Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This article summarizes the main results of an investigation that is part of a project regarding the construction of youth and gender identity in television fiction. The methodology integrates reception analysis (focus group) with data obtained through an anonymous questionnaire, designed to contextualize the results of the qualitative research. Television fiction is the favourite macro-genre of young people, especially women. Broadly speaking, participants appreciate the greater proximity of Spanish fiction, which favours the different mechanisms of identification/projection activated during the reception process, and they acknowledge that TV fiction has a certain didactic nature. The research highlights the more intimate nature of female reception compared to the detachment of the male viewer, who watches fiction less frequently and assimilates it as pure entertainment. Age influences the different modes of reception, while the social class and origin of participants hardly have any impact. Confident, rebellious and ambivalent characters are found to be more interesting than the rest. By contrast, the structure of the story and a major part of the topics addressed by the programme are usually consigned to oblivion, highlighting the importance of selective memory in the interpretative process, as well as suggesting the limited nature of the effects of television fiction.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Despite the influence of Cultural Studies on research into television fiction, following the impetus of feminist studies of series from the 1980s onwards (Brunsdon, 2000), many researchers have traditionally resisted admitting its innovative and educational potential, as noted by Meijer (2005), Henderson (2007) and Lacalle (2010b). Similarly, specialists’ widespread interest in the processes of children’s viewing (faithful consumers of the programmes targeted at them) coupled with the volatility characteristic of young viewers partly explain the void in studies on the values and opinions conveyed by television to adolescents and young adults (Von Feilitzen, 2008; Montero, 2006).

Reception analysis carried out in the 1980s revealed the tendency of young adults to appropriate content, which led certain authors to stress this group’s involvement with television drama (Rubin, 1985; Lemish, 2004), while other researchers noted that knowledge of fiction-production techniques boosted young viewers’ pleasure (Buckingham, 1987). Subsequently, scholars have stressed the ambivalent relationship between young viewers and fiction, which according to Gerargthy (1991) fluctuates between projection and distancing. Greenberg et al. (1993) uphold the greater permeability of this target audience to dominant messages, compared to adults.

In recent years, the impetus that television fiction has undergone –fiction of a quality that is often better than in films– and the rise of new transmedia storytelling (Jenkins, 2006), which stem from the extension of programmes to the Web, has dramatically increased young people’s interest (especially that of young women) in this television genre (Lacalle, 2010a). The use of new technologies by adolescents and young adults encourages their increased involvement with the Internet, i resulting in a more personalised reception; this allows users to construct their own listings. Likewise, the websites linked to programmes are a kind of repository of technical and cultural knowledge that enables the main means of viewing media content to be oriented, while they also encourage reception and perform a socialising «web tribe» function (Della Torre & al. 2010).

Following on from those authors who advocate the cultural and social contextualisation of studies on viewing, the purpose of this paper is to determine the role of age and gender in the reception of television fiction. The «Adolescents’ Media Practice Model» devised by Steel and Brown in 1995 and built around the dialectic between representations and interpretations performed by individuals situated in a social and cultural environment that determines their media reception will serve as a guide by which to organise the results of this study. This model emphasizes transformations in programme content due to constant negotiation between individual action and the broader social context, organized around different phases that, in accordance with both authors’ opinions, affect the interpretation process: selection, interaction and application.

2. Material and methods

This article summarises ethnographic research into television fiction conducted in Catalonia between April and July 2011. It pairs an analysis of viewing with a socio-semiotic analysis of the young characters and the discourses on fiction in the Web 2.0. Analysis of viewing presented below includes three female-only focus groups and three mixed-gender focus groups built around the following age groups: 9 to 14 (one group), 15 to 17 (two groups), 18 to 23 (two groups) and 24 to 29 (one group). The six focus groups were made up of a total of 51 participants (38 females and 13 males) who discussed the different issues related to television fiction suggested by the moderator.

In order to obtain specific data on the viewing and interpretation processes, the interviewees filled out an anonymous questionnaire prior to the group interview, which posed questions on their viewing habits, their use of the Web 2.0 linked to fiction and their participation in events organised by the fiction programmes. They were also asked about their favourite programmes and characters. Following this, the group interview per se then began; this was structured around a socio-semiotic script that intersects the different stages of viewing and interpretation: preferences, viewing habits, the incorporation of new technologies into the viewing process, the construction of interpretative communities, interviewees’ relationship with the young characters in the fictions analysed; the correspondence between fiction and reality; and determinations of different television formats and genres.

The number of participants in each focus group ranged from 8 to 13, in line with the plurality of interactions sought in a dimension that would minimise as much as possible the inhibition of the most introverted members. Thus, the different groups were made up of adolescents and young adults who already knew each other and who were used to talking about issues similar to those raised in the group interview. In this way we sought to reconstruct in as unforced a way as possible the natural context of their everyday interactions, which is the ultimate object of interpretation (Baym, 2000: 201). Thus, most of the young interviewees were friends (in Lleida and Granollers), but they also had other ties that, without excluding friendship, shaped the groups in a different way, including classmates (in Sant Cugat, Barcelona and Tarragona) and participants at an after-school activity centre for youngsters at risk of social exclusion (in Girona).

The SPSS database, which was designed to process the responses to the anonymous questionnaire, includes 51 coded cases with 64 frequencies (one per variable). These frequencies represent the total number of applications of each value of the category to all the characters in the sample. The two independent variables used to perform the correlations with the others were gender and age group. When both independent variables were crossed with the secondary variables, 126 contingency tables were generated, that is, 63 for each of the independent variables chosen. Despite the high volume of data and the limited relevance of one part of the contingency tables, we chose not to discriminate the less clarifying results in order to be as exhaustive as possible. As mentioned above, the interpretation of the resulting 126 contingency tables enables us to contextualise the discourse analysis of the group interviews summarised below.

3. Results

Fiction is the genre preferred by the interviewees, led by television fiction (98%) and followed by films (74.5%), comedy/zapping programmes, including fictionalised sketches (68.6%) and animated series (64.7%). After fiction, females opt for comedy/zapping programmes (73.7%), news (50%), reality shows (39.5%) and celebrity and human-interest entertainment shows (23.7%), while males opt for films (84.6%) and sports programmes (61.5%). By age, the 9 to 14 and 24 to 29 age groups watch more films (75%). The group between the ages of 15 and 17 was more interested in reality shows (52.6%) and celebrity and human interest entertainment shows (31.6%). Young adults aged 18 to 23 preferred humour/zapping programmes and news shows (both at 87.5%).

Half of the interviewees watch television fiction regularly, one-third of the young adults do so very frequently and only a few do so occasionally. Women prefer Spanish fiction more than men, with men tending to prefer US programmes. By age, adolescents aged 15 to 17 are the most constant, although the 24 to 29 age group also watch their favourite programmes quite often.

3.1. Selection

Sentimental topics trigger young women’s attraction for drama. Males, however, prefer comedies, even though the most important finding on men’s viewing preferences is unquestionably their wide-ranging dispersion. The most popular series among the interviewees are «Física o Química» (Antena3), «Polseres vermelles» (TV3) and «El internado» (Antena3). «El internado» stands out in the 15 to 17 and 18 to 23 age groups, while the dispersion in the 24 to 29 age group is such that it renders it impossible to draw a clear map of their tastes. As a whole, we can note a clear preference for fiction programmes with a high number of young actors among the leading characters.

The interviewees rank Spanish fiction beneath its US counterpart. The unjustified endings and excessive prolongation of programmes, a lack of technical quality and special effects and surplus of fiction programmes made for the family target audience are the aspects criticised the most. While some interviewees prefer characters who are self-assured, as well as «bad guys» and rebels, others chose more ambivalent characters (good/bad). Unlike gender, age is hardly a factor in the choice of favourite character.

