Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The online space is rich in playful experiences and can provide many pleasures and lessons to their younger users. However, it is true that children cannot always handle the advertising noise and other adverse effects resulting from excessive or inappropriate use of technology and particularly the game pages. This article aims to confirm the advertising pressure that affects children in Brazil and Spain when playing on Internet game pages. Measuring advertising pressure in online games by the theoretical and methodological framework for content analysis applied to the game pages visited by a group of Brazilian and Spanish children 9 to 11 years. This research showed that online games are occupied by a considerable amount of publicity, which repeatedly blocks access and disrupts key moments of young players with unwanted or not interesting messages. Like in television programming we must put more attention on quality and the amount of ads in online playing. So if there is a concern with the commercial content of children's programming on television similar reasons demand prompt and adequate attention to those games pages. Abusive ads damage advertiser’s reputation, affects gaming experiences and disturb the playtime. Game managers, advertisers, educators and families may use children opinions that are actually successful.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and background

For years, research of effects driven by media has given consideration to the training and educational possibilities of the modernization of equipment and technological devices to separate ages or stages in audience reception. As the effectiveness of communication lies not in technology, but in the power of political and economic groups that - in spite of the changes in cultural industries - continue to control at least part of audience reception, it is necessary to maintain a critical perspective when continuing studies on the communicative impact of contemporary technologies.

Besides, critical studies are still less numerous than research on communication and audience (Martínez-Nicolás & Saperas, 2011). The importance of this research perspective has already reached institutional policies, such as the European Commission, that since 2002 has been highlighting the academic focus of technology and media to research of users’ practices (Pérez-Tornero, 2010).

During the last decades, information and communication technologies have marked the production and spread of information and knowledge. The rhythm of the development of the cultural industries and the several stages in the idea of «being a child» can be distinguished: in the book world, in television or in nowadays mobile and portable communication world. This work connects with the receptionist research, but trying to expand reception to interaction as a more conscious and voluntary way that occurs differently in digital relationships experienced and expressed by their own users.

The notion of child education is as modern as the book but only in recent times and with the concept of school a certain conception of childhood with its own vital objectives has been made visible. With schooling, although somewhat hidden, there is also an adult and institutional colonization of the possible childhood involved (Ariès, 1981). The textbook –reading is aimed at teachers and only centuries later to the individual reception– expectations and values between lines are drawn according to each culture.

At the stage of media, a different childhood is conceptualized, particularly during the golden age of television. After the World Wars, five centuries after the invention of letterpress printing, an international review defines children through the Universal Decla­ration of their rights. But simultaneously, powerful media technologies consolidate their power: film, news­papers, radio and television stations. Starting from the mass dissemination of information through press, radio and television another idea of childhood that is more sensitive and less autonomous is being built. Unlike books, these mass media «tell it all». Contents that were never in school textbooks make television a «revealing secrets machine» for children education, as rightly noted by Meyrowitz (1995).

Now, due to reasons contrary to the criticism of the modern book, naturalism accuses technology again, particularly the audiovisual media, of the disappearance of childhood (Postman, 1982), or at least one of its utopian idealizations. Among so many interests, media research on the psychosocial effects of television on children is not simple. However, studies on violence, sexism and other abuses of power agree that this audiovisual medium has not distinguished itself for its educational role and effects with the turn of the XXI century (Pérez-Salgado, Rivera & Ortiz, 2010; Martínez, Nicolas & Salas, 2013).

Unlike books, children’s television programming is produced, catalogued and evaluated as mere entertainment, but its contents sometimes compete directly with family lifestyles or the legal school curriculum. In the most benevolent treatments, it is recognized that television for children barely reaches the category of electronic nanny while the parents rest.

If textbooks hide other forms of childhood, and television makes it fade in dreams, in the harsh terms of Postman (1982), how will childhood look with video games? The burden of blame has been cast on the time uselessly spent in front of «TV», children’s favourite entertainment and dominant among Western children from the last decades of the twentieth century and now shared with electronic games so far this century. In the field of academic and industrial research, macro studies confirm every year the penetration of technologies into the practices of North American children (Kaiser Family Foundation, 2010), European children (EU Kids Online, 2010) and Brazilian children (TIC Kids Online Brasil, 2013). In addition many other micro studies have been published, more qualitative and close to navigation and children’s online interactions, such as those mentioned in this article.

While critical research is minority, the ethnographic approaches to children’s groups and communities within reception studies are even fewer. So, there is still pending a sociology, an anthropology, etc. of digital practices in the current reality of mobile technologies, including tablets and other devices that multiply the possibilities of video games and consoles for group playing, beyond languages and cultures, with strangers, in virtual or augmented realities, etc.

Children breeze in throughout the global computer network, with some tighter controls at home and in the classroom. From their very own words they de­clare that they feel freer in moments and spaces «just for them», displacing towards this audiovisual playful interaction –like unique and own practices– previous ways of reading and reception of TV content and, even more, editorial content on paper.

Muros, Aragon and Bustos (2013) agree that the youngest use video games and digital networks mainly for entertainment. On the Internet, they «talk for the sake of talking» or play« for the sake of playing». However, it must not be forgotten that, in the latest technological period of cultural industries, video games –online or offline– are still funded by direct sales and contextual advertising. With an increasing number of users and generating billions of dollars annually worldwide, video games are advertising businesses as well as entertainment media. Even during the economic crisis, in 2009, games totalled 823 million dollars in the United States (Puro Marketing, 2010). In Brazil, the combination of play and advertising, called «advergame» in 2011, reached three billion dollars (Campi, 2012). In 2012 in Spain, over 27 million euros were spent on promotional games (Info­adex, 2013). The American sector (ESA 2014) states that they expect to reach 7.2 billion in 2016. It is clear that behind the scenes of gaming –and the type of child socialization involved– there is a profitable market. Away from adults behind screens, children can access possible worlds. Several Internet advertisement formats can be found in this context, which are aimed at young consumers or purchase influencers, and also entertainment formulas for domestic economies.

A general prevention of excessive advertising pressure requires a more careful approach in the case of children. The business experience of the crisis in the media is showing that advertising saturation does not make them more sustainable. Advertising has shifted from funding media to spoil the perception and value of what now are saturated channels. It is a serious matter in any case, but in addition, among children the probabilities of domestication of technologies (Silver­stone and Haddon, 1996), i.e., making alternative uses of the devices to escape the programming, are, in theory, lower. Children, eager to enjoy their favourite leisure time, allow the advertising price» in those seemingly free and safe games. Both Brazil and Spain are missing a specific regulation on child advertising in games and, as a matter of fact, the recommendations coming from agreements and self-monitoring initially designed for the television industry are not being respected. Moreover, technologies, by extending access to information with portability and mobility, exponentially multiply the possibilities of communication with more people in very varied places and formats. From this technological context that changes advertising, Méndiz (2010) details that the advertisements receive replies, they hybridize with information and they integrate under entertainment formats. Advertising campaigns of major brands during the golden age of television can be viewed as historical remnants.

Since the turn of the century, communication on corporate sites creates infotainment pages in sections that are more interesting for its audiences. And among the most innovative formats, the hybrid «advergame» becomes established, a video game with an advertising purpose that through sponsoring and contextual advertising stands over traditional formats. The exploitation of brand placement in films and on television has been extended to video games as in-game advertising, which is only placed on previously designed audiovisual spaces. But «advergames» provide the qualitative difference of offering entertainment designed by the brand for better visibility and recall (Martí, Currás & Sánchez, 2012). Méndiz (2010) considers advertising in virtual worlds as another type of advergame. From that format called «virtual world advertising», products and brands provide the virtual realism embedded in designed imaginary worlds that books or television of the most powerful creativity cannot reach. To Martí (2010), the advantage of the association between advertising and games is the fact that, in the middle of an excess of traditional advertising formats, games have an entertainment value that serves as bait to lure consumers tired of a type of advertising that they do not hesitate to eliminate because of its annoyance. Works published later than González & Fran­cés (2009) and Méndiz (2010) insist that the attraction of attention by such kind of advertising particularly facilitates communication with children. Children’s ability for games should target and adapt to children the business information present in those spaces. But while children are still entering the world of consumption, advertisers in games could be practicing the most incisive strategies to build brand loyalty among children.

