Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Worldwide, curricular changes and financial investments are currently underway to promote the integration of technology in public education and English language learning at a young age. This study examines the ICTs that have become part of the daily instructional practices and educational settings of teachers of English who work with young learners in public schools. To this end, this mixed-methods study draws on a quantitative descriptive-exploratory design and a qualitative multiple-case study. The quantitative data were collected through a Likert questionnaire administered to 28 secondary school teachers of English across 17 municipalities in five regions of Southeast Mexico and 2,944 learners. The qualitative data were gathered from a subsample of six teachers through longitudinal classroom observations, teacher and administrator interviews, and school visits. The non-parametric analyses of the quantitative data and the categorical aggregation analyses of the qualitative data reveal that the use of some multimedia and mobile-assisted communication resources is emerging in the L2 public classrooms. In line with findings from other international contexts, variables that seem particular to public education for young learners and their school setting, however, led teachers to prefer using their own technological devices that included laptops, multimedia material, and cellphones, rather than those in the schools.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The development of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) has created new opportunities for learning and teaching (Felix, 2008; Johnson, Adams Becker, Estrada, & Freeman, 2015). In second/foreign language (L2) education, ICTs can be used, for instance, to expose learners to extensive comprehension and production opportunities in the new language (Izquierdo, 2014; Plass & Jones, 2005), to create learning conditions that are unique to technology-based instruction (Chapelle, 2002; Hulstijn, 2000), and to enhance learner motivation (Izquierdo, Simard & Garza, 2015; Lan, Sung, Cheng, & Chang, 2015). In light of these arguments, in higher education, some initiatives have aimed to blend L2 classroom instruction with complementary ICT-based materials (Leakey & Ranchoux, 2006; Sagarra & Zapata, 2008). Others have explored ICTs for distance L2 learning (Compton, 2009; Harker & Koutsantoni, 2005) or autonomous L2 learning (Figura & Jarvis, 2007; Raby, 2007). Furthermore, in public education for younger learners, local and international agencies have made major financial investments and curricular changes in order to promote the use of ICTs in public sector schools (Johnson & al., 2015; Macaro, Handley, & Walters, 2011; World Bank, 2007).

Technological applications and ICT choices for L2 learning and teaching are growing in number, evolving from “traditional” to “intelligent”, and becoming more available to researchers, teachers and learners (Cerezo, Baralt, Suh, & Leow, 2014). Golonka, Bowles, Frank, Richardson and Freynik (2014) reviewed several empirical studies and identified 18 broad types of ICT categories that could be used for L2 instruction, excluding technologies such as laptops, CDs, DVDs, etc. Due to the growing number of studies and technologies, meta-analyses have been conducted to examine the benefits and limitations of particular forms of technologies such as computer-mediated communication (Lin, 2015), glosses (Yun, 2011), management systems (Cerezo & al., 2014), mobile-assisted language learning (Burston, 2015), and virtual reality (Schwienhorst, 2002), among others.

Despite this growth, Felix (2008:146) notes that “investigations in tertiary settings still dominate the field”. Due to the ongoing efforts to incorporate ICTs in public sector education, Macaro & al. (2011) argue that the kinds of technologies used in primary and secondary schools for L2 teaching and learning deserve investigation. To date, from the L2 literature, two trends for research into the use of ICTs with young learners can be identified. One explores the effects of technology-enhanced instruction on L2 learning in contexts where the regular instructional practices are altered to accommodate for the use of existing ICTs (Guénette & Lyster, 2013; Lan & al., 2015) or ICT systems that were specifically developed for experimentation (Allen, Crossley, Snow, & McNamara, 2014; Edwards, Pemberton, Knight, & Monoghan, 2002). In a review of 117 studies that examined the effects of ICTs in these contexts between 1991 and 2010, Macaro and his colleagues found that multimedia, computer-mediated communication, and the internet constituted the most frequently targeted ICTs in experimental research with young learners. Overall, these studies provide evidence of the L2 cognitive, psychological, and socio-affective language learning dimensions that could be enhanced among young learners through the use of ICTs (Macaro & al., 2011). Other studies examine attitudes towards the potential integration of ICTs in L2 teaching in schools (Felix, 2004). In the survey data, young learners show a preference for the use of ICTs to expand the classroom L2 learning experience (Felix, 2004). In a similar fashion, the survey data reveal that teachers exhibit positive attitudes for the use of technology in public education and consider that the use of technology in public L2 education could enhance learning among young learners (Durán-Fernández, & Barrio-Barrio, 2007).