The most popular character is Ulises («El barco», Antena3), followed by Yoli («Física o Química», Antena3) and Luisma («Aída», Tele5). Females opt for three characters from three fiction shows broadcast by Antena3, all of whom are noteworthy for their physical attractiveness and who are tormented differently by the obstacles they must overcome in their emotional relationships, namely, Ulises («El barco»), Marcos («El internado») and Lucas («Los hombres de Paco»). In contrast to this, however, the dispersion of answers from the males remains, and even though they also include attractive young women among their favourites (Yoli, «Física o Química»), they seem to prefer caricatured adults (Amador, «La que se avecina»; Diego, «Los Serrano» and Mauricio, «Aída»). Interestingly, most of the interviewees were not able to point out the character that they like the least, and with the exception of those who prefer comedy, all the interviewees want the characters to evolve.

3.2. Interaction

Generally speaking, the content and the characters are determining factors when watching a fiction programme regularly or at least somewhat regularly, even though the choice of some of the participants in the focus group is conditioned by the reception context. The interviewees tend to watch fiction primarily alone, with a family member or with their partner, and only rarely with friends. Women tend to watch the programmes alone, whereas men do so with their family. By age, the 9 to 14 group and young adults aged 18 to 23 watch the most fiction alone, albeit for different reasons: the first group’s interest in animation, which the older family members rarely share, and the second group’s interest in major international hits, which tend to be watched on the Internet even before they premiere in Spain. On the other hand, adolescents aged 15 to 17 often watch the television with other family members living in their household; therefore, this age group’s preference for family-targeted programmes facilitates watching programmes together. Young adults aged 24 to 29 living on their own tend to share this form of entertainment with their partners.

The decision to watch programmes alone or with siblings stems from the diversity of tastes among parents and children. When their preferences are the same, the family watches shows on the main television set in the house together, even though they tend not to discuss the programmes. Some young interviewees even confessed to avoiding watching television as a family because they were embarrassed to watch certain programmes with their parents. Outside the home, however, fiction becomes a recurring light topic of conversation that often binds them with other people at school or work. However, even though the interviewees tend to talk about the fiction programmes they watch with others, their preference is to do so with their friends.

Women stand out for sharing their experiences about fiction with their group of friends. By age, girls from 9 to 14 use fiction as a topic of conversation with their friends. Adolescents from 15 to 17 tend to talk about the programmes they watch with their siblings, while the 18 to 23 age group talks less about television programmes, and the 24 to 29 age group talks about them almost exclusively with their partner.

3.2.1. TV and/or Internet

The difference between the number of interviewees who watch fiction on the television and on the Internet is quite small. Women watch more programmes on the Internet. By age, girls from 9 to 14 and young adults aged 24 to 29 prefer television, the former because at this age they are rarely free from their parents’ control over the contents they watch, while the latter tend to enjoy their leisure time in the company of their partner after the workday. The age groups 15 to 17 and 18 to 23 are the ones that watch the most fiction on the Internet, data coherent with their inclination for new US shows and for watching by themselves.

Many of those who watch fiction on the television concentrate exclusively on this activity. However, some adolescents are in the habit of doing their homework as they watch their favourite programmes, while young adults aged 24 to 29 often combine watching TV with their household chores. The 15 to 17 and 18 to 23 age groups, however, tend to watch television while they use forums and social networks (sometimes on their smart phones), where they also talk about questions unrelated to the programme they are watching.

Watching TV programmes in streaming is the most popular choice among the interviewees who watch fiction on the Internet, either on the channels’ official websites or on other sites2. The desire to watch fiction without having to be bound by the programme schedule encourages some youngsters to download the programmes, which they then watch on television sets for reasons of technical quality. This quest for quality also motivates the interviewees who are indecisive about their favourite medium and combine the television and Internet depending on which is more convenient at any given time (such as watching programmes recorded on the computer in HD if they do not have the right television set)3.

Loyal fans tend use the Internet to watch the episodes they were unable to watch on the TV set, while the other interviewees tend to miss those shows or ask someone to tell them what happened. The Web is also used to get information on programmes, especially by women. By age, the most visitors to these websites are the 15 to 17 year age group, who are the leading members of the fan groups (wishing to keep abreast of all the news related to their favourite fiction shows). In contrast to this, however, this activity diminishes drastically among young adults aged 24 to 29, who have more responsibilities and less free time than the others.

Almost half the interviewees talk about the programmes somewhat frequently in forums and social networks. However, the percentage of women users of 2.0 fiction resources is much higher than the percentage of men, while barely any differences can be discerned by age. The most popular social networks linked to fiction 2.0 are Facebook, Twitter and Tuenti. The interviewees tend to use these Internet tools to look for photographs, videos or music from their favourite shows, as well as links to the websites where the original material can be found. However, they rarely contribute their opinions, nor do they tend to share contents with other users.

3.2.2. Fandom

Fourteen people, or 27.5% of the interviewees, are fans of some fiction shows and are linked to some fan group. However, no participant in the study has ever created anything such as a website or blog devoted to a character, story or actor. There are more female than male fans (31.6% and 15.4%, respectively), even though no significant differences are found by gender. By age, adolescents aged 15 to 17 years old are more involved in the phenomenon of fandom (42.1%), which gradually wanes over time (12.5% in the 24 to 29 year age group). «Polseres vermelles» (TV3) and «El barco» (Antena3), two series mainly targeted at young people, are the fiction shows with the most fans. Other programmes being broadcast at the time the focus groups were meeting («Física o Química» and «El internado» on Antena3, and «La que se avecina on Tele5) and even some programmes that had ended («Aquí no hay quien viva», Antena3) also have young fans on the Internet. The characters with the highest number of fans are Lleó («Polseres vermelles», TV3) and Ulises («El barco», Antena3).

3.3. Application

The sentimental and relationship-based problems of the characters attract the interest of the interviewees much more than social issues. However, some young interviewees believe that television fiction is a major source of learning and that it helps them to cope with personal problems or socialisation issues. There are also youngsters who appreciate current or historical information provided by such fiction, while the remainder do not believe that it teaches them anything and only see this fiction as a form of entertainment.

The participants in the focus groups believe that the lifestyle shown on foreign fiction programmes is very different to the lifestyles of young Spaniards, thus many value domestically produced fiction precisely because it is more familiar. Nonetheless, many of the youngsters interviewed criticised the trend towards exaggeration and think that the plots, experiences or places (homes, schools, workplaces, etc.) tend to be more lifelike than the characters themselves. The youngest viewers recognise similarities with the characters’ way of speaking, dressing and acting, while the 24 to 29 age group finds it hard to identify with them.

Fiction does not tend to serve as a reference as the interviewees cope with their day-to-day problems. However, even though some of the plots are not very realistic, there are youngsters of all ages who try to extrapolate the ideas from the fiction to their own reality, a more marked trend among critical viewers. In fact, the sentimental relationships and entertainment of the main characters are the representations that the participants in the focus groups wanted to imitate the most often. Some youngsters also identified with the attitude and actions of the characters, contextualised according to their own experience.

4. Conclusions and discussion

Television fiction is the macro-genre preferred by the interviewees, especially the females, whose greater loyalty to their favourite programmes is coherent with their preference for dramatic shows (mainly soap operas). Conversely, the males’ inclination for comedy corresponds to the much more discontinuous nature of male viewing. On the other hand, the social class of the participants in the focus groups did not seem to influence their television viewing, nor did their origin (local or foreign). Generally speaking, the interviewees can be classified into the four groups proposed by Millwood and Gatfield (2002) according to their reception patterns and attitude towards the programmes:

• Fanatics: they are deeply enthusiastic about television fiction and follow it regularly, usually without questioning it.

• Ironic: they like television fiction, but they experience contradictory feelings, which sometimes lead them to adopt a critical attitude towards the programmes.

• Non-committed: they are attracted by television fiction but only follow it sporadically when seeking an «easy» form of entertainment.

• Dismissive: these viewers are full of prejudices against television fiction and never or almost never watch it.

