always takes place via mobile phone, and very rarely via newspaper”, remarked one participant (female, 24).

The predominance of mobile devices for accessing news means that knowledge of breaking news sometimes occurs via platforms that typically serve another purpose. One such example is instant messaging services, which become a gateway for information consumption through the user’s personal contacts and groups. In the words of one participant (female, 27): “We have a group on WhatsApp, and when something attracts someone’s attention, they usually share a link to the newspaper or story in question”. In general, participants did not subscribe to news alerts and did not use media apps.

3.5. Perception of advertising

The participants’ opinions on advertising were not very positive. “I hardly ever watch a whole ad, unless it relates to something I’m really interested in”, said one participant (male, 30). Another participant (male, 31) was more explicit: “Sometimes they’re very invasive because they take up the whole screen and prevent you from reading the article”.

When asked about advertising based on browser cookies, the participants unanimously responded that it was “awful”. As one participant (female, 27) said: “If just one ad pops up, it’s not a problem. But if you lose your place on the page, then you don’t know what you’re clicking on, where to search, or where you are”. However, this dislike of cookies bore no direct relation to the use of ad-blockers, and awareness of the existence of ad-blockers was not commonplace amongst the groups.

With regard to specific devices, advertising was found to be more annoying on mobile phones. For one participant (female, 24), it depended on which device she was using: “If I’m using my laptop, it’s not an issue, because I can close the ads easily. But if I’m using my tablet or my phone, it’s a lot harder”. The discussion generated a more vehement response from another participant (female, 25), who stated that advertising “makes you angry”.

3.6. Privacy concerns

When the participants were asked if media outlets required them to identify themselves in order to access content, some of them said that they had signed up using their social network accounts “for the sake of convenience” (female, 34) and to avoid having to remember so many passwords. Others said that they signed up using an email address that they do not habitually access. When local media outlets required them to sign up, the participants were willing to provide a certain amount of personal information, such as their name, postcode and email address. However, they refused to provide other details, such as their postal address, telephone number, or bank account details. One participant (male, 30) said that he would only give these details “if he were a subscriber”.

When discussing whether they were prepared to activate geolocation on their mobile devices, the participants generally responded negatively. They would only agree to geolocation in order to access content offered by local or regional media and to use other services, such as maps. The participants were of the opinion that certain apps recorded information without their knowledge and shared their data with third parties. This made them feel uncomfortable and as though they had given up control. In the words of one participant (female, 34), “It makes me feel a little uncomfortable to think that they can tell where you are through your mobile phone”.

Some participants had experimented with personalized content and/or alerts. In general, their assessment was negative, as the media outlets in question were unable to reflect their interests. Some felt they received too many notifications and related advertising. Generic subjects did not work adequately, as one participant (male, 29) noted: “I was interested in a podcast that discussed the economic aspects of current affairs, but the filter was so broad that [...] all it did was send you ads and news stories that you’d never even think about reading”.

Some participants disliked the idea of someone else pre-selecting the news stories they received. One participant (female, 27) summed it up as follows: “I scan everything, and then take a further look at what interests me”. For the time being, the participants were not interested in personalized news stories.

4. Discussion and conclusions

Although young adults are interested in news, they dislike being overloaded with information, being repeatedly exposed to the same news stories, and becoming lost in the tangle of available news sources. According to our qualitative study, the ways in which young people access news is conditioned by their social and family environments, the types of activity they engage in, and their routines.

Traditional media still form part of their “information diet”, given that their personal environments facilitate access to media outlets such as the press. However, they are very critical of these outlets, as they consider them to be ideologically biased. Although they describe it as “sensationalist”, television remains a go-to source for important news. This was also reflected in the study conducted by Antunovic and others (2018). The 25-34 age group is, therefore, a generation that embraces digital without abandoning traditional.

Their interest increases when the content affects them directly or when they can relate to the news story in question. “Young people have an increased appetite for news” (Casero-Ripollés, 2012) and want to be informed so that they can interact with others. They appreciate immediacy, plurality, and depth in the news stories that interest them (García Jiménez, Tur-Viñes, & Pastor, 2018).

Although it is not easy to identify homogeneous patterns of consumption, there is evidence to show that young people “snack on the news, whenever and wherever they feel like it”, as asserted by Dholakia and others (2014). They prefer frequent “news snacks” to regular full meals. However, prioritizing the brevity of content more than its information value may give the news media less incentive to produce quality content (Chyi, 2009; Chyi & Yang, 2009). In this respect, and as noted by Westlund (2013), and Canavilhas and Rodrigues (2017), adapting to the mobile era represents a major challenge for journalism: not only in terms of language and journalism genres but also regarding the business models adopted and user interaction.

Although young people make extensive use of social networks as a way of finding news with a plurality of perspectives, and despite the trend towards sharing this news within their communities, young people paradoxically consider these sources too untrustworthy or biased to be used as a sole source of information. However, this study has also highlighted the use of WhatsApp for information purposes and revealed that it could even serve as the initial gateway of access to important news.

Mobile phones are the device of choice, as they provide immediate access to news. Mobility makes consumption possible under a wide range of circumstances, as noted by Peters (2015) and corroborated by the focus groups. However, emerging devices such as smart TVs are beginning to gain ground among young people in the 25-34 age group, as well as amongst users in other age groups. Consequently, media outlets must make an effort to develop content and positive user experiences for smart devices (López-García, 2018).

In general, the 25-34 age group sees advertising as a nuisance, although the qualitative study showed that young people in this age group are not generally aware of or use ad-blockers. However, after they were told about the features of ad-blockers, they became interested in them. Although the 2018 Digital News Report Spain revealed that ad-blockers are mostly used with computers and have achieved very little penetration on mobile devices, the qualitative study revealed that advertising could be considered far more annoying on mobile devices than on computers. Consequently, when we argue that journalism must adapt its languages and formats to the mobile era (Westlund, 2013; Canavilhas & Rodrigues, 2017), we should bear in mind that this adaptation will also have an impact on advertising.

Young adults are willing to provide personal or geolocation data only if they receive high-quality personalized services in return and if they trusted the company in question, as noted by Woodnutt (2018) and confirmed in the qualitative study. In any case, improving personalization services and soliciting anonymous data may be two plausible alternatives for media outlets to collect useful information for their business.

In conclusion, journalism must take these new patterns of consumption into account if it wishes to continue to attract the attention of young adults and future generations. However, any action taken to achieve this must not result in poorer-quality content or misuse of advertising. A professional journalistic approach is needed in order to maintain user confidence in the media outlet’s brand and to increase income by offering services that add value.

