Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Nowadays, we cannot ignore the fact that young children are over flooded with technologies. Only a proper action and a positive attitude from adults can prevent potential negative consequences, and prepares the child for a life where the usage of communication technologies (ICTs) is necessary for an individual’s social success. This article represents the child’s access to information-communication technology, its usage at home, the influence of child’s ICTs usage on his or hers development of competences, and the child’s relation with the ICTs at home. The data was gathered with the help of 130 parents who filled out a questionnaire and provided us with their opinions about their four-year-old children and their usage of ICTs at home. We found out that four-year-old children in their home environment regularly encounter ICTs. Besides that, we were also interested whether there exist differences accord­ing to the child’s gender and the parents’ level of education. Moreover, we present parents’ opinions at suggestions for further studying of this issue.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Information-communication technology (ICTs) has in the past few years become an indispensable part of modern society. It allows us simple and quick access to information, and eases the communication processes. Besides mediating information and communicating it also helps develop individual’s competences and learning skills. Among these is digital competence (Punie, 2007), which is an important part of life-long learning (Making a European Area of lifelong learning a reality, 2001). Digital competence is of great importance, for it contributes to a successful life of each individual (Markovac & Rogulja, 2009). We have to be aware that ICTs is not only used by adults, since also the youngest children can come into contact with this special type of technology. McPake, Stephen and Plowman (2007) describe children as active members of the so-called «e-society», which is based on digital connectivity. This society dictates their lives, although they are probably not aware of it. Because ICTs is becoming a widespread phenomenon, experts find it irresistible to study. Several studies explore the influence that ICTs has on the child in the kindergarten, but none of them deals with the child’s usage at home. When we started studying the child’s home usage of ICTs, we used a wider concept of ICTs, which reaches beyond computers and mobile technology, and which includes a variety of everyday technologies also accessible for children. These technologies are: televisions, electronic toys, interactive boards, playing games, various players, digital or video cameras, cameras, printers, and all other devices the child can encounter at home. All these types of technologies were chosen because Nikolopoulu, Gialamas and Batstuta (2010) believe that they acquaint the child with the concept of interactivity, which is also one of the most important features of ICTs. Interactivity is the possibility of active participation in the process of communication between its partakers (Hoffman and Novak, 1996), in our case, even four-year-old children.

For this reason, the purpose of our research was to find out how many types of ICTs the child’s family owns, the nature of the child’s access at home (limited or unlimited), how the child uses ICTs at home (independently, needs help, does not use at all), how often the child uses at home, the influences on the child’s usage of ICTs at home, the influence of the child’s usage on his or her development, the child’s attitude towards ICTs at home, and the parents’ awareness about ICTs usage in general. In doing so, we tried to find differences according to the child’s gender and parents’ level of education.

2. Material and methods

We used a descriptive method and a causal, non-experimental method of empirical pedagogical research. The study was implemented on a sample consisting of 130 parents (83.8% females and 16.2% males; 53.1% with a high school education and 46.9% with higher education qualifications; 46.9% were parents of girls and 42.8% of boys) of four-year-old pre-school children who attend kindergartens all over Slovenia. They filled out a questionnaire and demonstrated the child’s general access, its usage and the relation that the child has towards ICTs at home. With the help of the literature we first composed a draft questionnaire, which was tested after a rational evaluation. We eliminated all possible mistakes and imperfections. We tested the questionnaire in February 2011. The final questionnaires were given to parents in April and May 2011. The survey was anonymous.

The data gathered with the questionnaire were then computer analysed with the help of a SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) program. We used a method of descriptive statistics for all the questions. We defined absolute (f) and percentage (f %) frequencies, and the data were then displayed in tables. The dependent relations between the variables were tested with a ?2 – test. For the analysis of the data gathered by evaluating scales we used the Mann-Whitney U-test.

3. Results

3.1. The presence of ICTs in the home environment of four-year-old children

As mentioned before, the broader definition of ICTs encompasses various electronic devices, media products and their applications. Nowadays, almost every family can afford most of these products and devices, among which some are intended especially for children and others for other family members. Nevertheless, the child can still access and use them together with other family members.


Draft Content 885178522-26736-en024.jpg

This table shows that almost every family owns a television (99.2%), a mobile phone (98.5%), a computer (94.6%), a CD or a DVD player (93.8%), a digital camera (92.3%), and a printer (80%). In approximately three quarters of all cases families own MP3players or iPods (74.7%), and just under half the have digital video cameras (42.3%). The fewest number of families own gaming consoles (24.6%) and portable gaming consoles (32.3%). We are glad to see that a lot of families also possess ICTs intended especially for children. A total of 102 (78.5%) families own programmable toys (remote-controlled cars, robots, talking dolls…), and even more (80.8%) own simulation toys (children computers, cash-registers, irons…).

3.2. The child’s access to ICTs and its usage at home

The child’s access to ICTs at home can be physically restricted or non-restricted. Usually access is not restricted in the case of the child’s toys or things that the child uses habitually. On the other hand, ICTs access can be limited in several different ways if these devices are placed out of the child’s reach (on high shelves, or behind closed doors), while older brothers and sisters even hide their personal ICTs.

The results for the child’s access to ICTs at home were not surprising. In more than half the examples children have free or unlimited access to ICT-toys, while on the other hand they find it harder to access ICTs devices such as gaming consoles, digital video cameras and digital cameras, that is, those devices that are harder to use and which are usually used only by the adult family members. In approximately half the examples, children also use TV and CD- or DVD-players. A more detailed review of the data also revealed that, in this example, girls’ ICTs access was more physically restricted than that of boys.

We were also interested in why parents restrict the child’s access to certain types of ICTs. Although they have stated numerous plausible reasons (complicated usage, access to functions that are vital for the operation of the device, access to delicate information and contents, damaging the ICTs device...), most parents state that the major reason for restricting the access to ICTs is their fear that the device will be harmful for the child. Parents fear that the usage of ICTs will harm their child.

Because a lot of children need help using ICTs, we wanted to discover who most often helps them. The results have shown that help is most often given by the parents, but also by older brothers or sisters, and even grandparents. A lot of parents believe that ICTs has educational value (Rideout, Vandewater & Wartella, 2003). Kirkorian, Wartella and Anderson (2008) consider that parents should not limit the child’s interactive experience with ICTs, since it helps to sustain the child’s interest in an activity. Of course we expected that it would be the parents who most often help their children, for they are the closest to them, and they spend a lot of time with them. Here, we have to state that ICTs should not be used as «digital babysitters», and cause unnecessary damage (Plowman, McPake & Stephen, 2010).


