Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This article questions the relationships between literacy, media literacy and media education. In the process, we connect the findings from a range of our ethnographic research and use these to propose new forms of practice for critical media literacy. By ‘after the media’, we do not posit a temporal shift (that ‘the media’ has ceased to be). Instead, we conceive of this as akin to the postmodern – a way of thinking (and teaching) that resists recourse to the idea of ‘the media’ as external to media literate agents in social practice. The preservation of an unhelpful set of precepts for media education hinder the project of media literacy in the same way as the idea of ‘literature’ imposes alienating reading practices in school. Just as the formal teaching of English has obstructed the development of critical, powerful readers by imposing an alienating and exclusive model of what it means to be a reader, so has Media Studies obscured media literacy. Despite ourselves, we have undermined the legitimation of studying popular culture as an area by starting out from the wrong place. This incomplete project requires the removal of ‘the media’ from its gaze. The outcomes of our research thus lead us to propose a ‘pedagogy of the inexpert’ as a strategy for critical media literacy.

Download the PDF version

==== 1. Introduction: Media Literacy

The need to set one literacy apart from another can only be explained by a need to use the concepts for other reasons, that is, to strengthen the professional status of its constituencies, or to take issue with the approaches used by proponents (Tyner, 1999: 104). The convergence of findings from ethnographic research projects undertaken over the last three years provide us with some new and deeply problematic research questions related to the term «media literacy» (Bennett, Kendall and McDougall, 2011). Here, in bringing together the accumulative outcomes of this research, we propose new models of practice that embed the process of meaning-making – as opposed to the media (or its various forms of content) as central to critical media literacy.

Media literacy has never been an accepted and cohesively defined idea. The UK media regulator OFCOM offered a pragmatic definition of media literacy as consisting of three competences – accessing, communicating and creating. But Bazalgette is only one of a number of media educators who finds the term problematic. The very term «media literacy» is inherited from an outworn and discredited 20th century tactic; that of adding the term «literacy» to topics and issues in an attempt to promote them as new and essential aspects of learning (Bazalgette, cited in Murphy, 2010: 24).

If we consider that, a year after offering this critique at the European Congress of Media Education Practitioners, Bazalgette convened an international Media Literacy Conference in London, the complexity of the issue is apparent – media education practitioners use the term for pragmatic and political leverage whilst arguing for alternative semantics with one another. Bazalgette’s preference is simply to return to a reframed version of literacy as opposed to a set of variants (media literacy, new literacy, digital literacy, game literacy), but –as we shall discuss– David Buckingham (2010; 2011), another leading protagonist in media education – is highly skeptical of «multimodal literacy» work. Buckingham has recently observed the declining prominence of media literacy in policy rhetoric and implementation, from the peak in attention shortly after the inception of OFCOM – a regulator charged with a neo-liberal agenda for equipping citizens with the necessary competences for responsible participation in digital media – to the current reformulation of this as «digital literacy» – a more industry-friendly version, further away from the conceptual and critical practices of media education:

There is now an urgent need to sharpen our arguments, and to focus our energies. There is a risk of media literacy being dispersed in a haze of digital technological rhetoric. There is a danger of it becoming far too vague and generalized and poorly defined – a matter of good intentions and warm feelings but very little actually getting done (Buckingham, 2010: 10).

There is a deep irony in the link between any kind of formal education and digital literacy, of course, which is simply but powerfully expressed here by Instrell who remarks that «we are all aware of the bizarre fact that the only time many learners are not connected digitally is when they are in the classroom» (2011:5). For Buckingham, three obstacles are identified as impeding a more far reaching implementation of critical media literacy, of which the move to «digital literacy» is just one. The other two are the Media Studies 2.0 intervention (Merrin, 2008; Gauntlett, 2002) which he derides as a patronizing and naïve «techno-euphoria», and the renewed interest of media educators in «the literacy brigade» from whom media educators have developed a set of approaches to a «multimodal media literacy lens» (Instrell, 2011) which Buckingham views as an over-extension of linguistics into social theory. These three developments, he suggests, have served to, in different but connected ways, undermine the potential of media literacy to be taught as a kind of critical thinking – instead, technology, textual modes and overstated claims to democratization are celebrated uncritically and the educational response to them is reduced to a set of competences and skills.

The way out of these various cul-de-sacs would appear to be a sharper focus on the objectives of critical media literacy in the twenty first century – a clearer view of what we want to achieve. It is our contention, though, that this can only be achieved if we first depart from the idea of the media itself as, fundamentally, it is this mythical construct – ignored by media educators in the «internal politics» we have described here - that has most seriously impaired our vision.

2. Contention: Looking at the media

The media, as more than merely a technical grammatical plural, is constructed out of a need to preserve a status outside of it, to maintain it as other, to be looked upon with the pedagogic gaze through judgments which - in the case of media literacy - are conservative in their preservation of the idea that there exists the media to be critical about. The media exist no more than literature exists. Both are constructions, demarcated for particular forms of pedagogic attention but neither are read critically, in Gee and Hayes’ sense (2011: 63), by students.

Our argument here is not an extension of the much-contested idea of Media Studies 2.0 although we have found that intervention helpful in so much as it has asked us to re-connect media education to people and disconnect from the media. We do not subscribe to any technologically determined paradigm shift. But we do propose that new digital media has created a visible space for what was already happening in between people and media – and hence we can see more clearly now what was already, but less observably, there. Going back to the multimodal, new digital media does serve to complicate beyond repair the idea of the singular text: Even if you don’t accept the ecological metaphor, there’s no doubt that our emerging information environment is more complex – in terms of numbers of participants, the density of interactions between them, and the pace of change – than anything that has gone before (Naughton, 2010: 10).

Laughey (2011) also derides Media Studies 2.0 for its over-stated technological determinism, lamenting what he sees as a move away from «critical thinking» and, in this sense, his views chime with Buckingham’s. However, in seeking to offer an alternative, Laughey adopts a Leavisite «enrichment’ position: Those positive standards of quality, whether in literature, drama, music, film, television, radio, in the press or on the web remain constant. Rather than appealing to the lowest common denominator of mass appeal and sentimental melodrama, the best of popular culture captures something original and progressive about the social, political and moral attitudes of its time. That’s why we will always value Hitchcock over Hammer Horror, «The Wire» over «Without a Trace», The Beatles over The Bee Gees, serious over citizen journalism. (Laughey, 2011: 16).

Laughey here reinforces the (unhelpful) binary opposition between an «uncritical» embrace of the supposedly democratizing impact of new digital / social media and this «canonical» idea of «serious» critical study. Neither, of course, are helpful. Instead, in the interests of a universal project for critical media literacy, we should be thinking reflexively about the way that cultural products connect with peoples’ construction of their selves and how media play a part in performance of identity – through affiliations and affinities that signify within language games and foster the connecting of people to one another – on or offline. A critical understanding of how we attribute meaning to cultural material, along with how we attribute meaning to ourselves – must surely be the «key competence» of media literacy.

3. Methods

The argument we present here is a summary of a convergence of a range of research outcomes, pedagogic strategies and dialogic work with texts of various kinds conducted over the last three years (Bennett, Kendall & McDougall, 2010). Our agenda is to raise a set of important and challenging questions for everyone concerned with media education and its current and deeply problematic variant – media literacy. The findings from three specific research interventions form the basis of our later discussion and suggestions for critical media literacy in the future. This article cannot provide substantial detail on these individual research projects, all of which are discussed in other articles, as our focus here is on the collective weight they add to our argument and how we can locate this in current discussions about the future of media literacy. However, a summary of each intervention is as follows.

