Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Research on the characteristics shown by children who cyberbully others is scarce. The objective of this research is to know the variables that predict the involvement of youngsters in cyberbullying perpetration. The current study examined the relation between socio-cognitive and emotional variables and cyberbullying perpetration. It examined the cyberbullies' beliefs about moral disengagement towards cyberbullying. It tested also the social support and emotional reactions to cyberbullying with the aim of understanding their association with cyberbullying perpetration. A number of 1,062 teenagers (54% girls) between 12 and 19 years old (M=15.20, SD=1.91), from six public secondary schools in Castilla-La Mancha (Spain), participated in the study. Results suggest that students who engage in cyberbullying perpetration have higher levels of cyberbullying victimization and bullying aggression when compared with their peers who do not engage in cyberbullying. The findings show that socio-cognitive and emotional variables are important to understand individual differences in engagement in cyberbullying. Result of regressions indicated that perpetration of cyberbullying was positively associated with cyberbullying victimization, bullying aggression, moral disengagement towards cyberbullying, social support and satisfaction expression. In contrast, perpetration of cyberbullying was not associated with negative emotions. Gender and age did not play a significant role in the prediction on perpetration of cyberbullying. Future research should continue to examine predictive factors associated with cyberbullying perpetration.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the art

In the last decade, we have heard news about many cases of bullying, humiliation, and violence involving schoolchildren who use the new communication technologies (Smith, Mahdavi, Carvalho, Fisher, Russell, & Tippett, 2008). By extending the traditional definition of bullying, cyberbullying is defined as an aggressive behavior among schoolchildren perpetrated repeatedly through electronic means by a group or individual against a victim who cannot defend himself/herself easily on his/her own (Smith & al., 2008).

Cyberbullying incidence is lower than traditional bullying (Herrera-López, Romera, & Ortega-Ruiz, 2017; Raskauskas & Stoltz, 2007). Slonje & Smith (2008) reported that 5.3% suffered cyberbullying victimization, and 2.8% suffered from it frequently. In Spain, Giménez-Gualdo, Hunter, Durkin, Arnaiz & Maquilón (2015) provide similar data. In a sample of 1,353 youngsters, 8% reported suffering cyberbullying experiences. Regarding gender, the results are not consistent (Garaigordobil, 2011). According to some studies, males are more frequently involved (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012; Slonje & Smith, 2008). In other studies, females report higher levels of victimisation (Giménez-Gualdo & al., 2015; Ortega, Calmaestra, & Mora-Merchán, 2008; Ortega, Elipe, Mora-Merchán, Calmaestra, & Vega, 2009). Other studies do not show any gender differences (Giménez-Gualdo & al., 2015; Smith & al., 2008). Regarding age, some studies show that cyberbullying increases with age (Ortega & al., 2008). Other studies show a decrease in the number of schoolchildren involved (Moore, Huebner, & Hills, 2012), and others report a curvilinear relationship with an increase in the middle years of Secondary Education (Calvete, Orue, Estévez, Villardón, & Padilla, 2010; Ortega & al., 2009). Some studies do even show that there are no differences (Garaigordobil, 2015; Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012).

Intervention programmes against bullying have had positive results regarding reduction of victimisation rates but not in terms of perpetration rates (Ttofi & Farrington, 2011). From the point of view of Psychology Groups, it is essential to understand the adversary to resolve any conflict (Gómez & Vázquez, 2015). In this line, in order to predict cyberbullying and to introduce preventive actions, it would be necessary to take into account personal and social variables of those adolescents who perpetrate cyberbullying. Most studies have been conducted from the victims’ point of view, and just a few have focused on analysing cyberbullies. For this reason, we believe this study is relevant as it focuses on cyberbullies specifically.

1.1. The perpetrator’s role

Previous research has shown a strong relationship between the victim’s and perpetrator’s roles in cyberbullying (Meter & Bauman, 2016). On the other hand, studies analysing face-to-face bullying and cyberbullying have found a correlation in the involvement in both forms of aggression. The results obtained in many studies suggest that both phenomena coexist (Cross, Lester, & Barnes, 2015; Herrera-López & al., 2017). Longitudinal studies show that involvement in bullying behaviors is a predictor of potentially being involved in episodes of cyberbullying (Cross & al., 2015; Sticca, Ruggieri, Alsaker, & Perren, 2013). Cyberbullies are thus prone to also attack their peers face-to-face (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012). Therefore, students perpetrating traditional bullying can also perpetrate cyberbullying (Smith & al. 2008). It also turns out that victims may also be cyberbullies (Smith & al. 2008). Nevertheless, other studies do not support such findings totally (Raskauskas & Stoltz, 2007; Slonje & Smith, 2008).

The ecological model of bullying, adapted to Bronfenbrenner’s Model (1977), shows that both individual and social variables may act as risk and protection factors. Indeed, peer relationships may become a risk factor for the involvement in negative interactions (Menesini, Nocentinni, & Paladino, 2012). For this reason, aggression may also be strengthened by group dynamics (Olthof, Goossens, Vermande, Aleva, & van-der-Meulen, 2011). Some studies show that those students who perpetrate bullying do not have any social support (Calvete & al., 2010). This situation is especially relevant in the bully-victim group (Cerezo, Sánchez, Ruiz, & Arense, 2015). Nevertheless, Twyman, Saylor, Taylor & Comeaux (2010) state that having a group of friends may also promote cyberbullying. Indeed, Olthof & al. (2011) stated that those students who use bullying to maintain their position within their respective groups are seen as socially popular and enjoy the support of their group.

Bandura’s Social Cognitive Theory (1999) identifies moral disengagement as a cognitive process through which people justify their aggressive behavior or distort its potential impact on other people. In a longitudinal study, Williams & Guerra (2007) found that those students who seem to accept normative beliefs related with bullying are more involved in this type of behavior; this is also a predictor positively related with cyberbullying. Such relationship with cyberbullying was also verified in other studies (Almeida, Correia, Marinho, & Garcia, 2012; Bauman, 2010; Meter & Bauman, 2016). Nevertheless, other studies did not find such relationship. For example, Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger (2012) reported that moral disengagement was only significant predicting traditional bullying.

In addition to moral disengagement, research is focused on the study of emotional reactions as potential indicators of moral and personal reasons for such aggressive behavior (Menesini, Palladino & Nocentini, 2015). The existing link between low levels of guilt and grief may legitimise negative behaviors (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012). If aggressors feel proud of or indifferent to their behaviors, these emotions, in turn, contribute to an increase in moral disengagement (Menesini & al., 2003). Similarly, Menesini & al. (2015) reported that the absence of emotions for their victims and the positive emotions experienced by perpetrators are the positive feedback to them that strengthens their bullying behavior. Boulton & Underwood (1992) reported that victims of school bullying thought that their perpetrators felt well and happy about their behavior.

Taking into account the conflicting data collected in different research on the variables linked to cyberbullying perpetration, the need to conduct fur­ther research in this direction is evidenced. Getting to know the variables that may predict the continuation of face-to-face bullying by means of the new technologies would be a very important step forward to prevent it and take all necessary steps against it.

Given the relevance of the socio-cognitive and emotional variables in the perpetration role and the absence of studies that analyse all these variables together, the objective of this study is to jointly analyse the link between cognition (moral disengagement), social support and personal variables (involvement in bullying and emotions) in cyberbullying perpetration.

The objective of this study is to identify the relationships between variables previously reviewed and cyberbullying perpetration. Therefore, we will study the correlation between cyberbullying perpetration and involvement in traditional bullying and cyberbullying victimisation, as well as social support perceived by perpetrators, social disengagement, and the emotions linked to their behavior. We will then establish the predictive value of the variables studied in cyberbullying perpetration.

Due to the inconsistency of the data collected from prior research, we do not hypothesize any relationship between cyberbullying and gender and age. The research question is: do gender and age have any impact on cyberbullying perpetration? Regarding bullying, we expect that traditional bullying and cyberbullying victimisation will be a significant predictor of cyberbullying perpetration (H1). Moral disengagement will be positively related to cyberbullying perpetration (H2). Regarding the social context, we expect that cyberbullies feel supported by their peers (H3). Based on previous literature, we expect that cyberbullies do not feel guilty and feel pleasant emotions as a result of their behaviour (H4).

2. Material and methods

2.1. Participants

The sample was incidental and made up of 1,062 students of Secondary Education, Vocational Education and Years 12 and 13. 46% were men and 54% were women, aged between 12 and 19 years old (M=15.20, SD=1.91). 47.8% were students of a lower cycle of secondary education (n=508), 35.4% were students of a higher cycle of secondary education (n=376), and 16.6% were students of Years 12 and 13 (n=178). Six public Secondary Schools in the region of Castilla-La Mancha participated in this study: two from a rural environment and two from the provincial capital. 91% was born in Spain. Concerning the inmigrant students, more than 50% come from Eastern Europe (n=52), from Romania mostly, and 17% come from Latin American countries.