Funding Agency

The “News Preferences and Use within the New Media Scenario in Spain: Audiences, Companies, Content, and Multi-Platform Reputation Management” project was jointly funded by the Ministry of Finance and Competitiveness and the European Regional Development Fund (CSO2015-64662-C4-1-R).

References

AIMC (Ed.) (2018). Marco General de los Medios en España 2018. Madrid: Asociación para la Investigación de los Medios de Comunicación. https://bit.ly/2Dh0AET

Antunovic, D., Parsons, P., & Cooke, T.R. (2018). Checking and googling: Stages of news consumption among young adults. Journalism, 19(5), 632–648. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884916663625

Báez y Pérez-de-Tudela, J. (2007). Investigación cualitativa. Madrid: ESIC.

Bennett, S.E., Rhine, S.L., & Flickinger, R.S. (2008). Television news grazers: Who they are and what they (don’t) know. Critical Review, 20(1-2), 25-36. https://doi.org/10.1080/08913810802316316

Buckingham, D., & Martínez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos: Nueva ciudadanía entre redes sociales y escenarios escolares. [Interactive youth: New citizenship between social networks and school settings]. Comunicar, 40, 10-14. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-00

Canavilhas, J., & Rodrigues, C. (Eds.) (2017). Jornalismo móvel: linguagem, géneros e modelos de negócio. Covilhã: Editora LabCom IFP.

Casero-Ripollés, A. (2012). Más allá de los diarios: el consumo de noticias de los jóvenes en la era digital. [Beyond newspapers: News consumption among young people in the digital ra]. Comunicar, 20, 151-158. https://doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-03-05

Chyi, H. I., & Yang, M.C. (2009). Is online news an inferior good? Examining the economic nature of online news among users. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 86(3), 594-612. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769900908600309

Chyi, H.I. (2009). Information surplus and news consumption in the digital age: Impact and implications. In Z. Papacharissi (Ed.), Journalism and citizenship: New agendas (pp. 91-107). New York: Taylor & Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203871263

CIES (2018). Estudio de la audiencia de medios de comunicación. https://bit.ly/2QNhHWc.

Costera, I. (2007). The paradox of popularity. How young people experience news. Journalism Studies, 8(1), 96-116. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616700601056874

Costera-Meijer, I., & Groot Kormelink, T. (2015). Checking, sharing, clicking and linking: Changing patterns of news use between 2004 and 2014. Digital Journalism, 3(5), 664-679. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2014.937149

Dholakia, N., Reyes, I., & Bonoff, J. (2014). Mobile media : From legato to staccato, isochronal consumptionscapes. Consumption Markets & Culture, 18(1), 10-24. https://doi.org/10.1080/10253866.2014.899216

Dimmick, J., Feaster, J.C., & Hoplamazian, G.J. (2011). News in the interstices: The niches of mobile media in space and time. New Media & Society, 13(1), 23-39. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444810363452

Dimock, M. (2018). Defining generations: Where millennials end and post-millennials begin. Pew Research Center. March, 1st. https://pewrsr.ch/2CQR87r

Evens, T., & Van-Damme, K. (2016). Consumers’ willingness to share personal data: Implications for newspapers’ business models. International Journal on Media Management, 18(1), 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1080/14241277.2016.1166429

Fundación Telefónica (Ed.) (2017). Sociedad digital en España 2017. Madrid: Ariel. https://bit.ly/2lOc7RH

Gálvez, M. (2017). La publicidad digital en manos de los usuarios: más allá del ad-blocking. Madrid: Publicis Media y AEDEMO. https://bit.ly/2EcPTUu

García-Jiménez, A., Tur-Viñes, V., & Pastor-Ruiz, Y. (2018). Consumo mediático de adolescentes y jóvenes. Noticias, contenidos audiovisuales y medición de audiencias. Icono 14, 16(1), 22-46. https://doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v16i1.1101

Geser, H. (2004). Towards a sociological theory of the mobile phone (release 3.0). Zürich: Universidad de Zürich.

Ghersetti, M., & Westlund, O. (2018). Habits and generational media uses. Journalism Studies, 19(7), 1039-1058. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2016.1254061

Hermida, A., Fletcher, F., Korell, D., & Logan, D. (2012). Share, like, recommend. Decoding the social media news consumer. Journalism Studies, 13(5-6), 815-824. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2012.664430

Infoadex (Ed.) (2018). Estudio Infoadex de inversión publicitaria en España 2018. Madrid: Infoadex. https://bit.ly/2Iu9u14

Lee, L.T. (2016). Privacy: future threat or opportunity? In R.E. Brown, M. Wang, & V.K. Jones (Eds.), The new advertising. Volume Two. New media, new uses, new metrics (pp. 337–352). Santa Barbara: Praeger.

Ling, R. (2012). Taken for grantedness – The embedding of mobile communication into society. Cambridge: MIT Press. https://doi.org/10.5860/choice.50-6584

Ling, R., & Campbell, S.W. (2009). The reconstruction of space and time: mobile communication practices. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315134499

López-García, X. (2018). Panorama y desafíos de la mediación comunicativa en el escenario de la denominada automatización inteligente. El Profesional de la Información, 27(4), 725-731. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2018.jul.01

Meeker, M. (2018). Internet Trends Report 2018. https://bit.ly/2Nrssrz

Mihailidis, P. (2014). A tethered generation: Exploring the role of mobile phones in the daily life of young people. Mobile Media & Communication, 2(1), 58-72. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050157913505558

Molyneux, L. (2018). Mobile news consumption. A habit of snacking. Digital Journalism, 6(5), 634-650. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2017.1334567

Morris, J. S., & Forgette, R. (2007). News grazers, television news, political knowledge, and engagement. The Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics, 12(1), 91-107. https://doi.org/10.1177/1081180X06297122

Noguera-Vivo, J. M. (2018). Generación efímera. La comunicación de las redes sociales en la era de los medios líquidos. Salamanca: Comunicación Social.

Peters, C. (2015). Introduction. The places and spaces of news audiences. Journalism Studies, 16(1), 01-11. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2014.889944

Portilla, I. (2018). Privacy concerns about information sharing as trade-off for personalized news. El Profesional de la Información, 27(1), 19-26. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2018.ene.02

Reuters Institute (Ed.) (2016). Reuters Institute Digital News Report, 2016. London. https://bit.ly/2SzV4Sa

Reuters Institute (Ed.) (2018). Reuters Institute Digital News Report, 2018. London. https://bit.ly/2OrqRSG

Sádaba, CH., & Sánchez Blanco, C. (2018). El uso de bloqueadores de publicidad entre los usuarios de noticias online en España: perfiles y motivos. In J.L. González-Esteban., & J.A. García-Avilés (Coords.), Mediamorfosis. Radiografía de la innovación en periodismo (pp.123-136). Madrid: Sociedad Española de Periodística y Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche.