Females’ loyalty to their favourite fiction shows partly contradicts much of the spontaneity that Morley attributed to female viewing in 1986 and reveals the fact that the most casual planning and viewing are linked not to viewers’ gender but to programme genre.

More familiar topics and typically Spanish humour are among the most highly valued aspects, as well as the characters’ problems and controversial themes (Tufte, 2007). However, even though some interviewees were disdainful of Spanish fiction (compared to that of the US), others appreciated its greater familiarity and recognised that it had a certain didactic value. Thus, the enthusiasm shown by adolescents and young adults for the Catalan show «Polseres vermelles», a drama featuring a group of children and adolescents hospitalised for serious illnesses, reveals the educational potential of fanfiction in adolescents’ personal development, as noted by authors like Rebecca W. Black (2008).

The youngsters expressed their preference for the characters who are their age (Harwood, 1997). However, self-assured characters, as well as those who are rebels and ambivalent, aroused greater interest than the others, an indication of a possible cathartic identification aimed at reconciling the similarities between the characters and the viewer with the extraordinary nature of the narrative, as noted by Gripsrud, following Jauss (Gripsrud, 2005). Nonetheless, the ironic interviewees clearly understand that the characters are stereotypes and that their experiences do not resemble those of real youngsters (Spence, 1995), while the fanatics believe that the general features of the characters tend to be realistic (in the emotional sense of the concept as defined by Ien Ang in 1985). The desire to imitate the most admired characters4, as well as the similarities between the ways these characters speak and the viewers’ speech patterns, also bring the latter closer to the fiction and reveal the constant process of mutual feedback induced by television viewing (Galán Fajardo & del Pino, 2010; Lacalle & al., 2011).

The interviewees’ preferences reaffirm the influence of gender in television viewing (Lemish, 2004; McMillin & Fisherkeller, 2008), since the females prefer good-looking characters, while the males tend to prefer the unusual ones, or «geeks» even though the dispersion of male tastes makes it difficult to generalise. In any event, both appreciate the image of eternal adolescence projected in fiction by the young characters, who spend most of their time between recreation and sentimental and sexual relations (Bragg & Buckingham, 2004).

The interviewees of all ages, especially the females, preferred to watch fiction by themselves due to their divergent tastes with their parents. This thus revalidates the relationship between family roles and television viewing noted by and Morley (1986), Silverstone (1994) and Lull (1990), except that in single-parent families headed by mothers (more numerous in the analysis sample than single-parent families headed by men), the mother now controls the main television set. Contrary to what Bragg and Buckingham (2004) claim, youngsters who tend to watch television with their family rarely comment on the more delicate topics (mainly related to sex) with their parents. Nor did the focus groups provide any indication of possible closer inter-generational ties in families, which these British authors claims characterises television viewing shared among the different household members.

However, the socialising nature of television fiction can be seen in the interviewees’ enthusiasm at talking about their favourite programmes, mainly with their peers, which dovetails with the results of the study by Thornham and Purvis (2005). This enthusiasm suggests that, as Modlesky (1979) noted, some viewers may regard television fiction as a kind of extension of their family, a «second family» that enables them to create a «fantasy community» boosted today by the rising use of forums and social networks to comment on them. The ease with which the majority of the interviewees speak about fiction also reaffirms its «therapeutic» nature and its role as a catalyst of social relations (Madill & Goldemeir, 2003), to such an extent that social use or interaction (Rubin, 1985) seems to be one of the main reasons driving youngsters to consume fiction.

Youngsters also find fiction to be a way of evading their problems and everyday duties. This function has been systematically recognised by Cultural Studies researchers ever since the pioneering analysis of the series «Crossroads» performed by Hobson in 1982, which was revalidated in more recent studies (McMillin & Fisherkeller, 2008). Hence the fanatics recognise the addictive nature of fiction, as noted by authors like Millwood and Gatfield (2002), which is only fostered by the rising hybridisation of formats characteristic of today’s television production in an environment of extreme competitiveness.

The interviewees are perfectly aware of the determinations to which the different television genres and formats are subjected, something which seems to boost the viewing pleasure of ironic viewers, as Buckingham (1987) noted. However, while the fanatics prefer the plots to be surprising with unexpected twists, the ironic viewers prefer to guess at the ending and even anticipate the programme’s conclusion. The ironic viewers also particularly appreciate the hybridisation and innovation of the subjects covered, as well as the technical quality (narrative structure) and technology (special effects and the look of the programmes) of the shows. Fanatics, on the other hand, mainly care about the topics and the characters.

Favourite characters, climaxes and gags are the most persistent memories, which vary substantially according to the interviewees’ degree of involvement. In contrast to this, however, the structure of the story and even many of the subjects dealt with in the episode or chapter of the programme watched seem to be quickly relegated to oblivion, which reveals the importance of selective memory in the processes of interpretation, and possibly the limited nature of the effects of television fiction. There are interviewees of all ages who try to extrapolate the elements of the story to their everyday lives. However, it does not seem that any of the interviewees believe that their real life and fictitious life are an inseparable whole, which is what is claimed by Yolanda Montero based on the results of her study on the Tele5 children’s series, «Al salir de clase» (After School; Montero, 2006).

Notes

1 See the report by A. Lenhart, K. Purcell, A. Smith & K. Zickuhr (2010). Social Media and Young Adults, written for The Pew Internet and American Life Project in 2010. Online: (www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults.aspx) (14-12-2011).

2 According to the «Informe Anual de los Contenidos Digitales en España 2010» (Annual Report of Digital Contents in Spain 2010) by red.es, the decline in the download model in favour of streaming in recent years is due to the change in mindset, primarily among the youngest viewers, who view the reception of contents as a service without the need to have ownership of these contents. (www.red.es/media/registrados/201011/1290073066269.pdf?aceptacion=230ed621b2afb25bab3692b9b951e2c6) (02-12-2011).

3 The «Annual Report of Digital Contents in Spain 2010» by red.es also notes that convenience is the reason that drives most web-based consumers of television and film fiction. (www.red.es/media/registrados/201011/1290073066269.pdf?aceptacion=230ed621b2afb25bab3692b9b951e2c6) (02-12-2011).

4 We could cite, for example, the success of «El armario de la tele» (The TV Wardrobe), the shop that commercialises the clothing worn by television characters. (www.elarmariodelatele.com) (09-12-2011).

Support

The competitive project «The Social Construction of Women in Television fiction: Representations, Viewing and Interactions via Web 2.0», 2010-11, was subsidised by the Institut Català de les Dones. This part of the study was developed by Charo Lacalle (director) and researchers Mariluz Sánchez and Lucía Trabajo. Contributors included Ana Cano, Beatriz Gómez and Nuria Simelio.

References

Ang, I. (1985). Watching Dallas. Soap Opera and the Melo dra matic Imagination. London (UK): Methuen.

Baym, N. (2000). Tune In, Log on. Soaps, Fandom, and Online Com munity. London (UK): Sage Publications.

Black, R.W. (2008). Adolescents and Online Fanfiction. New York (US): Peter Lang.

Bragg, S. & Buckingham, D. (2004). Embarrassment, Education and Erotics: the Sexual Politics of Family Viewing. European Jour nal of Cultural Studies, 7(4), 441-459.

Brunsdon, C. (2000). The Feminist, the Housewife, and the Soap Opera. London (UK): Oxford Clarendon Press.

Buckingham, D. (1987). Public secrets. Eastenders and its audience. London (UK): BFI.

Della Torre, A. & al. (2010). Il caso true blood: consumo telefilmico su media digitali. Le rappresentazioni culturali dei serial ad dicted: consumo, identità e resistenza. Centro Studi Etnografia Digi ta le. (www.etnografiadigitale.it) (02-12-2011).

Galán Fajardo, E. & del Pino, C. (2010). Jóvenes, ficción y nuevas tecnologías. Área Abierta, 25, marzo. (www.ucm.es/ BUCM /re vistas/inf/15788393/articulos/ARAB1010130003A.PDF) (02-12-2011).