2.2. Instruments

The Bullyharm (Hall, 2016) was used to measure cyberbullying. The scale comprises 14 Likert-type items for each subscale of perpetration and victimisation with a rating response that ranges from 0 to 3: 0=never happened to me; 1=it happened to me once or twice; 2=it happened to me at least once a week; and 3=it happened to me twice or more times a week. Students were asked to determine their frequency of participation in certain behaviors in the last month. The internal consistency of the scale is optimal, regarding traditional bullying for perpetration a=.81 and a=.86 for victimisation, to measure cyberbullying, a=.79 for victimisation and a=.64 for perpetration.

Social support was measured using the subscale of perceived social support by friends from the AFA-R scale (González & Landero, 2014). It consists of seven Likert-type items with five-point response options ranging from 1 to five: 1=never; 2=rarely; 3=sometimes; 4=often; 5=always. The consistency of the subscale was high, a=.88.

The questionnaire on moral disengagement towards cyberbullying by Bussey, Fitzpatrick & Raman (2015) was employed. It consists of eight Likert-type items regarding moral disengagement towards cyberbullying behaviours, with five options: 1=strongly disagree; 2=disagree; 3=not sure; 4=agree; 5=strongly agree. The consistency of the subscale was appropriate, a=.68.

A scale was built to evaluate the emotional component of cyberbullies following the structure of previous research (Giménez-Gualdo & al., 2015; Ortega & al., 2009). Students had to identify the emotional intensity of each of the emotions proposed according to their cyberbullying experience. It was measured using a Likert-type scale with five items ranging from 1=not at all to 5=very much. Following the theoretical review performed, guilt was included (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012), as it had already been included in Ortega & al. (2009) and Caravita, Colombo, Stefanelli & Zigliani (2016). Sadness was also included considering that it is highlighted in most studies about the emotional component of bullying. Following the results obtained by Menesini & al. (2015), the absence of emotions (feel nothing) and positive emotions were included. No evaluation of emotions was found in prior research. Therefore, it was considered appropriate to include the opposite of negative emotions. In this line, fun was selected as opposite to sadness and satisfaction as opposite to guilt. Boulton and Underwood (1992) reported that bullies felt well, and we also included the well-being element and its opposite, discomfort. Discomfort had already been used by Ortega & al. (2009) and Horner, Asher, and Fireman (2015). A pilot study was conducted before using it in order to determine whether the students understand the terms proposed or not and no problems were detected. The reliability of pleasant emotions amounted to a=.68, and the reliability of unpleasant emotions amounted to a=.86.

2.3. Design

The research has a cross-sectional design, retrospective ex-post with multiple measurements.

2.4. Procedure

Attending to ethical considerations, in the first place we obtained the informed consent of the minors’ parents. 1.5% of the families did not respond to our request, and their children did not participate in the study.

The questionnaire was distributed in the classrooms by agreement with the headmasters and the teachers of the schools. The objective of the study was explained to the students, and they were informed that their participation was voluntary and that their answers would remain anonymous. The average time to fill in the battery of tests was 20 minutes.

2.5. Data analysis

Participant’s categorization as victims or perpetrators was made considering answers equal or above 1 (it happened to me once or twice in the last month) in the bullying questionnaires. After setting the contrasting groups, the Pearson correlation coefficient was conducted to identify the relationships between cyberbullying perpetration and the study variables. Student t-tests were conducted to verify the existence of differences in such variables between cyberbullies and non-involved students. Finally, a logistic regression analysis was performed to analyse the predictive value of the variables included in this study. A step analysis was conducted, including gender and education cycle as control variables. Bullying variables were included in the first step; the cognitive variable of moral disengagement was included in the second step; then the variable of the social context related with the perception of support from their classmates was included. Emotions were included in the last step. All the analyses were conducted using the statistical package SPSS (version 23) at a significance level of .05.

3. Results

8.2% of boys and 5.1% of girls (?2=4.23, p<.05) are involved in cyberbullying perpetration. Regarding the education cycle, 6.3% of students of the first cycle (Year 8 and 9) reported cyberbullying perpetration, 7.2% in the case of students of the second cycle (Year 10 and 11) and in Year 12 and 13, 5.6% (?2=0.55, p=.760) reported being a cyberbully.

3.1. Relationship between the variables of this study

The Pearson correlation analyses show that there are statistically significant correlations between cyberbullying perpetration, cyberbullying victimization and bullying involvement as a perpetrator or a victim. Moral disengagement, pleasant emotions, and indifference are also significantly correlated to cyberbullying perpetration. However, the perception of support from friends and negative emotions are not significantly correlated (Table 1).

3.2. Differences according to involvement in cyberbullying perpetration

As shown in table 1, cyberbullies reported higher levels of bullying victimization, and perpetration, as well as cyberbullying victimization than non-involved students.


Larranaga et al 2018a-66326-en006.jpg

Moral disengagement is also significantly higher among cyberbullies. There is also a significant difference in perception of support from their friends, which is lower among cyberbullies. Regarding emotions, cyberbullies link their behavior with pleasant emotions. Cyberbullying perpetration is associated with fun, well-being, and satisfaction. They also feel indifference to a greater extent. On the contrary, there are no statistically significant differences between cyberbullies and uninvolved students in terms of unpleasant emotions (guilt, sadness, and discomfort).

3.3. Predictive value of the study variables

The regression analysis was performed to explain cyberbullying perpetration among youths. Gender and education cycle were included as control variables. The results obtained (table 2) confirm the predictive value of the variables analysed, which explain 21% of the cyberbullying perpetration.


Larranaga et al 2018a-66326-en007.jpg

More specifically, cyberbullying victimisation (ß=1,94), bullying perpetration (ß=1,10), moral disengagement (ß=1,19), perception of support from friends (ß=0,76) and satisfaction (ß=1,92) are statistically significant variables associated with cyberbullying perpetration. On the other hand, bullying victimisation, indifference, fun, well-being and unpleasant emotions are not significant. Likewise, gender and education cycle were not significant in any model.

4. Discussion and conclusions

The objective of the present study was to analyse the relationship between cognitive variables (moral disengagement), social context variables (perceived social support) and personal variables (involvement in bullying and emotions) and cyberbullying perpetration. Most studies have focused on analysing the situation of victims, but we believed it was also important to know what variables may be determining perpetration in cyberbullying. In sum, we wanted to analyse what social, cognitive and emotional variables lead some youth to engage in bullying behaviours outside the school through the digital technologies.

Research on the prevalence of cyberbullying has shown different prevalence rates, which frequently depends on the measures used (Romera & al., 2016; Zych, Ortega-Ruiz, & Marín-López, 2016). The results of this research show that 8.2% of male and 5.1% of female youth are cyberbullies. Such percentages are in line with previous research (Slonje & Smith, 2008; Giménez-Gualdo & al., 2015). According to previous studies (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012; Slonje & Smith, 2008), male youth are significantly more involved. However, there were no differences in involvement reported by the students according to their education cycle (Garaigordobil, 2015; Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012). Nevertheless, none of these two variables were included in the regression with a significant explanatory relevance on cyberbullying perpetration.

The correlational analysis confirms the existing relationship between bullying and cyberbullying behaviours. Such relationship had already been reported in previous studies (Cross & al., 2015; Herrea-López & al., 2017). Nevertheless, according to the regression analysis, only traditional bullying and cyberbullying victimisation are significant for cyberbullying perpetration. Therefore, H1 is partially supported.

Regarding social support, cyberbullies in this study were significantly less supported than non-perpetrators. Nevertheless, they felt encouraged if we take into account that they were above the theoretical mean. In line with prior studies on school bullying (Salmivalli, 2010), perpetrators are directly or indirectly supported by their classmates (for example, by seeing it as something fun and unimportant, even by encouraging them). Additionally, the new technologies may also become a new source of online support (Caravita, Gini, & Pozzoli, 2012). Nevertheless, according to Romera & al. (2016), the fact that cyberbullies feel supported does not imply that they are liked by their classmates. They may be popular and accepted by their classmates but for fear of being victimised, not due to a relationship of sympathy towards them.

Social support has proven itself to be a relevant variable in cyberbullying perpetration (H3). This result may have relevant implications for intervention in the classroom. Working together would be an option, trying to find the best way to provide social support to students so that they ignore perpetrators. We should prevent the problem of two-way social relationships, understood as those situations where it is believed that support leads to an increased probability that the youngster perpetrates cyberbullying. It could also be the case that the lack of support to the perpetrator may lead him/her to increase bullying against those classmates who ignore him/her. Intervention efforts could create protection conditions through peer groups and adults available and ready to support them. Interventions aimed at enhancing relationships among students and between teachers and students may also be a useful way to reduce the incidence of cyberbullying. Particularly, the teacher’s support intervention, combined with the assistance of classmates, invigorates the protective effect of social support and may reduce the support provided to cyberbullies without fear of being victimised. From this line of study, the objective of the intervention should focus on enhancing communication between education agents.