More broadly, a critical discourse analysis of Subject Media (the institutional form of media education) involved a deconstruction of the assumptions at work, and their manifestation in social pedagogic practices in the teaching of the key conceptual framework for media education. To this end, each of power, genre, representation, ideology, identity, history, audience, narrative, technology and pedagogy itself were the subject of discourse analysis, in response to which a series of strategies for dealing with (or dispensing with) each concept «after the media» were proposed (Bennett, Kendall & McDougall, 2011). Informing this were a critical discourse analysis of the socio-cultural framing of Subject Media (McDougall, 2010) and the three interventions we turn to here - research into perceptions of reading and being a reader by participants in the Richard and Judy Book Group (Kendall & McDougall, 2011); a mixed-methods study of male teenage gamers telling stories about their experiences in «Grand Theft Auto 4» (Kendall & McDougall, 2009) and a «multi-modal» remixing of Morley’s Nationwide Study (1980) with contemporary application to audience groups’ engagements with «The Wire» (McDougall, 2010). Each of these research studies were analysed for their potential to transgress orthodox «othering» arrangements of teacher-student and media-audience which, we argue, serve to reproduce culture and power relations that exclude by the imposition of self-regulatory identity-practices. Our thesis for After the Media is, then, informed by this series of ethnographic research interventions that have explored various ways of «doing media literacy» by fixing our attention on people and how they attribute meaning to culture and to their own reading and literacy practices – ways of being with others, and the role that media might play in this.

4. Results 1: On Being a Reader

For this study (Kendall & McDougall, 2011) the discussion prompts offered for the discussion of particular novels on the website of the Richard and Judy book club (http://www.richardandjudy.co.uk) were analysed in relation to ideas about literature, reading and being a reader with particular attention to what the function of the interactive new media context for this might be.

Collins (2010) observes the transformation of American literary culture into popular culture and the role played by new digital media in this genealogy. Alongside institutional determinants related to the convergence of publishing and other media forms, Collins describes a fragmentation in the dynamics of access to literature:

A number of other factors are the result of changes in taste hierarchies – the radical devaluation of the academy and New York literacy scene as taste brokers who maintained the gold standard of literary currency, the collapse of the traditional dichotomies that made book reading somehow naturally antagonistic to film going or television watching, and the transformation of taste acquisition into an industry with taste arbiters becoming media celebrities. And perhaps the most fundamental change at all, the notion that refined taste, or the information needed to enjoy sophisticated cultural pleasures, is now easily accessible outside a formal education. Its’ just a matter of knowing where to access it, and whom to trust (Collins, 2010: 8).

Collins does not appear to be concerned with further dismantling the categories at work here - «refined taste», «sophisticated cultural pleasures» and, of course, the idea of literature itself. Nonetheless there is a resonance here with the project of media literacy and in particular the claims that Media 2.0 has a similarly fundamental impact on cultural hierarchies. To what extent, though, can these «taste dynamics» change purely through access alone, if the contextual elements of «distinction» (Bourdieu, 1984) and textual value remain intact?

An example of the kind of «celebrity arbitration» Collins describes, in the UK, is the Richard and Judy Book Club. However, whilst clearly offering an «out of school» route into engagement with literature, our research suggests that this new popular cultural domain, in its provision of prompts for reading group discussion of its listed novels, operates in a hybrid space between opening up reading to an audience connected by a daytime TV show and maintaining schooled literature appreciation discourses. In this example, the imposition of the idea of «thematic significance» is discussed:

Readers are interpellated into the act of discussing something that is assumed to exist – thematic significance. This is presented as objective, in that such a theme can only be significant if it exists and can be looked at and known as such, outside of the thinking of the reader. There is no space for the reader to think that the phrase is not thematically significant, or that themes are questionable or that the idea of lines from a novel echoing other lines is subjective. (Kendall & McDougall, 2011: 18).

Just as this «reaching out» by the Richard and Judy group on behalf of and by the idioms of «Subject English» is a conservative practice, so too can media literacy be viewed as an intervention which appears more progressive than it has proven – in its normative and regulatory impact - to be.

The theorisation of reading practices at work in research into literacy is fundamental to the study of how people attribute meaning to media but that this domain has been largely ignored in favour of reductive models of media literacy. Ideas about reading in the discourses of media literacy are very similar to those that dominate other text conscious subjects like English and, so, a cross disciplinary idea of reading is in place that is rarely challenged - what Bernstein might call a «horizontal discourse» (1996). A multimodel, or «transmedia» approach will not in and by itself do much to subvert this more general meta-narrative of sense-making that understands text, reader, author and reading in particular as bound concepts - stable, fixed and certain - contributing to meaning making and taking in obvious and predictable ways.

4.1. Results 2: Just Gaming

Assessing the outcomes of a study (Kendall and McDougall, 2009) of young male players of «Grand Theft Auto 4» and how they talk and write / blog about in-game experiences in relation to theories of narrative from Subject Media, our approach to play was concerned with the brokering of particular ways of being in different modalities of practice. Participants play with the game, against and through the game for multiple audiences (us, each other, the online community) performing and re-performing versions of their (male) selves. To re-think young men’s participation in game cultures as a form of ritualised performance opens up new possibilities for re-reading the functionality of gaming in young peoples lives.

A group of 16-17 year old players were connected on a Facebook blog, sharing, to an open brief, narrative accounts of their gameworld experiences in the weeks after the release of the game and were subsequently interviewed with a set of common questions followed by supplementary enquiries to explore the style and content of their blog posts.

Drawing on post-structuralist understandings of self, Gauntlett reminds us that «we do not face a choice of whether to give a performance. The self is always being made and re-made in daily interactions» (2002: 141) and it this peformativity that is central to constructions of gender. What became quickly striking was the manner in which our participants, although on the surface interacting with a text that has been derided for its apparently amoral representation of vice, were contemporaneously playing with identities in ways which might be described in Maclure’s (2006) terms as «frivolous». Maclure understands frivolity as «whatever threatens the serious business of establishing foundations, frames, boundaries, generalities or principles. Frivolity is what interferes with the disciplining of the world» (2006: 1). Furthermore, it is precisely this kind of posturing that Butler (1990) advocates in her incitement to make gender trouble.

Through the possibility of subverting and displacing those naturalized and reified notions of gender that support masculine hegemony and heterosexist power, to make gender trouble, not through the strategies that figure a utopian beyond, but through the mobilization, subversive confusion, and proliferation of precisely those constitutive categories that seek to keep gender in its place by posturing as the foundational illusions of identity. (Butler, 1990: 33-34).

We could, perhaps with some surprise, see our gaming participants as engaged in radical moves that threaten the stability of the binaries around which moral panic discourses converge. The participants shared an explicit and «knowing» meta-awareness of how to play against, with or despite the narrative that resonated with Gauntlett’s idea of the postmodern «pick and mix» reader of magazines which are understood to offer possibilities for «being» that «might» be engaged with dialogically as the (female) reader is invited to play with different types of imagery (Gauntlett, 2002: 206). Such shared and quasi-conventional «parology» (Lyotard, 1985) – new moves in the game that disrupt orthodox analyses of effects and of reading itself – are perhaps our most compelling evidence that there is no singular way of being in a game – more of an event than a text – like «Grand Theft Auto 4». This has clear and present implications for the key concept of audience in media education.

Such playfulness around identity stands as further evidence (if needed) of the need for a re-reading of masculinities as a way of re-positioning young men in relation to textual and literacy practices. Rejecting the discourses that locate male readers as victims and losers in terms of achievement in literacy, a further interpretation of our data allows us to construct the figure of the «baroque showman» – the fusion of «I» as player and «I» as character (Nico) as an act of resistance against becoming the object of study with the truth of identity eluded and eclipsed by the camp humour of the interplay. Such self-knowing, critical posturing queers, in Butler’s sense, what it is possible to know, in the sense of grasp, about young people’s engagement with popular textualities. For the development of critical media literacy, the acceptance of this is surely fundamental.