The extent to which the observed willingness and openness towards ICTs translate into their actual integration in L2 teaching on a daily basis has yet to receive attention, however. Durán-Fernández and Barrio-Barrio (2007), for instance, showed that public sector teachers from approximately 100 educational settings in Spain expressed interest and had experience using ICTs in elementary classrooms, but 73% of them did not report exploiting them. Bax (2003; Chambers & Bax, 2006) argues that ICTs could constitute valuable L2 instructional resources, but teachers have yet to overcome the novelty and unfamiliarity phase to normalize technology in regular instructional practices. In contexts with young L2 learners, the pedagogical and contextual needs that are particular to their educational settings could have an impact on the classroom use of technology (He, Puakpong, & Lian, 2015). Macaro & al. (2011) highlight the need of process-oriented research to document the ICTs that characterize L2 instruction in public contexts. Moreover, further research is needed to examine the ICTs that L2 teachers can access in contexts with limited technological resources, as well as how ICT use is being maximized in these settings (Egbert & Yang, 2004; Jeon-Ellis, Debski, & Wigglesworth, 2005; Taylor & Gitsaki 2003). In light of these issues, the objective of this study was to examine the “current,” rather than the “potential” use of ICTs in public L2 education for young learners. The study was conducted in Mexico, an emerging economy, where major investments and curricular changes are underway in order to foster both the integration of ICTs in education and the learning of English at a young age in public sector classrooms (Izquierdo, Aquino, García, Garza, Minami, & Adame, 2014; Izquierdo, García, Garza, & Aquino, 2016). In this context, the study addresses this research question: Which ICTs have become normalized in the regular instructional practices and settings of secondary school teachers of English in public schools?

2. Material and methods

To achieve our objective and answer the research question, a concurrent triangulation mixed-methods study was conducted. This approach “uses separate quantitative and qualitative methods as a means to offset the weakness inherent within one method with the strengths of the other” (Cresswell, 2009: 213). The quantitative data were collected through a descriptive-exploratory design for the examination of a phenomenon within a group of participants using survey data (Mackey & Gass, 2005). Specifically, Likert questionnaires were administered to the teachers and their learners in Grade 3, in order to identify ICTs in regular L2 instruction. The qualitative data were collected using a multiple-case study (Cresswell, 2013), with a subsample of teachers. This design allows for an in-depth exploration of a phenomenon within a specific population in a real-life setting (Cresswell, 2013; Thouin, 2014). As this design requires extensive data collection through different instruments, for each teacher, information about ICTs in their instructional practices and contexts was gathered through longitudinal classroom observations, a school visit, and teacher and principal interviews.

2.1. Context and participants

Approximately 100 teachers from general, state and technical public secondary schools in Southeast Mexico were contacted for the study. Across the three types of public secondary schools, the teaching of English ascribes to the same curriculum, number of instructional hours, and language attainment goals. The study was conducted in Grade 3, as learners had completed the largest number of English instructional hours in the secondary education, and teachers were expected to be consolidating learners’ English language competencies through a variety of instructional practices and resources (Izquierdo & al., 2014).

Table 1 shows the demographics of the 28 Grade 3 teachers of English who consented to participate in the quantitative phase along with their learners. All teachers were native speakers of Mexican Spanish and had learnt English in Mexico. They held undergraduate studies in English teaching, they were familiar with the national curriculum and policies for the integration of ICTs in public education, and they had taught English in Grade 3 for a minimum of two years. Their schools were located across 17 municipalities in five geographical areas with different social and economic profiles. The learners were all native speakers of Mexican Spanish and had completed their previous education in the public system.