In line with prior research, cyberbullies justify violence (Calvete & al., 2010). Cyberbullies reported higher levels of moral disengagement (Bauman, 2010; Meter & Bauman, 2010), which is a relevant predictor of their behavior (H2). Nevertheless, moral disengagement towards cyberbullying is not related to guilt. Prior research had already reported that the distance between the perpetrator and the victim generated by cyberbullying could mitigate perpetrator’s guilt (Slonje & Smith, 2008) and dissociates responsibility for their actions (Almeida & al., 2008). These facts are used by some authors to explain the absence of any relationship between cyberbullying and moral disengagement in their research (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012). It should be noted that a moral disengagement scale specifically aimed at cyberbullying was applied (Bussey & al., 2015), and this may explain the results obtained.

Only satisfaction was significant in the regression analysis, which means that the study hypothesis (H4) was partially supported. This result should be interpreted with caution, as satisfaction may be derived –directly or indirectly– from support from peers. No significant differences were found in these variables between cyberbullies and participants not involved in cyberbullying. Caravita & al. (2012) already reported that bullies have a negative perception of their behavior; for this reason, they need to trigger the moral disengagement mechanism. It seems that this also happens to cyberbullies: there are no significant differences in terms of sorrow or unrest, nevertheless, they perpetrate the agression. It seems that they need to justify their behavior, which they see negatively, and trigger cognitive mechanisms of moral disengagement to feel good about themselves (Raskauskas & Stoltz, 2007). As a matter of fact, they feel indifference, fun, well-being or satisfaction for their behavior, which makes them repeat this aggressive behavior (Giménez-Gualdo & al., 2015). It is essential to attach vital importance to prevention and intervention programmes in order to break the aggression/fun nexus once and for all. Nevertheless, we cannot forget the impact of socialisation in the acquisition of social values; therefore, we should ask ourselves about the role played by violence in conflict resolution in our society. We believe that it is also important to attach a critical analysis of fun and satisfaction linked to aggression in such programmes, beginning with an analysis of many of the videogames played by youngsters in their free time that generate fun as a result of the aggressions they contain. However, adolescents state that fun lies in online conversations held as they are playing (Muros, Aragón, & Bustos, 2013). Pérez-Latorre (2012, 128) stated that “videogames always say interesting things about ourselves, about our world and our relationship with it”. Therefore, it would be interesting to analyse the existing relationship between playing video games with violent behaviors and involvement in cyberbullying.

This study has several limitations that should be addressed in future research. One important limitation is the cross-sectional design, as we cannot draw any conclusions on the direction of the effects. It would be necessary to conduct longitudinal studies to confirm the data obtained. As the sample is Spanish, it is obvious that it has certain cultural biases that cannot be present in other international studies and that are determining the results found. Self-reporting makes us cautious when making any generalisation related to the weight of variables when determining to cyberbulling. On the other hand, some studies have reported the existing link between social support and the emotional perception of fun in addition to the absence of guilt (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012), and moral disengagement (Caravita & al., 2012). Moral disengagement is in turn related to the emotional factors of bullying (Menessi & al., 2003) and to the absence of guilt in cyberbullying (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012). As we can see, these are complex relationships that should be further studied, and research about such interactions should be conducted using structural models. In last place, this study focuses on cyberbullies exclusively. Further research should analyse poly-aggressive students who perpetrate bullying and cyberbullying to harass their classmates, and the group of bully-victims.

Nevertheless, although this is an exploratory study, our results go in the direction of an interesting line of research that may establish an influence framework of socio-cognitive and emotional variables to determine cyberbullying, if such trends are confirmed in other studies. In line with previous research (Romera & al., 2016), the results obtained allow for the conclusion that the way peer groups manage their emotional and social lives may explain the situation of cyberbullying among adolescents. Future research should identify the specific factors responsible for aggression through the new technologies to manage and mitigate the impact of such aggressions.

In this sense, analysing the way students construe and manage cognitive, social and emotional information and the way it is regulated could be particularly interesting for intervention. Nevertheless, these components have not been sufficiently addressed so far (Della- Cioppa, O´Neil, & Craig, 2015). Preventive actions should focus on the permissive beliefs adolescents have towards aggression. The objective of this intervention should be trying to neutralise those cognitive and emotional aspects strengthening bullying that have been internalized or are in the process of development.

Despite the limitations indicated above, this is the first study that analyses the existing relationship between bullying, socio-cognitive and emotional variables, and more specifically, cyberbullying perpetration. We believe this study provides very significant facts on prediction of cyberbullying and may have very strong implications for intervention. In conclusion, perpetrating bullying against classmates in “real” space, face to face, being cyberbullied, feeling supported by friends, justifying aggressive behaviours through moral disengagement, combined with satisfaction for perpetrating aggression against peers explains a high proportion of aggressive behaviors in cyberspace.

Funding Agency

This research has been conducted within the Framework of the I+D+i Project called “Protection of Cyberbulling Victims: A Study of Family and Gender Variables” (PSI2015-70822-R), funded by the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness of the Government of Spain.

References

Almeida, A., Correia, I., Marinho, S., & Garcia, D. (2012). Virtual but not less real: A study of cyberbullying and its relations to moral disengagement and empathy. In Q. Li, D. Cross, & P.K. Smith (Eds.), Cyberbullying in the global playground: Research from international perspectives (pp. 223-244). Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Bandura, A. (1999). Moral disengagement in the perpetration of inhumanities. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 3(3), 193-209. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327957pspr0303_3

Bauman, S. (2010). Cyberbullying in a rural intermediate school: An exploratory study. Journal of Early Adolescence, 30, 803-833. https://doi.org/10.1177/0272431609350927

Boulton, M.J., & Underwood, K. (1992). Bully/victim problems among middle school children. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 62, 73-83.

Bronfenbrenner, U. (1977). Toward an experimental ecology of human development. American Psychologist, 32, 513-531. https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.32.7.513

Bussey, K., Fitzpatrick, S., & Raman, A. (2015). The role of moral disengagement and self-efficacy in cyberbullying. Journal of School Violence, 14(1), 30-46. https://doi.org/10.1080/15388220.2014.954045

Calvete, E., Orue, I., Estévez, A., Villardón, L., & Padilla, P. (2010). Cyberbullying in adolescents: Modalities and aggressors’ pro-file. Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 1128-1135. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2010.03.017

Caravita, S.C.S., Colombo, B., Stefanelli, S., & Zigliani, R. (2016). Emotional, psychophysiological and Behavioral responses elicited by the exposition to cyberbullying situations: Two experimental studies. Psicología Educativa, 21, 49-59. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pse.2016.02.003

Caravita, S.C.S., Gini, G., & Pozzoli, T. (2012). Main and moderated effects of moral cognition and status on bullying and defending. Aggressive Behavior, 38, 456-468. https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.21447

Cerezo, F., Sánchez, C., Ruiz, C., & Arense, J.J. (2015). Adolescents and preadolescents’ roles on bullying, and its relation with social climate and parenting styles. Psicodidáctica, 20, 139-155. https://doi.org/10.1387/RevPsicodidact.11097

Cross, D., Lester, L., & Barnes, A. (2015). A longitudinal study of the social and emotional predictors and consequences of cyber and traditional bullying victimization. International Journal of Public Health. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00038-015-0655-1

Della-Cioppa, V., O’Neil, A., & Craig, W. (2015). Learning from traditional bullying interventions: A review of research on cyberbullying and best practice. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 23, 61-68. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2015.05.009

Garaigordobil, M. (2011). Prevalence and consequences of cyberbullying: A review. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 11, 233-254.

Garaigordobil. M. (2015). Cyberbullying in adolescents and youth in the Basque Country: Changes with age. [Ciberbullying en adolescentes y jóvenes del País Vasco: Cambios con la edad]. Anales de Psicología, 31(3), 1069-1076. https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.31.3.179151

Giménez-Gualdo, A.M., Hunter, S.C., Durkin, K., Arnaiz, P., & Maquilón, J. (2015). The emotional impact of cyberbullying: Differences in perceptions and experiences as a function of role. Computers & Education, 82, 228-235. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2014.11.013

Gómez, A., & Vázquez, A. (2015). The power of ‘feeling one’ whit a group. Identity fusion and extreme pro-group behaviors. International Journal of Social Psychology, 30, 481-511. https://doi.org/10.1080/02134748.2015.1065089

González, M.T., & Landero, R. (2014). Psychometric properties of the Social Support From Parents and Friends Scale (AFA-R) in a student sample. [Propiedades psicométricas de la Escala de Apoyo Social Familiar y de Amigos (AFA-R) en una muestra de estudiantes]. Acta de Investigación Psicológica, 4(2), 1469-1480.