4.2. Results 3: The Audience (Remix)

Taking season 4 of the US drama «The Wire» (which deals with the US school system), we have explored (McDougall, 2010) how it might be possible to remix Morley’s Nationwide study and in so doing we were unpacking much of the Media 2.0 thesis to challenge the part of that intervention which might assume too much about the end of the hierarchical nature of media production and reception at the same time as wanting to try out the move from doing Media to doing people. A major component, theoretically, of this intervention was the thinking through of secondary encoding as a refinement of Morley’s model. But in this account, we will concentrate on the act of mapping the event of «The Wire» by the research participants to their textualised lives.

Five participant groups –all located in different ways in relation to formal education– were given different methods with which to reflect on the drama in relation of their lifeworlds. From online critics to a group of youth workers, a preferred reading emerged but differently constructed for each group.

Media teachers provided an intertextual metalanguage coded as a semiotic chain of meaning (or a taxonomy in their words), with their own identities woven in. They assumed that the proximal relations of «The Wire», «Do the Right Thing» and «Public Enemy» – and the meanings attributed to such by white professionals (as several choose to identify themselves – an important detail since ethnicity was not a marker for this study) would be understood. Drama lecturers were alike in their eagerness to discuss «The Wire» as a text, but more comforttable with a discourse of cultural value, and more distant from the form – television. Though their acquisition of cultural capital was close to their media counterparts, their mapping of the text to their lifeworlds came less instinctively. The youth workers appeared to have the most at stake, contrasting greatly with both the media teachers (for whom the reality depicted is mediated through other media references) and the drama teachers who confessed to having little direct experience of such aspects of social reality. For the youth workers the preferred reading was apparently articulated through lived experience either in the present or projected into the future (it’s gonna come down on us). And subsequently there was less interest in the text, the craft or its objectives. For the education students a great deal was also at stake – their life experience and proximity to the social reality represented was closer to the youth workers, but their optimism for change marked their responses as different to all of the other groups - including the online critic-fans.

For audience after the media, what this study revealed about «The Wire» is far less interesting than how the research methods allowed for some more experimental and reflexive work with people. The reasons for the nuances and markers in the data from each group are not only a product of location in educational social practice but also by the research method – which was different for each group – employed. Critical media literacy research might, then, adopt this kind of «mash-up ethnography» to move away from the text to explore in new ways how people in culture attribute meaning to media – the event.

5. Discussion: Scales from Eyes

Jenkins (Berger & McDougall, 2011) draws our attention to a new kind of relationship between people and media : This represents a fundamentally different culture than one where media production and circulation is almost entirely professionalized. And in many cases, we are seeing what educational theorists describe as legitimate peripheral participation - that is, they are actively watching how culture gets produced with the recognition that they can engage and join the process when they feel ready (Berger & McDougall, 2011: in press).

Jenkins is drawing here upon the work of Lave and Wenger (1991), who observe the process by which individuals make the move from peripheral participation in social apprenticeships’ to full participation. With this analogy we can develop a model of social learning by which students, through their participation in social media education, progress from being peripheral to full practitioners in media audiences. So we are no longer looking at the audience as an object of study or at our own audience behaviour as reflection. Instead we are conceiving of full participation in culture as the key learning outcome. This full participation –«situatedness» in Lave and Wenger’s terms– leads to the making of meaning and the articulation of identity, learning to articulate in culture, through and with media, as opposed to learning from the articulations of others – whether elite producers, canonized texts or legitimated fans. Once again, it is the construct of the media which has denied us this opportunity, as a «big Other» it imposes a distributive model of social capital whereby this currency is always-already and can only be acquired in relation to its normative gaze –social capital achieved through the academic modality– being critical about the media, or through the vocational modality – working within its idioms to gain access. The in between space will be a community of practice in which texts, events and exchanges are produced in the practice but the media is ignored.

However, might it be that this kind of «legitimate peripheral participation» was always-already a feature of our engagement with culture and mediation and the role of online digital media has merely been to make it visible? In this more mundane sense we can see more clearly now, in the public domain, hitherto private attributions of meaning, affinity and, perhaps, creativity. If we are to find new ways of doing critical media literacy in this context, a new kind of pedagogy will be important – a pedagogy of the inexpert. To use Lave and Wenger’s terminology, the apprenticeship we want students serve is not craft or skill determined, but rather that they are apprentices in theorising their culture. Critical media literacy teaching must strive to facilitate «mastery» in a metalanguage which gives voice to reflexive negotiation of identity – a kind of «culture literacy».

Through a pedagogy of the inexpert we draw alternative subject positions for teachers and students engaged in critical media literacy work, predicated on models of post-structuralist educational practice but we refresh these for the contemporary environment in which, we suggest, the fluid, context bound and socially embedded nature of textual relations are more ordinarily and routinely fore-grounded. The apparent paradox of the inexpert teacher is purposeful and intended to communicate a shift in teacher expertise from orientation towards a mastery model of specialist content knowledge to a co-constructivist ethnographic model of finding out that takes as its common sense that the textual object is a fiction of textualisation to which models of reading are indexed and from which the traditional tools of critical literacy emerge.

The model of practice we’re proposing is predicated on a model of reading which explores meaning-making as a category. That is to say, rather than elucidating something about genre, narrative, content or author, instead the practice is to ask - how meaning-making is learned; what different kinds there are; what it is; who it is for; what sorts of things signify expertise; and what sorts of meaning-making are done in different kinds of contexts? This approach asserts as primary the constructedness of reading (and attributing meaning) within the context of cultural practice whilst simultaneously noticing the positioning and rootedness of individual agency within wider social relations. Couldry (2000) pays attention to the trajectories of individual agents negotiating «textual fields» through the «total textual environment» and this offers a new focus for the type of exploratory work that inverts the dynamics of traditional investigative endeavour of text conscious subjects from a concentration on text to a focus on people. This does not imply the mass demographic, projected idea of audience but instead a sense of real readers in real contexts, readers that Hills recognises as «textualised agents [who] make certain texts matter in a way that allows new, text-derived, social groupings to emerge» (2005: 29).

We can begin to see that a critical pedagogy founded on this set of ideas might look very different to the kind of textual analysis and audience research models we have been used to because a pedagogy based on this kind of understanding will of necessity be process rather than content orientated. That is to say the focus of study will not be the text but the tracing and analysis of textual fields, the choices individuals make as they negotiate myriad texts and the common patterns in their selections. The work of the teacher in this version of textual practice is to facilitate ethnographic enquiry that enables young people to read the «textualized stories of their lives» (Kehler & Greig, 2005: 367). This is what we think of as critical media literacy. Far removed from OFCOM’s key competences, Internet safety and digital literacy but also resistant to the technological determinism and binary oppositions of Media Studies 2.0 and its skeptical respondents and, crucially, more critical – in the move away from the media towards being with others and with media – than the linguistic determinism of multimodality.

For Gee and Hayes (2011), the most profound effect of digital media is its breaking down of the restrictions of literacy –who has the access to the means of production of knowledge. The implications of this for pedagogy are obvious– the barriers between the expert and the student mirror, in some ways, those between the professional author / journalist / producer and the amateur / apprentice. Enacting this kind of pedagogical practice requires a very different kind of teacher expertise, of course. We need a reading of teacher identity against the grain to accept our awareness of, but unfamiliarity with and inexpertise in the particular textual fields of learners and the ways they make texts matter. The role of the teacher in this dynamic is to facilitate and scaffold the auto-ethnographic story-telling of learners and to accept and embrace the more unchartered, unknowable learning spaces that emerge, learning spaces that, we assert, are charged with productive possibility.