In order to adjust the analysis to the updating of advertising formats, the prominence of the product and the brand is stressed in «advergame», «in-game advertising» and «virtual world advertising». The analysis of advertising content on the Web is completed with the rest of advertising formats online reviewed by scholars and profesionales¹ that can be summarized in:

• Background: sets the background of the site.

• Banner: marks out a two-dimensional space with static or animated content.

• Button: rectangle that normally includes the name and the logo or symbol of the advertiser.

• Classifieds: small classic wording on classified advertising pages of print newspapers organized by category.

• Interstitial: intermediate window that opens when activating a link to another destination, it is usually displayed for a short time.

• Sponsorship: financial producer of a space that is generally related to the niche of the sponsoring brand or of interest for the target group of their services-products.

• Pop under: advertising window that opens in the background.

• Pop up: advertising window that opens up in the foreground covering the content that was being browsed.

• Skyscraper: type of vertical banner that takes up one of the sides when navigating the information on the page.

• Slotting fee: privileged positioning on the information page that has a higher price, with different sizes and format (it shows a superior economic power of the advertiser).

• Subset: it takes up a horizontal space that disappears vertically when browsing the information on a page.

• Superstitial: like a pop up, but only for a while or until a click hides the information. Unlike pop ups, it opens in the same window and not on a new page.

Given the interpretive horizon of the criticism of books, television and games, it is important to consider the evolution of reading and television reception until the current child interaction with electronic devices. Professional and industry reports have been taken into account, but for this academic research, children’s subjective opinion is preferred to select game spaces in both countries. As in other cases, this field of study can be an effect of global campaigns or a conscious and fully voluntary preference from the minors. But it is from their observation and interviews that the advertisements are taken. The idea is not studying the channels nor the advertisers with the intention of confirming some kind of effect. It consists on assessing children’s judgement on the communicative and in-game effect of advertisements on their usual gaming portals. For a thermostatic education, as proposed by Postman (1984), advertising levels should be counteracted with specific actions in families and in schools, but also in game portals and businesses. In addition to fostering digital critical capacity in children, the intention is to examine how they are able to evaluate and manage their preferences and values (Martínez, Nicolás & Sa­las, 2013).

2. Materials and methods

In our previous study where we observed and interviewed groups of Brazilian and Spanish children between nine and eleven years old, we noted the value that children attach to these online games and what opinion they have on advertising (Uchoa-Cra­veiro & Araujo, 2013). In the age range of less than 12 years old, according to Te’eni-Harari, Leh­man-Wilzig and Lampert (2009), skills and abilities for critical reception of advertising messages are formed. Thus, the sample and the age choice in two countries that are away from each other but united by the Internet. On the game sites that they suggest we researched the format and pressure of the advertisements found.

The focus is directed at advertising content visible on game pages that 20 Brazilian children and 29 Spanish children can access in a classroom with computers. These children are observed and interviewed during one free hour at school. In view of their reactions, objections and suggestions (Uchoa-Craveiro & Araujo, 2013) the opinions of 9-11-year-old children of both countries are compared to messages and advertising formats that appear on the portals where they play. Among the sites visited by children in Brazil and Spain, there are virtual worlds, social networks, portals and sites containing a single game. We have removed the pages that were visited by a single child due to representation. The Spanish sites that were analyzed are: juegosdechicas.com, juegosjuegos.com, habbo.es, akinator.com, ciudadpixel.es and clubpenguin.com. And the Brazilian game sites suggested: click­jogos.com.br, iguinho.ig.com.br, stardoll.com.br and clubpenguin.com.br. Both small groups indicate very well-known game spaces.

For content analysis, we have followed the conventional descriptions by Bardin (2004) and Piñuel (2002) with which we quantify the presence, the formats of presentation and frequency of advertisements on game portals used by groups of children. Among the data of the analysis sheet for each advertisement the following aspects are registered:

• Origin of the distribution of advertising, whether it has been embedded by the site or it has been placed by Google as contextualized exposure during navigation.

• Position and space requirement of the advertisement on the screen according to templates.

• Type of format according to the professional advertising name mentioned in the previous section.

• Global or national character of the advertised brands.

• Levels of interaction of the advertisements: low, medium (one click, moving to another page, watching a few seconds of a video, etc.) or high, interactive and immersive.

• The general or specific and thematic nature of the ads displayed.

3. Analysis and results

In total we have analyzed 158 advertisements on Spanish game websites and 126 on Brazilian sites. Chart 1 shows more self-managed publicity on Brazilian’s pages; whereas game pages used in Spain have more contextual advertising by Google.

Contextual advertising suggests that Spanish children see advertisements that are more related to their personal preferences or recent searches. On the other hand, direct management and charging of Brazilian advertising suggests more independence when it comes to financing game websites.

According to the complaints expressed by children, an aggressive advertising that invades the centre of the screen prevails. Charts 2 and 3 confirm that in both countries the game is interrupted by ads.


Draft Content 545024639-36829-en089.jpg

In table 1 (see table in next page), a more detailed analysis of the formats shows that contextualized advertisements by Google are less intrusive: banner (55% in Brazilian pages and 50% in Spanish sites), slotting fee (29% in Brazilian sites and 25% in Spanish sites), subset (3% for Brazilian spaces and 25% in Spanish pages) and classified advertisements that are only distributed on Brazilian portals (13%). The formats that girls and boys feel more uncomfortable with (pop-up, superstitial and interstitial) are not among the sponsored ads. A success in advertising management and beneficial to children’s gaming in portals indirectly funded by Google’s contextual advertising.


Draft Content 545024639-36829-en090.jpg

However, as shown in table 2 (see table in next page), publicity managed by gaming websites does not defend a quality experience in their games. Adding pop-under, superstitial and interstitial, 24% of advertisements are considered intrusive in Spanish sites. In Brazilian sites those are 19% of the advertising displayed. According to children’s opinion, it is confirmed again that half of the advertising displayed in online games interrupts gameplay and devalue the experience.

In this utilization of advertising funds, it is surprising the low use of «advergame», which includes a relative «pact of interaction» as it is played on a stage that children recognize as advertising.


Draft Content 545024639-36829-en086.jpg


Draft Content 545024639-36829-en087.jpg


Draft Content 545024639-36829-en088.jpg

Figure 1 presents the «advergame» in Brazil’s Click Jogos, advertising of the juice brand Ades, which enhances the gaming experience by giving away a box of juice as a prize after some challenges. The evolution of product placement facilitates a more positive perception, communication and childhood memory of brands.

There is a significant difference in virtual world advertising, absent in the selected Brazilian games while, instead, it is the fifth preferred format on Spanish pages, surpassed only by superstitial and slotting fee advertisements. An example of virtual world advertising appears on the Spanish website Ciudad Pixel. As seen in figure 2, an entire room of Ciudad Pixel has been decorated with several objects with the brand Facebook approaching the brand experience to the context where it is displayed.

Both advergames and virtual world advertising are better suited formats to the current advertising paradigm with a tendency to offer consumers a playful brand experience (Méndiz, 2010). More than information about the product or service, they are formats that allow user identification with the brand. Their absence in game spaces wastes the competences that the younger players may wish to voluntarily exercise in them.

In terms of general or specific nature of the advertisements analyzed, it is surprising the pragmatic and self-interested advertising management in these game portals, with a majority of generic advertisements, both in the Brazilian programming (74%) and the Spanish (54%) one. They are generic and not directed at children playing in them (chart 4). The fact that very few are advertisements aimed at children playing in them (chart 4) misses a native targeting of children practices.