For the case-study phase of the study, only six teachers consented to participate. Table 1 displays their demographics. In addition to the teaching and educational background described previously, these teachers demonstrated positive attitudes towards ICTs during the interviews. Furthermore, the school principals had identified them as being highly motivated teachers and committed to language teaching, professional development and educational innovation in their schools.

2.2. Questionnaires

In order to quantitatively examine the integration of ICTs in L2 teaching practices, a four-point scale (i.e., never, rarely, sometimes, often) questionnaire was designed. The methodological principles for its conceptualization emerged from a review of empirical studies that examined L2 instructional practices using Likert-scale questionnaires (Fabila, Minami, & Izquierdo, 2012). First, a set of items was developed to explore the three kinds of ICTs that Macaro and others (2011) identified in L2 research with young learners: multimedia (items 2, 4, 12), computer-mediated communication (item 7, 13, 16), and the internet (item 3, 9, 10, 11), in addition to the generic use of computers (item 1, 5, 6, 8, 14, 15). The items were divided in two sections. Items 1 through 8 were included in Section A, and items 9-16 in Section B. Moreover, in order to validate the questionnaire, two versions of each section were developed. Both versions included the same items, but in reverse order. In order to triangulate the quantitative data, both a teacher and a learner questionnaire were developed. Teachers’ and learners’ questionnaires included the same items and conformed to the principles outlined previously; but the items were adapted semantically for each respondent type. For instance, in the Teacher Questionnaire, Item 2 stated “I combine the use of textbooks with computer-based video, audio, or other type of computer materials”. In the Learner Questionnaire, the same item stated “My teacher uses the textbook with computer-based videos, audio, or other types of computer materials”. All teachers and students completed Sections A and B within a week interval in class.


Draft Content 624916237-54551-en011.jpg

2.3. Classroom observations

In order to qualitatively examine the use of ICTs during instruction, longitudinal classroom observations were conducted. “[O]bservations are useful means for gathering in-depth information” (Mackey & Gass, 2005: 186) about L2 classrooms and instruction; thus, the teachers were observed five times in the same Grade 3 class during the two months when they were covering the same curricular unit: Food and eating habits. This shared criterion allowed us to observe comparable lessons across teachers. Observations took place every second week. As a result, our observations covered 30 video-recorded lessons. The length of each lesson was approximately 50 minutes. Five members of the team with extensive research experience in public sector English language education in the Southeast of Mexico watched all the video recordings and completed a checklist, based on the questionnaire items. Then, in focus groups, they discussed their answers for each teacher in regards to the four ICT categories. Discussions were audio-recorded and transcribed.

2.4. Interviews

A 30-minute semi-structured interview was conducted with the six teachers and their school principals. According to Mackey and Gass (2005: 173), this instrument allows for the investigation of “phenomena that are not directly observable”. Its design revolves around a set of initial questions, while researchers have the freedom to elicit additional information as the interview unfolds. Moreover, “the outcomes are not limited by the researcher’s preconceived ideas about the area of interest” (Mackey & Gass, 2005: 173). Following these principles, the interviews explored five areas of interest: first, the language curriculum and ongoing educational reforms; second, the relevance of English language education for young learners; third, the potential of ICTs for language teaching and learning; fourth, technological infrastructure and facilities in the school; and finally, teachers’ continuing education and professional development. By the request of the participants, the interviews were not audio-recorded. Two of the au­thors conducted each interview, and teachers and principals were interviewed separately. Upon completion of the interview, the researchers wrote notes on issues the interviewees had addressed for each central question.

2.5. School visits

The researchers arranged one-hour visits to the school facilities where some technology could be found. These facilities included libraries, computer labs, or classrooms with a TV set, a projector, or a computer. Two of the re­searchers visited the facilities guided by the language teacher. During the visits, the researchers asked questions about regulations for accessing these facilities, training for the use of the equipment, technology/non-technology-based L2 materials available, and access to internet and computer peripherals (printers, scanners, etc.). Field notes were made upon completion of the school visits.