Hall, W.J. (2016). Initial development and validation of the Bullyharm: The bullying, harassment, and aggression receipt measure. Psychology in the Schools, 53(9). http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pits.21957

Herrera-López, M., Romera, E., & Ortega-Ruiz, R. (2017). Bullying and cyberbullying in Colombia; co-occurrence in adolescent schoolchildren. [Bullying y cyberbullying en Colombia; coocurrencia en adolescentes escolarizados]. Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología, 49(3), 163-172. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rlp.2016.08.001

Horner, S., Asher, Y., & Fireman, G.D. (2015). The impact and response to electronic bullying and traditional bullying among adolescents. Computers in Human Behavior, 49, 288-295. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2015.03.007

Menesini, E., Nocentinni, A., & Palladino, B.E. (2012). Empowering students against bullying and cyberbullying: Evaluation of an Italian peer-led model. International Journal of Conflict and Violence, 6(2), 313-320.

Menesini, E., Palladino, B.E., & Nocentini, A. (2015). Emotions of moral disengagement, class norms, and bullying in adolescence: A multilevel approach. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 61(1), 124-143. https://doi.org/10.13110/merrpalmquar1982.61.1.0124

Menesini, E., Sanchez, V., Fonzi, A., Ortega, R., Costabile, A., & Lo Feudo, G. (2003). Moral emotions and bullying: A cross-national comparison of differences between bullies, victims and outsiders. Aggressive Behavior, 29(6), 515-530. https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.10060

Meter, D.J., & Bauman, S. (2016). Moral disengagement about cyberbullying and parental monitoring: Effects on traditional bullying and victimization via cyberbullying involvement. Journal of Early Adolescence, 1-24. https://doi.org/10.1177/0272431616670752

Moore, P.M., Huebner, E.S., & Hills, K.J. (2012). Electronic bullying and victimization and life satisfaction in middle school students. Social Indicators Research, 107(3), 429-447. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11205-011-9856-z

Muros, B., Aragón, Y., & Bustos, A. (2013). Youth’s usage of leisure time with video games and Social Networks. [La ocupación del tiempo libre de jóvenes en el uso de videojuegos y redes]. Comunicar, 40, 31-39. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-03

Olthof, T., Goossens, F.A., Vermande, M.M., Aleva, E.A., & van-der-Meulen, M. (2011). Bullying as a strategic behavior: Relations with desired and acquired dominance in the peer group. Journal of School Psychology, 49, 339-359. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2011.03.003

Ortega, R., Calmaestra, J., & Mora-Merchán, J. (2008). Cyberbullying. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 8(2), 183-192.

Ortega, R., Elipe, P., Mora-Merchán, A., Calmaestra, J, & Vega, E. (2009). The emotional impact on victims of traditional bullying and cyberbullying. A study of Spanish adolescents. Journal of Psychology, 217(4), 197-204. https://doi.org/10.1027/0044-3409.217.4.197

Pérez-Latorre, O. (2012). From chess to StarCraft. A comparative analysis of traditional games and videogames. [Del ajedrez al StarCraft. Análisis comparativo de juegos tradicionales y videojuegos]. Comunicar, 38, 121-129. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-03-03

Perren, S., & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, E. (2012). Cyberbullying and traditional bullying in adolescence: Differential roles of moral disengagement, moral emotions, and moral values. European Journal of Developmental Psychology, 9, 195-209. https://doi.org/10.1080/17405629.2011.643168

Raskauskas, J., & Stoltz, A.D. (2007). Involvement in traditional and electronic bullying among adolescents. Developmental Psychology, 43(3), 564-575. https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.43.3.564

Romera, E., Cano, J.J., García-Fernández, C., & Ortega-Ruiz, R. (2016). Cyberbullying: Social competence, motivation and peer relationships. [Cyberbullying: competencia social, motivación y relaciones entre iguales]. Comunicar, 48, 71-79. https://doi.org/10.3916/C48-2016-07

Salmivalli, C. (2010). Bullying and the peer group: A review. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 15, 112-120. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2009.08.007

Slonje, R., & Smith, P.K. (2008). Cyberbullying: Another main type of bullying? Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 49, 147-154. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9450.2007.00611.x

Smith, P., Mahdavi, J., Carvalho, M., Fisher, S., Russell. S., & Tippett, N. (2008). Cyberbullying: Its nature and impact in secondary school pupils. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49(4), 376-385. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2007.01846.x

Sticca, F., Ruggieri, S., Alsaker, F., & Perren, S. (2013). Longitudinal risk factors for cyberbullying in adolescence. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 23, 52-67. https://doi.org/10.1002/casp.2136

Ttofi, M.M., & Farrington, D.P. (2011). Effectiveness of school-based programs to reduce bullying: A systematic and meta-analytic review. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 7(1), 27-56. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11292-010-9109-1

Twyman, K., Saylor, C., Taylor, L.A., & Comeaux, C. (2010). Comparing children and adolescents engaged in cyberbullying to matched peers. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 13(2), 195-199. https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2009.0137

Willians, K.R., & Guerra, N.G. (2007). Prevalence and predictors of internet bullying. Journal of Adolescence Health, 41(6 Suppl 1), 14-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2007.08.018

Zych, I., Ortega-Ruiz, R., & Marín-López, I. (2016). Cyberbullying: a systematic review of research, its prevalence and assessment issues in Spanish studies. Psicología Educativa 22(1), 5-18. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pse.2016.03.002



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Las investigaciones sobre los ciberagresores son escasas. El objetivo de esta investigación ha sido conocer las variables que predicen la agresión de ciberacoso. El presente estudio examinó la relación entre las variables socio-cognitivas y emocionales con la agresión de ciberacoso. Se examinó la desconexión moral hacia el ciberacoso. Se midió también el apoyo social y las emocionales con el objetivo de conocer su relación con la participación en el ciberacoso. Participaron en el estudio 1.062 adolescentes (54% chicas) con edades entre los 12 y 19 años (M=15,20; DT=1,91), de seis Institutos de Enseñanza Secundaria de Castilla-La Mancha (España). Los resultados muestran que los estudiantes que participan en la agresión tienen niveles más elevados de cibervictimización y acoso, en comparación con sus compañeros que no agreden a través de ciberacoso. Los resultados muestran que las variables socio-cognitivas y emocionales son relevantes para entender las diferencias individuales en la participación de ciberacoso. El resultado del análisis de regresión indicó que la ciberagresión estaba positivamente asociada con la cibervictimización, la agresión cara a cara, la desconexión moral hacia el ciberacoso, el apoyo social y la satisfacción por su comportamiento. En contraste, no se asoció con emociones negativas. El género y la edad no desempeñaron un papel significativo para la predicción de la ciberagresión. Por ello, investigaciones futuras deben continuar examinando los factores predictivos asociados a la agresión del ciberacoso.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

Durante la última década hemos asistido a las noticias sobre numerosos episodios de acoso, humillación y violencia protagonizados por escolares haciendo uso de las nuevas tecnologías de la comunicación (Smith, Mahdavi, Carvalho, Fisher, Russell, & Tippett, 2008). Extendiendo la definición del acoso tradicional, el ciberacoso ha sido definido como una conducta agresiva entre escolares realizada de forma repetida a través de medios electrónicos por un grupo o un individuo sobre una víctima que no puede defenderse fácilmente por sí misma (Smith & al., 2008).

Los índices de ciberagresión son inferiores a la agresión tradicional (Herrera-López, Romera, & Ortega-Ruiz, 2017; Raskauskas & Stoltz, 2007). Slonje y Smith (2008) informaron de una prevalencia de la cibervictimización de 5,3%, el 2,8% de forma frecuente. En España, Giménez-Gualdo, Hunter, Durkin, Arnaiz y Maquilón (2015) aportan datos similares, en una muestra de 1.353 adolescentes, un 8% informó de experiencias de ciberacoso. Respecto al sexo, los resultados son inconsistentes (Garaigordobil, 2011). En unos estudios, los chicos muestran mayor implicación (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012; Slonje & Smith, 2008); en otros casos, son las chicas las que informan de mayor incidencia de victimización (Giménez-Gualdo & al., 2015; Ortega, Calmaestra, & Mora-Merchán, 2008; Ortega, Elipe, Mora-Merchán, Calmaestra, & Vega, 2009), y en otros, no aparecen diferencias de género (Giménez-Gualdo & al., 2015; Smith & al., 2008). En cuanto a la edad, unas investigaciones informan que el ciberacoso se incrementa con la edad (Ortega & al., 2008), otros que disminuye el número de implicados (Moore, Huebner, & Hills, 2012), en otros se informa de una relación curvilínea con un aumento en los grados medios del periodo de Secundaria (Calvete, Orue, Estévez, Villardón, & Padilla, 2010; Ortega & al., 2009), e incluso, otros informan que no se producen diferencias (Garaigordobil, 2015; Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012).