Draft Content 885178522-26736-en025.jpg

3.3. The development of a child’s competences through ICTs usage

It is difficult to determine when a child should start using ICTs. We chose four years of age, because the majority of studies show that after this particular age a child’s usage of ICTs starts to increase. The fourth year of life most likely denotes the beginning of a critical period that is important for a child’s learning with ICTs (Wartella, Lee & Caplovitz, 2002). Until recently, learning with ICTs was mostly associated with the concept of distant learning, but this is not the case anymore. The concept of learning with ICTs is changing. ICTs is also more and more present in the homes of children, where learning with ICTs happens naturally and enhances the development of important child competences. By using ICTs, the child develops competences by which he or she can operate in a digital society. The level of these adopted competences depends upon access to equipment as well as upon the support, interest and engagement of family members. McPake et al. (2005) established three general categories of ICTs competences: technological, cultural and learning.


Draft Content 885178522-26736-en026.jpg

Based on this, we were interested in which competences a child develops most by using ICTs. The table shows that parents are quite unified in their opinions about the development of a child’s competences by using ICTs. In all examples, approximately one half of parents believe that ICTs partially develops child’s competences. In their opinion, ICTs develops: motor competences (53.8%), learning competences (58.5%), language competences (49.2%), self-expression competences (53.8%), social competences (42.3%) and cultural competences (51.5%).

A more detailed analysis of the results has shown that parents with a higher level of education believe that the usage of ICTs increasingly develops certain child competences (learning competences, language competences, self-expression competences and social competences). This fact is not surprising; because we can assume that parents with a higher level of education are more ICT-competent and that they are using ICTs for their own purposes. This means that beliefs of parents with a higher level of education about a child’s usage of ICTs are more positively oriented than the opinions of parents with a lower level of education.

3.4. The child’s attitude towards ICTs at home

Just like everybody else, children also have an attitude towards ICTs that is difficult to determine, because children do not yet know how to best express their feelings about ICTs (what they like and what they do not) (Plowman & Stephen, 2002).The table shows that the majority of parents (87.7%) believe that their child is interested in ICTs and that he or she likes to use it. Parents denote this attitude positively and also approve of it, as long as it is regulated. A lot less parents (9.2%) believe that their child is overly interested in ICTs and that he or she uses it too much. Few parents (3.1%) believe that their child is not interested in ICTs at all and that he or she does not use it yet. Parents also feel that this is not bad, and they do not encourage the child to use ICTs, because they think that it is not the right time to use ICTs yet.


Draft Content 885178522-26736-en027.jpg

4. Discussion

Four-year-old children often encounter ICTs in their homes. The majority of them live in families that own a TV, a mobile phone, a computer, a CD or a DVD player, a digital camera and a printer. A lot of families also own other ICTs devices (MP3 players, iPods, digital video-cameras, gaming consoles…) that are not so common, so children encounter them rarely. Most families own ICTs devices that are designed especially for children. These are programmable toys (talking dolls and robots) and simulating toys (child computer, phone, kitchen appliances…).

Research has also shown that, in general, families with girls more often own various types of ICTs than families with boys. This fact is quite surprising, because we would expect the opposite. So far, a lot of studies have indicated that boys prefer to take part in ICTs activities than girls, which could consequently mean that families with boys own more various types of ICTs devices (McPake, Stephen, Sime & Downey, 2005). We also found that parents with a lower level of education more often own a personal computer than parents with a higher level of education. This is very surprising, because we would expect the opposite. We could assume that a higher level of education provides parents with a higher salary level and thus easier purchasing of a computer. A higher level of education can also be connected to the fact that those parents use their computers for work purposes more often than parents with a lower level of education. This is not always the case, because almost every family now owns at least one or more computers.

Children like to use technology, because it is entertaining. Some children at this age already develop permanent interests in certain types of play, and this is reflected in the technology they use. At the age of four, according to Piaget, a child is already capable of symbolic thought (Birch, 1997). This means that the child can use mental pictures, words and movements as symbols for denoting something else (Marjanovic, Umek & Zupancic, 2004). We have to emphasise here that children probably still comprehend and use ICTs as a toy and not as a device (Fekonja, Umek & Zupancic, 2006). We were interested in how children use ICTs at home. Do children use ICTs alone, do they need help and do they not use certain types of ICTs at all? Children use the TV, and of course ICTs toys, quite independently. ICTs toys are designed especially for them, and because of that their usage is simple and safe. On the other hand, children need help when using a computer and various other players. We were glad to see that many children almost never use other ICTs devices that they come across at home, and that their usage is limited only to basic and simple forms of ICTs. Children usually use the ICTs that is always available to them, and their usage is simple and independent. Here, we have to emphasise that children do not actually use ICTs but rather play with it, because its true purpose is not well-known to them yet. A more detailed revision of the results has shown that girls use ICTs more independently than boys, which is surprising, because McPake et al. (2005) have shown that boys prefer to take part in activities involving ICTs. In addition, Nikolopoulu et al. (2010) suggest that boys use ICTs more independently than girls because family values demand that from them (for boys, self-dependence, independence and taking initiative are seen as the first steps towards adulthood and taking a leading role in the family). This is a more traditional view of the family that is being gradually replaced by the modern concept of gender equality in the family.

Plowman, McPake & Stephen (2008) have also proved that the usage of ICTs best develops learning competences, because learning with ICTs is in itself a natural process, evolving independently and not self-consciously. This learning happens in the child’s home (informal) environment, where it is the result of cooperation in a socially situated practice. Nevertheless, learning how to use ICTs is not intentional (children see usage as a part of play); children can develop a broad spectrum of learning techniques but only by interacting with ICTs. On the other hand, we can assume that parents’ belief that ICTs least develops a child’s social competences is conditioned by their systems of cultural beliefs, which often originate from general public opinion. Our society is still greatly influenced by the mentality that ICTs harms the child and that the child does not benefit from it (Plowman, McPake & Stephen, 2008). This is also seen in parents’ beliefs. In general, they state that the usage of ICTs offers the child the possibility of gaining new knowledge and learning. But they still think that ICTs distracts the child from interacting with family members, peers and society in general. The results of the study have also shown that a lot of parents do not know if the usage of ICTs develops the child’s cultural competences, which include mostly understanding the various roles of ICTs in society and the possibilities of its usage for various social and cultural purposes (communication, work, manner of expression and entertainment).

A lot of children have a healthy relationship towards ICTs. At this age, they are already interested in ICTs and like to use it. It is important that parents see this relationship in a special way, because the child does not perceive the majority of ICTs the same way as we do. For the child, ICTs is still a toy and a source of entertainment. Stephen et al. (2008) showed that by the age of four children are sophisticated users of ICTs who asses their own accomplishments, know what they like and distinguish between their own operative competences and the possibility of taking part in ICTs activities. This cognition can also be applied in our case, and we can conclude that children are, to some extent, aware of the concept of ICTs, its employability and the role that it has in the family.