Gerarghty, C. (1991). Women and Soap Opera: A Study of Pri me Time Soaps. Cambridge (UK): Polity Press.

Greenberg, B., Stanley, C. & Siemicki, M. (1993). Sex Content on Soaps and Prime-time Television Series most Viewed by Ado lescents. In B. Greenberg, J. Brown & N. Buerkel-Rothfuss (Eds.), Media, Sex and the Adolescent. Cresskill (US): Hampton Press Coop, 29-44.

Gripsrud, J. (2005). The Dinasty Years: Hollywood Television and Critical Media Studies. London (UK): Routledge.

Harwood, J. (1997). Viewing Age: Lifespan Identity and Tele vision Viewing Choices. Journal of Broadcasting and Electro nic Media, 41, 203-213.

Henderson, L. (2007). Social Issues in Television Fiction. Edin burgh (UK): University Press.

Hobson, D. (1982). Crossroads. The Drama of a Soap Opera. Lon don (UK): Methuen.

Lacalle, C. & al. (2010a). Dal telespettatore attivo all’internauta: fiction televisiva e Internet. In-Formazione, IV, 6, 62-65.

Lacalle, C. & al. (2010b). Joves i ficció televisiva: representacions i efectes. Anàlisi, 40, 29-45.

Lacalle, C. & al. (2011). Construcción de la identidad juvenil en la ficción: entrevistas a profesionales. Quaderns del CAC, 36, XIV (1), 109-117.

Lemish, D. (2004). Girls Can Wrestle Too: Gender Differences in the Consumption of a Television Wrestling Series. Sex Roles, 38, 9-10, 1998, 833-850.

Lull, J. (1990). Inside Family Viewing: Ethnographic Research on Television’s Audiences. London (UK): Routledge.

Madill, A. & Goldmeier, R. (2003). EastEnders’: Texts of Female Desire and of Community. International Journal of Cultural Stu dies, 6 (4), 471-494.

McMillin, D. & Fisherkeller, J.E. (2008). Teens, Television Characters, and Identity. International Communication Associa tion, Annual Meetting, 22/26-05-2008 (Quebec). (http://citation.allacademic.com//meta/p_mla_apa_research_citation/2/3/2/6/0/pages232608/p232608-1.php) (05-12-2011).

Meijer, I. & Van Vossen, M. (2009). The Ethos of TV Relation ships. A Deconstructive Approach Towards the Recurring Moral Panic about the Impact of Television. International Communication Association, Annual meeting, 25-05-2009 (Nueva York).

Millwood, A. & Gatfield, L. (2002). Soap Box or Soft Soap? Au dience Attitudes to the British Soap Opera. London (UK): Broad casting Standards Comission. (www.ofcom.org.uk/static/ar chive/ bsc/ pdfs/ research/soap.pdf) (05-12-2011).

Modlesky, T. (1979). The Search for Tomorrow in Today’s Soap Operas. Notes on a Feminine Narrative Form. Film Quarterly, 33: 1, 12-21.

Montero, Y. (2006). Tv, valores y adolescencia: análisis de al salir de clase (3). Guió-Actualidad, 24 de abril. (http://200.2.115.237/ spip. php?article1495) (30-11-2011).

Morley, D. (1986). Family Television: Cultural Power and Do mes tic Leisure. London (UK): Routledge.

Rubin, A.M. (1985). Uses of Daytime Television Soap Operas by Collegue Students. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 29, 3, 241-258.

Silverstone, R. (1994). Television and Everyday Life. London (UK): Routledge.

Spence, L. (1995). They Killed off Marlena, but she’s on Another Show Now’: Fantasy, Reality, and Pleasure in Watching Daytime Soap Operas. In R.C. Allen (Ed.). To Be Continued…: Soap Ope ras around the World (pp. 182-197). London (UK): Routledge..

Steel, J.R. & Brown, J.D. (1995). Adolescent Room Culture: Studying Media in the Context or Everyday Life. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 24, 5, 551-575.

Thornham, S. & Purvis, T. (2005). Television Drama. Theories and Identities. New York (US): Palgrave MacMillan.

Tufte, T. (2007). Soap operas y construcción de sentido: mediaciones y etnografía de la audiencia. Comunicación y Sociedad, 8, 89-112.

Von Feilitzen, C. (2008). Children and Media Literacy: Critique, Practice, Democracy. Doxa, 6, 317-332.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El artículo resume los principales resultados de una investigación integrada en un proyecto más amplio sobre la construcción de la identidad juvenil y de género en la ficción televisiva. La metodología combina el análisis de la recepción («focus group») con los datos obtenidos mediante un cuestionario anónimo, destinados a contextualizar los resultados del estudio cualitativo. La ficción televisiva es el macrogénero preferido por los jóvenes, sobre todo por las mujeres. En general, los participantes aprecian la mayor proximidad de la ficción española, propiciadora de los diferentes mecanismos de identificación/proyección activados en los procesos de recepción, y le reconocen un cierto carácter didáctico. La investigación pone de manifiesto el carácter más intimista de la recepción femenina, frente al mayor distanciamiento de un espectador masculino mucho más inconstante, que asimila la ficción con el puro entretenimiento. La edad influye principalmente en las diferentes modalidades de recepción, mientras que apenas se constata la incidencia de la clase social ni del origen de los participantes. Los personajes seguros de sí mismos, rebeldes y ambivalentes, interesan más que el resto. Por el contrario, la estructura del relato y una buena parte de los temas del programa visionado se relegan generalmente al olvido, lo que revela el peso de la memoria selectiva en los procesos de interpretación y sugiere el carácter limitado de los efectos de la ficción televisiva.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

A pesar de la influencia de los Estudios Culturales en las investigaciones sobre ficción televisiva, tras el impulso de los estudios feministas sobre los seriales a partir de los ochenta (Brunsdon, 2000), muchos investigadores se han resistido tradicionalmente a reconocer su potencial innovador y didáctico, como señalan Meijer (2005), Henderson (2007) o Lacalle (2010b). Por otra parte, el interés generalizado entre los especialistas por los procesos de recepción de los niños (consumidores fieles de los programas dirigidos a dicho «target»), unido a la volatilidad característica del espectador juvenil, explican en parte el vacío en la investigación de valores y opiniones transmitidos por la televisión a los adolescentes y los jóvenes (Von Feilitzen, 2008; Montero, 2006).

Los análisis de la recepción realizados a lo largo de los años ochenta revelan la tendencia a la apropiación de los contenidos por parte de los jóvenes, lo que induce a algunos autores a destacar la implicación de este grupo social con la ficción (Rubin, 1985; Lemish, 2004), mientras que otros investigadores observan que el conocimiento de las técnicas productivas de la ficción aumenta el placer del espectador joven (Buckingham, 1987). Sucesivamente, los estudiosos subrayan la ambivalencia de la relación entre los jóvenes y la ficción, que según Gerargthy (1991) oscila entre la proyección y el distanciamiento. Greenberg & al. (1993) sostienen la mayor permeabilidad de este «target» a los mensajes dominantes respecto de los adultos.

En los últimos años, el impulso experimentado por la ficción televisiva, cuya calidad supera en muchos casos la cinematográfica, y el auge de las nuevas narrativas transmediáticas (Jenkins, 2006), originadas por la extensión de los programas a la Red, han incrementado de manera exponencial el interés de los jóvenes (sobre todo de las mujeres jóvenes) por este macrogénero (Lacalle, 2010a). La destreza de los adolescentes y de los jóvenes en el uso de las nuevas tecnologías propicia su creciente implicación con Internet1 y se traduce en un consumo más personalizado, que le permite al usuario construir su propia parrilla a la carta. Por otra parte, las páginas ligadas con los programas constituyen una especie de repositorio de conocimientos técnicos y culturales que les permiten orientar las propias modalidades de recepción de los contenidos mediáticos, al mismo tiempo que fomentan el consumo y desempeñan una función socializadora de «web tribe» (Della Torre & al. 2010).