Los programas de intervención contra el acoso han obtenido buenos resultados en la reducción de la victimización, no así en la agresión (Ttofi & Farrington, 2011). Desde la perspectiva de la Psicología de los Grupos, es imprescindible entender al adversario para resolver un conflicto (Gómez & Vázquez, 2015). En la misma línea, para predecir el ciberacoso, y poder actuar desde medidas preventivas, sería necesario tener en cuenta variables personales y del contexto social de los adolescentes que llevan a cabo los comportamientos de ciberacoso. La mayoría de los estudios se han realizado desde la perspectiva de las víctimas, pocos estudios se han centrado en analizar a los ciberagresores. Por ello, consideramos que la relevancia de este trabajo consiste en centrarse específicamente en los agresores del ciberacoso.

1.1. El rol del agresor

Investigaciones previas han indicado una elevada relación entre los roles de agresor y de víctima en el ciberacoso (Meter & Bauman, 2016). Por otra parte, los estudios que han investigado conjuntamente el acoso cara a cara y el ciberacoso han encontrado correlación en la participación entre las dos formas de agresión. Los resultados de muchos estudios sugieren la coexistencia de ambos fenómenos (Cross, Lester, & Barnes, 2015; Herrera-López & al., 2017). En estudios longitudinales, se ha comprobado que participar en comportamientos de acoso actúa como predictor de estar posteriormente implicado en ciberacoso (Cross & al., 2015; Sticca, Ruggieri, Alsaker, & Perren, 2013). De manera que los ciberagresores tienden a agredir a sus iguales también en persona (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012). Así, los alumnos que son agresores de la manera tradicional también pueden serlo mediante las TIC (Smith & al., 2008). Además, ocurre que las víctimas, pueden ser a su vez acosadores cibernéticos (Smith & al., 2008). Sin embargo, otros estudios no apoyan totalmente estos datos (Raskauskas & Stoltz, 2007; Slonje & Smith, 2008).

El modelo ecológico del acoso, adaptado del Modelo de Bronfenbrenner (1977), indica que tanto los factores individuales como los sociales actúan como variables de riesgo y protección. En efecto, las relaciones con los iguales pueden constituirse en factor de riesgo en la implicación de interacciones negativas (Menesini, Nocentinni, & Palla­dino, 2012). Por ello, la agresión también puede ser reforzada por las dinámicas de grupo (Olthof, Goossens, Ver­mande, Aleva, & van-der-Meulen, 2011). Algunas investigaciones afirman que los alumnos agresores no tienen apoyo social (Calvete & al., 2010), situación especialmente relevante en el grupo de victimización-agresión (Ce­rezo, Sánchez, Ruiz, & Arense, 2015). Sin embargo, Twyman, Saylor, Taylor y Comeaux (2010) apuntan que disponer de un grupo de amigos también puede favorecer el ciberacoso. Olthof y otros (2011) indicaron que los estudiantes que empleaban el acoso para mantener su posición en el grupo eran considerados socialmente populares y contaban con el apoyo de este.

La Teoría Cognitiva Social de Bandura (1999) identifica la desconexión moral como un proceso cognitivo, a través del cual las personas justifican su comportamiento agresivo, o distorsionan las consecuencias que puede tener en otras personas. En un estudio longitudinal, Williams y Guerra (2007) identificaron que los estudiantes que mostraban aceptación de las creencias normativas hacia el acoso estaban más implicados en estos comportamientos, resultando un predictor positivamente relacionado también con el ciberacoso. La relación con el ciberacoso también se ha confirmado en otros estudios (Almeida, Correia, Marinho, & Garcia, 2012; Bauman, 2010; Meter & Bauman, 2016). Aunque otros estudios no han encontrado tal vinculación. Perren y Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger (2012) informaron que la desconexión moral era solamente significativa en la predicción para el acoso tradicional.

Junto a la desconexión moral, las investigaciones se centran en el estudio de las reacciones emocionales como posibles indicadores de la motivación moral y personal del comportamiento agresivo (Menesini, Palladino, & No­centini, 2015). La asociación de bajos niveles de culpabilidad y de pena pueden legitimar los comportamientos negativos (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012). Si los agresores experimentan orgullo por su comportamiento o indiferencia, estas emociones, a su vez, contribuyen al incremento de la desconexión moral (Menesini, Sanchez, Fonzi, Ortega, Costabile, & Feu­do, 2003). De manera similar, Menesini y otros (2015) señalaron que la ausencia de emociones ante sus víctimas y las emociones positivas experimentadas por los agresores les proporcionan retroalimentación positiva que refuerza su comportamiento de acoso. Boulton y Underwood (1992) apuntaron que las víctimas de acoso escolar pensaban que los agresores se sentían bien y felices con su comportamiento.

Teniendo en cuenta los datos contradictorios de las diversas investigaciones sobre las variables vinculadas con la ciberagresión, se evidencia la ne­cesidad de continuar la investigación en esta dirección. Conocer las variables que pueden predecir la continuación del acoso cara a cara a través de las nuevas tecnologías podría suponer un importante avance para su prevención e intervención.

Dada la relevancia de las variables sociocognitivas y emocionales en la agresión, y la inexistencia de investigaciones que las estudien conjuntamente en los agresores de ciberacoso, el objetivo de esta investigación es analizar conjuntamente la vinculación de la cognición (desconexión moral), de la variable social de apoyo y de las variables personales (implicación en el acoso y emociones) sobre la ciberagresión.

Los objetivos del presente trabajo han sido precisar las relaciones entre las variables analizadas previamente y la agresión del acoso a través de las nuevas tecnologías. Así, estudiaremos la correlación de la ciberagresión con la implicación en el acoso y la victimización en el ciberacoso, el apoyo social percibido por los agresores, la desconexión social y las emociones vinculadas con su comportamiento. Posteriormente determinaremos el valor predictivo de las variables de estudio sobre la ciberagresión.

Debido a la inconsistencia de los resultados de las investigaciones previas, no realizamos ninguna hipótesis previa sobre la influencia del género y la edad, la pregunta de la investigación es: ¿influirá el sexo y la edad en la ciberagresión? Respecto al acoso, esperamos que la implicación en el mismo y la cibervictimización resulten significativas para la predicción del ciberacoso (H1).

La desconexión moral estará positivamente relacionada con la agresión on line (H2). Respecto al contexto social, esperamos que los ciberagresores se sientan apoyados por sus iguales (H3). Basándonos en la literatura previa, es deseable que los ciberagresores no se perciban culpables y muestren emociones placenteras con su comportamiento (H4).

2. Material y métodos

2.1. Participantes

La muestra fue incidental y estuvo formada por 1.062 estudiantes de Educación Secundaria, Ciclos Formativos y Bachillerato; el 46% eran hombres y el 54% mujeres, con edades entre los 12 y 19 años (M=15,20, DT=1,91). El 47,8% del alumnado pertenecía al primer ciclo (n=508), un 35,4% cursaban segundo ciclo (n=376) y un 16,8% cursaban Bachillerato (n=178). Han participado seis Institutos de Enseñanza Secundaria públicos de la región de Castilla-La Mancha, dos de entorno rural y cuatro ubicados en la capital de provincia. El 91% han nacido en España. De los alumnos inmigrantes, más del 50% provienen de países del este (n=52), la mayoría de Rumanía, un 17% son de origen latinoamericano.

2.2. Instrumentos

Para medir el acoso y el ciberacoso se utilizó el Bullyharm (Hall, 2016). Está compuesto por 14 ítems en cada escala, de agresión y de victimización, de tipo Likert con cuatro opciones de respuesta desde 0 a 3, 0=no me ha ocurrido, 1=me ha ocurrido 1 o 2 veces, 2=me ha ocurrido al menos una vez a la semana y 3=me ha ocurrido 2 o más veces a la semana. Se solicitaba a los alumnos que evaluaran la frecuencia de participación en los comportamientos durante el último mes. La consistencia interna de la prueba es óptima, en acoso tradicional para agresión a=,81 y a=,86 para victimización, para la medida de ciberacoso, a=,79 para victimización y a=,64 para agresión.

El apoyo social fue evaluado mediante la subescala de apoyo social percibido de los amigos de la escala AFA-R (González & Landero, 2014). Consta de siete ítems tipo Likert con cinco opciones de respuesta desde 1 a 5, siendo 1=nunca, 2=pocas veces, 3=a veces, 4=muchas veces, 5=siempre. La consistencia de la subescala fue elevada, a=,88.