In simple terms, despite the arguments over access, participation, technological affordances and what happens to literacy in new media environments, there is a shared desire amongst media educators to find a way of doing critical media literacy at this time, in this changing landscape. In many ways, our pedagogy of the inexpert is nothing new – we merely extend existing ideas about facilitation and the shared construction of knowledge, along with elements of «deschooling».

However, our observation that the exclusive categories of teacher / student cannot be challenged without doing the same to media / audience is we hope, more considered, subtle, cautious and critical than Media 2.0 and yet calling for change, for a shift in our practice is at the heart of our analysis. The incomplete project of critical media literacy can be resurrected through the formulation of new local rules and microstrategies for learning about how textual experience – but not the media – is part of making sense of ourselves and how we might be together.

====

References====

Bennett, P.; Kendall, A. & McDougall, J. (2011). After the Media : Culture and Identity in the 21st Century. London (UK): Routledge.

Berger, R. & McDougall, J. (2011). Apologies for Cross-posting: a Keynote Exchange (interview with Henry Jenkins). In Media Education Research Journal (02-01-2011).

Bernstein, B. (1996). Pedagogy, Symbolic Control and Identity: Theory, Research, Critique. London (UK): Taylor & Francis.

Bourdieu, P. (1984). Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste. London (UK): Routledge.

Buckingham, D. (2010). The Future of Media Literacy in the Digital Age: Same Challenges for Policy and Prac-tice. Media Education Journal, 47; 3-10.

Buckingham, D. (2011). Keynote Address: Breaking Barriers. AMES Conference, Dundee (UK), (14.4.11).

Butler, J. (1990). Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. London (UK): Routledge.

Collins, J. (2010). Bring on the Books for Everybody: How Literary Culture Became Popular Culture. London (UK): Duke University Press.

Couldry, N. (2000). Inside Culture: Re-imagining the Method of Cultural Studies. London (UK): Sage.

Gauntlett, D. (2002). Media, Gender and Identity: an Introduction. London (UK): Routledge.

Gee, J. & Hayes, E. (2011). Learning and Language in the Digital Age. London (UK): Routledge.

Hills, M. (2005). How to do Things with Cultural Theory. London (UK): Hodder Arnold.

Instrell, R. (2011). Breaking Barriers: Multimodal and Media Literacy in the Curriculum for Excellence. Media Education Journal, 49; 4-11.

Kehler, M. & Greig, C. (2005). Reading Masculinities: Exploring the Socially Literate Practices of High School Young Men. In International Journal of Inclusive Education, 9; 4; 351-370.

Kendall, A. & McDougall, J. (2009). Just Gaming: on Being Differently Literate. In Eludamos: Journal for Computer Game Culture, 3:2; 245-260.

Kendall, A. & McDougall, J. (2011). Different Spaces, Same Old Stories? on Being a Reader in the Richard and Judy Book Club. In Cousins, H. & Ramone, J. (Eds.). The Richard and Judy Book Club Reader. London (UK): Ashgate.

Laughey, D. (2011). Media Studies 1.0: Back to Basics. In 3D, 16; 13-15. Lave, J. & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated Learning: legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lyotard, J. & Thebaud, J. (1985). Just gaming. Minneapolis, MN: Minnesota University Press.

MacLure, M. (2006). Entertaining Doubts: on Frivolity as Resistance. In Satterthwaite, J.; Martin, W. & Roberts, L. (Eds.). Discourse, Resistance and Identity Formation. London (UK): Trentham.

McDougall, J. (2010). Wiring the Audience. In Participations 7:1; 73-101.

Merrin, W. (2008). Media Studies 2.0 (twopointzeroforum.blogspot.com) (20-06-11).

Morley, D. (1980). The «Nationwide» Audience: Structure and Decoding. London (UK): BFI. Murphy, D. (2010). Euromeduc: the Second Congress of Media Education Practitioners. In Media Education Journal, 47: 23-27.

Naughton, J. (2010). Everything You Ever Needed to Know about the Internet. In The Observer (www.-guardian.co.uk/technology/2010/jun/20/internet-everything-need-to-know) (20-06-11).

Tyner, K. (1999). Literacy in a Digital World: Teaching and Learning in the Age of Information. London (UK): Routledge.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En este trabajo se reflexiona sobre las relaciones entre alfabetización, alfabetización mediática y educación para los medios, relacionándolas con los hallazgos de diferentes investigaciones etnográficas, a fin de proponer nuevas formas de práctica para la alfabetización crítica en los medios. Vivimos en la postmodernidad, en la era «después de los medios» –y no es que ya no existan los medios–, sino que, por el contrario, surge una forma de pensar –y enseñar– que se resiste a la idea de considerar los medios como algo ajeno a la ciudadanía en la vida cotidiana. Para el autor, la permanencia de preceptos y prácticas anquilosadas sobre educación en los medios dificulta la puesta en marcha de proyectos de alfabetización mediática, al igual que una visión tradicionalista de la literatura genera prácticas viciadas de lectura en el aula. La enseñanza formal de la lengua ha obstaculizado el desarrollo de lectores críticos y competentes, imponiendo un modelo de lector unidimensional. Igualmente, los estudios mediáticos han ensombrecido la alfabetización en los medios, subestimando la legitimidad del estudio de la cultura popular en sí misma desde un punto de partida erróneo. La educación en medios es aun una asignatura pendiente y requiere un cambio de perspectiva. En este artículo, fruto de investigaciones, se propone una «pedagogía del inexperto» como estrategia para la alfabetización crítica en los medios.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

==== 1. Introducción: Alfabetización en los medios

La necesidad de establecer una alfabetización diferente se explica por la necesidad de emplear conceptos con otros fines, es decir, fortalecer el estatus de profesionalidad de sus destinatarios, o discrepar de los enfoques empleados por sus portavoces (Tyner, 1999: 104). La convergencia de los hallazgos obtenidos en los proyectos de investigación etnográficos llevados a cabo en los últimos tres años nos proporciona nuevas y polémicas cuestiones relacionadas con el término «alfabetización mediática» (Bennett, Kendall & McDougall, 2011). En este artículo, a partir de los resultados de esta investigación, proponemos nuevos modelos de práctica que integran el proceso de creación de significado, tan opuesto a los medios (o a sus formas de contenido) como decisivo para la alfabetización en los medios críticos.

El concepto de alfabetización en los medios no ha logrado englobar una idea definida y cohesionada. El OFCOM británico –organismo regulador de telecomunicaciones británico– ofrecía una definición pragmática de la alfabetización presentándola como un compendio de tres competencias: acceso, comunicación y creación. Pero Bazalgette opina, como otros muchos profesionales de los medios, que el término en cuestión es bastante problemático. La «alfabetización mediática» se enmarca en la tendencia propia del siglo XX de añadir el término «alfabetización» con el fin de impulsar ciertas áreas como aspectos esenciales del aprendizaje (Bazalgette, citado en Murphy, 2010: 24).

Teniendo en cuenta esto, un año después de presentar estas aportaciones en el Congreso Europeo de Profesionales de la Educación en los Medios, Bazalgette convocó una Conferencia sobre Alfabetización en los Medios en Londres, donde se analizó la evidente complejidad del asunto. Los profesionales de los medios emplean el término dentro del ámbito pragmático o político, y defienden semánticas alternativas con otro. La propuesta de Bazalgette consiste en retornar a una versión reestructurada de alfabetización, opuesta al conjunto de variantes como son la alfabetización mediática, la nueva alfabetización, la alfabetización digital o la alfabetización en los juegos. Buckingham (2010; 2011), experto destacado de la educación en medios, se muestra escéptico sobre las «alfabetizaciones multimodales». Este investigador ha observado recientemente el declive de la alfabetización en los medios en la retórica política y en la materialización de medidas. Este recorrido por la alfabetización pasa por un estelar momento, justo después de los comienzos de OFCOM, con su apuesta por equipar a los ciudadanos con las competencias necesarias para la participación responsable en los medios digitales, hasta hoy en día, con la reformulación actual del término, alejado de las prácticas conceptuales y críticas de la educación en los medios.