An example of advertising aimed at children is the type «virtual world advertising» which appears in the virtual world Habbo. Figure 3 shows that the advertisement publicizes the product Cheetos of the brand Elma Chips through vending machines and pushcarts scattered throughout the virtual world. The users of the game, through their avatar, could pick up a package of Cheetos and pretend to eat it. Buying and eating are expected actions of avatars in these games, which facilitates the advertising strategy used in the example. Because of its perspective, but also because of its shape of pet, Chester Cheetah is an advertisement aimed at the users of a game. This advertising suggests and gets a more emotional, playful and direct communication with their interlocutors: children.


Draft Content 545024639-36829-en091.jpg

In the playing field of gaming, interaction is still untapped by advertising. Besides, there is some correlation between the level of interaction and the appeal of an advertisement. The results in figures 2 and 4 suggest that interaction can reach further and with more sense than the imperative and emotions given by other types of advertisements. However, chart 5 confirms that high interactivity advertisements are not the majority on the game pages reviewed. It is also proved, in line with the general advertising studies cited in the introduction, that multinational advertising dominates the industry of online games. Only 4% are Spanish advertisers and 11% are Brazilian companies. Despite the dominance of international advertising in children’s games in this sample, only Disney, Google and Apple coincide as global brands in both countries.


Draft Content 545024639-36829-en092.jpg

In short, chart 6 points out that the ones who finance games chosen by girls and boys aged 9 and 11 during a gaming experience conducted in Brazil and Spain are multinational advertisers.

4. Discussion and conclusions

Gaming is the star of pre-teen children’s entertainment. Beyond advertising pressure on television, children can spend more than one third of their leisure time in advertising or trying to avoid them. Few are instructive, fun and almost none is interactive. Two groups of Brazilian and Spanish girls and boys under 12 recognized gaming websites and complained about intrusion and advertising saturation (Uchoa-Craveiro & Araujo, 2013). Having reviewed opinions and games, it is found that during that time, media children can be even more influenced no matter how much we speak of interactivity.

As their users themselves say, misdirected and in­appropriately managed advertisements are an uncomfortable companion in online games for children. At least just as we are concerned about commercial content in children’s television programs and series, particular attention should be given in a professional and quick manner to advertising communication on game pages that repeatedly blocks access to the game chosen and that interrupts key moments with unwanted messages which are often out of the interest of young players.

Screens have got smaller and into our pockets, so distinguishing formats by the space and time they take represents an analogue management of digital devices. Except in the case of advergames and virtual world advertising –which could confuse younger users– there is little formal and conceptual update in the publicity use of the revised games. The views of young users of online games are of interest to publicists and managers of websites whose users are children. Interaction keeps being an unfinished business in communication, even in its form of entertaining programming. Like any other unmet user experience or demand for entertainment, ignoring opinions and suggestions of users simply because of their age results in commercial and media loss.


Draft Content 545024639-36829-en093.jpg

Beyond a presentation that is worthy or technologically appropriate for a digital context, this work has to emphasize the huge amount of advertisements and time consumed in one hour of online play. The reception of so many advertisements is very difficult and the playing time is halved because of disruptions and annoyances that in many cases do not even interest or affect them.


Draft Content 545024639-36829-en094.jpg


Draft Content 545024639-36829-en095.jpg


Draft Content 545024639-36829-en096.jpg

More elaborate and expensive games deserve fur­ther reflection, like games on virtual worlds pages due to the amount of clichés and stereotypes of consumer society² that get active around the accumulation of virtual currency. Buying items/accessories for their avatars with this money generates differentiation among users making children pre-consumers. In addition to the fact that the scenario of this type of page makes it harder for children to recognize the advertising intention of some information, kids are conditioned by the promotional aids that are being offered at different levels of those games that they clearly prefer and enjoy.

As in the case of other digital spaces for adults, it is confirmed that most of the pages from Spain and Brazil requested personal data about their child users. Giving away this data provides richer game experiences and, theoretically, it would offer a more personalized ad­vertising. Through their privacy policy, game pages inform about whether they use user data to guide users and personalize advertising. Nevertheless, this quasi-contract comes in long texts and with the use of technical language that is difficult to understand even for an adult.

This analysis validates that the online space is rich in recreational experiences and can provide enjoyment and learning to their younger users. However, it is confirmed that they can not handle so much and so disparate advertising noise whose effects in the best of cases reduce play time and worsen their experience. Still pending more precise regulation and better ethics and corporate commitments, it is important to note that educators and parents should take a more active role in the entertainment and informal education of minors. Mediation of adults must surpass the model based on controlling the time children spend playing or the use of the content of the advertising that appears on game sites. As suggested by previous studies (García-Ruiz, Ramirez & Rodriguez-Rosell, 2014; Bujokas & Roth­berg, 2014), it is essential to develop media literacy in order to establish acceptable levels of digital skills and promote the shaping of citizens with a marked critical-constructive character. Specifically, we have to anticipate the knowledge of the persuasive intention of advertisements so that children can defend themselves from the arguments of the advertisers. Even though the advertisements on game sites nowadays are still not presented in an attractive enough way to children, the trend is moving towards more interactive and attractive products whose persuasive arguments children must be able to understand and value.

Last but not least is the theoretical justification of advertising as financing and support of information and entertainment on the Internet. If advertisements are really intended to serve as the economic base of the «free» space on the Internet, they have to adjust to the times and game skills and in no way hinder or complicate the game experience. A possible quality marketing communication should not only preserve and disseminate a brand image. As communication, it should be respectful with the children that are active subjects of reception and interaction. At this stage of their educational period, perception and values ??are also developed. The brands that attack children’s experience, no matter how visible and noticeable, may be losing reputation. Critical training is of interest to the children’s environment, including advertisers and publicists. Advertising communication and games that befit our times help avoid damage to players as well as loss of reputation and investment resulting from obsolete business and communication models.

Notes

¹ The definitions of the types of ads are based on the works of Brandão and Moraes (2004), Carniello, and Assis (2009), North­east (2009) and Sebastião (2011).

² Authors like Baudrillard (1998) and Bauman (2007) argue that postmodern society is a consumer society in which the individual is seen as a consumer. In this type of society, the exercise of consumption is something that is standardized and shapes relationships between individuals.

References

Ariès, P. (1981). História social da criança e da família. Rio de Janeiro: Guanabara Koogan.

Bardin, L. (2004). Análise de conteúdo. Lisboa: Edições 70.

Baudrillard, J. (1998). A sociedade de consumo. Rio de Janeiro: Elfos.

Bauman, Z. (2007). Vida para consumo: a transformação das pessoas em mercadoria. Rio de Janeiro: Zahar.

Campi, M. (2012). A vez dos «advergames» na Internet. Exame.com. (http://goo.gl/2VXgrg) (30-05-2013).

Carniello, M., & Assis, F. (2009). Formatos da publicidade digital: evolução histórica e aprimoramento tecnológico. 7º Encontro Nacional da ALCAR. Associação Brasileira de Pesquisadores de História da Mídia. (http://goo.gl/7WgyFQ) (25-07-2013).

Entertainment Software Association (2014). In-game Advertising. Press Release, Website Newsroom, 2014. (http://goo.gl/gLwKZL) (24-12-2014).

Eu Kids Online (2011). Riesgos y seguridad en Internet: los menores españoles en el contexto europeo. Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao. (http://goo.gl/m6FOAe) (02-02-2013).

García-Ruiz, R., Ramírez, A., & Rodríguez-Rosell, M. (2014). Educación en alfabetización mediática para una nueva ciudadanía prosumidora. Comunicar, 43, 15-23. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-01

González, C., & Francés, M.T. (2009). Advergaming aplicado a las estrategias comunicativas dirigidas al target infantil. Actas del Congreso Brand Trends. Valencia: CEU Universidad Cardenal Herrera.