Se aplicó el cuestionario de desconexión moral hacia el ciberacoso de Bussey, Fitzpatrick y Raman (2015). Está constituido por ocho ítems de desconexión moral específicos hacia los comportamientos de ciberacoso, tipo Likert con cinco anclajes: 1=muy en desacuerdo, 2=en desacuerdo, 3=no estoy seguro/a, 4=de acuerdo, 5=muy de acuerdo. La consistencia de la escala fue adecuada, a=,68.

Para evaluar el componente emocional de los ciberagresores se construyó una escala siguiendo la estructura de estudios anteriores (Giménez-Gualdo & al., 2015; Ortega & al., 2009). Los alumnos tenían que identificar la intensidad emocional de cada una de las emociones propuestas según su experiencia en el acoso. Se midió con una escala tipo Likert de cinco puntos desde 1=nada a 5=mucho. Siguiendo la revisión teórica realizada, se ha incluido la culpa (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012), que ya había sido considerada previamente por Ortega y otros (2009) y Caravita, Colombo, Stefanelli y Zigliani (2016), y la tristeza, que aparece en casi todos los estudios sobre el componente emocional del acoso. Atendiendo a los resultados de Menesini y otros (2015) se incluyó la ausencia de emociones (no sentir nada) y emociones positivas. En las investigaciones previas no se encontró la evaluación de emociones positivas; por ello, se consideró más conveniente incluir los antónimos de las emociones negativas. Así, fueron seleccionadas diversión frente a tristeza, y satisfacción versus culpa. Boulton y Underwood (1992) informaron que los acosadores se sentían bien, incluimos también el atributo de bienestar y, en su vertiente negativa, malestar. El malestar había sido ya empleado por Ortega y otros (2009) y Horner, Asher y Fireman (2015). Previamente a su empleo en la investigación se realizó un estudio piloto para valorar la comprensión en los adolescentes de los términos propuestos, no se detectó ningún problema. Las emociones placenteras alcanzaron una fiabilidad de a=,68 y las emociones displacenteras una fiabilidad de a=,86.

2.3. Diseño

El diseño de la investigación fue transversal, ex post facto retrospectivo de múltiples medidas.

2.4. Procedimiento

Atendiendo a las consideraciones éticas, en primer lugar, se procedió a obtener el consentimiento informado de los padres de los menores. No respondieron el 1,5% de las familias, sus hijos no participaron en el estudio.

El cuestionario fue pasado en las aulas previo acuerdo con los directores de los centros y los profesores. Se explicó a los estudiantes el objetivo del estudio y se informó sobre la voluntariedad de su participación y el anonimato de sus respuestas. El tiempo medio aproximado de cumplimentación de la batería fue de 20 minutos.

2.5. Análisis de datos

Para establecer los roles de víctima y de agresor se consideraron los estudiantes con respuestas iguales o superiores a 1 (me ha ocurrido 1 o 2 veces, en el último mes). Establecidos los grupos de contraste, se realizó un análisis de correlación de Pearson para determinar las relaciones entre la ciberagresión y las variables de estudio, y una prueba t de Student para comprobar la existencia de diferencias en estas variables entre los ciberagresores y los estudiantes que no emplean Internet para acosar a sus compañeros. Por último, se realizó un análisis de regresión logística para analizar el valor predictivo de las variables de estudio. Se aplicó un análisis por pasos, incluyendo el sexo y el ciclo formativo como variables de control. En el primer modelo se incluyeron las variables de acoso, la variable cognitiva de desconexión moral en el segundo paso, posteriormente la variable del contexto social de percepción de apoyo de sus compañeros, y en último lugar, fueron incluidas las emociones. Todos los análisis se realizaron con el paquete estadístico SPSS (versión 23) a un nivel de significatividad de ,05.

3. Resultados

Un 8,2% de los chicos y un 5,1% de las chicas (?2=4,23, p<,05) realizan comportamientos de agresión a través de las nuevas tecnologías. Respecto al ciclo que están cursando, los estudiantes de primer ciclo (1º y 2º curso) informan de un 6,3% que son ciberagresores, en segundo ciclo (3º y 4º curso) se ha encontrado un 7,2% de estudiantes agresores de ciberacoso, en Bachillerato son un 5,6% (?2=0,55, p=,760).

3.1. Relación entre las variables de estudio

El análisis de la correlación de Pearson muestra que existen correlaciones estadísticamente significativas entre la agresión de ciberacoso, la victimización de ciberacoso y la implicación en el acoso, tanto agresor como víctima. La desconexión moral, las emociones placenteras y la indiferencia también correlacionan significativamente con la agresión en ciberacoso. No así la percepción de apoyo de los amigos ni las emociones negativas (Tabla 1).

3.2. Diferencias según la implicación en la ciberagresión

También se observa en la Tabla 1 que existen diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre los ciberagresores y los estudiantes que no agreden on line, en la victimización de acoso, la agresión de acoso y la cibervictimización, siendo en todos los casos superior la implicación de los agresores de ciberacoso.

La desconexión moral es significativamente más elevada en los ciberagresores. También se produce diferencia significativa en la percepción de apoyo de los amigos, siendo inferior en los ciberagresores. Respecto a las emociones, los agresores de ciberacoso relacionan su experiencia con emociones placenteras, les resulta divertido, obtienen bienestar y se encuentran satisfechos, también indican en mayor medida indiferencia. Por el contrario, no existen diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre los agresores de ciberacoso y los estudiantes que no agreden a través de nuevas tecnologías en las emociones displacenteras (culpa, tristeza y malestar).

3.3. Valor predictivo de las variables de estudio

El análisis de regresión se realizó con objeto de explicar el comportamiento agresivo a través de nuevas tecnologías en los jóvenes. Se incluyeron el sexo y el ciclo formativo como variables de control. Los resultados obtenidos (Tabla 2) confirman el valor predictivo de las variables de análisis, conjuntamente explican el 21% de la ciberagresión.

De forma específica, se constata que la victimización online (ß=1,94), la agresión de acoso (ß=1,10), la desconexión moral (ß=1,19), la percepción de apoyo de los amigos (ß=0,76) y la satisfacción (ß=1,92), son algunas de las variables explicativas estadísticamente significativas. No siendo significativa la victimización de acoso, la indiferencia, la diversión, el bienestar ni las variables emocionales displacenteras. El sexo y el ciclo de estudio tampoco entraron en ningún modelo.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

La finalidad de esta investigación fue analizar conjuntamente la vinculación de la cognición (desconexión moral), de la variable social de apoyo y de las variables personales (implicación en el acoso y emociones) sobre la ciberagresión. La mayoría de los estudios se han centrado en el análisis de la situación de las víctimas, pero consideramos relevante conocer también qué variables pueden estar determinando la agresión en el ciberacoso. Quere­mos analizar qué variables sociales, cognitivas y emocionales pueden llevar a algunos adolescentes a trasladar el acoso fuera de las aulas, a través de las nuevas tecnologías.


Larranaga et al 2018a-66326 ov-es006.jpg

Las investigaciones sobre la prevalencia del ciberacoso han mostrado diferentes porcentajes de participación, dependiendo en muchos casos de la medición realizada (Romera & al., 2016; Zych, Ortega-Ruiz, & Marín-López, 2016). Los resultados de esta investigación muestran que un 8,2% de los chicos y un 5,1% de las chicas son ciberag­resores. Porcentajes que se encuentran en la línea de investigaciones previas (Slonje & Smith, 2008; Giménez-Gualdo & al., 2015). Con más implicación, estadísticamente significativa, de los chicos en la agresión de ciberacoso, como afirman estudios previos (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012; Slonje & Smith, 2008), pero sin diferencias entre las agresiones que informan los estudiantes atendiendo al ciclo que están cursando (Garaigordobil, 2015; Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012). Sin embargo, ninguna de estas dos variables ha entrado en la regresión con peso explicativo significativo sobre la ciberagresión.


Larranaga et al 2018a-66326 ov-es007.jpg

El análisis correlacional confirma la relación entre los comportamientos de acoso y de ciberacoso. Relación que ya había sido informada en múltiples estudios (Cross & al., 2015; Herrea-López & al., 2017). Sin embargo, en el análisis de regresión solamente ha resultado significativa para la ciberagresión la agresión de acoso tradicional y la cibervictimización. Por tanto, hay apoyo parcial de la H1.

Respecto al apoyo social, los estudiantes ciberagresores de este estudio se situaban significativamente por debajo de los no agresores. Aunque sí se percibían apoyados si consideramos que se situaban por encima de la media teórica. Consistentemente con estudios previos sobre el acoso escolar (Salmivalli, 2010), los estudiantes agresores en las aulas reciben apoyo de sus compañeros, indirecta o directamente (por ejemplo, mostrando que es un hecho divertido o sin importancia, incluso apoyándoles). Además, las nuevas tecnologías también puede ser otra fuente de recibir apoyo online (Caravita, Gini, & Pozzoli, 2012). Aunque, como indican Romera y otros (2016), que los ciberagresores se sientan apoyados no significa que sean queridos. Pueden obtener popularidad y aceptación de sus compañeros, pero más por miedo a ser ellos mismos victimizados que por una relación de simpatía hacia ellos.