Roberts, Foehr, Rideout & Brodie (1999) found that most children use ICTs between one to three hours per day. This usage often takes place without parents knowing it, because children have unlimited access to their own personal media. At the age of four, a child is already in potential danger if usage of ICTs is not properly regulated. That is why parents have to supervise its usage consistently. It is necessary to achieve a balance between all of a child’s activities, introduce time limitations and equally distribute the child’s play between outdoor and indoor activities and individual and group games. Experts have raised great differences in opinion regarding the question of how often and how much children should use ICTs. Some of them believe that usage of ICTs harms the child, while others see only positive effects from it. That is why we asked parents how often their children use certain types of ICTs at home. Parents have stated that children use the TV every day, while all other ICTs are used rarely or never. Of course, the majority of children use ICTs toys several times a week.

5. Conclusions

In accordance with the results, we can conclude that the majority of four-year-old children live in a technological environment, enriched with media, where the family supports learning through ICTs. We also support this assertion with the fact that nowadays there are few families that do not own the majority of basic ICTs devices (TV, mobile phone, computer, digital camera…), since technology has become a part of our everyday way of life and because without its constant presence it would be very hard to live.

A four-year-old child is curious, and because of that there is a possibility that he or she will want to use ICTs more and more often and for longer periods of time. We have found that this (increased) desire to use ICTs is influenced by parents’ (or other family members’) constant usage of ICTs. These results coincide with the results of another study, that shows that a child’s (increased) desire to use ICTs is most influenced by family habits (family values and expectations), which affect the relationship between the usage of traditional toys and ICTs. Even though the child’s (increased) desire to use ICTs is influenced by all family members, parents still play the most important role, because they are closest to the child, spend the most time with him/her and provide help and support when needed.

Parents believe that usage of ICTs develops a child’s motor competences, learning competences, language competences, self-expression competences, social competences and cultural competences. Usage of ICTs with a young child could already have positive consequences, but excessive usage could also cause negative consequences. Experts believe that proper usage of ICTs cannot have negative effects (Technology and young children – ages 3 through 8, 1996). When we asked parents what they think about such ICTs usage, the majority of them stated that such usage could have negative and positive consequences at the same time. As negative consequences, parents mention contact with violent or inappropriate content, threats to physical health (deterioration of sight, stiffness, spinal damage due to sitting position, obesity…), associability, loss of contact with reality and even addiction. As positive consequences, parents mention the acquisition of new knowledge and skills and understanding ICTs, which will serve the child in his or her future schooling and employment. All parents agree that ICTs has to be chosen properly and the manner and time of usage controlled. Parents should be aware of the broad selection of ICTs intended for children and know how to buy products suitable for their four-year-old children and their stage of development (Aubry & Dahl, 2008). In addition, the child should be given help and explanations regarding the concept of ICTs in order to use ICTs correctly in the future.

It is encouraging that all parents are acquainted with the child’s usage of ICTs, because only a few parents expressed a desire for additional information: mostly about the child’s usage of ICTs in the kindergarten, about the influences of ICTs on a child’s development and about the proper way of introducing ICTs to a child. We would also like to point out the importance of mutual informing and cooperation of parents, educators, kindergarten administrations and other involved individuals who are in contact with the child. Only in this way can parents teach their children to use ICTs correctly, supervise the usage and prevent possible negative consequences of its usage.

Everything in life has its good and bad sides. It is the same with the question regarding the appropriateness of using ICTs among preschool children, especially the youngest ones. The ever-increasing presence of ICTs in everyday life has forced parents, educators and child proponents to question its relationship with the cognitive, social and developmental needs of preschool children. The debate soon created division between those who believe that the usage of ICTs is pernicious for the child’s health and learning and those who think that using ICTs contributes to the child’s social and intellectual development in an important way. Our research has shown that four-year-old children already have contact with basic types of ICTs at home and that they also gladly use it, but their usage is not yet controlled and definitely does not have any negative consequences.

Parents have expressed that they are happy with their children’s ways of using ICTs, although some of them doubt its educational value, especially at such a young age. That is way we emphasise once more the importance of cooperation between parents, educators, kindergarten administrations and other involved individuals. They should share information about the child’s usage of ICTs and its influences on the child as well as about all other positive or negative effects on the child’s development. Only through everyone’s cooperation can the child begin to learn, develop important competences for further schooling and become an active member of today’s modern e-society.

References

Aubrey, C. & Dahl, S. (2008). A Review of the Evidence on the Use of ICTs in the Early Years Fundation Stage. (www.e-learningcentre.co.uk/Resource/CMS/Assets/5c10130e-6a9f-102c-a0be-003005bbceb4/form_uploads/review_early_years_foundation.pdf) (06-01-2011).

Birch, A. (1997). Developmental Psychology: From Infancy to Childhood. London: McMillian Press LTD.

European Commission (Ed.) (2001). Making a European Area of Lifelong Learning a Reality. (www.bologna-berlin2003.de/pdf/Mi­tteilung­Eng.pdf) (22-04-2011).

Fekonja, U. (2006). Igra?e. In L. Marjanovi? Umek & M. Zu­pan­?i? (Eds.), Psihologija otroške igre: od rojstva do vstopa v šolo (pp. 99-124). Ljubljana: Universidad de Ljubljana, Facultad de Artes.

Hoffman, D.L. & Novak, T.P. (1996). Marketing in Hypermedia Computer-mediated Environments: Conceptual Foundatuions. Journal of Marketing, 60, 50-68. JSTOR (15-04-2010).

Kirkorian, H.L., Wartella, E.A. & Anderson, D.R. (2008). Media and Young Children’s Learning. Future of Children, 18, 39-61. ERIC (05-11-2010).

Marjanovi? Umek, L. & Zupan?i?, M. (2004). Razvojna Psiho­logija. Ljubljana: Scientific and Research Institute of Faculty of Arts.

Markovac, V. & Rogulja, N. (2009). Key ICTs Competences of Kindergarten Teachers. In 8th Special Focus Symposium on ICESKS: Information, Communication and Economic Sciences in the Knowledge Society (str. 72-77). Zadar: The Faculty of Teacher Education, University of Zagreb and ENCSI.

McPake, J., Stephen & Plowman, L. (2007). Entering e-society. Young Children’s Development of e-literacy. University of Stirling (www.ioe.stir.ac.uk/research/projects/esociety/documents/Enteringe-SocietyreportJune2007.pdf) (06-12-2010).

McPake, J., Stephen, C., Plowman, L., Sime, D. & Downey, S. (2005), Already at a Disadvantage? ICTs in the Home and Children’s Preparation for Primary School. University of Stirling. (www.ioe.stir.ac.uk/research/projects/interplay/docs/already_at_a_disadvantage.pdf) (30-10-2010).

Nikolopoulu, K., Gialamas, V. & Batstouta, M. (2010). Young Children’s Access to and Use of ICTs at Home. University of Patras. (www.ecedu.upatras.gr/review/papers/4_1/4_1_25_40.pdf) (06-10-2010).

Plowman, L. & Stephen, C. (2002). A «benign addition»? Re­search on ICTs and Preschool Children. University of Stirling (ht­tps://dspace.stir.ac.uk/bitstream/1893/459/1/Plowman%20JCAL.pdf) (21-11-2011).