Infoadex (2013). Estudio Infoadex de la inversión publicitaria en España en 2013. (http://goo.gl/x5iC9P) (30-05-2013).

Kaiser Family Foundation (2010). Generation M²: Media in the Lives of 8 to 18 Year Olds. (http://goo.gl/Kapm0j) (30-06-2012).

Martí, J. (2010). Marketing y Videojuegos: Product Placement, In-game Advertising y Advergaming. Madrid: Esic.

Martí, J., Currás, R., & Sánchez, I. (2012). Nuevas fórmulas publicitarias: los «advergames» como herramienta de las comunicaciones de marketing. Cuadernos de Gestión, 12(2), 43-58. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5295/cdg.100236jm

Martínez, E., Nicolás, M.A., & Salas, Á. (2013). La representación de género en las campañas de publicidad de juguetes en Navidades (2009-12). Comunicar, 41, 187-194. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-18

Méndiz, A. (2010). Advergaming: concepto, tipología, estrategias y evolución histórica. Icono 14-15, 37-58. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v8i1.279

Meyrowitz, J. (1995). Mediating Communication: What Happens? In J. Downing, A. Mohammadi & Sreberney-Mohammadi (Eds), Questioning theMedia : A Critical Introduction. (pp. 39-53). Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Muros, B., Aragón, Y. & Bustos, A. (2013). La ocupación del tiempo libre de jóvenes en el uso de videojuegos y redes. Comunicar, 40, 31-39. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-03

Nordeste, R.M. (2009). Publicidade online das empresas: estratégias actuais. Dissertação de Mestrado. Universidade de Aveiro, Departamento de Comunicação e Artes. (http://goo.gl/xqSLmW) (20-07-2013).

Pérez-Salgado, D., Rivera, J.A., & Ortiz, L. (2010). Publicidad de alimentos en la programación de la televisión mexicana: ¿los niños están más expuestos? Salud Pública, 52(2). (http://goo.gl/MNW8tt) (19-01-2015).

Pérez-Tornero, J.M. (2010). Trends and Models of Media Literacy in Europe: Between Digital Competence and Critical Understanding. Anàlisi, 40, 85-100. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7238/a.v0i40.1146

Piñuel, J.L. (2002). Epistemología, metodología y técnicas del análisis de contenido. Estudios de Sociolingüística, 3(1), 1-42. (http://goo.gl/gEAxjX) (05-05-2012).

Postman, N. (1982). The Disappearance of Childhood. London: Vintage Books.

Postman, N. (1984). El fin de la educación. Una nueva definición de la escuela. Barcelona: Octaedro.

Puro Marketing (2011). Los «advergames», una tendencia al alza del marketing móvil para 2012. (http://goo.gl/J8qcQ) (30-05-2013).

Sebastião, S. (2011). Formatos da publicidade digital: sistematização e desambiguação. Comunicação e Sociedade, 19, 13-24. (http://goo.gl/q55XXD) (20-11-2012).

Silverstone, R., & Haddon, L. (1996). Design and the Domestication of Information and Communication Technologies. Technical Change and Everyday Life. In R. Silverstone, & R. Mansell (Eds.), Communication by Design: The Politics of Information and Communication Technologies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Te’eni-Harari, T., Lehman-Wilzig, S., & Lampert, S. (2009). The Importance of Product Involvement for Predicting Advertising Effectiveness among Young People. International Journal of Advertising, 28(2), 203-229. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2501/S0265048709200540

TIC kids Online BrasiL 2012 (2013). Pesquisa sobre o uso da Internet por crianças e adolescentes no Brasil. (http://goo.gl/lFAYX) (20-10-2013).

Uchoa-Craveiro, P.S. & Araujo, J.R. (2013). Publicidad y juegos digitales en el cotidiano de niños españoles y brasileños: un análisis de la recepción infantil. Estudios del Mensaje Periodístico, 19, 501-509. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2013.v19.42136



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El espacio online es rico en experiencias lúdicas y puede proporcionar muchos placeres y aprendizajes a sus usuarios más jóvenes. Sin embargo es cierto que los niños no siempre pueden manejar el ruido publicitario y otros efectos nocivos derivados del uso excesivo o inapropiado de la tecnología, y en particular de las webs de juegos. Este artículo tiene como objetivo confirmar la presión publicitaria que afecta a niños de Brasil y España cuando se entretienen en portales de Internet con juegos. Para medir la presión publicitaria en los juegos actuales se recurre al marco teórico y metodológico del análisis de contenido sobre una muestra de webs visitadas por un grupo de niños brasileños y españoles de 9 a 11 años. Esta investigación evidencia que los juegos on-line son obstruidos por una cantidad considerable de anuncios que repetidamente bloquean el acceso e interrumpen momentos claves con mensajes no deseados o sin interés para los pequeños jugadores. De la misma forma que hay una preocupación con el contenido comercial de las programaciones infantiles en la televisión, se espera una pronta y suficiente atención a aquellas webs de juegos que lesionan la imagen de los anunciantes, entorpecen la experiencia del juego y sobre todo afectan a quienes están formándose como ciudadanos antes que consumidores. Se comprueba que las opiniones de este grupo de usuarios son acertadas y relevantes para comunicadores, profesores y familiares.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

Durante años la investigación de los efectos de los medios de comunicación ha prestado atención a las posibilidades formativas y educativas de la renovación de equipos y dispositivos tecnológicos a fin de separar edades o etapas en la recepción de las audiencias. Es sabido que la eficacia de la comunicación no está en la tecnología, sino en el poder de los grupos político-económicos que –a pesar de los cambios en las industrias culturales– continúan controlando al menos parte de la recepción que efectúan las audiencias. Se hace necesario, por tanto, mantener una perspectiva crítica en los sucesivos estudios sobre el impacto comunicativo de tecnologías contemporáneas. Ade­más los estudios críticos siguen siendo menos numerosos que el resto de investigaciones sobre comunicación y públicos (Martínez-Nicolás & Saperas, 2011). La importancia de esta perspectiva investigadora se ha acreditado en las instituciones internacionales: es el caso de la Comisión Europea que desde 2002 destaca la importancia académica de las tecnologías y los medios, así como la investigación de las prácticas en los usuarios (Pérez-Tornero, 2010).

Durante las últimas décadas las tecnologías de la información y de la comunicación han marcado la producción y la extensión de la información y del conocimiento. Al ritmo de la evolución de las industrias culturales se pueden reconocer también diversas etapas en la concepción de lo que es «ser niño/a»: en el mun­do del libro, en el de la televisión o en el mundo de la actual comunicación móvil y portátil. Este trabajo enlaza con la investigación recepcionista pero intenta am­pliar la recepción hacia la interacción como una forma más consciente, voluntaria y novedosa de relación digital; es así como la experimentan y expresan sus mismos usuarios.

La noción de educación infantil es tan moderno como el libro pero solo en épocas recientes y con el concepto de escuela se ha hecho visible una determinada concepción de la infancia donde se le proponen unos objetivos vitales propios. Con la escolarización llega también, aunque algo oculta, una colonización adulta e institucional de la infancia (Ariès, 1981). En el libro escolar –cuya lectura está orientada a los maestros y solo siglos más tarde a la recepción individual– se dibujan entre líneas las expectativas y los valores propios de cada cultura. Ya en la etapa de los medios de comunicación se conceptualiza una infancia distinta, en particular durante la edad de oro de la televisión. Tras las Guerras Mundiales, cinco siglos después de la imprenta, una revisión internacional define al niño desde la Declaración Universal de sus derechos. A la vez se van consolidando como poderosas las tecnologías de medios de comunicación: el cine, los diarios, las radios y las cadenas de televisión. A partir de la difusión masiva de los contenidos por prensa, radio y televisión se va construyendo otra idea de infancia más sensible y menos autónoma. A diferencia del libro estos medios de masas «lo cuentan todo». Contenidos que nunca estuvieron en los libros escolares hacen de la televisión una «máquina reveladora de secretos» para los pequeños en formación, como acertadamente señaló Meyrowitz (1995).