En este momento existe una necesidad urgente de preparar los argumentos y focalizar la energía, ante el riesgo de que la alfabetización mediática se disperse en la bruma de la retórica tecnológica. Otro riesgo posible es caer en la ambigüedad extrema y generalizada, poco definida. Algo así como un conjunto de buenas intenciones, pero insuficientes en la práctica (Buckingham, 2010: 10).

Se aprecia una profunda ironía en la conexión entre cualquier tipo de educación formal y la alfabetización digital, expresada de forma muy simple y acertada por Instrell (2011: 5): «todos somos conscientes de que el único momento en que los estudiantes no están conectados digitalmente es durante el tiempo de la clase». Para Buckingham, existen tres impedimentos a la hora de lograr una implementación más efectiva de la alfabetización crítica. Entre estos factores, se encuentra la transición hacia la «alfabetización digital». Los otros dos impedimentos son, de un lado, la aparición de un nuevo enfoque para el estudio de los medios (Media Studies 2.0) (Merrin, 2008; Gauntlett, 2002), que considera como una tecno-euforia paternalista e ingenua; y de otro lado, el renovado interés de los educadores por la «brigada alfabetizadora», a partir de la cual los educadores han desarrollado un conjunto de enfoques hacia una «lente multimodal de alfabetización mediática» (Instrell, 2011), que Buckingham considera como una extensión de la lingüística en la teoría social. Según Buckingham, estos tres planteamientos han servido para, con procedimientos distintos pero conectados, debilitar el potencial de la alfabetización mediática como forma de pensamiento crítico. En su lugar, se celebran la tecnología, los modos textuales y los reclamos de democratización sin sentido crítico alguno, y la respuesta educativa se reduce a una serie de competencias y destrezas.

La solución podría pasar por un enfoque más directo sobre los objetivos de la alfabetización crítica en el siglo XXI, una visión más clara de lo que queremos lograr. Nuestro argumento se centra en plantear si es cierto que la solución pasa por partir de la idea de los medios en sí mismos, pues consideramos que ese supuesto –ignorado por los educadores en las «políticas internas» que aquí se describen– ha empañado seriamente nuestras perspectivas.

2. El argumento: mirando a los medios

Los medios existen, como existe la literatura. Ambas son representaciones marcadas por sus particulares formas de atención pedagógica, pero no se lleva a cabo una lectura crítica de las mismas en el sentido expresado por Gee y Hayes (2011: 63).

El argumento que desarrollamos a continuación no es una extensión de la ya discutida idea de los Media Studies 2.0, aunque hemos encontrado esas intervenciones útiles por la demanda de reconexión de la educación en los medios con la gente y menos con los medios. Aunque no suscribimos ningún cambio en el paradigma tecnológico, sugerimos que los nuevos medios digitales han creado un espacio visible para lo que está ocurriendo entre la gente y los medios de comunicación, y podemos apreciar con más claridad lo que ya existía de forma menos palpable. Los nuevos medios digitales complican irremediablemente la idea de texto singular. Incluso sin aceptar la metáfora ecológica, no hay duda de que los ambientes informativos que subyacen son más complejos que nunca, en términos de número de participantes, densidad de interacción entre ellos, y el ritmo del cambio (Naughton, 2010: 10).

Laughey (2011) critica los Media Studies 2.0 por su determinismo tecnológico, lamentando lo que él aprecia como un alejamiento del «pensamiento crítico» y, en este sentido, su visión colinda con la de Buckingham. No obstante, a la búsqueda de una alternativa, Laughey (2011: 16) adopta una posición «leavisista»1 de «enriquecimiento»: Los niveles de calidad ya sea en literatura, teatro, música, cine, televisión, radio, prensa o Internet, se mantienen inmóviles. En lugar de atraer al mínimo denominador común de las masas y el melodrama sentimental, lo mejor de la cultura popular captura lo original y progresista de lo social, la política y las actitudes morales del momento. Esta es la razón por la cual se valora el terror de Hitchcock sobre el de Hammer, a los Beatles sobre los Bee Gees, el periodismo serio por encima del periodismo ciudadano.

Laughey reafirma así la oposición binaria entre la adopción «incondicional» del supuesto impacto democratizador de los nuevos medios digitales y sociales y su idea «canónica» de estudio crítico «serio». Ninguno de estos enfoques es del todo útil. Al contrario, para lograr un proyecto universal para la alfabetización crítica, debemos reflexionar sobre la forma en que los productos culturales conectan con la configuración de los individuos, y cómo los medios desempeñan un papel específico en la creación de la identidad dentro y fuera de la Red, a través de afiliaciones y afinidades significativas dentro de los juegos del lenguaje, promoviendo y favoreciendo la conexión de unos y otros. En este sentido, la «competencia clave» de esta alfabetización sería un análisis crítico sobre cómo atribuimos el significado al material cultural, y cómo nos atribuimos significado a nosotros mismos.

3. Métodos

El argumento que presentamos a continuación es el resumen de la convergencia de un conjunto de resultados procedentes de estudios, estrategias pedagógicas y trabajo dialógico con textos de varios tipos llevados a cabo en los últimos tres años (Bennett, Kendall & McDougall, 2011). Nuestro objetivo es plantear una serie de cuestiones fundamentales para todos aquellos que participan de la educación en los medios y su variante más actual y controvertida: la alfabetización mediática. Los hallazgos obtenidos a partir de tres intervenciones específicas forman la base del debate y las propuestas de alfabetización crítica en el futuro. En este artículo no podemos profundizar en cada uno de los proyectos mencionados, pero éstos aparecen detallados en otros artículos. En este caso, el enfoque está dirigido al peso colectivo que añaden estos proyectos a nuestro argumento, y cómo podemos situarlo en el debate actual sobre el futuro de la alfabetización en los medios. No obstante, a continuación se incluye un resumen de cada intervención.

De un modo general, un análisis crítico de Subject Media (la forma institucional de la educación en medios, esto es, los medios como asignatura) supuso la reconstrucción de los supuestos existentes, y su manifestación en las prácticas pedagógicas sociales en la enseñanza de los marcos conceptuales de educación en los medios. Con este fin, el poder, el género, la representación, la ideología, la identidad, la historia, el público, la narrativa, la tecnología y la pedagogía se convirtieron en temas de análisis del discurso, en respuesta a lo cual se propusieron una serie de estrategias para tratar cada concepto en relación con los medios (Bennett, Kendall & McDougall, 2011). Apoyando esta idea encontramos, de un lado, un análisis crítico del discurso del marco sociocultural de Subject Media (McDougall, 2010) y de otro, las tres intervenciones siguientes: la investigación de las percepciones en torno a la lectura y el ser lector llevada a cabo por los participantes en el «Richard and Judy Book Group» (Kendal & McDougall, 2011); un estudio de métodos sobre chicos adolescentes y sus experiencias con el videojuego Grand Theft Auto 4 (Kendall & McDougall, 2009), y una mezcla «multi-modal» del estudio «Morley’s Nationwide» (1980) con aplicaciones contemporáneas a la implicación del público con la serie norteamericana «The Wire» (McDougall, 2010). Cada uno de estos estudios ha sido analizado por su potencial para transgredir la ortodoxia de la «otredad» entre profesor-alumno y medios-audiencia, útil para reproducir la cultura y las relaciones de poder, excluidas por la imposición de prácticas de identidad auto-reguladas. Nuestra tesis está sustentada, por tanto, en una serie de investigaciones etnográficas que han explorado varias formas de alfabetización mediática a partir de un enfoque centrado en los individuos, y en cómo éstos atribuyen significado a la cultura y a sus propias prácticas de lectura y alfabetización. Estudios que han explorado formas de ser con los otros y el papel que los medios juegan en estos procesos.