Plowman, L., McPake, J. & Stephen, C. (2008). Just Picking it up? Young Children Learning with Technology at Home. Cam­bridge Journal of Education, 38, 303-319. ERIC (30-10-2010).

Plowman, L., McPake, J. & Stephen, C. (2010). The Tech­nologisation of Childhood? Young Children and Technology in the home. Children and Society, 24. (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/­doi/10.1111/j.1099-0860.2008.00180.x/full) (30-10-2010).

Punie, Y. (2007). Learning Spaces: an ICT-enabled Model of Fu­ture Learning in the Knowledge-based Society. European Jour­nal of Education, 42. (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/­doi/10.1111/­j.1465-3435.2007.00302.x/full) (30-10-2010).

Rideout, V.J., Vandewater, A.E. & Wartella, A.E. (2003). Zero to Six: Electronic Media in the Lives of Infants, Toddlers and Preeschoolers. (www.kff.org/entmedia/upload/Zero-to-Six-Electro­nic-Media-in-the-Lives-of-Infants-Toddlers-and-Preschoolers-PDF.pdf) (30-10-2010).

Roberts, D.F., Foehr, U.G., Rideout, V.J. & Brodie, M. (1999). Kids and Media @ the New Millenium. (www.kff.org/entmedia/­upload/­Kids-Media-The-New-Millennium-Report.pdf) (06-01-2011).

Stephen, C., McPake, J., Plowman, L. & Berch-Heyman, S. (2008). Learning from the Children: Exploring Preschool Children’s en­­counters with ICTs at Home. Journal of Early Childhood Re­search, 6 (2), 99-117.

Technology and Young Children. Ages 3 throught 8 (Ed.) (1996). (www.kqed.org/assets/pdf/education/earlylearning/media-sym­­posium/technology-children-naeyc.pdf?trackurl=true) (22-12-2012).

Wartella, E.A., Lee, J.H. & Caplovitz, A.G. (2002). Children and Interactive Media. (http://74.125.155.132/scholar?­q=cache:­FGj8L4ExmDAJ:scholar.google.com/+children+and+interactive+media&hl=sl&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1) (06-01-2011).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Hoy en día, no podemos ignorar el hecho de que los niños pequeños están demasiado expuestos a las tecnologías. Solo una acción rápida y una actitud positiva por parte de los adultos puede prevenir consecuencias potencialmente negativas, y preparar a los chicos para una vida donde el uso de tecnologías de la comunicación (TIC) es necesario para el éxito social del individuo. Creemos que resulta importante estudiar la relación de la infancia con las TIC en casa, porque estamos seguros de que las TIC ejercen un gran impacto sobre el desarrollo temprano de los niños. Este artículo representa el acceso infantil a las tecnologías de la información y comunicación, su uso en casa, la influencia del uso por parte de los niños de las TIC en su desarrollo de competencias y la relación del niño con las TIC en el hogar. Los datos se recopilaron con la ayuda de 130 padres que rellenaron un cuestionario y nos proporcionaron sus opiniones sobre sus hijos de cuatro años y su uso de las TIC en el hogar. Los resultados fueron analizados con un programa por ordenador SPSS. Nos dimos cuenta de que los niños de cuatro años regularmente encuentran TIC en su entorno familiar. Además, estuvimos también interesados por si había diferencias según el sexo de los chicos y el nivel educativo de los padres. Además, presentamos las opiniones de los padres como propuestas para un posterior estudio de este tema.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Las tecnologías de la información y de la comunicación (TIC), se han convertido, en los últimos años, en una parte fundamental de la sociedad moderna. Nos permiten tener rápido acceso a la información y nos facilitan los procesos de comunicación. Además de actuar como mediadores en el proceso de información y de comunicación, también ayudan a desarrollar las competencias individuales y la capacidad de aprendizaje. Entre estas, también se encuentra la competencia digital (Punie, 2007), que constituye una parte fundamental del aprendizaje permanente (European Commission, 2001). La competencia digital es de vital importancia, ya que contribuye a que el individuo tenga una vida llena de éxitos (Markovac & Rogulja, 2009). Tenemos que ser conscientes de que las TIC no solo las utilizan los adultos, sino que incluso los infantes más pequeños pueden entrar en contacto con este tipo de tecnología especial. McPake, Stephen y Plowman (2007) describen a los niños como miembros activos de la así denominada «e-society», que se basa en la conectividad digital. Esta sociedad determina sus vidas, aunque probablemente no sean conscientes de ello. Las TIC se están convirtiendo en un fenómeno muy extendido, de indudable interés de estudio para los expertos. Existen varias investigaciones que exploran la influencia de las TIC en las escuelas infantiles, pero ninguna de ellas trata el uso de las TIC en el hogar. Cuando empezamos a estudiar el uso de las TIC en casa, utilizamos un concepto de TIC más amplio, que va más allá de los ordenadores y de la telefonía móvil y que incluye una gran variedad de tecnologías de uso cotidiano a las que los niños también tienen acceso. Estas tecnologías son: los televisores, los juguetes electrónicos, las pantallas táctiles, los videojuegos, los videojuegos de varios jugadores, las cámaras fotográficas digitales o las videocámaras, cámaras, impresoras y cualquier otro tipo de dispositivos que los niños puedan encontrar en su casa. Todos estos medios tecnológicos fueron seleccionados porque Nikolopoulu, Gialamas y Batstuta (2010) creen que hacen que los niños se familiaricen con el concepto de interactividad, lo que constituye asimismo una de las principales características de las TIC. La interactividad es la posibilidad de participar activamente en el proceso de comunicación de los participantes (Hoffman & Novak, 1996), en nuestro caso, incluso niños de cuatro años.

Por esta razón, el objeto de nuestro estudio fue el de descubrir cuántos tipos diferentes de tecnologías poseen las familias, cuál es la naturaleza del acceso que se le permite a los niños en casa (limitado o ilimitado), cómo usan los niños las TIC en casa (de manera independiente, necesitan ayuda, no las usan en absoluto), cuál es la frecuencia con la que las usan en el hogar, las influencias sobre el uso de las TIC en casa, la influencia del uso de las tecnologías en el desarrollo de los niños, la actitud de los niños hacia las TIC en el domicilio y la concienciación de los padres. Durante nuestra investigación, intentamos descubrir las diferencias existentes entre ambos sexos y el nivel educativo de los padres.