3. Quantitative results

In this section, the statistical validation of the questionnaires is presented first. Then, the answers given by the teachers and learners are discussed for the ICT categories. Tables 2 and 3 present the percentage distribution of the 28 teachers and 2944 learners across the questionnaire scale points for each item. In the discussion of the results, the percentages of the “sometimes/often” categories are added up, as they reflect sustained use of technology. Similarly, the percentages in the categories “never/rarely” are merged and interpreted as infrequent use of technology.

In order to test the differences in the answers between questionnaire versions, Mann-Whitney analyses were run. These analyses were selected due to the ordinal nature of the item scales (Fields, 2005). They revealed similar answers for all items in both teacher questionnaire versions, with a probability value above .05. They also revealed that the learners provided similar between-version answers for the items in table 3. Thus, the data from both versions were pooled for the analyses of each respondent type. Cronbach analyses indicated that teachers provided reliable answers in both questionnaire sections, and confirmed a satisfactory reliability level for learners’ answers in Section A and moderate reliability for Section B.

In the questionnaires, multimedia use was examined through items 2, 4, and 12. Item 2 explored the combined use of multimedia with the textbook. In the teacher questionnaire, this item (46.4%) out weighted the other items that explored teacher knowledge of L2 multimedia programs (32.2%) or the use of multimedia to teach a particular aspect of the L2 (10.7%). In the learner questionnaire, only this item (18.4%) yielded reliable results. These findings suggest that teachers use multimedia resources to complement traditional classroom materials, without exploring new instructional initiatives.

Internet/computer-mediated communication (CMC) was analyzed by items 7, 13, and 16 considering that teachers and learners could interact through emails, instant messaging, social networks, etc. In item 7, approximately 46% of the teachers reported using telephone text messages with learners. In the learner questionnaire, 14.4% of the participants confirmed this. The results further revealed that only a few teachers recommended the use of social networks for L2 practice (28.5%) or L2 communication (25%).


Draft Content 624916237-54551-en012.jpg

Teachers’ use and promotion of the internet encompassed items 3, 9, 10, and 11. From the outset of the study, the researchers knew that the schools had no access to internet. Thus, only item 9 focused on its use in class, considering that teachers could produce printouts or download materials from the internet for instruction (Egbert & Yang, 2004). Nonetheless, this item had the lowest response rate in the teacher (28.5%) and learner (11.4%) questionnaires. The questionnaire items with the largest numbers of often/sometimes responses from teachers and students (57.1% and 23.3% respectively) were items 10 and 11. These results suggest that, although teachers do not use Internet-based materials in class, they recommend its use for L2 learning outside of class.

Teachers’ “generic” use of computers/laptops in class (items 1, 5, 6, 8, 14, 15) was examined, as learners may be better able to identify this in comparison to the other specific types of ICTs. This was assumed, since many public-school learners have received computers/laptops in the southeast of Mexico through different government initiatives in recent years. In line with this assumption, this category obtained the largest number of reliable items through the statistical analyses in the learner questionnaire. Regarding teacher assistance when learners experience computer issues, similar percentages of learners (21.4%) and teachers (19.1%) selected the often/sometimes choices. As for teacher use of computers/laptops in class, different percentages of teachers (46.5%) and learners (14.4%) confirmed this (item 5), while teachers (25%) and learners (18.2%) acknowledged that teachers used computers for grading and record tracking. Moreover, the results reveal that the teachers ask their learners to use their computer/laptop/tablets in class, but only a few (35.7%) promote their use for completing assignments.