Silverstone, R., & Hirsch, E. (1992). Consuming technologies. Media and information in domestic spaces. London: Routledge.

Struckmann, S., & Karnowski, V. (2016). News consumption in a changing media ecology: An MESM-Study on mobile news. Telematics and Informatics, 33(2), 309-319. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tele.2015.08.012

Van-Damme, K., Courtois, C., Verbrugge, K., & de-Marez, L. (2015). What’s APPening to news? A mixed-method audience-centered study on mobile news consumption. Mobile Media & Communication, 3(2), 196-213. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050157914557691

Westlund, O. (2013). Mobile news. Digital Journalism, 1(1), 06-26. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2012.740273

Wolf, C., & Schnauber, A. (2015). News consumption in the mobile era. Digital Journalism, 3(5), 759-776. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2014.942497

Woodnutt, T. (2018). What do people really think about data privacy?… And what does it mean for brands? https://bit.ly/2QETlOh

Yuste, B. (2015). Las nuevas formas de consumir información de los jóvenes. Revista de Estudios de Juventud, 108, 179-191. https://bit.ly/2UtYYxF



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Esta investigación tiene como objetivo caracterizar cómo interactúan los jóvenes adultos con las noticias, en qué medida su consumo se ve condicionado por la presencia de publicidad y si se preocupan por la cesión de datos personales. Para ello, se toma como punto de partida el «Digital News Report Spain 2018», informe elaborado a partir de un cuestionario sobre consumo de medios digitales a un panel nacional de 2.023 internautas; de ellos, 293 son jóvenes de 25-34 años, que pertenecen a la generación «millennials». Estos datos se completaron con un estudio cualitativo, realizando dos grupos de discusión con personas de esa franja de edad residentes en la Comunidad Foral de Navarra. Entre las conclusiones de la investigación se señala que los jóvenes adultos se interesan por las noticias, a las que acceden de manera prioritaria por dispositivos móviles. Este interés es mayor cuando el contenido les afecta directamente o si empatizan con la temática de la noticia. Por otra parte, el entorno familiar y las rutinas sociales condicionan su manera de informarse. Siguen accediendo a medios tradicionales, aunque los consideran ideologizados. La publicidad la perciben como molesta, si bien no hay conocimiento ni un uso generalizado de bloqueadores. Finalmente, valoran negativamente los servicios de personalización actuales, aunque ceden algunos datos personales a los medios si le facilita el acceso a la información.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

En el actual ecosistema de medios en el que conviven y se complementan medios tradicionales y medios digitales es importante conocer los cambios que se producen en los usos y preferencias informativas de los públicos. Particularmente de aquellos grupos que han crecido en un «contexto saturado de tecnologías relacionales y de comunicaciones digitales» (Buckingham & Martínez, 2013).

El objetivo principal de este trabajo es caracterizar cómo interactúan con las noticias los jóvenes de 25-34 años al utilizar los medios móviles, y en qué medida este consumo está condicionado por la presencia de publicidad, así como la preocupación por su privacidad. Se trata de una generación de gran interés, que forma parte de los llamados «millennials», aquellos que han alcanzado la edad adulta a comienzos del siglo XXI (Dimock, 2018), con potencial comercial para medios de comunicación y anunciantes.

Como marco inicial se tendrá en cuenta la bibliografía sobre el tema complementada con los datos del «Digital News Report Spain 2018», estudio coordinado por el Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism de la Universidad de Oxford. Utilizando un cuestionario online, permite conocer el uso de noticias digitales en España de Internautas que han consumido noticias en el último mes (Reuters, 2018).

Esta primera revisión, no obstante, precisa ser confrontada con un estudio cualitativo que explique las motivaciones que sustentan tales comportamientos. Por ello, se realizan dos dinámicas de grupo a jóvenes adultos en Navarra, cuyo uso de medios se describe previamente a partir del «Estudio de la Audiencia de Medios de Comunicación» de CIES (2018).

La revisión bibliográfica y de fuentes secundarias cuantitativas, junto con el estudio propio cualitativo, permitirán conocer mejor la percepción y el comportamiento ante las noticias, la publicidad y la privacidad de este grupo de edad.

1.1. Comunicación, medios móviles y consumo informativo

Hoy en día es indudable la relevancia que han adquirido los dispositivos móviles, hasta tal punto que su compañía en la vida diaria se da por descontada (Ling, 2012). Como en otras tecnologías digitales, cabe advertir una «doble articulación» (Silverstone & Hirsch, 1992). Por una parte, el móvil es un objeto material que opera como medio de comunicación, conectando a su propietario con el mundo y con otras personas. Al mismo tiempo, es un objeto cultural estrechamente vinculado a la identidad, la actividad diaria y las relaciones sociales de sus usuarios, gracias a su omnipresencia y conectividad ubicua. Así pues, no solo sirve como un metadispositivo tecnológico con múltiples funciones, sino que ofrece una dimensión simbólica, que le reviste con nuevos significados que emergen a partir de la interacción social.

Las potencialidades de la comunicación móvil –que libera de las limitaciones de la proximidad física y la inmovilidad espacial (Geser, 2004)– conducen a una reconfiguración de nuestra relación con el espacio y el tiempo (Ling & Campbell, 2009). Este factor disruptivo de la movilidad se manifiesta en que aparecen así nuevos escenarios para el consumo cultural y mediático, pues ya no se desarrolla necesariamente en el ámbito doméstico, sino que, cada vez más, se lleva a cabo en lugares públicos y/o en situaciones de desplazamiento; haciendo de la espacialidad un factor contextual clave en la experiencia del consumo (Peters, 2015).

Este fenómeno social, cultural y tecnológico que es la comunicación a través de dispositivos móviles presenta diferencias generacionales (Ghersetti & Westlund, 2018). Gran parte de la investigación se ha centrado en el análisis de los «millennials», una «generación atada» al «smartphone» (Mihailidis, 2014), que juega un papel clave en sus interacciones diarias y en su socialización entre pares y que les provee de un consumo efímero, inmediato, móvil y especializado (Noguera Vivo, 2018; Van-Damme, Courtois, Verbrugge, & de-Marez, 2015).

En cuanto a los patrones de consumo informativo, los dispositivos móviles presentan algunas peculiaridades respecto a otras plataformas (Struckmann & Karnowski, 2016; Wolf & Schnauber, 2015). Se advierten las tendencias habituales en el uso de noticias como chequear, compartir, clicar, monitorizar o «picotear» la información (Costera-Meijer & Groot-Kormelink, 2015), pero de manera acentuada. El hecho de que el móvil sea un objeto que siempre acompaña al usuario hace que sea más probable que éste explore las noticias a lo largo del día, a veces de manera casi inconsciente o sin un propósito definido. Es un consumo, además, que puede desarrollarse en paralelo a otras actividades y en un nicho de tiempo vetado normalmente a los medios tradicionales: los diferentes intersticios que hay entre las rutinas diarias (Dimmick, Feaster, & Hoplamazian, 2011).