4. Resultados 1: Del ser lector

Para este estudio (Kendall & McDougall, 2011) se analizaron los elementos para estimular el debate sobre novelas concretas en el sitio de web del grupo de lectura «Richard and Judy Book Club» (www.richardandjudy.co.uk). Estas cuestiones se plantearon en relación con las ideas sobre literatura, lectura y el ser lector, con especial atención a la función del contexto interactivo de los nuevos medios.

Collins (2010) observa la transformación de la cultura literaria americana en cultura popular, y el papel que juegan los nuevos medios digitales en esta genealogía. Junto a los determinantes institucionales relacionados con la convergencia de las publicaciones y otras formas de medios de comunicación, Collins describe la fragmentación de la dinámica de acceso a la literatura del siguiente modo.

Existe una serie de factores que son el resultado de cambios en la jerarquía de gustos y preferencias, como son la devaluación radical de la academia y del escenario cultural neoyorkino, poblado de «brokers» que promueven la literatura comercial; el colapso de las dicotomías tradicionales que hacen de la lectura de un libro un hecho naturalmente antagónico al cine o a la televisión, y la transformación de la adquisición de gustos hacia una industria en la que los árbitros son los propios famosos de turno de los medios de comunicación. Es probable que la transformación fundamental, la noción de gusto refinado o la información necesaria para obtener placeres culturales sofisticados sea más accesible ahora fuera de la educación formal. Se trata simplemente de saber dónde acudir y en quién confiar (Collins, 2010: 8).

Collins no se ocupa específicamente de la desaparición de las nociones de «gusto refinado», «placeres culturales sofisticados», o la idea de literatura en sí. Sin embargo, se aprecia cierta resonancia con el proyecto de alfabetización mediática, y en particular con la afirmación de que los Medios 2.0 tienen un impacto similar en las jerarquías culturales. ¿Hasta qué punto entonces pueden estas dinámicas del gusto modificar el acceso si los elementos contextuales de distinción (Bordieu, 1984) y valor textual continúan intactos?

Según Collins, un buen ejemplo de este tipo de «árbitro famoso» al que hemos hecho referencia sería el grupo de lectura «Richard and Judy Book Club», en Reino Unido. Aunque aportan una vía extra académica de acceso a la literatura, nuestra investigación sugiere que este nuevo dominio cultural popular, en su intento por fomentar el debate en torno a su lista de novelas, opera en un espacio híbrido, entre la apertura a la lectura de una audiencia conectada diariamente al programa de televisión en cuestión y por otro lado, el mantenimiento de los discursos propios de la literatura escolar. En el ejemplo siguiente se debate la imposición de la idea de significación temática.

Se anima a los lectores a debatir elementos reales (significación temática) y se presenta como objetivo un tema significativo, por ser real y por poder ser examinado como tal, fuera del pensamiento del lector. No hay espacio para que el lector cuestione la falta de significación, para cuestionarse los temas o plantear que la idea de la trama en una novela reflejan otra subjetiva (Kendall & McDougall, 2011: 18).

Del mismo modo que esta práctica del grupo «Richard y Judy» puede parecer conservadora, la alfabetización mediática puede considerarse como una intervención que aparenta ser más progresiva de lo que se ha podido comprobar a partir de su impacto normativo y regulador.

La teoría y la investigación en torno a las prácticas de lectura en el área de la alfabetización resultan fundamentales para el estudio de la atribución de significado a los medios por parte de los usuarios, pero estos dominios han sido apartados durante mucho tiempo en favor de modelos reduccionistas de alfabetización. Las ideas sobre la lectura en los discursos de alfabetización mediática son muy similares a las que dominan otras asignaturas textuales como la Lengua, y por tanto, no suele plantearse la idea interdisciplinar de lectura, lo que Bernstein llamaría «discurso horizontal» (1996). Un enfoque multimodelo o «transmediático» no ayudaría mucho por y en sí mismo a la hora de cuestionar esta meta-narrativa de creación de sentido que comprende texto, lector, autor y a la lectura en particular, presentándolos como conceptos unidos, estables, fijos y determinados, contribuyendo a la creación de significado y tomando caminos obvios y predecibles.

4.1. Resultados 2: Experiencia con un videojuego

El estudio en cuestión (Kendall & McDougall, 2009) se realizó con chicos jóvenes, jugadores del videojuego «Grand Theft Auto 4». Se analizaron sus procedimientos de comunicación verbal y escrita en torno a sus experiencias con el videojuego y en relación con las teorías de la narrativa de Subject Media. El enfoque de la investigación se centraba en el estudio de la negociación que se lleva a cabo con las formas particulares de ser en las distintas prácticas. Los participantes interactuaron con el juego, contra él y a través de él para múltiples audiencias (nosotros, ellos entre sí y la comunidad online) desarrollando y reconstruyendo versiones de su propio ser (masculino). Replantear la participación de estos chicos en las culturas del juego como forma de práctica ritual ofrece nuevas posibilidades para una relectura de la funcionalidad de los juegos en la vida de los jóvenes.

Un grupo de jóvenes de 16-17 años conectados a Facebook compartían en abierto aportaciones narrativas de sus experiencias con el juego en las semanas posteriores a su salida al mercado, y fueron entrevistados con posterioridad, respondiendo a un conjunto de preguntas seguidas de cuestiones adicionales para explorar el estilo y el contenido de los post publicados en sus blogs.

Partiendo de concepciones post-estructuralistas del ser, Gauntlett nos recuerda que «no tenemos opción de elegir a la hora de actuar. El ser se hace y rehace continuamente en sus interacciones diarias» (2002: 141) y sus acciones son decisivas para la construcción del género. Lo que trascendió rápidamente fue la forma en que nuestros participantes, a pesar de la interacción superficial con un texto que ha sido criticado por su aparente representación amoral del vicio, desarrollaban identidades que bien podría encajar en los términos de Maclure (2006) como «frívolas». Maclure entiende por frivolidad «cualquier amenaza a la creación de fundamentos, marcos, límites, generalidades o principios. La frivolidad es lo que interfiere en la disciplina del mundo» (2006: 1). Es precisamente esta postura la que asocia Butler (1990) con la aparición de problemas de género.

A través de la posibilidad de cuestionar y desplazar esas nociones naturalizadas y materializadas del género, que apoyan la hegemonía masculina y el poder heterosexual, no a través de estrategias que configuran un futuro utópico, sino a través de la movilización, la confusión subversiva y la proliferación de esas categorías constitutivas que persiguen mantener el género en su sitio, postulándose como ilusiones fundamentales de la identidad (Butler, 1990: 33-34).

Pudimos constatar con sorpresa que nuestros participantes se implicaban en tendencias radicales que amenazan la estabilidad de los binarios en torno a los cuales convergen los discursos morales del pánico. Los participantes compartieron una metaconciencia explícita y consciente de cómo jugar contra, con, o a pesar de la narrativa con la idea de Gauntlett del lector ecléctico postmoderno de revistas concebidas como un abanico de posibilidades para el «ser», que «puede» involucrarse en la dialógica, invitando a las lectoras en este caso a desenvolverse en otras formas de imaginería (Gaunlett, 2002: 206). Esta «parología» compartida y cuasi convencional (Lyotard, 1985) de avances en el juego que interrumpen los análisis ortodoxos de la lectura en sí misma, es quizás la evidencia más destacable de que no existe una única identidad en el juego. Esto tiene implicaciones claras y presentes en el concepto clave de audiencia en la educación en los medios.