Tras la estela de los autores que abogan por la contextualización cultural y social de los estudios de recepción, el objetivo de las páginas siguientes es determinar el papel de la edad y del género en la recepción de la ficción televisiva. El modelo «Adolescents’ Media Practice Model», elaborado por Steel y Brown en 1995 y construido en torno a la dialéctica entre las representaciones y la interpretación llevada a cabo por individuos situados en un entorno social y cultural que determina su consumo mediático, va a servir de guía para estructurar los resultados de la presente investigación. Dicho modelo enfatiza las transformaciones experimentadas en el contenido de los programas por efecto de la constante negociación entre la acción individual y el contexto social, articuladas en torno a las diferentes fases que, en opinión de ambas autoras, atraviesan el proceso de interpretación: selección, interacción y aplicación.

2. Material y métodos

Este artículo resume una investigación etnográfica sobre ficción televisiva realizada en Cataluña entre abril y julio de 2011, que integra el análisis de la recepción con el análisis socio-semiótico de los personajes jóvenes y con los discursos sobre la ficción en la web 2.0. El análisis de la recepción que se presenta en las páginas siguientes incluye tres «focus group» femeninos y otros tres de carácter mixto, construidos en torno a las siguientes franjas de edad: 9-14 años (1 grupo); 15-17 años (2 grupos); 18-23 años (2 grupos) y 24-29 años (1 grupo). Los seis «focus group» están integrados por un total de 51 participantes (38 mujeres y 13 hombres), que conversan sobre las diferentes cuestiones relativas a la ficción televisiva sugeridas por la moderadora.

A fin de obtener algunos datos específicos sobre los procesos de recepción e interpretación, los entrevistados rellenaban un cuestionario anónimo previo a la entrevista de grupo, donde se plantean cuestiones relativas al visionado, al uso de la web 2.0 ligado a la ficción o a la participación en eventos organizados por los programas de ficción. También se les preguntaba por sus programas y sus personajes favoritos. A continuación comenzaba la entrevista de grupo propiamente dicha, estructurada a partir de un guión socio-semiótico que interseca los diferentes estadios de la recepción y de la interpretación: preferencias; hábitos de recepción; incorporación de las nuevas tecnologías al proceso de recepción; construcción de comunidades interpretativas; relación de los entrevistados con los personajes jóvenes de las ficciones analizadas; correspondencia entre la ficción y la realidad; determinaciones de los diferentes formatos y géneros televisivos.

El número de participantes de cada «focus group» oscilaba entre 8 y 13 personas, de manera consecuente con la pluralidad de las interacciones perseguidas en una dimensión que minimizara todo lo posible la inhibición de los más introvertidos. De ahí que los diferentes grupos estuvieran compuestos por adolescentes o jóvenes que se conocían con anterioridad, habituados a comentar frecuentemente temas parecidos a los suscitados en la entrevista grupal. Con ello se pretendía llegar a reconstruir el contexto natural de sus interacciones cotidianas de la manera menos forzada posible, referente fundamental de la interpretación (Baym, 2000: 201). Así, los jóvenes entrevistados eran mayoritariamente amigos (Lleida, Granollers), pero también había otros vínculos que, sin excluir la amistad, configuraban el grupo de una manera diferente: compañeros de estudios (Sant Cugat, Barcelona, Tarragona) o asistentes a actividades extraescolares para jóvenes con riesgo de exclusión social (Girona).

La base de datos SPSS, diseñada para procesar las respuestas al cuestionario anónimo, incluye 51 casos codificados, con un total de 64 frecuencias (una por variable). Dichas frecuencias representan el número total de aplicaciones de cada valor de la categoría al conjunto de los personajes de la muestra. Las dos variables independientes utilizadas para realizar las correlaciones con el resto son el género y la franja de edad. El cruce de ambas variables independientes con las variables secundarias ha generado 126 tablas de contingencia, es decir, 63 para cada una de las variables independientes seleccionadas. A pesar del elevado volumen de datos y la escasa relevancia de una parte de las tablas de contingencia, se ha optado por no discriminar los resultados menos clarificadores con el fin de ser lo más exhaustivos posible. Como se señalaba más arriba, la interpretación de las 126 tablas de contingencia resultantes permite contextualizar el análisis discursivo de las entrevistas grupales sintetizado a continuación.

3. Resultados

La ficción representa la tipología de programas preferida por los entrevistados, encabezada por la ficción televisiva (98,0%) y seguida por la cinematográfica (74,5%) y los programas de humor/zapping, incluidos los «sketchs» ficcionalizados (68,6%) y las series de animación (64,7%). Tras la ficción, las mujeres se decantan por los programas de humor/zapping (73,7%), los informativos (50,0%), los «realities» (39,5%) y el entretenimiento de contenido rosa (23,7%), mientras que los hombres eligen las películas (84,6%) y los programas deportivos (61,5%). Por edades, los grupos de 9-14 años y de 24-29 años ven más películas (75,0%). Entre los 15 y los 17 años se incrementa el interés por los «realities» (52,6%) y los programas de contenido rosa (31,6%). Los jóvenes de 18-23 años prefieren los programas de humor/zapping y los informativos (87,5% en ambos casos).

La mitad de los entrevistados ven ficción televisiva habitualmente, un tercio de los jóvenes lo hacen con mucha frecuencia y unos pocos de manera esporádica. Las mujeres son más fieles que los hombres y prefieren la ficción española, mientras que los hombres se inclinan más por los productos norteamericanos Por edades, los jóvenes de 15-17 años son los más constantes, aunque el grupo de 24-29 años también ven sus programas preferidos con bastante frecuencia.

3.1. Selección

Las temáticas sentimentales son los detonantes de la atracción de las mujeres jóvenes por el drama. Los hombres, en cambio, se escoran hacia la comedia, aunque el dato más relevante de las preferencias masculinas es, sin duda, su enorme dispersión. Las series más populares entre los entrevistados son «Física o Química» (Antena3), «Polseres vermelles» (TV3) y «El internado» (Antena3). «El internado» sobresale en los grupos de 15-17 años y de 18-23, mientras que la dispersión en la franja de 24-29 años no permite trazar un mapa claro de sus gustos. En conjunto, se aprecia una clara preferencia por las ficciones que cuentan con un elevado número de actores jóvenes entre el elenco de los protagonistas principales.

Los entrevistados sitúan la ficción española por debajo del estándar estadounidense. Los finales poco justificados, el excesivo alargamiento de los programas, la falta de calidad técnica y de efectos especiales o la abundancia de ficciones dirigidas al «target» familiar son los aspectos más criticados. Mientras algunos entrevistados prefieren a los personajes seguros de sí mismos, así como a los malos y rebeldes, otros escogen a los personajes ambivalentes (bueno/malo). Contrariamente al género, la edad apenas incide en la elección del personaje preferido.

Ulises («El barco», Antena3) es el personaje que suscita mayor entusiasmo, seguido por Yoli («Física o Química», Antena3) y Luisma («Aída», Tele5). Las mujeres eligen tres personajes de otras tantas ficciones emitidas por Antena3, caracterizados por su atractivo físico y atormentados de diferente manera por los obstáculos que deben salvar en sus relaciones de pareja: Ulises («El barco»), Marcos («El internado») y Lucas («Los hombres de Paco»). Por el contrario, la dispersión de las respuestas masculinas sigue siendo la tónica general y, aunque también incluyen jóvenes atractivas entre sus preferencias (Yoli, «Física o Química»), se inclinan por los adultos de caricatura (Amador, «La que se avecina»; Diego, «Los Serrano» y Mauricio, «Aída»). Curiosamente, la mayor parte de los entrevistados no aciertan a señalar al personaje que menos les gusta y, a excepción de los amantes de la comedia, todos los entrevistados desean que los personajes evolucionen.