El apoyo social se ha mostrado como una variable relevante en la agresión del ciberacoso (H3). Este resultado puede tener implicaciones relevantes para la intervención en las aulas. Una alternativa sería trabajar conjuntamente, intentando encontrar el mejor camino para proporcionar apoyo social a los alumnos que ignoren a los agresores. Debemos evitar el posible problema de bidireccionalidad de las relaciones sociales; nos referimos a la situación por la cual, aunque se considere que el apoyo conduce a mayor probabilidad de ciberagresión del adolescente, también podría ocurrir que la falta de apoyo del agresor conduzca a una mayor agresión en los comportamientos de acoso hacia los compañeros que les ignoran. La intervención podría consistir en crear condiciones de protección, a través de grupos de pertenencia de iguales y adultos disponibles y atentos para apoyarlos. Las intervenciones dirigidas a mejorar las relaciones entre alumnos y entre profesores y alumnos, pueden ser un medio útil para reducir la incidencia del ciberacoso. Principalmente, teniendo en cuenta que la intervención de apoyo del profesor, conjuntamente con los compañeros, potencia la acción protectora del apoyo social y podría reducir el apoyo proporcionado a los ciberagresores, sin miedo a poder ser victimizado. El objetivo de la intervención desde esta línea de estudio se debe centrar en mejorar la comunicación entre los distintos agentes educativos.

En consonancia con investigaciones previas, los ciberagresores justifican su violencia (Calvete & al., 2010). Los alumnos agresores de ciberacoso han presentado niveles más elevados de desconexión moral (Bauman, 2010; Meter & Bauman, 2010), siendo un relevante predictor de su comportamiento (H2). Sin embargo, la desconexión moral hacia el ciberacoso no se relaciona con la culpa. Investigaciones anteriores ya habían indicado que la distancia con la víctima que genera el acoso online podría mitigar la culpabilidad del agresor (Slonje & Smith, 2008) y disociar la responsabilidad de sus actos (Almeida & al., 2008). Lo que ha llevado a algunos autores a explicar la ausencia de relación encontrada en su investigación entre el ciberacoso y la desconexión moral (Perren & Gutzwiller-Hel­fenfinger, 2012). Debemos indicar, que en este estudio fue aplicada una escala de desconexión moral dirigida específicamente hacia el ciberacoso (Bussey & al., 2015) y que podría explicar los resultados obtenidos.

Solamente la satisfacción ha entrado significativamente en la regresión, lo que implica una confirmación parcial de la hipótesis de estudio (H4). Debemos tomar los resultados con precaución, ya que la satisfacción también podría derivarse, directa e indirectamente, del apoyo que perciben de los iguales. No se han encontrado diferencias significativas en estas variables entre los agresores de ciberacoso y los no implicados en la agresión online. Caravita y otros (2012) ya indicaron que los agresores de acoso evaluaban negativamente su comportamiento y, por ello, precisaban activar el mecanismo de desconexión moral. Parece que lo mismo les acontece a los ciberagresores, no se encuentran diferencias significativas en tristeza y malestar, sin embargo llevan a cabo la agresión. Parece que necesitan justificar su comportamiento, que reconocen negativo, y activar los mecanismos cognitivos de desconexión moral para sentirse bien consigo mismos (Raskauskas & Stoltz, 2007). De hecho, sienten indiferencia, o diversión, bienestar y satisfacción por su comportamiento. Lo que motiva la repetición del comportamiento agresivo (Giménez-Gualdo & al., 2015). Es imprescindible incidir en los programas de prevención e intervención para romper definitivamente el binomio agresión/diversión. No obstante, no podemos olvidar la influencia de la socialización en la adquisición de los valores sociales, deberíamos cuestionar a nuestra sociedad qué papel ocupa la violencia en la resolución de conflictos. Creemos que es también necesario insertar en los programas el análisis crítico de la diversión y la satisfacción vinculada a la agresión, empezando con el análisis de muchos de los videojuegos que están en manos de los jóvenes en su tiempo de ocio y que les genera diversión la agresión que conllevan. Aunque los adolescentes afirman que la diversión se encuentra en los diálogos online que llevan a cabo paralelamente al juego (Mu­ros, Aragón, & Bustos, 2013). Pérez-Latorre (2012, 128) afirmó que «los juegos siempre nos están diciendo cosas interesantes sobre nosotros mismos, sobre nuestro mundo y nuestras relaciones con el mismo». Podría ser de interés analizar la relación entre el empleo de videojuegos que representan comportamientos violentos y la implicación en la ciberagresión.

Este estudio tiene varias limitaciones que tendrán que abordarse en futuras investigaciones. Una limitación importante es el diseño transversal, por lo que no podemos realizar conclusiones acerca de la dirección de los efectos. Sería necesario realizar estudios longitudinales, que permitieran la confirmación de los datos obtenidos. Al tratarse de una muestra española, es evidente que presenta sesgos culturales que pueden no estar presentes en otros estudios internacionales y que estén determinando los resultados hallados. El empleo de autoinforme nos obliga a ser cautelosos al hacer cualquier generalización en relación al peso de las variables en la determinación del ciberacoso. Por otra parte, diversos estudios han señalado la vinculación del apoyo social con la percepción emocional de diversión y la ausencia de culpabilidad (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012), y con la desconexión moral (Ca­ravita & al., 2012). A su vez, la desconexión moral se relaciona con los factores emocionales en el acoso (Mene­ssi & al., 2003), y con la ausencia de culpabilidad en el ciberacoso (Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012). Como podemos observar, se trata de relaciones complejas en las que es preciso profundizar y llevar a cabo otros estudios en los que se tenga en cuenta estas interacciones a través de modelos estructurales. Por último, el estudio se centra exclusivamente en los ciberagresores, futuras investigaciones podrían dirigirse a analizar la relación en los estudiantes poliagresores, que emplean ambas formas de acosar a sus compañeros, y al grupo de víctimas-agresores.

Sin embargo, a pesar de ser un estudio exploratorio, nuestros resultados apuntan a una interesante línea de in­vestigación que podría, si estas tendencias se confirman en otros estudios, establecer un marco de la influencia de las variables sociocognitivas y emocionales en la determinación de la ciberagresión. En la misma dirección que otras investigaciones (Romera & al., 2016), los resultados obtenidos permiten concluir que la forma en que el grupo de iguales gestiona su vida emocional y social puede estar explicando la situación de ciberacoso entre los adolescentes. Las futuras investigaciones deben identificar los factores específicos responsables de la agresión a través de nuevas tecnologías para poder gestionar y minimizar el impacto de estas agresiones.

En este sentido, el análisis de la forma en que los estudiantes interpretan y gestionan la información cognitiva, social y emocional, así como su regulación, podría ser particularmente interesante para la intervención. Sin embargo, estos componentes no han sido tenidos suficientemente en cuenta hasta ahora (Della-Cioppa, ONeil, & Craig, 2015). Las actuaciones preventivas han de centrarse en las creencias permisivas de la agresión presentes en los adolescentes. El objetivo de esta intervención debe ser intentar neutralizar los aspectos cognitivos y emocionales que refuerzan el acoso entre iguales que ya hayan sido interiorizados y/o que se encuentren en proceso de desarrollo.

A pesar de las limitaciones mencionadas, es el primer trabajo que ha estudiado conjuntamente la relación entre el acoso, las variables socio-cognitivas y emocionales, específicamente, con la agresión en el ciberacoso. Creemos que este trabajo aporta datos muy sugerentes sobre la predicción de la ciberagresión que pueden tener importantes implicaciones para la intervención. En conclusión, ser agresor de los compañeros en el espacio real cara a cara, recibir acoso a través de las nuevas tecnologías, sentirse apoyado por los amigos, justificar su comportamiento agresivo a través de la desconexión moral, unido a la satisfacción por agredir a sus iguales explica un porcentaje elevado de los comportamientos agresivos a través del ciberespacio.

Apoyos

Esta investigación se ha elaborado en el marco del Proyecto de Investigación I+D+i «La protección de las víctimas del cyberbullying: un estudio de las variables familiares y de género» (PSI2015-70822-R), subvencionado por el Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad del Gobierno de España.

Referencias

Almeida, A., Correia, I., Marinho, S., & Garcia, D. (2012). Virtual but not less real: A study of cyberbullying and its relations to moral disengagement and empathy. In Q. Li, D. Cross, & P.K. Smith (Eds.), Cyberbullying in the global playground: Research from international perspectives (pp. 223-244). Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

Bandura, A. (1999). Moral disengagement in the perpetration of inhumanities. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 3(3), 193-209. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327957pspr0303_3

Bauman, S. (2010). Cyberbullying in a rural intermediate school: An exploratory study. Journal of Early Adolescence, 30, 803-833. https://doi.org/10.1177/0272431609350927

Boulton, M.J., & Underwood, K. (1992). Bully/victim problems among middle school children. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 62, 73-83.