Estas aproximaciones hacia la identidad se presentan como una evidencia más –si fuera necesaria– de la necesidad de una relectura de la masculinidad, como forma de reposicionar a los jóvenes en relación con las prácticas textuales y de alfabetización. Rechazando los discursos que sitúan a los lectores masculinos como desaventajados en el campo de la alfabetización, la interpretación detallada de los datos nos permite construir la figura del «showman barroco», una fusión del «yo» jugador y el «yo» personaje (Nico). Esto constituye un acto de resistencia, en contra de la idea de devenir objeto de estudio, con la realidad de la identidad eclipsada por la extravagante interacción. Este autoconocimiento y posicionamiento crítico es, según Butler, lo que se deduce de la implicación de los jóvenes en las textualidades populares. Para el desarrollo de la alfabetización mediática crítica, sería fundamental la aceptación de este principio.

4.2. Resultados 3: La audiencia4.2. Resultados 3: La audiencia

A partir de la cuarta temporada de la serie norteamericana «The Wire» (que trata sobre el sistema escolar norteamericano), hemos explorado (McDougall, 2010) las posibilidades de combinarlo con el estudio Morley’s Nationwide. Durante el proceso analizamos gran parte de la tesis de los Medios 2.0 para cuestionar esa parte de la intervención que quizás presupone en exceso el final de la naturaleza jerárquica de la producción mediática y la recepción, en el intento de pasar los medios de comunicación a las personas en sí. En teoría, un componente esencial en la intervención fue la reflexión a través de la codificación secundaria refinando el modelo de Morley. No obstante, en este caso nos centraremos en la descripción de la experiencia de los estudiantes con «The Wire» en sus vidas textuales.

Cinco grupos participantes, relacionados de forma distinta con la educación formal, recibieron diferentes métodos para reflexionar sobre la serie en relación con sus vidas. En todos los casos emergió un lector tipo específico, construido de forma distinta en función del grupo.

Los educadores proporcionaron un metalenguaje intertextual codificado como una cadena semiótica de significado (o taxonomía en sus palabras), con sus propias identidades integradas. Asumieron que así se comprenderían las relaciones proximales con «The Wire», «Do the Right Thing» y «Public Enemy», así como los significados atribuidos por los ‘profesionales blancos’ (como decidieron autodenominarse). Los docentes mostraron bastante interés por trabajar con «The Wire» como texto, pero se sentían más cómodos ante un discurso de valor cultural y más distante de la forma (televisión). A pesar de que la adquisición del capital cultural estaba próximo a sus homólogos mediáticos, la representación del texto en sus vidas reales fue menos instintiva. Los jóvenes trabajadores parecían tener más en juego que los docentes del ámbito de los medios (para los cuales la realidad descrita está mediada a través de otras referencias mediáticas) y que los profesores de teatro, que confesaron no tener apenas experiencia directa en estos aspectos de la realidad social. Para los jóvenes trabajadores la lectura preferida estaba aparentemente articulada a través de la experiencia del presente o de un futuro proyectado. Como consecuencia, había menos interés rodeando al texto, el arte en sí o sus objetivos. Para los estudiantes de educación había mucho en juego: su experiencia de vida y la proximidad a la realidad social representada estaba más cercana a la de los jóvenes trabajadores, pero su optimismo por el cambio hizo que sus respuestas fueran distintas a las del resto de grupos, incluyendo a los fans críticos online.

Para la audiencia, lo que resulta verdaderamente interesante de este estudio sobre «The Wire» es cómo los métodos de investigación permitieron un trabajo más experimental y reflexivo con la gente. Las razones por las cuales se aprecian estos matices en los datos obtenidos de cada grupo no son sólo producto del contexto de la práctica social educativa, sino también de los propios métodos de investigación, diferentes para cada grupo. La investigación en el campo de la alfabetización crítica debería por tanto adoptar esta «combinación etnográfica» para lograr la transición del texto a nuevas formas de exploración que indaguen en cómo los individuos, inmersos en la cultura, atribuyen significado a los medios.

5. Debate

Jenkins (Berger & McDougall, 2011) llama nuestra atención sobre un nuevo tipo de relación entre los usuarios y los medios: representa una cultura fundamentalmente distinta de aquella en la que la producción mediática y la circulación están totalmente profesionalizadas. En muchos casos observamos lo que los teóricos de la educación denominan como «participación periférica legítima», consecuencia de observar cómo se genera cultura, reconociendo que se puede formar parte y participar del proceso cuando se está preparado. (Berger & McDougall, 2011: in press).

Jenkins se basa en el trabajo de Lave y Wenger (1991), donde se observa el proceso mediante el cual los individuos pasan de la participación periférica en el aprendizaje social a la participación plena. Con esta analogía podemos desarrollar un modelo de aprendizaje social con el que los estudiantes, a través de su participación en los medios de educación social, progresan desde la periferia a la práctica plena. De esta forma, dejamos de considerar a la audiencia como un mero objeto de estudio, y tampoco nos centramos en la reflexión de nuestro comportamiento como audiencia. En lugar de eso, concebimos la participación plena en esa cultura como el resultado clave del aprendizaje. Esta participación total (‘situacionalidad’ en términos de Lave and Wenger) conduce a la creación de significado y a la articulación de la identidad, aprendiendo a articular en cultura, a través y con los medios, en lugar de aprender a partir de las articulaciones de otros (productores de élite, textos canonizados o fans legítimos). Una vez más, es el supuesto de los medios el que nos ha denegado la oportunidad de ser críticos, bien a través de la imposición de modelos distributivos de capital social y comercial o a través de la modalidad vocacional, forzados a trabajar en determinadas líneas para lograr acceso. El término medio será una comunidad de práctica en la que los textos, intercambios y eventos se produzcan en la práctica ignorando los medios.

No obstante, puede ser que este tipo de participación periférica haya existido desde siempre como característica de nuestra implicación con la cultura y la mediación, y que hayan sido los medios digitales los encargados de hacerla visible. En este sentido y hasta ahora podemos apreciar en el dominio público atribuciones de significado, afinidad y creatividad, pero si queremos encontrar nuevas formas de alfabetización crítica en este contexto, precisamos de un nuevo tipo de pedagogía, la pedagogía del inexperto. Haciendo uso de la terminología de Lave y Wenger, el aprendizaje que queremos no está determinado por destrezas, sino por el hecho de que sean los propios estudiantes quienes teoricen sobre su propia cultura. La enseñanza de la alfabetización crítica ha de facilitar el dominio en un metalenguaje que dé voz a la negociación reflexiva de la identidad, una dimensión más de la «alfabetización cultural».

A través de esa pedagogía del inexperto podemos extraer posiciones alternativas para estudiantes y profesores del ámbito de la alfabetización crítica, basados en modelos de prácticas educativas post estructuralistas, pero adaptándolas a un ambiente contemporáneo en el que proponemos que se prioricen las formas más ordinarias y comunes del contexto y la naturaleza social de las relaciones textuales. La aparente paradoja del profesor inexperto está dirigida a comunicar un cambio en la profesionalización del docente, pasando de la orientación hacia un modelo de dominio sobre el contenido especializado, y hacia un modelo etnográfico co-constructivista de conocimiento que tome como eje principal al objeto textual entendido como una ficción de la textualización en la cual se indizan modelos de lectura y de la cual emergen las herramientas tradicionales de alfabetización crítica.