2. Material y métodos

Utilizamos un método descriptivo y un método de causa-efecto, no experimental, de investigación pedagógica empírica. El estudio se realizó con una muestra de 130 padres (83,8% mujeres y 16,2% hombres; 53,1% con estudios de secundaria y 46,9% con estudios superiores; 46,9% de los padres tenían hijas; 42,8% de los padres tenían hijos) de niños de cuatro años, en edad preescolar, que van a escuelas infantiles en toda Eslovenia. Cumplimentaron un cuestionario y demostraron cuál es el acceso generalizado de los niños a las TIC, su uso y la relación de los niños con ellas en casa. Con la ayuda de la documentación, creamos en una primera fase un cuestionario borrador, sobre el que realizamos pruebas, tras haber sido evaluado de manera racional. Eliminamos todos los posibles errores e imperfecciones. Probamos el cuestionario en febrero de 2011. La versión final de los cuestionarios fue entregada a los padres en abril y mayo de 2011. La encuesta fue anónima.

La información recabada gracias a los cuestionarios fue analizada por un ordenador, con la ayuda de un programa de estadísticas SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). En todas las preguntas utilizamos un método estadístico descriptivo. Determinamos la frecuencia absoluta (f) y porcentual (f %). La información recabada se demostró con los cuadros. Las relaciones dependientes entre las variables fueron examinadas mediante la prueba ?2. Para analizar la información recabada con las escalas de evaluación utilizamos la prueba de U de Mann-Whitney.

3. Resultados

3.1. La presencia de las TIC en el entorno familiar de los niños de cuatro años

Tal como hemos mencionado anteriormente, la definición más amplia de TIC, engloba varios dispositivos electrónicos, productos multimedia y sus aplicaciones correspondientes. Hoy en día, casi todas las familias pueden permitirse este tipo de productos y dispositivos, algunos de ellos han sido especialmente creados para niños y otros para otros miembros de la familia. No obstante, pueden acceder a ellos y utilizarlos junto a otros miembros de su familia.


Draft Content 885178522-26736 ov-es024.jpg

Este primer cuadro muestra que casi todas las familias poseen un televisor (99,2%), un teléfono móvil (98,5%), un ordenador (94,6%), un reproductor de CD o DVD (93,8%), una cámara fotográfica digital (92,3%) y una impresora (80%). En aproximadamente tres cuartas partes de todos los casos, las familias poseen MP3 o iPODs (74,7%); y en un poco menos de la mitad de todos los casos, también una videocámara digital (42,3%). Lo que menos poseen las familias son videoconsolas (24,6%) y videoconsolas portátiles (32,3%). Nos alegramos de que numerosas familias también posean TIC especialmente diseñados para niños. 102 (78,5%) familias poseen juguetes programables (coches teledirigidos, robots, perros que ladran…) y algunas familias más (80,8%), otros de simulación (ordenadores para niños, cajas registradoras, planchas…).

3.2. El acceso de los niños a las TIC y su uso en casa

El acceso de los niños a las TIC en casa puede ser restringido físicamente o no restringido. Por lo general, el acceso no se restringe en el caso de juguetes u objetos que estén acostumbrados a utilizar. Por otro lado, el acceso puede limitarse de varias maneras diferentes. Las TIC se ponen en lugares a los que los niños no llegan (en las estanterías más altas, o detrás de puertas cerradas), mientras que los hermanos y hermanas mayores incluso llegan a esconderlas.

Los resultados del acceso de los niños a las tecnologías en casa no fueron sorprendentes. En más de la mitad de los ejemplos, los niños tienen acceso libre e ilimitado a los juguetes tecnológicos, mientras que por otro lado les resulta más complicado acceder como videoconsolas, videocámaras digitales y cámaras fotográficas digitales. Es decir, les resulta más difícil acceder a todos los dispositivos de uso más complicado y que habitualmente solo utilizan los adultos de su familia. En aproximadamente la mitad de todos los ejemplos los niños también utilizan la televisión o el reproductor de CD o DVD. Un informe más detallado sobre los datos obtenidos también reveló que en este ejemplo a las niñas se les restringe más el acceso a las TIC que a los niños.

También queríamos descubrir por qué los padres restringen el acceso a cierto tipo de TIC. Aunque nos han proporcionado numerosas razones plausibles (son difíciles de usar, acceso a funciones vitales para el funcionamiento del aparato, acceso a información y contenidos delicados, puede romperlas...), la mayoría de los padres afirmó que la causa principal para que restringiesen el acceso es el miedo a que el dispositivo pudiese ser perjudicial para los niños. Los padres temen que las TIC puedan perjudicar a sus hijos.

Dado que muchos niños necesitan ayuda para utilizarlas, hemos preguntado quién es la persona que ayuda a los niños con mayor frecuencia cuando las usan. Los resultados han demostrado que en la mayoría de los casos son los padres quienes los ayudan, pero también los hermanos o hermanas mayores e incluso los abuelos. Muchos padres creen que las TIC contienen valores educativos (Rideout, Vandewater & Wartella, 2003). Kirkorian, Wartella y Anderson (2008) consideran que los padres no deben limitar las experiencias interactivas de sus hijos con las TIC, ya que mantienen despierto el interés que los niños experimentan hacia la actividad. Lógicamente esperábamos que fuesen los padres quienes ayudasen a sus hijos con mayor frecuencia, ya que son los miembros de la familia más cercanos a ellos y quienes más tiempo pasan con ellos. En este caso debemos informar de que las TIC no se deberían utilizar como «cuidadores digitales de niños», ya que se podrían provocar daños innecesarios (Plowman, McPake & Stephen, 2010).


Draft Content 885178522-26736 ov-es025.jpg

3.3. El desarrollo de las competencias de los niños gracias al uso de las TIC

Resulta difícil determinar cuándo los niños deberían empezar a utilizarlas. Hemos elegido la edad de cuatro años, porque la mayoría de los estudios demuestran que a partir de esa edad concreta, los niños empiezan a aumentar el uso de las TIC (Wartella, Lee & Caplovitz, 2002). Habitualmente, en el cuarto año de edad se inicia un período crítico que resulta importante para el aprendizaje de los niños mediante tecnologías. Hasta hace poco aprender con la ayuda de estas se solía asociar al concepto de aprendizaje a distancia, pero hoy en día ya no es el caso. El concepto de aprendizaje mediante la ayuda de las TIC está cambiando. Estas se encuentran cada vez más presentes en los hogares de los niños, donde aprender con la ayuda de las TIC ocurre de manera espontánea y mejora el desarrollo de competencias importantes para ellos. Mediante su uso, los niños desarrollan habilidades con las que podrán operar en una sociedad digital. El nivel de estas competencias adquiridas depende del acceso a los equipos y del apoyo, interés en el que participen los miembros de la familia. En su estudio, McPake y otros (2005), han establecido tres categorías generales de competencias: tecnológicas, culturales y de aprendizaje. Basándonos en ellas nos hemos interesado por cuáles son las competencias que más desarrollan los niños gracias al uso de las TIC.


Draft Content 885178522-26736 ov-es026.jpg

El cuadro muestra que los padres suelen estar de acuerdo en sus opiniones sobre el desarrollo de las competencias de los niños con el uso de las TIC. En todos los ejemplos, aproximadamente la mitad de los padres creen que las TIC prácticamente no desarrollan las competencias de los niños. En su opinión las tecnologías casi no desarrollan las competencias motrices (53,8%), las competencias de aprendizaje (58,5%), las competencias lingüísticas (49,2%), las competencias de autoexpresión (53,8%), las competencias sociales (42,3%) y las competencias culturales (51,5%).