4. Qualitative results

In order to describe ICTs in the English class and the schools, the qualitative data are holistically presented using categorical aggregations (Cresswell, 2013). This analysis type is relevant for a multiple-case study, as it facilitates the identification of the categories of a phenomenon through communalities across cases, and the integration of extensive data from different instruments (Cresswell, 2013). Using this type of analysis, the data from the classroom observations, school visits, and interviews are combined into two categories that were set from the onset of the study in line with the research objective. The first category targets the ICTs that are available to teachers in their educational settings. The second category covers the ICTs that are used in the English class. In the reports that follow, the quotation marks indicate words that were used by the participants.

In regards to ICTs in the public schools, the interviewees acknowledged that they were aware of the curricular policies that favour the use of ICTs for educational purposes. Moreover, they felt that the use of ICTs in the language class “could motivate kids to learn English”. But, they indicated the school settings lacked ICT infrastructure. During the school visits, it was observed that a few schools had an improvised computer lab in a classroom or a library corner; other facilities consisted of a classroom with one computer or a display. In some schools, L2 learning multimedia CDs, a multimedia projector or laptop could be borrowed from the main office. However, some factors constrained access to these technologies, including one concern related to school regulations. Computer rooms were available only for “subjects in which learners need to develop technological knowledge, which is not the case for the English class”. The lack of knowledge of how to operate school equipment also hinders teachers’ use of school technologies. Most teachers were concerned about operating “expensive” equipment or dealing with technology malfunctioning. Another reason for avoiding school facilities or equipment was that their use “requires time that could be used more effectively”. Some teachers felt that using technology “wasted time”, as the learners needed in-class time to get to school facilities with technology and then return to their classrooms; they also needed time to start the equipment and “the students get easily distracted”.

As for the ICTs in the English class, the qualitative findings substantiate the quantitative reports in that multimedia and CMC are finding their place in the observed classrooms. Moreover, they point to a remarkable divide in ICT classroom use between the younger and older teachers. Regarding multimedia, the younger teachers had personal laptops, portable speakers, or tablets. These teachers were observed asking learners to work on a textbook passage as they were getting their media files, laptops and speakers ready for the lesson. They were also observed to use media files already available on their laptops. The older teachers were observed using CD players only. Both types of teachers relied on these different technologies to implement listening comprehension exercises, and have students listen and repeat dialogues. In one class, one of the younger teachers distributed a printout with images and a language task from an L2 website. He also referred his students to the website on a few occasions.

Regarding CMC, the teachers were observed using text messages for teacher-learner communication, or to communicate with the parents. Moreover, one of the younger teachers indicated that CMC constituted a valuable technology for L2 practice. She reported having tried an information exchange task through a cellphone instant message application with some learners in one of her classes, as a requirement of a continuing L2 education program in which she was participating. She reported that her students liked the activity; she felt it was a “real kind of thing” for learners to use English, since they have this application on their phones and use it for real-life communication. Another young teacher acknowledged having an internet social network account, and learners would sometimes send him postings with messages in “Spanglish”. He thought it was an alternative for students to use “some English in real communication”.


Draft Content 624916237-54551-en013.jpg

5. Discussion and conclusion

This study examined the ICTs that have become part of the regular instructional practices and educational settings of L2 teachers in public secondary school education. In the observed contexts, the percentage of the educators who reported using ICTs with young learners is in line with reports from other international public education contexts (Durán-Fernández & Barrio-Barrio, 2007). The qualitative data support previous research findings that highlight teachers’ willingness and interest in ICTs for L2 education (Durán-Fernández & Barrio-Barrio, 2007; Felix, 2004). Although our findings suggest that L2 teachers are making efforts and finding ways to overcome the technological constraints in their public education settings (Egbert & Yang, 2004; Taylor & Gitsaki, 2003), both the quantitative and qualitative evidence of our study converge in that the integration of technology in L2 education in the observed public classrooms is still in its early stages.