El modelo de práctica que se propone se basa en un modelo de lectura que explora la creación de significado como categoría. En lugar de aclarar cuestiones sobre el género, la narrativa, el contenido o el autor, la práctica consiste en cuestionar cómo se aprende esa creación de significado, cuántos tipos hay, qué es exactamente, para qué sirve, qué implica el dominio de la misma y qué tipo de proceso de creación de significado se lleva a cabo en cada contexto. Este enfoque afirma como primario el principio de la constructividad de la lectura (y atribución del significado) en el contexto de la práctica cultural, al tiempo que deja constancia del posicionamiento y el arraigo de la entidad individual en relaciones sociales a escala más amplia. Couldry (2000) se centra en las trayectorias de agentes individuales negociando «campos textuales» en un «medio totalmente textual», y esto ofrece un nuevo enfoque para el tipo de trabajo de exploración que invierte la dinámica tradicional de investigación, pasando del enfoque en el texto al enfoque en los individuos, sin caer en la idea de masas. Lectores en contextos reales, que Hills reconoce como «agentes textualizados que conceden importancia a los textos permitiendo la aparición de nuevos grupos sociales derivados de los mismos» (2005: 29).

Podemos apreciar que una pedagogía crítica fundada sobre estas ideas puede resultar muy distinta al tipo de análisis textual y a los modelos de investigación de la audiencia a los que estamos habituados, puesto que principalmente está orientada hacia el proceso en lugar de hacia el contenido. De esta forma, el enfoque del estudio no es el texto en sí, sino el seguimiento y el análisis de los campos textuales, las elecciones del individuo ante un sinfín de textos, y los patrones comunes en sus selecciones. El trabajo del docente en esta versión de la práctica textual es promover investigaciones etnográficas que permitan a los jóvenes leer «historias textualizadas de sus vidas» (Kehler & Greig, 2005: 367). Esto es lo que nosotros entendemos por alfabetización crítica en los medios. Se trata de un concepto alejado de las competencias clave enunciadas por el OFCOM, de la seguridad en internet y la alfabetización digital y resistente al determinismo tecnológico y a la oposición de los planteamientos, el enfoque de los «Media Studies 2.0», y sus escépticos defensores. Es un concepto resistente fundamentalmente más crítico –en su camino hacia el ser con otros y con los medios– que el determinismo lingüístico de la multimodalidad.

Para Gee y Hayes (2011), el efecto más destacado de los medios digitales es la ruptura de las restricciones en el campo de la alfabetización, que al fin y al cabo es la vía de acceso a los medios de producción del conocimiento. Las implicaciones que tiene esto sobre la pedagogía son evidentes, y hacen referencia a las barreras entre el experto y el estudiante, entre el autor profesional, periodista o productor y el amateur o aprendiz. Realizar este tipo de práctica pedagógica requiere un modelo docente distinto, y se necesita por tanto una lectura renovada de la identidad del profesor para aceptar la conciencia y la inexperiencia en los campos textuales de los estudiantes y en los procesos a través de los cuales ellos mismos dan sentido a los textos. El papel del docente en esta dinámica es facilitar y armar el relato auto-etnográfico de los estudiantes, y aceptar y apoyar los espacios de aprendizaje desconocidos e inexplorados que puedan surgir; espacios de aprendizaje que, afirmamos, están cargados de posibilidades productivas.

En otros términos, a pesar de la polémica sobre el acceso, la participación, las posibilidades y lo que realmente ocurre con la alfabetización en los nuevos contextos mediáticos, existe un deseo común a todos los educadores: encontrar el modo de desarrollar la alfabetización crítica en los medios en este mismo momento, inmersos de este paisaje de continuos cambios. Esta pedagogía de la inexperiencia no es nueva, pero nos planteamos expandir ideas que ya existen sobre la construcción compartida del conocimiento con elementos de «desescolarización».

No obstante, la observación de que las categorías exclusivas de profesor/estudiante no deben cuestionarse mientras no se cuestionen también las de medios/audiencia es –esperamos– una observación más cauta, sutil y crítica que aquella de los Medios 2.0. El cambio en las prácticas actuales constituye el foco central de nuestro análisis. El proyecto incompleto de la alfabetización crítica puede resurgir a partir de la formulación de nuevas reglas y microestrategias de aprendizaje que traten la experiencia textual –y no únicamente a los medios– como parte de la creación de nuestro propio sentido, y cómo crearlo juntos.

====

Referencias====

Bennett, P.; Kendall, A. & McDougall, J. (2011). After the Media : Culture and Identity in the 21st Century. London (UK): Routledge.

Berger, R. & McDougall, J. (2011). Apologies for Cross-posting: a Keynote Exchange (interview with Henry Jenkins). In Media Education Research Journal (02-01-2011).

Bernstein, B. (1996). Pedagogy, Symbolic Control and Identity: Theory, Research, Critique. London (UK): Taylor & Francis.

Bourdieu, P. (1984). Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste. London (UK): Routledge.

Buckingham, D. (2010). The Future of Media Literacy in the Digital Age: Same Challenges for Policy and Prac-tice. Media Education Journal, 47; 3-10.

Buckingham, D. (2011). Keynote Address: Breaking Barriers. AMES Conference, Dundee (UK), (14.4.11).

Butler, J. (1990). Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. London (UK): Routledge.

Collins, J. (2010). Bring on the Books for Everybody: How Literary Culture Became Popular Culture. London (UK): Duke University Press.

Couldry, N. (2000). Inside Culture: Re-imagining the Method of Cultural Studies. London (UK): Sage.

Gauntlett, D. (2002). Media, Gender and Identity: an Introduction. London (UK): Routledge.

Gee, J. & Hayes, E. (2011). Learning and Language in the Digital Age. London (UK): Routledge.

Hills, M. (2005). How to do Things with Cultural Theory. London (UK): Hodder Arnold.

Instrell, R. (2011). Breaking Barriers: Multimodal and Media Literacy in the Curriculum for Excellence. Media Education Journal, 49; 4-11.

Kehler, M. & Greig, C. (2005). Reading Masculinities: Exploring the Socially Literate Practices of High School Young Men. In International Journal of Inclusive Education, 9; 4; 351-370.

Kendall, A. & McDougall, J. (2009). Just Gaming: on Being Differently Literate. In Eludamos: Journal for Computer Game Culture, 3:2; 245-260.

Kendall, A. & McDougall, J. (2011). Different Spaces, Same Old Stories? on Being a Reader in the Richard and Judy Book Club. In Cousins, H. & Ramone, J. (Eds.). The Richard and Judy Book Club Reader. London (UK): Ashgate.

Laughey, D. (2011). Media Studies 1.0: Back to Basics. In 3D, 16; 13-15. Lave, J. & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated Learning: legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lyotard, J. & Thebaud, J. (1985). Just gaming. Minneapolis, MN: Minnesota University Press.

MacLure, M. (2006). Entertaining Doubts: on Frivolity as Resistance. In Satterthwaite, J.; Martin, W. & Roberts, L. (Eds.). Discourse, Resistance and Identity Formation. London (UK): Trentham.

McDougall, J. (2010). Wiring the Audience. In Participations 7:1; 73-101.

Merrin, W. (2008). Media Studies 2.0 (twopointzeroforum.blogspot.com) (20-06-11).

Morley, D. (1980). The «Nationwide» Audience: Structure and Decoding. London (UK): BFI. Murphy, D. (2010). Euromeduc: the Second Congress of Media Education Practitioners. In Media Education Journal, 47: 23-27.

Naughton, J. (2010). Everything You Ever Needed to Know about the Internet. In The Observer (www.-guardian.co.uk/technology/2010/jun/20/internet-everything-need-to-know) (20-06-11).

Tyner, K. (1999). Literacy in a Digital World: Teaching and Learning in the Age of Information. London (UK): Routledge.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 29/02/12
Accepted on 29/02/12
Submitted on 29/02/12

Volume 20, Issue 1, 2012
DOI: 10.3916/C38-2012-02-02
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 12
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?