El consumo de información a través de móviles y sus aplicaciones puede conllevar que el acceso venga de alertas y notificaciones, convirtiendo así la exposición mediática en algo no siempre planificado por el usuario y a lo que dedica una atención parcial. Desde el punto de vista de la temporalidad –y empleando la metáfora musical de Dholakia y otros (2014)– frente al «legato» lánguido y continuado de otras plataformas, en los dispositivos móviles el consumo es más de tipo «staccato», esto es, basado en episodios breves e intermitentes, como ráfagas de información.

El «picoteo» informativo propio de los dispositivos móviles es un hábito que puede tener consecuencias negativas (Molyneux, 2018). En oposición a formas de consumo más profundas y pausadas, ha sido asociado por la literatura académica –aunque aplicado al «zapping» televisivo– a un menor conocimiento de los asuntos públicos y a una menor implicación cívica (Bennett, Rhine, & Flickinger 2008; Morris & Forgette, 2007).

1.2. Rasgos y tendencias del consumo de noticias

Diversos estudios señalan que los jóvenes tienen una actitud positiva ante las noticias y les gusta estar informados (Costera, 2007; Casero-Ripollés, 2012). Sin embargo, está cambiando su patrón de consumo, que es móvil y social (Yuste, 2015). Además, se caracteriza por el acceso casual o incidental desde las redes sociales, la vigilancia o monitoreo rápido en Internet, y el acceso a medios tradicionales solo para verificar y ampliar información (García-Jiménez, Tur-Viñes, & Pastor-Ruiz, 2018).

Los datos del «Digital News Report Spain 2018» lo corroboran. El interés por las noticias manifestado por los jóvenes españoles de 25-34 años es muy alto: de 293 usuarios encuestados, un 32% y un 48% está extremadamente interesado o muy interesado en las noticias. Al respecto, no hay diferencias significativas con otros grupos de edad, a excepción de los mayores de 55 años que manifestaron estar un 58% muy interesados.

Con respecto al uso de fuentes de noticias, medios sociales (69%), web de periódicos (54%), programas de televisión (50%) y periódicos impresos (44%) predominan como fuente de acceso. Aunque el grupo de 25-34 años no abandona los medios tradicionales, los medios sociales además de fuente se convierten en espacios clave para compartir, recomendar noticias y personalizar la difusión, tal como señalan Hermida y otros (2012). Según el informe del Reuters Institute (2018), el 45% de los jóvenes adultos accede a noticias a través de redes. Otros itinerarios destacados son los motores de búsqueda de sitios de noticias concretos (45%), el acceso directo a web de medios (36%) y las búsquedas por palabras clave de una noticia (33%).

Con respecto a los dispositivos, el teléfono móvil se convierte en la principal vía de acceso al ecosistema digital. El «Digital News Report Spain 2018» confirma el dato de otros estudios (AIMC, 2018; Fundación Telefónica, 2017): el 97% de los usuarios de 25-34 años reconocen que el móvil es el dispositivo de acceso principal a las noticias. Sin embargo, este grupo no abandona el consumo de noticias a través de ordenadores fijos o portátiles (69%).

1.3. Interacción con la publicidad y gestión de la privacidad

Internet se consolida en la segunda posición dentro de los medios convencionales (29%), teniendo en cuenta la inversión publicitaria en España (Infoadex, 2018). Según Sádaba y Sánchez-Blanco (2018) su crecimiento se debe a la generalización de Internet, la automatización, la innovación de formatos y la necesidad de generar nuevos ingresos.

En su relación con el consumo de noticias, la publicidad digital es percibida por muchos usuarios como un peaje para acceder a los contenidos. Además, aunque es un elemento natural dentro del nuevo ecosistema, muchas veces es mal valorada porque crece de forma indiscriminada e interrumpe la navegación (Gálvez, 2017). De allí que muchos usuarios recurran al bloqueo de anuncios.

El denominado «adblocking» ha dejado de ser un comportamiento aislado, sobre todo en el grupo de usuarios en el que se centra este trabajo. Gálvez (2017) señala que el 59% de los internautas mayores de 14 años conocen los bloqueadores de anuncios y que un 28% lo utiliza regularmente, mientras que entre los usuarios de 25-34 años, este porcentaje es mayor: un 73% conoce y un 45% usa. Entre los motivos, se indica que más de un 90% bloquea la publicidad para no perder velocidad de navegación, esquivar la publicidad de mal gusto y prevenir el riesgo de virus.

Estos datos de uso son bastante similares a los que arroja el estudio cuantitativo de referencia. El 51% de los usuarios de 25-34 años –señala el «Digital News Report Spain 2018»– ha descargado alguna vez un bloqueador de anuncios, siendo el grupo de edad que más los utiliza. Un 42% lo usa actualmente, la mayoría de ellos en el ordenador (89%), y pocos en la tableta (27%) o el móvil (25%).

Con respecto a la preocupación por la privacidad, aunque existe, se cede información para acceder a servicios o simplemente para compartirla (Evens & Van-Damme, 2016; Lee, 2016). La voluntad de compartir datos depende de tres factores: lo que se recibe a cambio, la confianza en la empresa y cómo de personal es la información (Woodnutt, 2018). Aquellos preocupados por la privacidad recurren a borrar su historial de navegación, utilizar nombres de usuario o direcciones de correo electrónico temporales, borrar aplicaciones o ajustar las opciones de privacidad en sus dispositivos (Lee, 2016; Meeker, 2018).

El «Digital News Report Spain 2016» estudió esta cuestión (Reuters Institute, 2016). En concreto, se preguntó si preocupaba que recibir noticias personalizadas pudiese conllevar un mayor riesgo para su privacidad. España, con un 54%, era el tercer país con mayor porcentaje de personas que se manifestaron de acuerdo con esta frase (Portilla, 2018). Con la edad crecía la preocupación. En el grupo de 25-34 años, un 53% se mostró preocupado por la privacidad, un valor similar al del conjunto de españoles (54%).

2. Material y métodos

A partir de la revisión de la literatura y los datos cuantitativos expuestos, se ha obtenido un panorama de cómo interaccionan los jóvenes adultos con las noticias y la publicidad, y también en qué grado les preocupa la privacidad. Sin embargo, quedan cuestiones sobre las que profundizar:

• ¿Por qué se interesan por las noticias?