Un análisis más detallado de los resultados ha demostrado que los padres con un mayor nivel educativo creen que su uso incrementa el desarrollo de las competencias de los niños de manera progresiva (competencias de aprendizaje, competencias lingüísticas, competencias de autoexpresión y competencias sociales). Este hecho no es sorprendente, ya que podemos asumir que los padres con un mayor nivel educativo tienen mayores competencias en su uso y por tanto utilizan las TIC para sus asuntos personales. Esto significa que los padres con un mayor nivel educativo tienen una opinión más positiva sobre el uso de las tecnologías por parte de los niños, que los padres con un menor nivel educativo.

3.4. La actitud de los niños en casa respecto a las TIC

Al igual que el resto de personas, los niños tienen una actitud frente a las tecnologías. Esta es difícil de averiguar, ya que los niños en esa edad todavía no saben como expresar cómo se sienten en relación a ellas (lo que les gusta y lo que no) (Plowman & Stephen, 2002). El cuadro muestra que la mayoría de los padres (87,7%) creen que sus hijos se interesan por las TIC y que les gusta usarlas. Los padres informan de esta actitud de manera positiva, mostrando su aprobación, siempre y cuando el uso sea limitado y regulado. Muchos menos (9,2%) creen que sus hijos están demasiado interesados en las TIC y que las utilizan demasiado. La menor parte (3,1%) cree que ellos no tienen interés por las TIC y que no las han empezado a utilizar todavía. Los padres no creen que sea malo y no animan a sus hijos a usar las TIC, porque creen que todavía no es el momento de usarlas.


Draft Content 885178522-26736 ov-es027.jpg

4. Debate

Los niños de cuatro años de edad cuentan en la mayoría de los casos con TIC en sus casas. La mayoría viven en hogares que disponen de TV, de teléfono móvil, ordenador, reproductor de CD o DVD, cámara fotográfica digital y una impresora. Muchas familias poseen asimismo otros dispositivos TIC (MP3, iPods, videocámaras digitales, videoconsolas...) que no son tan comunes, de manera que los niños los encuentran con menos frecuencia. Gran parte de las familias también poseen TIC que han sido especialmente diseñadas para ellos. Estas son juguetes programables (perros que ladran y robots) y juguetes de simulación (ordenador infantiles, teléfono, cocina, electrodomésticos…).

El estudio también demostró que por lo general las familias con niñas suelen poseer mayor número de diferentes tipos de TIC con mayor frecuencia que las familias con niños. Este hecho es realmente sorprendente, ya que sería de esperar exactamente lo contrario. Hasta ahora una multitud de estudios habían indicado que los chicos se adaptan antes que las niñas a las actividades realizadas con las TIC, lo que podría significar que las familias con niños poseen más tipos diferentes (McPake, Stephen, Sime & Downey, 2005). Asimismo hemos descubierto que los padres con un menor nivel educativo suelen poseer un PC con mayor frecuencia que los padres con un nivel educativo más elevado. Este hecho nos sorprende, ya que hubiésemos esperado exactamente lo contrario. Podríamos asumir que un nivel educativo más elevado dotaría a esos padres de un mayor poder adquisitivo y por tanto de mayores facilidades para comprar un ordenador. Un nivel educativo más elevado, también podría estar relacionado con el hecho de que esos padres utilizasen el ordenador con fines laborales, con una frecuencia mayor que los padres con un nivel educativo menos elevado. Esto ya no se cumple, puesto que hoy en día casi todas las familias cuentan con al menos un ordenador o incluso más de uno.

A los niños les gusta usar la tecnología, porque es entretenida. A esta edad ya han desarrollado intereses permanentes hacia algún tipo de juego y estos se ven reflejados en la tecnología que utilizan. Con cuatro años, según Piaget, los niños ya tienen la capacidad de pensar simbólicamente (Birch, 1997), lo que significa que pueden utilizar imágenes mentales, palabras y movimientos como símbolos para nombrar otras cosas (Marjanovic Umek & Zupancic, 2004). En este caso debemos destacar que los niños probablemente sigan entendiendo y utilizando las TIC como un juego, no como un dispositivo (Fekonja, in Umek & Zupancic, 2006). Hemos intentado averiguar cómo las utilizan los niños en casa. ¿Utilizan los niños las tecnologías solos, necesitan para ello ayuda o existen incluso ciertos tipos de TIC que no utilizan en ningún caso? Los niños utilizan la televisión y por supuesto los juguetes tecnológicos de manera prácticamente independiente. Estos últimos, han sido diseñados especialmente para ellos y por ello su uso es simple y seguro. Por otro lado, los niños necesitan ayuda para usar el ordenador y otros tipos de reproductores. Nos alegramos de ver que muchos niños casi nunca utilizan otros dispositivos TIC que los que encuentran en su casa y que su uso se limita a formas de TIC simples y básicas. Los niños suelen utilizar de manera independiente aquellas que siempre tienen a su disposición y cuyo uso es simple. En este caso debemos informar sobre el hecho de que los niños no suelen utilizarlas en el propio sentido de la palabra, sino que suelen jugar con ellas, ya que todavía no son conscientes de su verdadera utilidad. Un análisis más detallado de los resultados ha demostrado que las niñas suelen utilizarlas de manera más independiente que los niños, lo que parece sorprendente, puesto que McPake y otros (2005) habían demostrado en su estudio que los niños suelen ser quienes realicen actividades relacionadas con las tecnologías con mayor frecuencia. Al margen de ello, (Nkolopoulou & al., 2010), el hecho de que los niños utilicen las TIC de manera más independiente que las niñas entra en conflicto con la explicación, según la que los valores familiares son los que se lo exigen (la autodependencia, independencia y la toma de iniciativa, suelen verse en ellos como el primer paso hacia la edad adulta y la adopción de su rol de padre de familia). Esta resulta ser una visión de la familia más tradicional, que cada vez está siendo más reemplazada por la igualdad entre hombres y mujeres dentro de la familia.