Por motivos opuestos a la crítica del libro moderno el naturalismo vuelve a acusar a la tecnología y en particular a los medios audiovisuales de hacer desaparecer la infancia (Postman, 1982) o al menos una de sus idealizaciones utópicas. Entre tantos intereses no es sencilla una investigación mediática de los efectos psicosociales de la televisión en los niños. Con todo, estudios de violencia, sexismo y otros abusos de poder coinciden en que este medio audiovisual en el paso al siglo XXI no ha brillado ni por su papel ni por sus efectos educativos (Pérez-Salgado, Rivera & Ortiz, 2010; Martínez, Nicolás & Salas, 2013).

A diferencia de los libros, la programación televisiva infantil se produce, cataloga y evalúa como mero entretenimiento, y esto aunque sus contenidos compitan a veces en directo con estilos de vida familiares o con el currículum escolar legal. En los más benévolos tratamientos se reconoce que la televisión para niños apenas alcanza la categoría de niñera electrónica du­rante el descanso de los padres.

Si los libros escolares ocultan otras formas de in­fancia, y la televisión la hace desvanecerse en ensoñaciones, con los duros términos de Postman (1982), ¿cómo queda la infancia con los videojuegos? La carga de la culpa se ha volcado en el tiempo inútilmente gastado ante «la tele», entretenimiento infantil preferido y dominante en los niños occidentales desde las últimas décadas del siglo XX y que en los años que llevamos de este siglo se ha compartido con los juegos electrónicos. En el campo de la investigación académica e industrial, cada año los estudios macro confirman la penetración de las tecnologías en las prácticas de niños norteamericanos (Kaiser Family Foundation, 2010), europeos (EU Kids Online, 2010) y brasileños (TIC Kids Online Brasil, 2013). Hay además muchos otros estudios micro, más cualitativos y cercanos a la navegación y a las interacciones infantiles en Internet, pu­blicados por revistas universitarias como los citados en este artículo.

La investigación crítica es minoritaria pero dentro de los estudios de recepción son aún menores las aproximaciones etnográficas a grupos y comunidades infantiles. Queda aún pendiente una sociología o una antropología de las prácticas digitales en la actual realidad de las tecnologías. Concretamente nos referimos a los móviles, tablets y el resto de dispositivos que multiplican las posibilidades de videojuegos y consolas pa­ra juego en grupo, más allá de lenguas y culturas, in­cluso con desconocidos, en realidades virtuales o au­mentadas, etc.

Por la red mundial de ordenadores los niños/as campan a sus anchas, con algunos controles más estrechos en casa y en las aulas escolares. Y declaran sentirse más libres en unos momentos y espacios «solo para ellos», desplazando con esta interacción lúdica audiovisual –como prácticas propias y peculiares– las anteriores formas de lectura y de recepción de contenido televisivo y especialmente los contenidos editoriales en papel.

Muros, Aragón y Bustos (2013) señalan que los más jóvenes utilizan los videojuegos y las redes digitales so­bre todo por entretenimiento. En Internet, «hablan por hablar» o «juegan por jugar». Sin embargo no se puede olvidar que, en este último periodo tecnológico de las industrias culturales, el videojuego –online u offline– se sigue financiando por la venta directa y la publicidad contextual. Con el creciente número de usuarios y una generación de miles de millones de dólares anuales a nivel mundial, además de soportes de entretenimiento, los videojuegos son negocios pu­blicitarios. Incluso durante la crisis económica, en 2009, los juegos ascendieron a 823 millones de dólares en los Estados Unidos (Puro marketing, 2010). En Brasil en 2011 la combinación de juego y publicidad, llamada de «advergame», llegó a tres mil millones de dólares (Campi, 2012). En 2012 en España se gastó en juegos promocionales más de 27 millones de euros (Infoadex, 2013). Declara el sector estadounidense (ESA 2014) que espera alcanzar en 2016 los 7,2 billones de dólares. Queda claro que tras el telón del juego –y el tipo de socialización infantil que suponga– hay un mercado rentable. Alejados de los adultos gracias a sus pantallas, los niños acceden a mundos posibles. En estos entornos aparecen variados formatos de anuncios en Internet dirigidos a pequeños consumidores o prescriptores de regalos y de fórmulas para el entretenimiento en las economías domésticas.

Una prevención general sobre la excesiva presión publicitaria en el caso de los niños exige una atención más especializada. La experiencia empresarial de la crisis en los medios está demostrando que la saturación publicitaria no los hace más sostenibles. La publicidad ha pasado de financiar medios de comunicación a deteriorar la percepción y el valor de unos canales saturados. Una cuestión grave, en cualquier caso, pero más aun en niños es la posibilidad de domesticación de las tecnologías (Silverstone & Haddon, 1996), es decir, que las opciones de realizar usos alternativos de los dispositivos para escapar de la programación, son, en principio, menores. Los niños, ávidos de su tiempo libre preferido, consienten el «precio publicitario» en esos juegos aparentemente gratuitos e inocuos.

Tanto en Brasil como en España falta una regulación específica sobre la publicidad infantil en los juegos. Por su parte tampoco son respetadas las recomendaciones procedentes de pactos y autocontroles concebidos inicialmente para la industria televisiva. Además, al extender las tecnologías el acceso a la in­formación con la portabilidad y la movilidad, se multiplican exponencialmente las posibilidades de comunicación con más personas en lugares y formatos muy variados. Desde este contexto tecnológico que cambia la publicidad, Méndiz (2010) detalla que los anuncios reciben respuestas, se visten de géneros híbridos con la información y se integran bajo formatos de entretenimiento. Quedan como históricas las campañas publicitarias de las grandes marcas durante la época dorada de la televisión.

Desde el cambio de siglo, la comunicación en las páginas corporativas crea información y entretenimiento en secciones más interesantes para sus públicos. Y entre los formatos más innovadores se consolida el mestizo «advergame», un videojuego de pretensión publicitaria que con el patrocinio y la publicidad contextual destaca sobre los formatos tradicionales. La explotación del «brand placement» en el cine y en la te­levisión también se extendió por los videojuegos co­mo «in-game advertising», que solo se instala sobre es­pacios audiovisuales diseñados previamente. Pero el «ad­ver­game» aporta la diferencia cualitativa de ofrecer un entretenimiento diseñado por la marca para su mejor notoriedad y recuerdo (Martí, Currás & Sán­chez, 2012). Méndiz (2010) considera la publicidad en mundos virtuales como otro tipo de «advergame». Des­de ese formato llamado de «virtual world advertising», productos y marcas aportan el realismo virtual inserto en mundos imaginarios diseñados a los que no se podía acercar el libro o la televisión de los imaginarios más poderosos.

Para Martí (2010), la ventaja de la asociación entre la publicidad y los juegos es el hecho de que, en medio de un exceso de soportes publicitarios tradicionales, los juegos tienen un valor de entretenimiento que sirve como gancho para atraer a los consumidores, cansados de un tipo de publicidad que no dudan en eliminar por molesta. Trabajos posteriores a González y Fran­cés (2009) y Méndiz (2010) insisten en que la captura de atención de ese tipo de publicidad facilita especialmente la comunicación con los niños. La destreza infantil para el juego debería segmentar y ajustar a los niños la información comercial presente en esos espacios. Pero mientras los niños todavía están entrando en el mundo del consumo, los anunciantes pueden estar practicando en los juegos las más incisivas estrategias de fidelización del consumidor infantil.

Para ajustar el análisis a la actualización de formatos publicitarios, se destaca el protagonismo del producto y de la marca en «advergame», «in-game advertising» y «virtual world advertising». El análisis de los contenidos publicitarios en las webs se completa con el resto de formatos publicitarios on-line revisados por académicos y profesionales¹ que se puede resumir en:

• Background: compone el plano de fondo del sitio.