• ¿Confían en los medios tradicionales para informarse o diversifican las fuentes y los itinerarios de acceso?

• ¿Cómo usan los dispositivos para seguir las noticias?

• ¿Cómo valoran la publicidad? ¿Conocen y/o usan los bloqueadores?

• Si les piden información personal para acceder a noticias, ¿qué datos están dispuestos a dar y por qué?

Para responder a estas preguntas se precisa un estudio cualitativo que permita conocer la realidad a través del discurso que se genera en este tipo de investigaciones. Se trabajó con casos particulares representativos de los jóvenes de 25-34 años en Navarra, y que hubieran consumido noticias digitales, de modo que fueran equiparables al universo de estudio del «Digital News Report Spain 2018». La técnica empleada fue el grupo de discusión porque ofrece mayor número de enfoques y más información de la que se alcanzaría entrevistando a sus miembros aisladamente. Es un procedimiento habitual de la metodología cualitativa, que permite conocer actitudes y motivaciones de un grupo social, alcanzando principios generales desde lo particular (Báez & Pérez de Tudela, 2007). Dado que en este estudio nos centramos en Navarra, se mostró en primer lugar datos del consumo de medios en esta región de los jóvenes que conforman el universo de estudio. Posteriormente, se presentaron los resultados del estudio cualitativo, basado en las percepciones de los participantes sobre cómo es su consumo informativo.

2.1. Medios y audiencia joven en Navarra

Según el «Estudio de la Audiencia de Medios de Comunicación», en 2017 residían en Navarra 73.500 personas de 25-34 años, de las que 72.640 (99%) había accedido a Internet alguna vez.

Este grupo consume todo tipo de medios, destacando sobre el resto de grupos de edad en lectura de prensa digital, ya que un 53% declaró haberla leído antes. Los medios digitales destacados en el target 25-34 años navarros e internautas son Diariodenavarra.es (17%) y Marca.com (11%). En medios tradicionales, el 16% lee Diario de Navarra en papel, el 10% escucha Europa FM Navarra y un 16% ve Antena 3. Otro dato interesante para este estudio es constatar que el 65% de ellos se conectó a Facebook el día anterior.

Los jóvenes adultos navarros presentan un consumo de medios informativos de interés para esta investigación, lo que justifica utilizar este universo en el estudio cualitativo sobre el motivo de los comportamientos ante las noticias, cómo compatibilizan medios y dispositivos, y su actitud hacia la publicidad y la privacidad.

2.2. Metodología

Se realizaron dos grupos de discusión para el universo de estudio definido como personas residentes en Navarra de 25-34 años, consumidoras de cualquier formato de noticias digitales locales y regionales de dicha zona geográfica.

Para el diseño metodológico, la captación de participantes y desarrollo del trabajo de campo, se contó con la colaboración de la empresa de estudios y opinión CIES. Los grupos se convocaron el jueves 22 de febrero de 2018, consecutivamente (17:00 y 19:30) con una duración de dos horas cada uno. Participaron 16 personas, ocho en cada grupo, siendo 50% mujeres y 50% hombres. La media de edad fue de 28,5 años.

Durante los grupos de discusión se trataron cinco grandes temas: consumo de noticias, interés por las noticias y los medios locales, consumo de medios digitales, uso de redes sociales y, por último, publicidad y datos personales. El uso de dispositivos móviles fue un punto destacado de la conversación.

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Interés en noticias

Teniendo en cuenta el universo estudiado, los participantes mostraron interés por la información de actualidad en mayor grado cuando empatizan con su contenido o este contenido les afecta directamente. En los grupos de discusión, varias personas coincidieron en la importancia de «saber qué pasa en el mundo» (varón, 26) y «lo que es la actualidad, el día a día» (mujer, 34). Por tanto, se corroboraron los datos cuantitativos.

Para ahondar en las motivaciones, se preguntó sobre el tipo de noticias que generan mayor interés. Los entrevistados distinguieron entre noticias generales e intereses particulares. En lo que se refiere a las noticias generales, varias personas indicaron estar interesadas en temas sociales, agenda cultural y sucesos locales «con los que empatizo» (mujer, 25; varón, 31). También el deporte local fue un contenido recurrente. Con respecto a las noticias relacionadas con los intereses particulares, un participante (varón, 29) señaló que le llamaba la atención especialmente la información que le afecta «de forma directa». Por otra parte, se centraron más en las noticias de proximidad, las que se refieren al entorno cercano de las personas. Las noticias relacionadas con la política institucional tuvieron menos interés entre algunos participantes: «la política satura bastante, no se le presta demasiada atención» (varón, 27). Mientras, otros son seguidores habituales: «aunque a veces me hierva la sangre, me encanta ver la política, porque me gusta saber qué pasa en el mundo y aquí» (varón, 30).

Relacionado con las temáticas de las noticias encontramos otro fenómeno relevante y es la saturación que produce la repetición del contenido cuando los medios ya no tienen más información que aportar. Esa saturación corresponde, según un participante, a ciertas noticias que se convierten «en moda» y ante las que se pierde el interés (varón, 29).

3.2. Fuentes informativas empleadas

El estudio cuantitativo había revelado que, entre los jóvenes de 25-34 años, los medios sociales, las webs de medios y los programas de televisión eran las fuentes más consultadas, y solo en cuarto lugar aparecían los periódicos impresos. Sin embargo, al contrastar esta cuestión en los grupos de discusión se percibió cierta contradicción al respecto: las marcas tradicionales impresas mantienen su prestigio, mientras que la televisión es considerada como sensacionalista y las redes sociales tienen tanto detractores como defensores. Así, la mayoría de los consultados reconoció utilizar con más frecuencia los medios «online» que los tradicionales, porque ofrecen acceso inmediato, más noticias, más pluralidad de enfoques y «más libertad para escoger» (mujer, 33). Si los medios tradicionales caen en sus manos los leen; si no, no. Por esta misma razón, las marcas tradicionales que se consumen dependen de los hábitos familiares, de la comodidad del acceso y la proximidad ideológica. En ocasiones, es la situación familiar la que propicia el encuentro con el periódico: «Lo suelo leer en papel porque les llega a mis padres a casa» (mujer, 27). En otras, es un hábito cotidiano vinculado a otras actividades: «Yo leo en papel cuando me tomo el café, hago como una primera barrida en el bar todas las mañanas» (mujer, 34).

En general, la radio local se consume como medio de compañía, pero no como primera fuente informativa, al menos en este grupo. Aproximadamente la mitad de los participantes ve informativos de televisión y la tendencia parece decreciente: tres personas afirman no encender nunca la televisión. Sin embargo, para temas de gran alcance y repercusión, se recurre a dicho medio: «el vídeo es la versión más espectacular y a menudo la más dramática» (varón, 34).