Plowman, McPake y Stephen (2008) también han demostrado que el uso de las TIC es lo que más desarrolla las competencias del aprendizaje, ya que el aprendizaje con ellas es en sí mismo un proceso espontáneo, que se desarrolla de manera independiente sin ser conscientes de él. Este aprendizaje ocurre en el entorno familiar (informal) de los niños, en el que es el resultado de la colaboración en una práctica social extendida. No obstante, el aprendizaje del uso de las tecnologías no es intencionado (los niños ven su uso como parte de un juego), pueden desarrollar un amplio abanico de técnicas de aprendizaje con solo relacionarse con ellas. Por otro lado, podemos deducir que la creencia de los padres de que las TIC desarrollan las competencias sociales de los niños en menor medida, puede estar condicionada por sus sistemas de creencias culturales, que suelen derivar de la opinión pública general (Plowman, McPake & Stephen, 2008). Nuestra sociedad todavía se encuentra dirigida por la mentalidad de que las TIC perjudican a los niños y no los benefician. Esto también se puede constatar con las opiniones de los padres. Por lo general afirman que el uso de las tecnologías ofrece a los niños la posibilidad de adquirir nuevos conocimientos y aprendizajes, pero siguen creyendo que estas evitan que los niños se relacionen con los miembros de su familia, con niños de su edad y con la sociedad en general. Asimismo, los resultados de este estudio han demostrado que muchos padres no saben que el uso de las tecnologías desarrolla las competencias culturales de los niños, que suelen incluir la comprensión de sus diferentes roles en la sociedad y las posibilidades de uso con varios fines sociales y culturales (comunicación, trabajo, forma de expresión y entretenimiento).

Muchos niños mantienen una sana relación con las tecnologías. A estas edades empiezan a interesarse por las TIC y empieza a gustar usarlas. Es importante que los padres vean esta relación de una manera especial, ya que los niños no perciben la mayoría de ellas de la misma manera que nosotros. Para los niños las tecnologías siguen siendo un juguete y un entretenimiento. Stephen y otros (2008) han demostrado que con cuatro años, se convierten en usuarios sofisticados de las TIC, que evalúan sus propios logros, saben lo que quieren y distinguen entre sus propias competencias operativas y la posibilidad de realizar actividades tecnológicas. Esta cognición también se puede aplicar a nuestro caso, por lo que podemos llegar a la conclusión de que los niños son, en cierta medida, conscientes del concepto TIC, su funcionalidad y el papel que desempeña en la familia.

Roberts, Foehr, Rideout y Brodie (1999) han descubierto en su estudio, que los niños utilizan las tecnologías un promedio de una a tres horas diarias. El uso muchas veces tiene lugar sin que los padres lo sepan, ya que tienen acceso ilimitado a sus propios objetos multimedia. Con cuatro años, se encuentran ya en la edad potencial de peligro, en caso de que el uso de las tecnologías no sea regulado de manera adecuada. Para ello, los padres deberán hacerse cargo de supervisar su uso y aplicar sus reglas de manera constante. Es necesario encontrar un equilibrio entre las actividades de los niños, entre limitar el tiempo de uso de ellas y distribuir su tiempo de juego de manera equitativa entre actividades fuera de casa y actividades dentro de casa; así como entre juegos individuales y juegos en grupo. La pregunta sobre cuántas veces y cuántos niños las utilizan, siempre ha suscitado fuertes polémicas entre los expertos. Algunos de ellos creen que su uso es perjudicial para los niños, mientras que otros solo les ven el lado positivo. Por ello, hemos preguntado a los padres con cuánta frecuencia utilizan sus hijos en casa algunos tipos de TIC. Los padres han afirmado que sus hijos utilizan la televisión a diario, mientras que suelen utilizar el resto de TIC con poca frecuencia o incluso nula. Por supuesto, una gran mayoría de los niños utilizan juguetes tecnológicos especialmente diseñados para ellos, varias veces por semana.

5. Conclusiones

Según los resultados, podemos llegar a la conclusión de que la mayoría de los niños de cuatro años viven, en un entorno tecnológico, enriquecido con objetos multimedia, en el que sus familias apoyan el aprendizaje mediante TIC. Asimismo vemos como esta afirmación es respaldada por el hecho de que hoy en día solo hay algunas familias que no poseen la mayoría de tecnologías básicas (TV, teléfono móvil, ordenador, cámara fotográfica digital…), ya que la tecnología se ha convertido en una parte más de nuestra vida cotidiana, sin cuya presencia constante sería difícil vivir.

Los niños de cuatro años tienen curiosidad y por ello existe lógicamente la posibilidad de que quieran usarlas cada vez con mayor frecuencia y por períodos de tiempo más largos. Hemos descubierto que este (exponencial) deseo por usar las TIC se ve influenciado por el uso constante de ellas por parte de los padres (u otros miembros de la familia). Estos resultados coinciden con los resultados de otro estudio, que demuestra que el (exponencial) deseo de los niños por usarlas, la mayoría de las veces, se ve influenciado por los hábitos familiares (valores y expectativas de la familia), que afectan a la relación entre el uso de juguetes tradicionales y las tecnologías. Incluso, aunque el (exponencial) deseo de los niños por usarlas esté influenciado por todos los miembros de la familia, los padres siguen siendo quienes desempeñan el papel más importante, ya que son los más cercanos a ellos, quienes pasan el mayor tiempo con ellos y quienes les ofrecen su apoyo, en caso necesario.

Los padres creen que el uso de las tecnologías prácticamente no desarrolla las competencias motrices de los niños, sus competencias de aprendizaje, lingüísticas, de autoexpresión, sociales y culturales. Su uso por parte de un niño tan pequeño puede tener consecuencias positivas, pero un uso excesivo también puede tener consecuencias negativas. Los expertos creen que su uso adecuado no tiene efectos negativos (Technology and young children: ages 3 through 8). Cuando les preguntamos a los padres qué piensan sobre su uso, la mayoría de ellos afirmaron que este uso podría tener consecuencias negativas y positivas al mismo tiempo. Como consecuencias negativas los padres indican el contacto con contenido violento o inapropiado, los riesgos sobre la salud física (deterioro de la vista, rigidez, daños en la columna vertebral debido a las malas posturas, obesidad…), la pérdida de sociabilidad, la pérdida del contacto con la realidad e incluso la adicción. Una de las consecuencias positivas descrita por los padres es que los niños adquieren nuevos conocimientos y habilidades. Además aprenden a usarlas, lo que les ayudará en sus futuros estudios y trabajos. Todos los padres coinciden en que las TIC tienen que ser elegidas de manera adecuada y en que se debe limitar su tiempo de uso. Los padres deben tomar consciencia del amplio abanico de TIC creadas para niños, saber cómo comprar productos indicados para niños de cuatro años y su nivel de desarrollo (Aubry & Dahl, 2008). A parte de eso, se debería ayudarles y explicarles su uso para que aprendan a utilizarlas correctamente en el futuro.

Nos alegramos de que todos los padres conozcan el uso que sus hijos hacen de las tecnologías, ya que solo algunos padres manifestaron su interés por recibir información adicional, sobre todo, acerca del uso que hacen los niños de ellas en sus clases de educación infantil, acerca de la influencia de las TIC en el desarrollo de los niños y acerca de la manera correcta de dar a conocerlas a los niños. En este caso debemos destacar la importancia de la información y colaboración mutua entre los padres, educadores, equipo administrativo de las escuelas infantiles y otras personas implicadas que estén relacionadas con los niños. Solo de esta manera podrán los padres enseñarles a usarlas correctamente, supervisar su uso y evitar las importantes consecuencias negativas derivadas de este.