• Banner: delimita un espacio bidimensional con contenido estático o animado.

• Botón: formato rectangular que normalmente incluye el nombre y/o logo-símbolo del anunciante.

• Clasificados: pequeños enunciados clásicos en las páginas de publicidad por palabras de los diarios impresos organizados por categorías.

• Intersticial: ventana intermedia que se abre al activar un enlace a otro destino, generalmente dura un tiempo corto de exhibición.

• Patrocinio: productor financiero de un espacio, en general ligado al sector de actividad de la marca patrocinadora o del interés de los destinatarios de sus servicios-productos.

• Pop under: ventana publicitaria que se abre en segundo plano.

• Pop up: ventana publicitaria en primer plano de pantalla tapando el contenido que se estaba navegando.

• Skyscraper: tipo de banner vertical que ocupa uno de los lados al recorrer la información de la página.

• Slotting fee: posicionamiento privilegiado en la página de información publicitaria de precio superior, con distintos tamaños y formato (revela un superior poder económico del anunciante).

• Subset: también llamado pie o faldón en recuerdo de sus precedentes formatos periodísticos, ocupa en horizontal un espacio que desaparece al navegar verticalmente por la información de una página.

• Supersticial: ventana emergente como el «pop up», pero que solo por un tiempo o hasta un clic oculta la información que se navega. A diferencia del pop up, se abre en la misma ventana y no en una nueva página.

Teniendo en cuenta el horizonte interpretativo de la crítica del libro, de la televisión y del juego conviene considerar la evolución de la lectura y de la recepción televisiva hasta la actual interacción infantil con dispositivos electrónicos. En esta tarea se han tenido en cuenta informes profesionales y de la industria, pero para esta investigación académica se prefiere la opinión infantil como criterio de selección de los espacios de juego en ambos países. Como en otros casos, este campo de estudio puede ser efecto de campañas globales o preferencia consciente y plenamente voluntaria de los menores. Pero de su observación y entrevistas se toman los anuncios que aparecen en ellos. No se propone estudiar los canales ni los anunciantes con intención de confirmar algún tipo de efecto. Se trata de evaluar el juicio infantil sobre el efecto comunicativo y en el juego de los anuncios en sus portales habituales. Para una educación termostática, como propone Postman (1984), los niveles publicitarios deberían ser contrarrestados con acciones específicas en las familias y en los colegios, pero también en los portales de juego y las empresas. Además de fomentar la capacidad crítica digital de los niños se pretende comprobar cómo son capaces de evaluar y gestionar sus preferencias y valores (Martínez, Nicolás & Salas, 2013).

2. Materiales y métodos

En nuestro anterior estudio, basado en observaciones y entrevistas a grupos de niños/as brasileños y españoles entre 9 y 11 años, señalamos el valor que los menores conceden a estos juegos en red y qué criterio sobre la publicidad tienen ellos (Uchoa-Craveiro & Araujo, 2013). En la franja de edad inferior a los 12 años, según Te’eni-Harari, Lehman-Wilzig y Lampert (2009) se forman las competencias y capacidades para la recepción y la crítica de mensajes publicitarios. Por ello seleccionamos una muestra y franja etaria en dos países alejados geográficamente pero unidos en la Red. En las webs de juegos que sugieren se investigan la forma y la presión de los anuncios encontrados.

El foco se dirige a los contenidos publicitarios visibles en webs de juegos a los que acceden en un aula con ordenadores 20 niños brasileños y 29 españoles observados y entrevistados durante una hora libre es­colar. A la vista de sus reacciones, objeciones y propuestas (Uchoa-Craveiro & Araujo, 2013) se comparan las opiniones de niños de entre 9 y 11 años de ambos países con los mensajes y formas publicitarios que exponen los portales en los que juegan. Entre las webs visitadas por los niños de Brasil y España, hay mundos virtuales, redes sociales, portales y webs que contienen un solo juego. Por representación eliminamos las webs visitadas por un único niño. Las webs españolas analizadas fueron: juegosdechicas.com, juegosjuegos.com, habbo.es, akinator.com, ciudadpi­xel.es y clubpenguin.com. Y sugerencias de webs de juegos brasileñas fueron: clickjogos.com.br, iguin­ho.­ig.com.br, stardoll.com.br y clubpenguin.­com.br. Ambos grupos reducidos indican espacios de juego muy reconocidos.

Para el análisis de contenido se siguen las descripciones convencionales de Bardin (2004) y Piñuel (2002), con las que se cuantifica la presencia, las formas de presentación y la frecuencia de anuncios en portales de juego utilizados por los grupos infantiles. Entre los datos de la ficha de análisis para cada anuncio visto se contabilizaron los siguientes aspectos:

• Origen de la distribución de publicidad inserta en la web o contextualizado por Google durante la navegación.

• Posición y ocupación de pantalla del anuncio según plantillas.

• Tipo de formato según la denominación profesional publicitaria indicada en el apartado anterior.

• Carácter global o nacional de las marcas que se anuncian.

• Niveles de interacción de los anuncios: bajo, medio (un clic, pasar a otra página, ver unos segundos de un vídeo…) o alto, interactivo e inmersivo.

• La naturaleza generalista o específica y temática de los anuncios mostrados.

3. Análisis y resultados

En total se han analizado 158 anuncios de webs de juego españolas y 126 en webs brasileñas. En el gráfico 1 se refleja en webs brasileñas una mayor publicidad propia mientras que las webs de juegos utilizadas en España presentan más publicidad contextual del navegador Google.

La publicidad contextual sugiere que los niños españoles ven anuncios más relacionados con sus preferencias personales o búsquedas recientes. Por su parte, la gestión y cobro directo de la publicidad brasileña sugiere más independencia en la financiación de webs de juegos. De acuerdo con las quejas expresadas por los niños, predomina una publicidad agresiva que invade el centro de las pantallas. Los gráficos 2 y 3 confirman en ambos países que el juego es interrumpido por anuncios.

Como muestra la tabla 1, en un análisis más detallado de los formatos se comprueba que los anuncios contextualizados por Google son menos intrusivos: banner (55% en webs brasileñas y 50% en las españolas), el «slotting fee» (29% en sitios brasileños y 25% en los españoles), el «subset» (3% para los espacios brasileños y 25% en webs españolas) y los anuncios clasificados que solo se distribuyen en portales brasileños (un 13%). Los formatos que los niños consideran más incómodos (pop-up, supersticial e intersticial) no figuran entre los anuncios patrocinados: un acierto en la gestión publicitaria y un beneficio para el juego infantil en los portales indirectamente financiados por la publicidad contextual de Google.


Draft Content 545024639-36829 ov-es089.jpg

Sin embargo, como muestra la tabla 2, la publicidad gestionada por las webs de juegos no defiende una experiencia de calidad en sus juegos. Sumando pop-under, supersticial e intersticial hay un 24% de anuncios considerados intrusivos en sitios españoles que en los brasileños llegan a ser un 19% de los anuncios expuestos. De acuerdo con la opinión infantil, se confirma de nuevo que la mitad de la publicidad exhibida en juegos en red interrumpe las partidas y devalúan la experiencia.


Draft Content 545024639-36829 ov-es090.jpg

En esta explotación de los fondos publicitarios sorprende el bajo uso de «advergame» que incluye un relativo «pacto de interacción» al jugar en un escenario que los niños reconocen como publicitario.

La figura 1 presenta el «advergame» en el brasileño Click Jogos, una publicidad del zumo Ades, que mejora la experiencia de juego al ganar una caja de zumos tras algunos desafíos. La evolución del «product-placement» facilita una percepción, una comunicación y un recuerdo infantil de las marcas más positivo.