Los defensores de las redes sociales como fuente informativa aprecian la inmediatez y la variedad de enfoques frente a una prensa «local politizada y polarizada» (varón, 31). «Cuando sigues redes sociales –señaló otro participante– puedes seguir un montón de medios diferentes y ahí tienes siempre como un abanico más completo» (varón, 30). Algunos consultan los medios locales a través de las redes sociales, sobre todo Facebook, reciben recomendaciones de sus contactos de WhatsApp o siguen sucesos en directo por Twitter. Instagram se valora positivamente para el seguimiento de noticias deportivas. Entre los detractores, algunos manifestaron no utilizar, en general, las redes sociales para informarse de noticias locales porque les parecen poco fiables, cuesta discernir la credibilidad y hay que contrastar la fuente: «No me gustan cómo funcionan las redes sociales» (mujer, 27) y «lo manipulan todo» (mujer, 25). En cambio, otros reconocen que «para enterarse de noticias de última hora son importantes» (varón, 29).

3.3. Itinerarios de acceso

Aunque no es fácil identificar patrones de consumo comunes, los participantes indicaron que accedían a las noticias a través del sitio web de los medios, directamente o utilizando motores de búsqueda, y vía redes sociales, Facebook y Twitter, sobre todo.

Por lo que respecta a éstas, buena parte de la información proviene de cuentas oficiales de medios que algunos usuarios han elegido seguir, pero es muy frecuente también que las noticias aparezcan en su «timeline» porque son posteadas por sus contactos: «de rebote te va a salir una noticia que alguien ha compartido» (mujer, 27). Algunos jóvenes confiesan tener dificultades en distinguir las fuentes de información: «[En Facebook] yo tengo un desbarajuste de cosas que sigo, a veces me pierdo un poco de dónde te viene» (mujer, 24). Así pues, se trata de una exposición accidental a las noticias, en tanto que no parte de una búsqueda originada por el interés de los usuarios, sino que éstos se encuentran con la información, en el contexto de una actividad «online» guiada por otras motivaciones. Como indica una mujer de 24 años, las noticias «suelen llegar por todos lados. Me suelen llegar y si alguna me interesa más, voy a buscarla». Esta dinámica se extiende a las aplicaciones de mensajería como WhatsApp, nombrada en diversos momentos de los grupos de discusión como foro donde se conocen las noticias.

El itinerario de acceso a las noticias está además condicionado por el carácter más o menos urgente y el alcance geográfico del acontecimiento informativo. Las noticias inesperadas del ámbito local o regional las suelen conocer en primer lugar a través de WhatsApp, sobre todo por medio de grupos familiares o de amigos. Para ampliar la información algunos acuden a medios locales o hacen búsquedas en Google o en las redes sociales. En todo caso, coinciden en la necesidad de contrastar la información y en la mayor credibilidad que siguen teniendo los tradicionales. Cuando el acontecimiento noticioso es de orden nacional o internacional, el repertorio mediático se vuelve más amplio y la consulta se extiende a medios con más recursos para la cobertura.

Por último, los grupos de discusión pusieron de relieve que el consumo digital de los participantes es fragmentado pero constante a lo largo de día, en torno a micropausas: «sigo Diario de Navarra en todas las redes sociales, lo voy mirando todos los días por si se ha refrescado y hay noticias nuevas. Voy mirando cada tres horas o así» (varón, 25).

3.4. Preferencia de dispositivos

En consonancia con los datos del «Digital News Report Spain 2018», los grupos de discusión constataron que el dispositivo más utilizado por los jóvenes adultos para acceder a las noticias es el móvil, seguido por el ordenador. El consumo informativo «suele ser siempre por el móvil; periódico, poco» (mujer, 24).

Esa preponderancia de los dispositivos móviles para el acceso a las noticias conlleva a que el conocimiento de la actualidad se produzca, en ocasiones, en plataformas tradicionalmente vinculadas a otras funciones, como los servicios de mensajería instantánea, que se convierten en una puerta para el consumo informativo, a través de los contactos personales y grupales del propio usuario. Como explica una participante, «tenemos un WhatsApp de la cuadrilla y cuando a alguno le llama algo la atención suele mandar el enlace de ese periódico o de esa noticia» (mujer, 27). En general, los consultados no están suscritos a alertas de noticias y no utilizan aplicaciones de medios.

3.5. Percepción de la publicidad

La opinión de los jóvenes adultos acerca de la publicidad no es muy positiva: «Casi nunca he visto un anuncio entero, a no ser que sea de una cosa que me interese un montón» (varón, 30). Otro participante es más explícito al comentar que «a veces son muy invasivos» (varón, 31) porque ocupan toda la pantalla e impiden leer la noticia.

Efectivamente, al preguntarles acerca de la publicidad basada en las «cookies» de su navegación, fue unánime el comentario de que «es horrible» ya que «para un anuncio que sale no pasa nada, pero cuando te pierdes en la página, ya no sabes dónde estás pinchando, dónde quieres buscar, dónde estás» (mujer, 27). Sin embargo, ese rechazo no se relaciona directamente con el uso de los bloqueadores, de hecho, el conocimiento de los bloqueadores de publicidad no está muy generalizado.

En relación con los dispositivos, la publicidad es más molesta en el móvil. Una participante subraya que la percepción depende de «dónde lo estés mirando, si estoy con el portátil me da igual porque la puedes cerrar fácil, pero si estás con la tableta o con el móvil tengo que estar metiendo la uña» (mujer, 24), y otra más enfadada destaca: «te entra la agresividad» (mujer, 25).

3.6. Preocupación por la privacidad

Al preguntar a los participantes si los medios les piden identificarse para acceder a sus contenidos, algunos indicaron haberse registrado a través de sus cuentas en redes sociales «por comodidad» (mujer, 34), para no tener que recordar tantas contraseñas. Otros indicaron que utilizan una dirección de correo que no usan habitualmente.

En el caso de que un medio local solicite registro, se mostraron dispuestos a dar alguna información personal, como nombre, código postal y una dirección de correo electrónico. Sin embargo, manifestaron su rechazo a facilitar otros datos como dirección postal, teléfono, o cuenta bancaria; datos que solo darían «para ser suscriptor» (varón, 30).

Al discutir sobre si están dispuestos a activar la localización en dispositivos móviles, en general, manifestaron cierto malestar. Solo aceptan la geolocalización para acceder a contenidos de un medio de la zona y para utilizar otros servicios, como mapas. En todo caso, les parece que algunas aplicaciones registran información sin conocimiento del usuario y cediendo datos a terceros, lo que genera sensación de control e incomodidad: «Me da un poco de mal rollo que por el móvil sepan dónde estás» (mujer, 34).