Todo en la vida tiene un lado positivo y un lado negativo. Lo mismo ocurre con la pregunta sobre si su uso es apropiado para niños en edad preescolar, especialmente para los más jóvenes. El aumento de la presencia de las TIC en la vida cotidiana ha llevado a los padres, educadores y a los defensores de los niños a replantearse su relación con las necesidades cognitivas, sociales y necesidades de desarrollo en edad preescolar. Las opiniones pronto se dividieron entre los que creen que el uso de ellas es gravemente perjudicial para la salud de los niños y su proceso de aprendizaje, y los que creen que su uso contribuye de manera significativa a su desarrollo social e intelectual. Nuestro estudio demostró que los niños de cuatro años ya están en contacto con algunas TIC en casa y que disfrutan utilizándolas, aunque todavía no controlan su uso. Asimismo se demuestra que, sin lugar a dudas, no presentan consecuencias negativas.

Los padres han expresado que están contentos con la manera en que sus hijos utilizan las tecnologías, aunque algunos de ellos dudan de su valor educativo, en especial en los más pequeños. Por ello queremos destacar una vez más la importancia de la colaboración entre los padres, los educadores, el personal administrativo de las escuelas infantiles y otras personas implicadas: deberían informar sobre el uso que los niños hacen de las TIC, la influencia que ejercen sobre ellos, y sobre el resto de consecuencias positivas o negativas que puedan tener sobre su desarrollo. Solo con la colaboración de todos, empezarán, al usarlas, a aprender, y desarrollarán competencias importantes para su futuro académico al mismo tiempo que se convertirán en miembros activos de la «e-society».

Referencias

Aubrey, C. & Dahl, S. (2008). A Review of the Evidence on the Use of ICTs in the Early Years Fundation Stage. (www.e-learningcentre.co.uk/Resource/CMS/Assets/5c10130e-6a9f-102c-a0be-003005bbceb4/form_uploads/review_early_years_foundation.pdf) (06-01-2011).

Birch, A. (1997). Developmental Psychology: From Infancy to Childhood. London: McMillian Press LTD.

European Commission (Ed.) (2001). Making a European Area of Lifelong Learning a Reality. (www.bologna-berlin2003.de/pdf/Mi­tteilung­Eng.pdf) (22-04-2011).

Fekonja, U. (2006). Igra?e. In L. Marjanovi? Umek & M. Zu­pan­?i? (Eds.), Psihologija otroške igre: od rojstva do vstopa v šolo (pp. 99-124). Ljubljana: Universidad de Ljubljana, Facultad de Artes.

Hoffman, D.L. & Novak, T.P. (1996). Marketing in Hypermedia Computer-mediated Environments: Conceptual Foundatuions. Journal of Marketing, 60, 50-68. JSTOR (15-04-2010).

Kirkorian, H.L., Wartella, E.A. & Anderson, D.R. (2008). Media and Young Children’s Learning. Future of Children, 18, 39-61. ERIC (05-11-2010).

Marjanovi? Umek, L. & Zupan?i?, M. (2004). Razvojna Psiho­logija. Ljubljana: Scientific and Research Institute of Faculty of Arts.

Markovac, V. & Rogulja, N. (2009). Key ICTs Competences of Kindergarten Teachers. In 8th Special Focus Symposium on ICESKS: Information, Communication and Economic Sciences in the Knowledge Society (str. 72-77). Zadar: The Faculty of Teacher Education, University of Zagreb and ENCSI.

McPake, J., Stephen & Plowman, L. (2007). Entering e-society. Young Children’s Development of e-literacy. University of Stirling (www.ioe.stir.ac.uk/research/projects/esociety/documents/Enteringe-SocietyreportJune2007.pdf) (06-12-2010).

McPake, J., Stephen, C., Plowman, L., Sime, D. & Downey, S. (2005), Already at a Disadvantage? ICTs in the Home and Children’s Preparation for Primary School. University of Stirling. (www.ioe.stir.ac.uk/research/projects/interplay/docs/already_at_a_disadvantage.pdf) (30-10-2010).

Nikolopoulu, K., Gialamas, V. & Batstouta, M. (2010). Young Children’s Access to and Use of ICTs at Home. University of Patras. (www.ecedu.upatras.gr/review/papers/4_1/4_1_25_40.pdf) (06-10-2010).

Plowman, L. & Stephen, C. (2002). A «benign addition»? Re­search on ICTs and Preschool Children. University of Stirling (ht­tps://dspace.stir.ac.uk/bitstream/1893/459/1/Plowman%20JCAL.pdf) (21-11-2011).

Plowman, L., McPake, J. & Stephen, C. (2008). Just Picking it up? Young Children Learning with Technology at Home. Cam­bridge Journal of Education, 38, 303-319. ERIC (30-10-2010).

Plowman, L., McPake, J. & Stephen, C. (2010). The Tech­nologisation of Childhood? Young Children and Technology in the home. Children and Society, 24. (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/­doi/10.1111/j.1099-0860.2008.00180.x/full) (30-10-2010).

Punie, Y. (2007). Learning Spaces: an ICT-enabled Model of Fu­ture Learning in the Knowledge-based Society. European Jour­nal of Education, 42. (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/­doi/10.1111/­j.1465-3435.2007.00302.x/full) (30-10-2010).

Rideout, V.J., Vandewater, A.E. & Wartella, A.E. (2003). Zero to Six: Electronic Media in the Lives of Infants, Toddlers and Preeschoolers. (www.kff.org/entmedia/upload/Zero-to-Six-Electro­nic-Media-in-the-Lives-of-Infants-Toddlers-and-Preschoolers-PDF.pdf) (30-10-2010).

Roberts, D.F., Foehr, U.G., Rideout, V.J. & Brodie, M. (1999). Kids and Media @ the New Millenium. (www.kff.org/entmedia/­upload/­Kids-Media-The-New-Millennium-Report.pdf) (06-01-2011).

Stephen, C., McPake, J., Plowman, L. & Berch-Heyman, S. (2008). Learning from the Children: Exploring Preschool Children’s en­­counters with ICTs at Home. Journal of Early Childhood Re­search, 6 (2), 99-117.

Technology and Young Children. Ages 3 throught 8 (Ed.) (1996). (www.kqed.org/assets/pdf/education/earlylearning/media-sym­­posium/technology-children-naeyc.pdf?trackurl=true) (22-12-2012).

Wartella, E.A., Lee, J.H. & Caplovitz, A.G. (2002). Children and Interactive Media. (http://74.125.155.132/scholar?­q=cache:­FGj8L4ExmDAJ:scholar.google.com/+children+and+interactive+media&hl=sl&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1) (06-01-2011).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 28/02/13
Accepted on 28/02/13
Submitted on 28/02/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C40-2013-03-02
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 9
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?