Specifically, our results indicate that Multimedia and CMC tools are making their way into the public classrooms (Johnson & al., 2015; Macaro & al., 2011). In our context, Multimedia use seems to be emerging in public L2 instruction to complement the textbook, or to replace normalized technologies for L2 listening or oral practice. This use constitutes an initial move towards ICT-enhanced instructional practices, but underrepresents the potential of ICTs for L2 education (Plass & Jones, 2005), particularly among young L2 learners (Edwards & al., 2002). Regarding CMC, the use of cell phone text messages constituted a normalized communication technology in the L2 class. Nonetheless, CMC use is far from creating meaningful input and output L2 learning opportunities (Lin, 2015). The L2 teachers used text messages in Spanish to accomplish managerial tasks with parents and learners. Moreover, L2 use in text messages was limited to “throwing in a couple of words in English” for learners to realize that English can be used for real communication outside the class; thus, the use of CMC serves a L2 motivational purpose only. Although methodological aspects of the mixed-methods design of the study could influence the ecological and face validity of our results (Cresswell, 2009; 2013), the diversity of school contexts represented in the study, the convergence in the data collected from various sources and through different data collection instruments, and the number of participants provide a high level of representativeness with regard to instructional conditions across public sector education settings. In this regard, our data clearly indicate that the normalization of ICTs for L2 education in these classrooms is hindered by some factors that are particular to the contexts of public sector education with young learners (He, Puakponk, & Lian, 2015; Johnson & al., 2015). In the study, a striking finding was that teachers do not use the available institutional technologies; and thus, these technologies do not constitute a valuable resource for L2 teaching. Principals often acknowledged the efforts of the school to have some technology available, and pinpointed that the L2 teachers “do not like using them to enhance their teaching”. Instead, teachers bring their own technology into the L2 class. Explanations for this teacher behaviour related to overwhelming regulations and limited access to the facilities, technical support, time investment, and training, to mention but a few. This evidence and that from other international settings (Chambers & Bax, 2006; He, Puakponk, & Lian, 2015) raise concerns about the effectiveness of public school policies for encouraging teachers to benefit from the (limited) ICTs in their educational settings. Moreover, they raise questions about the extent to which current educational policies and curricular guidelines need to be reconceptualized in order to help teachers maximize the resources available in their school settings (Johnson & al., 2015; World Bank, 2007).

While the generalizability of our findings for other educational settings in other emerging economies deserves further exploration in future research (Johnson & al., 2015; Izquierdo & al., 2014), our findings substantiate the argument that “[t]eachers do not often have the adequate support systems to transition their good ideas beyond their own classrooms” (Johnson & al., 2015: 1). L2 research shows that in other international educational settings with limited technology, teachers have been able to circumscribe their contextual limitations by exploiting the available institutional resources in combination with their own personal devices and those of their learners (Egbert & Yang, 2004; Jeon-Ellis & al., 2005). Nevertheless, teachers require assistance in the form of training and teaching literature on the use of technology in L2 instruction (Compton, 2009; Johnson & al., 2015), as well as research initiatives that account for their diverse contextual realities and help them maximize the resources to which they have access on a daily basis (Taylor & Gitsaki, 2003; Guénette & Lyster, 2013).

Funding and acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Mexico’s National Research Council for Sciences and Technology (Strategic Research Grant: Tabasco) (TAB-2010-C19-144479). We thank the participants for their contribution to our work, Stephen Davis for his valuable feedback on previous versions of this manuscript, and our research assistants for their enthusiasm throughout the realization of this Project.

References

Allen, L.K., Crossley, S.A., Snow, E.L., & McNamara, D.S. (2014). L2 Writing Practice: Game Enjoyment as a Key to Engagement. Language Learning & Technology, 18(2), 124-150. (http://goo.gl/j6BGnN) (2016-04-30).

Bax, S. (2003). Call: Past, Present and Future. System, 31, 13-28. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0346-251X(02)00071-4

Burston, J. (2015). Twenty Years of MALL Project Implementation: A Meta-analysis of Learning Outcomes. ReCALL, 27, 4-20. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344014000159

Cerezo, L., Baralt, M., Suh, B., & Leow, P. (2014). Does the Medium Really Matter in L2 Development? The Validity of CALL Research Designs. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 27(4), 294-310. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2013.839569

Chambers, A., & Bax, S. (2006). Making CALL Work: Towards Normalisation. System, 34(4), 465-497. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2006.08.001

Chapelle, C. (2002). Computer-assisted Language Learning. In R. Kaplan (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Applied Linguistics (pp. 498-505). New York: Oxford University Press.