Algunos participantes habían probado la personalización de contenidos y/o alertas. Su valoración general era negativa porque los medios no acertaron con sus intereses o recibían demasiada cantidad de noticias y publicidad asociada. Los temas genéricos no funcionaban: «Me interesa un podcast de economía en noticias actuales, pero el filtro es tan amplio que (...) lo que hace es mandarte publicidad y noticias que tú no abrirías en la vida» (varón, 29).

Algunos participantes se mostraban reacios a que alguien preseleccione las noticias que reciben: «Yo miro un poco de todo y luego ya voy a lo que me interesa» (mujer, 27). Por el momento, no tenían interés en personalizar noticias.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Los jóvenes adultos se interesan por las noticias y se debaten entre la sobrecarga de información, la repetición de noticias y la necesidad de no perderse en la maraña de fuentes disponibles. Según el estudio cualitativo realizado, el entorno social y familiar, así como el tipo de actividad y las rutinas de estos jóvenes condicionan su forma de acceso a las noticias.

Los medios tradicionales todavía ocupan parte de su dieta informativa porque el entorno personal facilita el encuentro con medios como la prensa. Sin embargo, también son muy críticos con ellos porque los consideran ideologizados. Aún calificada de sensacionalista, la televisión es fuente para noticias de envergadura, resultado que también constata el estudio de Antunovic y otros (2018). Es, por tanto, una generación que abraza lo digital sin abandonar lo tradicional.

El interés es mayor cuando el contenido les afecta directamente o bien empatizan socialmente con la temática: «los jóvenes tienen un elevado apetito por las noticias» (Casero-Ripollés, 2012) y quieren estar informados para poder interactuar con otros. Aprecian la inmediatez, la pluralidad y la profundización en las historias que les interesan (García-Jiménez, Tur-Viñes, & Pastor Ruiz, 2018).

Aunque no es fácil identificar patrones de consumo homogéneos, se constata que este público «mordisquea las noticias, cuando y donde lo desea», como señalaban Dholakia y otros (2014). Prefiere aperitivos frecuentes de noticias a comidas completas de modo regular. Privilegiar la brevedad del contenido frente a su valor informativo podría desincentivar a los medios periodísticos a producir contenido de calidad (Chyi, 2009; Chyi & Yang, 2009). En este sentido, y como apuntan Westlund (2013), y Canavilhas y Rodrigues (2017), adaptarse a la era móvil supone para el periodismo retos tanto en las dimensiones del lenguaje y géneros periodísticos como en los propios modelos de negocio y en la interacción con los usuarios.

A pesar del alto uso de redes sociales para encontrar noticias con variedad de enfoques y la tendencia a compartirla en sus comunidades, se da la paradoja de que las consideran poco fiables o sesgadas como única fuente informativa. Sin embargo, en este estudio destaca el uso de WhatsApp para estos fines, siendo incluso su primer acceso a noticias de relevancia.

El móvil es el dispositivo de acceso por excelencia porque permite hallar de inmediato las noticias. La movilidad favorece el consumo en diversidad de escenarios, como recordaba Peters (2015) y se corroboró en los grupos de discusión. No obstante, medios emergentes como la «smart TV» comienza a ganar adeptos entre los jóvenes de 25-34 años, pero también en otros grupos. De ahí que los medios no puedan descuidar el desarrollo de contenidos y las buenas experiencias de usuarios en los dispositivos inteligentes (López-García, 2018).

En general, este grupo percibe la publicidad como molesta, pero el estudio cualitativo demostró que no hay conocimiento ni uso generalizado de bloqueadores. No obstante, una vez informados de sus prestaciones, muestran interés. A pesar de que el «Digital News Report Spain 2018» destaca que el uso del bloqueador es mayoritario en el ordenador y tiene muy poca presencia en el móvil, la investigación cualitativa hace pensar que la publicidad puede resultar más molesta en el móvil que en el ordenador. Por tanto, cuando se subraya que el periodismo debe adaptar sus lenguajes y formatos a la era móvil (Westlund, 2013; Canavilhas & Rodrigues, 2017), hay que entender que esta adaptación también afecta a la publicidad.

La audiencia joven adulta se muestra dispuesta a ofrecer datos o su geolocalización solo si recibe un buen servicio de personalización y confían en la empresa, como apuntaba Woodnutt (2018) y confirma el estudio cualitativo presentado. En todo caso, mejorar los servicios de personalización y solicitar datos no identificativos parecen ser dos alternativas plausibles para que los medios puedan lograr información de valor para su negocio.

En conclusión, el periodismo debe tener en cuenta estos nuevos patrones de consumo si quiere mantener la atención de estos jóvenes adultos y futuras generaciones. Sin embargo, esto no puede conllevar una peor calidad de los contenidos o el mal uso de la publicidad. Es preciso un trabajo periodístico profesional para lograr mantener la confianza en la marca del medio, así como para lograr mayores ingresos con una oferta de servicios que añada valor.

Apoyos

Proyecto «Usos y preferencias informativas en el nuevo mapa de medios en España: Audiencias, empresas, contenidos y gestión de la reputación en un entorno multipantalla» cofinanciado por el Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad y el Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional (CSO2015-64662-C4-1-R).

Referencias

AIMC (Ed.) (2018). Marco General de los Medios en España 2018. Madrid: Asociación para la Investigación de los Medios de Comunicación. https://bit.ly/2Dh0AET

Antunovic, D., Parsons, P., & Cooke, T.R. (2018). Checking and googling: Stages of news consumption among young adults. Journalism, 19(5), 632–648. https://doi.org/10.1177/1464884916663625

Báez y Pérez-de-Tudela, J. (2007). Investigación cualitativa. Madrid: ESIC.

Bennett, S.E., Rhine, S.L., & Flickinger, R.S. (2008). Television news grazers: Who they are and what they (don’t) know. Critical Review, 20(1-2), 25-36. https://doi.org/10.1080/08913810802316316

Buckingham, D., & Martínez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos: Nueva ciudadanía entre redes sociales y escenarios escolares. [Interactive youth: New citizenship between social networks and school settings]. Comunicar, 40, 10-14. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-00

Canavilhas, J., & Rodrigues, C. (Eds.) (2017). Jornalismo móvel: linguagem, géneros e modelos de negócio. Covilhã: Editora LabCom IFP.