Draft Content 545024639-36829 ov-es086.jpg


Draft Content 545024639-36829 ov-es087.jpg


Draft Content 545024639-36829 ov-es088.jpg

Aparece una notable diferencia en «virtual world advertising» ausente en los juegos brasileños seleccionados que en cambio es el quinto formato preferido en webs españolas, solo su­perado por los anuncios de tipo su­persticial y slotting fee. Un ejemplo de «virtual world advertising» aparece en la española Ciudad Pixel. Como se ve en la figura 2, una estancia entera de Ciudad Pixel ha sido decorada con varios objetos con la marca Facebook acercando la experiencia de marca al contexto en que se muestra.

Tanto «advergame» como «virtual world advertising» son formatos más adecuados al actual paradigma publicitario con tendencia a ofrecer al consumidor una experiencia lúdica de la marca (Méndiz, 2010). Más que información sobre el producto o servicio, son formatos que permiten una identificación del usuario con la marca. Su ausencia en espacio de juegos desaprovecha las competencias que voluntariamente pueden desear ejercitar los pequeños jugadores.

En cuanto a la naturaleza generalista o específica de los anuncios analizados sorprende la gestión pragmática e interesada de publicidad en estos portales de juego, con una mayoría de anuncios genéricos, tanto en la programación brasileña (74%) como en la española (54%) son genéricos y no están dirigidos al público infantil que juega en ellos (gráfico 4). Que los me­nos sean anuncios dirigidos al público infantil que jue­ga en ellos (gráfico 4) desaprovecha una segmentación nativa de las prácticas infantiles.

Como ejemplo de publicidad dirigida a los niños vale el anuncio de tipo «virtual world advertising», que aparece en el mundo virtual Habbo. Muestra la figura 4 que el anuncio divulga el producto Cheetos de la marca Elma Chips por medio de una expendedora y de carritos ambulantes diseminados por el mundo virtual. El usuario del juego, a través de su avatar, podría recoger un paquete de Cheetos y simular que lo come. Comprar y comer son acciones esperables de los avatares en estos juegos, lo que facilita la estrategia publicitaria utilizada en el ejemplo. Por su perspectiva, pero también por la forma de mascota Chester Cheetah, es un anuncio dirigido a los mismos usuarios de un juego. Una publicidad que propone y consigue una comunicación más emotiva, lúdica y directa con sus interlocutores: los niños.

En el terreno propio del juego, la interacción aún está desaprovechada por la publicidad. Además aparece cierta correlación entre nivel de interacción y en este caso, el atractivo de un anuncio. Los resultados en las figuras 2 y 3 sugieren que la interacción puede llegar más lejos y con más sentido que el imperativo y las emociones de otros tipos de anuncios. Sin embargo el gráfico 5 confirma que los anuncios de alta interactividad no son mayoría en las webs de juegos revisadas.


Draft Content 545024639-36829 ov-es091.jpg

También se demuestra, de acuerdo con los estudios publicitarios generales citados en la introducción, que la publicidad multinacional domina la industria de los juegos en línea. Solo un 4% son anunciantes españoles y un 11% empresas brasileñas. A pesar de este dominio de la publicidad internacional en los juegos infantiles en esta muestra, solo Disney, Google y Apple coinciden como marcas globales repetidas en ambos países.


Draft Content 545024639-36829 ov-es092.jpg

En definitiva, el gráfico 6 apunta que son anunciantes multinacionales quienes financian los juegos escogidos por niños de entre 9 y 11 años durante una experiencia de juego realizada en Brasil y España.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

El juego es protagonista del entretenimiento infantil preadolescente. Por encima de la presión publicitaria en televisión, los niños/as pasan más de una tercera parte de su tiempo de ocio en anuncios o intentando evitarlos. Pocos son instructivos, divertidos y casi ninguno es interactivo. Dos grupos de niños/as brasileños y españoles menores de 12 años reconocen los webs de juegos y se quejan de intrusión y saturación publicitaria (Uchoa-Craveiro & Araujo, 2013). Revisadas las opiniones y los juegos se comprueba que la infancia mediática puede estar siendo aún más mediatizada, y esto por mucho que se hable de interactividad.

Como bien dicen los mismos usuarios más pequeños el anuncio mal dirigido e inoportunamente gestionado es un incómodo acompañante en sus juegos en red. Es necesario, por tanto, prestar atención a la co­municación publicitaria en webs de juegos que repetidamente bloquean el acceso al juego buscado y que interrumpen momentos claves con mensajes no deseados y muchas veces también fuera del interés de los pequeños jugadores. Y hacerlo de una manera profesional y rápida, al menos del mismo modo que preocu­pa el contenido comercial en programas y series infantiles.

Las pantallas se han ido reduciendo e introduciendo en nuestros bolsillos por lo que distinguir los formatos por el espacio y el tiempo ocupado representa una gestión analógica en unos equipos que son digitales. Salvo en el caso del «advergame» y del «virtual world advertising» –que podrían confundir a los usuarios menores– hay poca actualización formal y de ideas en el uso publicitario de los videojuegos revisados. Las opiniones de los pequeños usuarios de juegos online son de interés para publicistas y administradores de webs con usuarios infantiles. La interacción sigue siendo una asignatura pendiente en comunicación, incluso en sus formas de programación lúdica. Como cualquier otra experiencia de usuario o demanda de entretenimiento insatisfecha el hecho de ignorar opiniones y sugerencias de usuarios simplemente por su edad se traduce en pérdida comercial y mediática.


Draft Content 545024639-36829 ov-es093.jpg

Más allá de una presentación digna o tecnológicamente adecuada a un contexto digital, este trabajo su­braya la enorme cantidad de anuncios y de tiempo consumidos en una hora de juego en portales de juegos en Internet. La recepción de tanto anuncio es muy difícil y el tiempo de juego se divide por la mitad con interrupciones y molestias que en muchos casos no les incumben ni afectan.


Draft Content 545024639-36829 ov-es094.jpg


Draft Content 545024639-36829 ov-es095.jpg


Draft Content 545024639-36829 ov-es096.jpg

Merecen ulteriores reflexiones aquellos juegos más elaborados y costosos, como son los juegos de mundos virtuales por la cantidad de tópicos y estereotipos de la sociedad de consumo² que se activan en torno a la acumulación de moneda virtual. La compra con este dinero de objetos/accesorios para sus avatares genera diferencias entre los usuarios haciéndolos de hecho preconsumidores infantiles. Además de que el escenario de tales páginas dificulta a los niños reconocer la intención publicitaria de algunas informaciones, también les condicionan con ayudas promocionales que los distintos niveles de unos juegos, que claramente prefieren y disfrutan, les van ofreciendo.

Como ocurre en otros espacios digitales para los adultos se confirma que la mayoría de las webs de España y Brasil solicita datos personales de los usuarios infantiles. Dar estos datos ofrece experiencias de juego más ricas y, en principio, permitiría una publicidad más personalizada. A través de la política de privacidad las webs de juegos informan si usan o no los datos de los usuarios para orientar y personalizar la publicidad. Sin embargo, este casi-contrato se presenta en textos largos y con un lenguaje técnico de difícil comprensión incluso para un adulto.

Este análisis revalida que el espacio on-line es rico en experiencias lúdicas y puede proporcionar muchos placeres y aprendizajes a sus usuarios más jóvenes. Sin embargo se confirma que no pueden manejar tanto y tan dispar ruido publicitario cuyos efectos, en el mejor de los casos, reducen el tiempo de juego y empeoran su experiencia. A la espera de una regulación más precisa y de mejores normas éticas y compromisos corporativos se señala la importancia de que educadores y padres ocupen papeles más activos en el entretenimiento y en la educación informal de los menores. La mediación de los adultos debe superar el modelo basado en controlar el tiempo que los niños pasan jugando y/o el uso del contenido de la publicidad que aparece en las webs de juegos. Como apuntan estudios anteriores (García-Ruiz, Ramírez & Rodríguez-Rosell, 2014; Bujokas & Rothberg, 2014), es fundamental desarrollar una alfabetización mediática para establecer niveles aceptables de competencias digitales y promover la formación de ciudadanos con un marcado carácter crítico-constructivo. En concreto, tenemos que anticipar el conocimiento de la intención persuasiva de los anuncios para que los niños puedan defenderse mejor de los argumentos de los anunciantes. Si hoy los anuncios en las webs de juegos todavía no se presentan de manera suficientemente atractiva para los niños, la tendencia avanza hacia productos más interactivos y atractivos que los niños tienen que en­tender y cuyos argumentos persuasivos deben valorar.