3.2. Interacción

En general, el contenido y los personajes resultan determinantes a la hora de seguir asiduamente un programa de ficción, o al menos con una cierta regularidad, aunque la elección de algunos participantes de los «focus group» está condicionada por el contexto de la recepción. Los entrevistados suelen ver la ficción principalmente solos, con algún miembro de su familia o con su pareja y raramente con amigos. Las mujeres tienden más a la recepción en solitario y los hombres en familia. Por edades, los grupos de 9-14 años y los jóvenes de 18 a 23 consumen más ficción a solas, aunque por diferentes motivos: el interés de los primeros por la animación, que generalmente no agrada a los familiares de más edad, y la preferencia de los segundos por los grandes éxitos internacionales, que suelen visionar por Internet incluso antes de su estreno en España. En cambio, los postadolescentes de 15 a 17 comparten frecuentemente el visionado con otros miembros de su hogar, pues la preferencia de este grupo de edad por los programas dirigidos al «target» familiar facilita la recepción conjunta. Los jóvenes adultos de 24 a 29 años independizados tienden a compartir esta forma de ocio con su pareja.

La decisión de ver los programas a solas o con los hermanos obedece a la diversidad de gustos entre los progenitores y los hijos. Cuando las preferencias de unos y otros coinciden, la familia se reúne para ver la televisión frente al receptor principal de la casa, aunque los programas no se suelen comentar. Algunos jóvenes incluso confiesan rehuir de la recepción familiar porque se avergüenzan de ver determinados programas con sus progenitores. Fuera del hogar, en cambio, la ficción se convierte en un tema de conversación recurrente y poco comprometido, que en ocasiones se revela como un verdadero nexo de unión con otras personas del entorno escolar o laboral. Pero, aunque los entrevistados suelen hablar con otras personas de las ficciones que ven, prefieren comentarlas con sus amigos.

Las mujeres destacan a la hora de compartir sus experiencias sobre la ficción con el grupo de amigos. Por edades, las adolescentes de 9-14 años utilizan la ficción como tema de conversación con los amigos. Los jóvenes de 15-17 años suelen hablar de los programas que ven con sus hermanos, mientras que en la franja de 18-23 años se comenta mucho menos y en la de 24-29 casi exclusivamente con la pareja.

3.2.1. TV y/o Internet

La diferencia entre el número de entrevistados que ven la ficción por el televisor o por Internet es muy reducida. Las mujeres superan a los hombres en el visionado por Internet. Por edades, las niñas de 9-14 años y los jóvenes de 24-29 prefieren la televisión, las primeras porque a esa edad aún no suelen eludir el control de los padres sobre los contenidos que eligen, mientras que los jóvenes adultos tienden a disfrutar esos momentos de esparcimiento en compañía de su pareja tras la jornada laboral. Los grupos de 15-17 años y 18-23 son los que más ficción consumen a través de Internet, un dato coherente con su inclinación por las novedades estadounidenses y por el visionado a solas.

Una buena parte de quienes ven la ficción en el televisor se concentran exclusivamente en dicha actividad. No obstante, algunas adolescentes suelen realizar sus deberes mientras ven sus programas favoritos, frente a los jóvenes adultos de 24-29 años que compaginan a veces la recepción con sus tareas domésticas. Los grupos de 15-17 años y de 18-23, en cambio, tienden a simultanear el visionado por televisión con el uso de foros y redes sociales (en ocasiones a través de sus «smartphones»), donde también hablan de cuestiones ajenas al programa que están viendo.

El visionado «in streaming» es la opción más popular entre quienes optan por ver la ficción a través de Internet, bien sea por las webs oficiales de las cadenas o de otras páginas2. El deseo de ver la ficción, sin someterse a la parrilla de programación, induce a algunos jóvenes a descargar los programas, que sucesivamente ven en el televisor aduciendo razones de calidad tecnológica. Esta búsqueda mueve también a los indecisos, que compaginan televisor e Internet en función de lo que les resulte más conveniente en cada momento (como por ejemplo, ver los programas grabados en HD por el ordenador si no se dispone de un televisor adecuado)3.

Los seguidores fieles suelen recuperar a través de Internet los episodios que no han podido ver, mientras que el resto los dejan pasar o simplemente le piden a alguien que se los resuma. También se recurre a la Red para obtener información sobre los programas, sobre todo las mujeres. Por edades, la visita a este tipo de webs alcanza su cénit entre los jóvenes de 15-17 años, los principales integrantes de los grupos de fans (que anhelan estar al tanto de todas las novedades relativas a sus ficciones preferidas). Por el contrario, esta actividad decae drásticamente entre los jóvenes de 24-29 años, con más responsabilidades y menos tiempo libre que el resto.

Casi la mitad de los entrevistados comentan los programas con cierta frecuencia en los foros y las redes sociales. No obstante, el porcentaje de mujeres usuarias de los recursos de la ficción 2.0 supera ampliamente a los hombres, mientras que apenas se aprecian diferencias por edades. Las redes sociales más populares ligadas a la ficción 2.0 son Facebook, Twitter y Tuenti. Los entrevistados suelen utilizar estas herramientas de Internet para buscar fotos, vídeos o música de sus ficciones preferidas, así como enlaces a los sitios web en los que se ubica el material original. Sin embargo, raramente contribuyen con opiniones ni suelen compartir contenidos con otros usuarios.

3.2.2. «Fandom»

El 27,5% (14 personas) de los entrevistados son «fans» de algún programa de ficción y están vinculados con algún grupo. Sin embargo, ningún participante ha creado nunca páginas, blogs, etc. dedicados a algún personaje, ficción o a un actor. Hay más mujeres fans que hombres (31,6% y 15,4% respectivamente), aunque no se aprecian diferencias significativas de género. Por edades, los jóvenes de 15-17 años están más involucrados en el fenómeno «fandom» (42,1%), que decae progresivamente con la edad (12,5% en el grupo de 24-29 años). «Polseres vermelles» (TV3) y El barco (Antena3), dos series dirigidas preferentemente al «target» juvenil, son las ficciones que cuentan con más fans. Otros programas en emisión en el momento de realizar los «focus group» («Física o Química», «El internado», de Antena3, y «La que se avecina», de Tele5) e incluso algunos ya concluidos («Aquí no hay quien viva», Antena3) también cuentan con jóvenes fans en Internet. Los personajes con un mayor número de seguidoras son Lleó («Polseres vermelles», TV3) y Ulises (El barco, Antena3).

3.3. Aplicación

Los problemas sentimentales y relacionales de los personajes concentran el interés de los entrevistados, muy por delante de las temáticas sociales. No obstante, algunos jóvenes consideran que la ficción televisiva es una importante fuente de aprendizaje, que les ayuda a afrontar problemas de carácter personal o de socialización. También hay jóvenes que aprecian las informaciones históricas o de actualidad de la ficción, mientras que el resto no creen que les enseñe nada y únicamente la perciben como una forma entretenida de ocio.

Los participantes en los «focus group» encuentran que el estilo de vida representado en las ficciones extranjeras es muy diferente al de los jóvenes españoles, por lo que muchos valoran la ficción de producción propia precisamente por su mayor proximidad. Aún así, una buena parte de dichos jóvenes critican la tendencia a la exageración y piensan que las tramas, las vivencias o los espacios (hogares, centros de enseñanza, lugares de trabajo, etc.) suelen ser más verosímiles que los propios personajes. Los más jóvenes reconocen semejanzas con la forma de hablar, de vestir o de actuar de los personajes, mientras que al grupo de 24-29 años les cuesta identificarse con ellos.