Bronfenbrenner, U. (1977). Toward an experimental ecology of human development. American Psychologist, 32, 513-531. https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.32.7.513

Bussey, K., Fitzpatrick, S., & Raman, A. (2015). The role of moral disengagement and self-efficacy in cyberbullying. Journal of School Violence, 14(1), 30-46. https://doi.org/10.1080/15388220.2014.954045

Calvete, E., Orue, I., Estévez, A., Villardón, L., & Padilla, P. (2010). Cyberbullying in adolescents: Modalities and aggressors’ pro-file. Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 1128-1135. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2010.03.017

Caravita, S.C.S., Colombo, B., Stefanelli, S., & Zigliani, R. (2016). Emotional, psychophysiological and Behavioral responses elicited by the exposition to cyberbullying situations: Two experimental studies. Psicología Educativa, 21, 49-59. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pse.2016.02.003

Caravita, S.C.S., Gini, G., & Pozzoli, T. (2012). Main and moderated effects of moral cognition and status on bullying and defending. Aggressive Behavior, 38, 456-468. https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.21447

Cerezo, F., Sánchez, C., Ruiz, C., & Arense, J.J. (2015). Adolescents and preadolescents’ roles on bullying, and its relation with social climate and parenting styles. Psicodidáctica, 20, 139-155. https://doi.org/10.1387/RevPsicodidact.11097

Cross, D., Lester, L., & Barnes, A. (2015). A longitudinal study of the social and emotional predictors and consequences of cyber and traditional bullying victimization. International Journal of Public Health. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00038-015-0655-1

Della-Cioppa, V., O’Neil, A., & Craig, W. (2015). Learning from traditional bullying interventions: A review of research on cyberbullying and best practice. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 23, 61-68. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2015.05.009

Garaigordobil, M. (2011). Prevalence and consequences of cyberbullying: A review. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 11, 233-254.

Garaigordobil. M. (2015). Cyberbullying in adolescents and youth in the Basque Country: Changes with age. [Ciberbullying en adolescentes y jóvenes del País Vasco: Cambios con la edad]. Anales de Psicología, 31(3), 1069-1076. https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.31.3.179151

Giménez-Gualdo, A.M., Hunter, S.C., Durkin, K., Arnaiz, P., & Maquilón, J. (2015). The emotional impact of cyberbullying: Differences in perceptions and experiences as a function of role. Computers & Education, 82, 228-235. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2014.11.013

Gómez, A., & Vázquez, A. (2015). The power of ‘feeling one’ whit a group. Identity fusion and extreme pro-group behaviors. International Journal of Social Psychology, 30, 481-511. https://doi.org/10.1080/02134748.2015.1065089

González, M.T., & Landero, R. (2014). Psychometric properties of the Social Support From Parents and Friends Scale (AFA-R) in a student sample. [Propiedades psicométricas de la Escala de Apoyo Social Familiar y de Amigos (AFA-R) en una muestra de estudiantes]. Acta de Investigación Psicológica, 4(2), 1469-1480.

Hall, W.J. (2016). Initial development and validation of the Bullyharm: The bullying, harassment, and aggression receipt measure. Psychology in the Schools, 53(9). http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pits.21957

Herrera-López, M., Romera, E., & Ortega-Ruiz, R. (2017). Bullying and cyberbullying in Colombia; co-occurrence in adolescent schoolchildren. [Bullying y cyberbullying en Colombia; coocurrencia en adolescentes escolarizados]. Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología, 49(3), 163-172. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rlp.2016.08.001

Horner, S., Asher, Y., & Fireman, G.D. (2015). The impact and response to electronic bullying and traditional bullying among adolescents. Computers in Human Behavior, 49, 288-295. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2015.03.007

Menesini, E., Nocentinni, A., & Palladino, B.E. (2012). Empowering students against bullying and cyberbullying: Evaluation of an Italian peer-led model. International Journal of Conflict and Violence, 6(2), 313-320.

Menesini, E., Palladino, B.E., & Nocentini, A. (2015). Emotions of moral disengagement, class norms, and bullying in adolescence: A multilevel approach. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 61(1), 124-143. https://doi.org/10.13110/merrpalmquar1982.61.1.0124

Menesini, E., Sanchez, V., Fonzi, A., Ortega, R., Costabile, A., & Lo Feudo, G. (2003). Moral emotions and bullying: A cross-national comparison of differences between bullies, victims and outsiders. Aggressive Behavior, 29(6), 515-530. https://doi.org/10.1002/ab.10060

Meter, D.J., & Bauman, S. (2016). Moral disengagement about cyberbullying and parental monitoring: Effects on traditional bullying and victimization via cyberbullying involvement. Journal of Early Adolescence, 1-24. https://doi.org/10.1177/0272431616670752

Moore, P.M., Huebner, E.S., & Hills, K.J. (2012). Electronic bullying and victimization and life satisfaction in middle school students. Social Indicators Research, 107(3), 429-447. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11205-011-9856-z

Muros, B., Aragón, Y., & Bustos, A. (2013). Youth’s usage of leisure time with video games and Social Networks. [La ocupación del tiempo libre de jóvenes en el uso de videojuegos y redes]. Comunicar, 40, 31-39. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-03

Olthof, T., Goossens, F.A., Vermande, M.M., Aleva, E.A., & van-der-Meulen, M. (2011). Bullying as a strategic behavior: Relations with desired and acquired dominance in the peer group. Journal of School Psychology, 49, 339-359. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2011.03.003

Ortega, R., Calmaestra, J., & Mora-Merchán, J. (2008). Cyberbullying. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 8(2), 183-192.

Ortega, R., Elipe, P., Mora-Merchán, A., Calmaestra, J, & Vega, E. (2009). The emotional impact on victims of traditional bullying and cyberbullying. A study of Spanish adolescents. Journal of Psychology, 217(4), 197-204. https://doi.org/10.1027/0044-3409.217.4.197

Pérez-Latorre, O. (2012). From chess to StarCraft. A comparative analysis of traditional games and videogames. [Del ajedrez al StarCraft. Análisis comparativo de juegos tradicionales y videojuegos]. Comunicar, 38, 121-129. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-03-03

Perren, S., & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, E. (2012). Cyberbullying and traditional bullying in adolescence: Differential roles of moral disengagement, moral emotions, and moral values. European Journal of Developmental Psychology, 9, 195-209. https://doi.org/10.1080/17405629.2011.643168

Raskauskas, J., & Stoltz, A.D. (2007). Involvement in traditional and electronic bullying among adolescents. Developmental Psychology, 43(3), 564-575. https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.43.3.564

Romera, E., Cano, J.J., García-Fernández, C., & Ortega-Ruiz, R. (2016). Cyberbullying: Social competence, motivation and peer relationships. [Cyberbullying: competencia social, motivación y relaciones entre iguales]. Comunicar, 48, 71-79. https://doi.org/10.3916/C48-2016-07

Salmivalli, C. (2010). Bullying and the peer group: A review. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 15, 112-120. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2009.08.007

Slonje, R., & Smith, P.K. (2008). Cyberbullying: Another main type of bullying? Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 49, 147-154. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9450.2007.00611.x

Smith, P., Mahdavi, J., Carvalho, M., Fisher, S., Russell. S., & Tippett, N. (2008). Cyberbullying: Its nature and impact in secondary school pupils. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49(4), 376-385. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2007.01846.x

Sticca, F., Ruggieri, S., Alsaker, F., & Perren, S. (2013). Longitudinal risk factors for cyberbullying in adolescence. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 23, 52-67. https://doi.org/10.1002/casp.2136

Ttofi, M.M., & Farrington, D.P. (2011). Effectiveness of school-based programs to reduce bullying: A systematic and meta-analytic review. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 7(1), 27-56. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11292-010-9109-1

Twyman, K., Saylor, C., Taylor, L.A., & Comeaux, C. (2010). Comparing children and adolescents engaged in cyberbullying to matched peers. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 13(2), 195-199. https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2009.0137

Willians, K.R., & Guerra, N.G. (2007). Prevalence and predictors of internet bullying. Journal of Adolescence Health, 41(6 Suppl 1), 14-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2007.08.018

Zych, I., Ortega-Ruiz, R., & Marín-López, I. (2016). Cyberbullying: a systematic review of research, its prevalence and assessment issues in Spanish studies. Psicología Educativa 22(1), 5-18. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pse.2016.03.002

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/18
Accepted on 30/06/18
Submitted on 30/06/18

Volume 26, Issue 2, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C56-2018-02
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?