Por último, no menos importante es la justificación teórica de la publicidad como financiación y sostenimiento de la información y el entretenimiento en Internet. Si realmente los anuncios se proponen como base económica del espacio «gratis» en Internet, han de ajustarse a los tiempos y habilidades propios de los juegos y en ningún caso obstaculizar o complicar la experiencia de juego. Una posible comunicación pu­blicitaria de calidad no solo debe conservar y difundir una imagen de marca. En cuanto a la comunicación debe ser respetuosa con los niños, sujetos activos de la recepción e interacción. En esta fase de su formación también se desarrollan la percepción y los va­lores. Las marcas que agreden la experiencia infantil pueden estar perdiendo reputación aunque sean más visibles y notorias. La formación crítica interesa al entorno in­fantil, incluidos anunciantes y publicistas. Con una co­municación publicitaria y unos juegos co­mo corresponde a estos tiempos se evitan daños en los jugadores y pérdidas de reputación e inversiones heredadas de modelos de negocio y de comunicación que apuntan a encontrarse al final de su ciclo de vida.

Notas

¹ Las definiciones de los tipos de anuncios se basan en los trabajos de Brandão y Moraes (2004), Carniello, y Assis (2009), Nordeste (2009) y Sebastião (2011).

² Autores como Baudrillard (1998) y Bauman (2007) argumentan que la sociedad posmoderna es una sociedad de consumo, en que el individuo es visto como un consumidor. En este tipo de sociedad, el ejercicio del consumo es algo estandarizado que da forma a las relaciones de los individuos.

Referencias

Ariès, P. (1981). História social da criança e da família. Rio de Janeiro: Guanabara Koogan.

Bardin, L. (2004). Análise de conteúdo. Lisboa: Edições 70.

Baudrillard, J. (1998). A sociedade de consumo. Rio de Janeiro: Elfos.

Bauman, Z. (2007). Vida para consumo: a transformação das pessoas em mercadoria. Rio de Janeiro: Zahar.

Campi, M. (2012). A vez dos «advergames» na Internet. Exame.com. (http://goo.gl/2VXgrg) (30-05-2013).

Carniello, M., & Assis, F. (2009). Formatos da publicidade digital: evolução histórica e aprimoramento tecnológico. 7º Encontro Nacional da ALCAR. Associação Brasileira de Pesquisadores de História da Mídia. (http://goo.gl/7WgyFQ) (25-07-2013).

Entertainment Software Association (2014). In-game Advertising. Press Release, Website Newsroom, 2014. (http://goo.gl/gLwKZL) (24-12-2014).

Eu Kids Online (2011). Riesgos y seguridad en Internet: los menores españoles en el contexto europeo. Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao. (http://goo.gl/m6FOAe) (02-02-2013).

García-Ruiz, R., Ramírez, A., & Rodríguez-Rosell, M. (2014). Educación en alfabetización mediática para una nueva ciudadanía prosumidora. Comunicar, 43, 15-23. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-01

González, C., & Francés, M.T. (2009). Advergaming aplicado a las estrategias comunicativas dirigidas al target infantil. Actas del Congreso Brand Trends. Valencia: CEU Universidad Cardenal Herrera.

Infoadex (2013). Estudio Infoadex de la inversión publicitaria en España en 2013. (http://goo.gl/x5iC9P) (30-05-2013).

Kaiser Family Foundation (2010). Generation M²: Media in the Lives of 8 to 18 Year Olds. (http://goo.gl/Kapm0j) (30-06-2012).

Martí, J. (2010). Marketing y Videojuegos: Product Placement, In-game Advertising y Advergaming. Madrid: Esic.

Martí, J., Currás, R., & Sánchez, I. (2012). Nuevas fórmulas publicitarias: los «advergames» como herramienta de las comunicaciones de marketing. Cuadernos de Gestión, 12(2), 43-58. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5295/cdg.100236jm

Martínez, E., Nicolás, M.A., & Salas, Á. (2013). La representación de género en las campañas de publicidad de juguetes en Navidades (2009-12). Comunicar, 41, 187-194. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-18

Méndiz, A. (2010). Advergaming: concepto, tipología, estrategias y evolución histórica. Icono 14-15, 37-58. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v8i1.279

Meyrowitz, J. (1995). Mediating Communication: What Happens? In J. Downing, A. Mohammadi & Sreberney-Mohammadi (Eds), Questioning theMedia : A Critical Introduction. (pp. 39-53). Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Muros, B., Aragón, Y. & Bustos, A. (2013). La ocupación del tiempo libre de jóvenes en el uso de videojuegos y redes. Comunicar, 40, 31-39. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-03

Nordeste, R.M. (2009). Publicidade online das empresas: estratégias actuais. Dissertação de Mestrado. Universidade de Aveiro, Departamento de Comunicação e Artes. (http://goo.gl/xqSLmW) (20-07-2013).

Pérez-Salgado, D., Rivera, J.A., & Ortiz, L. (2010). Publicidad de alimentos en la programación de la televisión mexicana: ¿los niños están más expuestos? Salud Pública, 52(2). (http://goo.gl/MNW8tt) (19-01-2015).

Pérez-Tornero, J.M. (2010). Trends and Models of Media Literacy in Europe: Between Digital Competence and Critical Understanding. Anàlisi, 40, 85-100. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7238/a.v0i40.1146

Piñuel, J.L. (2002). Epistemología, metodología y técnicas del análisis de contenido. Estudios de Sociolingüística, 3(1), 1-42. (http://goo.gl/gEAxjX) (05-05-2012).

Postman, N. (1982). The Disappearance of Childhood. London: Vintage Books.

Postman, N. (1984). El fin de la educación. Una nueva definición de la escuela. Barcelona: Octaedro.

Puro Marketing (2011). Los «advergames», una tendencia al alza del marketing móvil para 2012. (http://goo.gl/J8qcQ) (30-05-2013).

Sebastião, S. (2011). Formatos da publicidade digital: sistematização e desambiguação. Comunicação e Sociedade, 19, 13-24. (http://goo.gl/q55XXD) (20-11-2012).

Silverstone, R., & Haddon, L. (1996). Design and the Domestication of Information and Communication Technologies. Technical Change and Everyday Life. In R. Silverstone, & R. Mansell (Eds.), Communication by Design: The Politics of Information and Communication Technologies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Te’eni-Harari, T., Lehman-Wilzig, S., & Lampert, S. (2009). The Importance of Product Involvement for Predicting Advertising Effectiveness among Young People. International Journal of Advertising, 28(2), 203-229. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2501/S0265048709200540

TIC kids Online BrasiL 2012 (2013). Pesquisa sobre o uso da Internet por crianças e adolescentes no Brasil. (http://goo.gl/lFAYX) (20-10-2013).

Uchoa-Craveiro, P.S. & Araujo, J.R. (2013). Publicidad y juegos digitales en el cotidiano de niños españoles y brasileños: un análisis de la recepción infantil. Estudios del Mensaje Periodístico, 19, 501-509. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5209/rev_ESMP.2013.v19.42136

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/15
Accepted on 30/06/15
Submitted on 30/06/15

Volume 23, Issue 2, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C45-2015-18
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?