La ficción no suele constituir una referencia a la hora de afrontar los problemas cotidianos de los entrevistados. Pero, a pesar de lo inverosímil que les resultan algunas tramas, hay jóvenes de todas las edades que tratan de extrapolar los planteamientos de la ficción a su propia realidad, una tendencia más acusada entre los espectadores críticos. De hecho, las relaciones sentimentales y el esparcimiento de los protagonistas constituyen las representaciones que los participantes en los «focus group» desearían imitar con mayor frecuencia. Algunos jóvenes también se sienten identificados con la actitud y las acciones de los personajes, contextualizadas en función de su propia experiencia.

4. Conclusiones y discusión

La ficción televisiva es el macrogénero preferido por los entrevistados, sobre todo por las mujeres, cuya mayor fidelidad a sus programas favoritos es coherente con su preferencia por las series dramáticas (de estructura serializada). De manera inversa, la inclinación de los hombres por la comedia se corresponde con el carácter mucho más discontinuo de la recepción masculina. Por el contrario, la clase social de los participantes en los «focus group» no parece incidir en la recepción televisiva, al igual que ocurre con el origen (autóctono o extranjero) de los mismos. En términos generales, los entrevistados se pueden clasificar en los cuatro grupos propuestos por Millwood y Gatfield (2002) en función del consumo y la actitud adoptada ante los programas:

• Fanáticos (fanatic). Adoran la ficción televisiva y la siguen de manera regular, generalmente sin cuestionarla.

• Irónicos (ironic). Les gusta la ficción televisiva, pero experimentan sentimientos contradictorios que a veces les inducen a adoptar una actitud crítica con los programas.

• No comprometidos (non-committed). Se sienten atraídos por la ficción televisiva, pero solo la siguen de manera esporádica, buscando entretenimiento fácil.

• Desdeñosos (dimissive). Están llenos de prejuicios contra la ficción televisiva y no la ven nunca o casi nunca.

La fidelidad de las mujeres a sus ficciones favoritas contradice en parte la mayor espontaneidad que Morley atribuía a la recepción femenina en 1986 y pone de manifiesto que tanto la planificación como el visionado más casual no están ligados al género de los espectadores, sino más bien a la tipología de los programas.

Las temáticas más cercanas o el humor típicamente español se sitúan entre los aspectos más valorados, así como los problemas de los personajes y los temas controvertidos (Tufte, 2007). Pero, aunque algunos entrevistados se muestran desdeñosos con la ficción española (respecto de la norteamericana), otros aprecian su mayor proximidad y le reconocen un cierto carácter didáctico. Así, el entusiasmo de las adolescentes y las jóvenes por la serie catalana «Polseres vermelles», un drama protagonizado por un grupo de niños y adolescentes hospitalizados por enfermedad grave, pone de manifiesto el potencial pedagógico de la «fanfiction» en el desarrollo personal de las adolescentes, observado por autores como Rebecca Black (2008).

Los jóvenes manifiestan su preferencia por los personajes de su edad (Harwood, 1997). Sin embargo, los personajes seguros de sí mismos, así como los rebeldes y los ambivalentes, despiertan mayor interés que el resto, indicio de una posible identificación catártica destinada a conciliar las semejanzas entre los personajes y el espectador con el carácter extraordinario de los eventos narrados, como señala Gripsrud siguiendo a Jauss (Gripsrud, 2005). Aún así, los irónicos tienen muy claro que los personajes están estereotipados y que sus vivencias no se parecen a las de los jóvenes reales (Spence, 1995), mientras que los fanáticos consideran que los rasgos generales de dichos personajes tienden a ser realistas (en el sentido emocional del concepto definido por Ien Ang en 1985). El deseo de imitar a los personajes más admirados4, así como las semejanzas entre la forma de hablar de dichos personajes y los espectadores, también acercan a estos últimos a la ficción y ponen de manifiesto el constante proceso de retroalimentación inducido por la recepción (Galán-Fajardo & Del Pino, 2010; Lacalle & al., 2011).

Las preferencias de los entrevistados reafirman la incidencia del género en la recepción televisiva (Lemish, 2004; McMillin & Fisherkeller, 2008), pues mientras que las mujeres se decantan más por los personajes guapos, los hombres se inclinan por los «freaks», aunque la dispersión de los gustos masculinos dificulta todo intento de generalización. En cualquier caso, unas y otros aprecian la imagen de eternos adolescentes proyectada en la ficción por los personajes jóvenes, que ocupan la mayor parte de su tiempo entre el ocio y las relaciones sentimentales y sexuales (Bragg & Buckingham, 2004).

Los entrevistados de todas las edades prefieren ver la ficción a solas, sobre todo las mujeres, debido a la diversidad de gustos respecto de los progenitores. Se revalida así la relación entre los roles familiares y el visionado constatados por Morley (1986), Silverstone (1994) o Lull (1990), solo que en las familias monoparentales femeninas (más numerosas en la muestra de análisis que las monoparentales masculinas), la madre controla ahora el televisor principal. Contrariamente a cuanto sostienen Bragg i Buckingham (2004), los jóvenes que suelen ver la televisión en familia raramente comentan con los padres las temáticas que consideran más delicadas (relacionadas principalmente con el sexo). Los «focus group» tampoco aportan indicios sobre el posible estrechamiento de los lazos intergeneracionales en el seno de la familia que, según ambos autores británicos caracterizan la recepción televisiva compartida entre los diferentes miembros del hogar.

El carácter socializador de la ficción televisiva se manifiesta, en cambio, en el entusiasmo de los entrevistados al hablar de sus programas favoritos, principalmente con sus coetáneos, en sintonía con los resultados de la investigación de Thornham y Purvis (2005). Dicho entusiasmo sugiere que, como señalaba Modlesky (1979), algunos espectadores podrían considerar la ficción televisiva como una especie de extensión de su familia. Una «segunda familia» que les permite crear una «fantasía de comunidad», incrementada en la actualidad por el creciente uso de foros y redes sociales para comentarla. La facilidad con la que la mayor parte de los entrevistados se desenvuelven al hablar de ficción reafirma asimismo su carácter «terapéutico» y su función en cuanto catalizador de las relaciones sociales (Madill & Goldemeir, 2003), hasta el punto de que la utilidad social o de interacción (Rubin, 1985) parece ser uno de los motivos que impulsan a los jóvenes al consumo de ficción.

Los jóvenes también encuentran en la ficción un medio de evasión de los problemas y de las obligaciones cotidianas. Se trata de una función reconocida sistemáticamente por los investigadores de Estudios Culturales, desde el pionero análisis del serial «Crossroads» realizado por Hobson en 1982, y revalidado en investigaciones recientes (McMillin & Fisherkeller, 2008). De ahí que los fanáticos reconozcan el carácter adictivo de la ficción, constatado por autores como Millwood y Gatfield (2002) y fomentado por la creciente hibridación de formatos característica de la producción actual en un contexto de extremada competitividad.

Los entrevistados son perfectamente conscientes de las determinaciones a las que están sometidos los diferentes géneros y formatos televisivos, algo que, como señala Buckingham (1987), parece incrementar el placer de la recepción en los espectadores irónicos. Sin embargo, mientras que los fanáticos prefieren que las tramas les sorprendan con giros inesperados, a los primeros les gusta adivinar el desenlace e incluso anticipar la conclusión del programa. Los irónicos también valoran particularmente la hibridación y la innovación de los temas tratados, así como la calidad técnica (estructura narrativa) y tecnológica (efectos especiales y «look» de los programas). Los fanáticos, por el contrario, se apasionan sobre todo por la temática y los personajes.

Los personajes favoritos, los momentos de clímax y los «gags» integran los recuerdos más persistentes, que varían substancialmente en función del grado de implicación de los entrevistados. Por el contrario, la estructura del relato e incluso una buena parte de los temas del episodio o capítulo del programa visionado parecen ser relegados al olvido rápidamente, lo que revela el peso de la memoria selectiva en los procesos de interpretación y, posiblemente, el carácter limitado de los efectos de la ficción televisiva. Hay entrevistados de todas las edades que intentan extrapolar los planteamientos de la ficción a su realidad cotidiana. No parece, en cambio, que ningún entrevistado considere que la vida real y la vida de la ficción formen un todo inseparable, como por el contrario afirma Montero (2006), a partir de los resultados de su investigación sobre el serial juvenil de Tele5 «Al salir de clase».