Casero-Ripollés, A. (2012). Más allá de los diarios: el consumo de noticias de los jóvenes en la era digital. [Beyond newspapers: News consumption among young people in the digital ra]. Comunicar, 20, 151-158. https://doi.org/10.3916/C39-2012-03-05

Chyi, H. I., & Yang, M.C. (2009). Is online news an inferior good? Examining the economic nature of online news among users. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 86(3), 594-612. https://doi.org/10.1177/107769900908600309

Chyi, H.I. (2009). Information surplus and news consumption in the digital age: Impact and implications. In Z. Papacharissi (Ed.), Journalism and citizenship: New agendas (pp. 91-107). New York: Taylor & Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203871263

CIES (2018). Estudio de la audiencia de medios de comunicación. https://bit.ly/2QNhHWc.

Costera, I. (2007). The paradox of popularity. How young people experience news. Journalism Studies, 8(1), 96-116. https://doi.org/10.1080/14616700601056874

Costera-Meijer, I., & Groot Kormelink, T. (2015). Checking, sharing, clicking and linking: Changing patterns of news use between 2004 and 2014. Digital Journalism, 3(5), 664-679. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2014.937149

Dholakia, N., Reyes, I., & Bonoff, J. (2014). Mobile media : From legato to staccato, isochronal consumptionscapes. Consumption Markets & Culture, 18(1), 10-24. https://doi.org/10.1080/10253866.2014.899216

Dimmick, J., Feaster, J.C., & Hoplamazian, G.J. (2011). News in the interstices: The niches of mobile media in space and time. New Media & Society, 13(1), 23-39. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444810363452

Dimock, M. (2018). Defining generations: Where millennials end and post-millennials begin. Pew Research Center. March, 1st. https://pewrsr.ch/2CQR87r

Evens, T., & Van-Damme, K. (2016). Consumers’ willingness to share personal data: Implications for newspapers’ business models. International Journal on Media Management, 18(1), 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1080/14241277.2016.1166429

Fundación Telefónica (Ed.) (2017). Sociedad digital en España 2017. Madrid: Ariel. https://bit.ly/2lOc7RH

Gálvez, M. (2017). La publicidad digital en manos de los usuarios: más allá del ad-blocking. Madrid: Publicis Media y AEDEMO. https://bit.ly/2EcPTUu

García-Jiménez, A., Tur-Viñes, V., & Pastor-Ruiz, Y. (2018). Consumo mediático de adolescentes y jóvenes. Noticias, contenidos audiovisuales y medición de audiencias. Icono 14, 16(1), 22-46. https://doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v16i1.1101

Geser, H. (2004). Towards a sociological theory of the mobile phone (release 3.0). Zürich: Universidad de Zürich.

Ghersetti, M., & Westlund, O. (2018). Habits and generational media uses. Journalism Studies, 19(7), 1039-1058. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2016.1254061

Hermida, A., Fletcher, F., Korell, D., & Logan, D. (2012). Share, like, recommend. Decoding the social media news consumer. Journalism Studies, 13(5-6), 815-824. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2012.664430

Infoadex (Ed.) (2018). Estudio Infoadex de inversión publicitaria en España 2018. Madrid: Infoadex. https://bit.ly/2Iu9u14

Lee, L.T. (2016). Privacy: future threat or opportunity? In R.E. Brown, M. Wang, & V.K. Jones (Eds.), The new advertising. Volume Two. New media, new uses, new metrics (pp. 337–352). Santa Barbara: Praeger.

Ling, R. (2012). Taken for grantedness – The embedding of mobile communication into society. Cambridge: MIT Press. https://doi.org/10.5860/choice.50-6584

Ling, R., & Campbell, S.W. (2009). The reconstruction of space and time: mobile communication practices. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315134499

López-García, X. (2018). Panorama y desafíos de la mediación comunicativa en el escenario de la denominada automatización inteligente. El Profesional de la Información, 27(4), 725-731. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2018.jul.01

Meeker, M. (2018). Internet Trends Report 2018. https://bit.ly/2Nrssrz

Mihailidis, P. (2014). A tethered generation: Exploring the role of mobile phones in the daily life of young people. Mobile Media & Communication, 2(1), 58-72. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050157913505558

Molyneux, L. (2018). Mobile news consumption. A habit of snacking. Digital Journalism, 6(5), 634-650. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2017.1334567

Morris, J. S., & Forgette, R. (2007). News grazers, television news, political knowledge, and engagement. The Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics, 12(1), 91-107. https://doi.org/10.1177/1081180X06297122

Noguera-Vivo, J. M. (2018). Generación efímera. La comunicación de las redes sociales en la era de los medios líquidos. Salamanca: Comunicación Social.

Peters, C. (2015). Introduction. The places and spaces of news audiences. Journalism Studies, 16(1), 01-11. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2014.889944

Portilla, I. (2018). Privacy concerns about information sharing as trade-off for personalized news. El Profesional de la Información, 27(1), 19-26. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2018.ene.02

Reuters Institute (Ed.) (2016). Reuters Institute Digital News Report, 2016. London. https://bit.ly/2SzV4Sa

Reuters Institute (Ed.) (2018). Reuters Institute Digital News Report, 2018. London. https://bit.ly/2OrqRSG

Sádaba, CH., & Sánchez Blanco, C. (2018). El uso de bloqueadores de publicidad entre los usuarios de noticias online en España: perfiles y motivos. In J.L. González-Esteban., & J.A. García-Avilés (Coords.), Mediamorfosis. Radiografía de la innovación en periodismo (pp.123-136). Madrid: Sociedad Española de Periodística y Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche.

Silverstone, R., & Hirsch, E. (1992). Consuming technologies. Media and information in domestic spaces. London: Routledge.

Struckmann, S., & Karnowski, V. (2016). News consumption in a changing media ecology: An MESM-Study on mobile news. Telematics and Informatics, 33(2), 309-319. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tele.2015.08.012

Van-Damme, K., Courtois, C., Verbrugge, K., & de-Marez, L. (2015). What’s APPening to news? A mixed-method audience-centered study on mobile news consumption. Mobile Media & Communication, 3(2), 196-213. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050157914557691

Westlund, O. (2013). Mobile news. Digital Journalism, 1(1), 06-26. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2012.740273

Wolf, C., & Schnauber, A. (2015). News consumption in the mobile era. Digital Journalism, 3(5), 759-776. https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2014.942497

Woodnutt, T. (2018). What do people really think about data privacy?… And what does it mean for brands? https://bit.ly/2QETlOh

Yuste, B. (2015). Las nuevas formas de consumir información de los jóvenes. Revista de Estudios de Juventud, 108, 179-191. https://bit.ly/2UtYYxF

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/19
Accepted on 31/03/19
Submitted on 31/03/19

Volume 27, Issue 1, 2019
DOI: 10.3916/C59-2019-02
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 5
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?