Notas

1 Véase el informe de A. Lenhart, K. Purcell, A. Smith y K. Zickuhr: Social media and young adults, realizado para The Pew Internet and American Life Project en 2010. En línea: (www.pewInternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults.aspx) (14-12-2011).

2 El descenso del modelo de descarga a favor del modelo «streaming» en los últimos años se debería, según el «Informe Anual de los Contenidos Digitales en España 2010» de red.es al cambio de mentalidad sobre todo de los usuarios más jóvenes, que ven el consumo de contenidos como un servicio sin necesidad de ostentar la propiedad de los mismos. (www.red.es/media/registrados/201011/1290073066269.pdf?aceptacion=230ed621b2afb25bab3692b9b951e2c6) (02-12-2011).

3 La comodidad es también –según el «Informe Anual de los Contenidos Digitales en España 2010» de red.es– la razón que impulsa a la mayor parte de los consumidores de ficción (televisiva y cinematográfica) a través de la Red. (www.red.es/media/registrados/201011/1290073066269.pdf?aceptacion=230ed621b2afb25bab3692b9b951e2c6) (02-12-2011).

4 Pensemos, por ejemplo, en el éxito de El armario de la tele, la tienda dedicada a comercializar la ropa que lucen los personajes de la televisión. (www.elarmariodelatele.com) (09-12-2011).

Apoyos

Proyecto competitivo subvencionado por el Institut Català de les Dones, «La construcció social de les dones a la ficció televisiva: representacions, recepció i interacció a través del Web 2.0», 2010-11. Esta parte de la investigación ha sido desarrollada por Charo Lacalle (directora) y las investigadoras Mariluz Sánchez y Lucía Trabajo. Han colaborado Ana Cano, Beatriz Gómez y Nuria Simelio.

Referencias

Ang, I. (1985). Watching Dallas. Soap Opera and the Melo dra matic Imagination. London (UK): Methuen.

Baym, N. (2000). Tune In, Log on. Soaps, Fandom, and Online Com munity. London (UK): Sage Publications.

Black, R.W. (2008). Adolescents and Online Fanfiction. New York (US): Peter Lang.

Bragg, S. & Buckingham, D. (2004). Embarrassment, Education and Erotics: the Sexual Politics of Family Viewing. European Jour nal of Cultural Studies, 7(4), 441-459.

Brunsdon, C. (2000). The Feminist, the Housewife, and the Soap Opera. London (UK): Oxford Clarendon Press.

Buckingham, D. (1987). Public secrets. Eastenders and its audience. London (UK): BFI.

Della Torre, A. & al. (2010). Il caso true blood: consumo telefilmico su media digitali. Le rappresentazioni culturali dei serial ad dicted: consumo, identità e resistenza. Centro Studi Etnografia Digi ta le. (www.etnografiadigitale.it) (02-12-2011).

Galán Fajardo, E. & del Pino, C. (2010). Jóvenes, ficción y nuevas tecnologías. Área Abierta, 25, marzo. (www.ucm.es/ BUCM /re vistas/inf/15788393/articulos/ARAB1010130003A.PDF) (02-12-2011).

Gerarghty, C. (1991). Women and Soap Opera: A Study of Pri me Time Soaps. Cambridge (UK): Polity Press.

Greenberg, B., Stanley, C. & Siemicki, M. (1993). Sex Content on Soaps and Prime-time Television Series most Viewed by Ado lescents. In B. Greenberg, J. Brown & N. Buerkel-Rothfuss (Eds.), Media, Sex and the Adolescent. Cresskill (US): Hampton Press Coop, 29-44.

Gripsrud, J. (2005). The Dinasty Years: Hollywood Television and Critical Media Studies. London (UK): Routledge.

Harwood, J. (1997). Viewing Age: Lifespan Identity and Tele vision Viewing Choices. Journal of Broadcasting and Electro nic Media, 41, 203-213.

Henderson, L. (2007). Social Issues in Television Fiction. Edin burgh (UK): University Press.

Hobson, D. (1982). Crossroads. The Drama of a Soap Opera. Lon don (UK): Methuen.

Lacalle, C. & al. (2010a). Dal telespettatore attivo all’internauta: fiction televisiva e Internet. In-Formazione, IV, 6, 62-65.

Lacalle, C. & al. (2010b). Joves i ficció televisiva: representacions i efectes. Anàlisi, 40, 29-45.

Lacalle, C. & al. (2011). Construcción de la identidad juvenil en la ficción: entrevistas a profesionales. Quaderns del CAC, 36, XIV (1), 109-117.

Lemish, D. (2004). Girls Can Wrestle Too: Gender Differences in the Consumption of a Television Wrestling Series. Sex Roles, 38, 9-10, 1998, 833-850.

Lull, J. (1990). Inside Family Viewing: Ethnographic Research on Television’s Audiences. London (UK): Routledge.

Madill, A. & Goldmeier, R. (2003). EastEnders’: Texts of Female Desire and of Community. International Journal of Cultural Stu dies, 6 (4), 471-494.

McMillin, D. & Fisherkeller, J.E. (2008). Teens, Television Characters, and Identity. International Communication Associa tion, Annual Meetting, 22/26-05-2008 (Quebec). (http://citation.allacademic.com//meta/p_mla_apa_research_citation/2/3/2/6/0/pages232608/p232608-1.php) (05-12-2011).

Meijer, I. & Van Vossen, M. (2009). The Ethos of TV Relation ships. A Deconstructive Approach Towards the Recurring Moral Panic about the Impact of Television. International Communication Association, Annual meeting, 25-05-2009 (Nueva York).

Millwood, A. & Gatfield, L. (2002). Soap Box or Soft Soap? Au dience Attitudes to the British Soap Opera. London (UK): Broad casting Standards Comission. (www.ofcom.org.uk/static/ar chive/ bsc/ pdfs/ research/soap.pdf) (05-12-2011).

Modlesky, T. (1979). The Search for Tomorrow in Today’s Soap Operas. Notes on a Feminine Narrative Form. Film Quarterly, 33: 1, 12-21.

Montero, Y. (2006). Tv, valores y adolescencia: análisis de al salir de clase (3). Guió-Actualidad, 24 de abril. (http://200.2.115.237/ spip. php?article1495) (30-11-2011).

Morley, D. (1986). Family Television: Cultural Power and Do mes tic Leisure. London (UK): Routledge.

Rubin, A.M. (1985). Uses of Daytime Television Soap Operas by Collegue Students. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 29, 3, 241-258.

Silverstone, R. (1994). Television and Everyday Life. London (UK): Routledge.

Spence, L. (1995). They Killed off Marlena, but she’s on Another Show Now’: Fantasy, Reality, and Pleasure in Watching Daytime Soap Operas. In R.C. Allen (Ed.). To Be Continued…: Soap Ope ras around the World (pp. 182-197). London (UK): Routledge..

Steel, J.R. & Brown, J.D. (1995). Adolescent Room Culture: Studying Media in the Context or Everyday Life. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 24, 5, 551-575.

Thornham, S. & Purvis, T. (2005). Television Drama. Theories and Identities. New York (US): Palgrave MacMillan.

Tufte, T. (2007). Soap operas y construcción de sentido: mediaciones y etnografía de la audiencia. Comunicación y Sociedad, 8, 89-112.

Von Feilitzen, C. (2008). Children and Media Literacy: Critique, Practice, Democracy. Doxa, 6, 317-332.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/12
Accepted on 30/09/12
Submitted on 30/09/12

Volume 20, Issue 2, 2012
DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-03-01
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 9
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?