Compton, L. (2009). Preparing Language Teachers to Teach Language Online: A Look at Skills, Roles, and Responsibilities. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 22, 73-99. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588220802613831

Cresswell, J. (2009). Research Design. Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed-methods Approaches. Thousand, Oaks, CA: Sage.

Cresswell, J. (2013). Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design. Choosing among Five Approaches. Thousand, Oaks, CA: Sage.

Durán-Fernández, A., & Barrio-Barrio, J.F. (2007). Disposición y uso de recursos informáticos para la enseñanza-aprendizaje del inglés: Una descripción a partir de una muestra en cien centros públicos de Educación Infantil y Primaria de la Comunidad de Madrid. Porta Linguarum, 8, 193-223. (http://goo.gl/eHTyRD) (2016-04-30).

Edwards, V., Pemberton, L., Knight, J., & Monoghan, F. (2002). Fabula: A Bilingual Multimedia Authoring Environment for Children Exploring Minority Languages. Language Learning & Technology, 6(2), 59-69. (http://goo.gl/ZvBx9f) (2016-04-30).

Egbert, J., & Yang, Y.F. (2004). Mediating the Digital Divide in CALL Classrooms: Promoting Effective Language Tasks in Limited Technology Contexts. ReCALL,16, 280-291. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344004000321

Fabila, A., Minami, H., & Izquierdo, J. (2012). La escala de Likert en la evaluación docente. Acercamiento a sus características y principios metodológicos. Perspectivas Docentes, 50, 31-40. (http://goo.gl/BztbXh) (2016-04-30).

Felix, U. (2004). A Multivariate Analysis of Secondary Students’ Experience of Web-based Language Learning. ReCALL, 16, 129-141. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344004001715

Felix, U. (2005). Analysing Recent CALL Effectiveness Research - Towards a Common Agenda. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 18, 1-32. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588220500132274

Fields, A. (2005). Discovering Statistics using SPSS. London, UK: Sage.

Figura, K., & Jarvis, H. (2007). Computer-based Materials: A Study of Learner Autonomy and Strategies. System, 35, 448-468. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2007.07.001

Golonka, E., Bowles, A., Frank, V., Richardson, D., & Freynik, S. (2014). Technologies for Foreign Language Learning: A Review of Technology Types and Their Effectiveness. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 27, 70-105. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2012.700315

Guénette, D., & Lyster, R. (2013). Written Corrective Feedback and its Challenges for Pre-service ESL Teachers. The Canadian Modern Language Review, 69(2), 129-153. https://doi.org/10.3138/cmlr.1346

Harker, M., & Koutsantoni, D. (2005). Can it be as Effective? Distance versus Blended Learning in a Web-based EAP Programme. ReCALL, 17, 197-216. https://doi.org/10.1017/S095834400500042X

He, B., Puakpong, N., & Lian, A. (2015). Factors Affecting the Normalization of CALL in Chinese Senior High Schools. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 28(3), 189-201. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2013.803981

Hulstijn, J.H. (2000). The Use of Computer Technology in Experimental Studies of Second Language Acquisition: A Survey of Some Techniques and Some ongoing Studies. Language Learning & Technology, 3, 32-43. (http://goo.gl/OOlYJM) (2016-04-30).

Izquierdo, J. (2014). Multimedia Instruction in Foreign Language Classrooms: Effects on the Acquisition of the French Perfective and Imperfective Distinction. The Canadian Modern Language Review, 70(2), 188-219. https://doi.org/10.3138/cmlr.1697

Izquierdo, J. García, V., Garza, G., & Aquino, S. (2016). First and Target Language Use in Public Language Education for Young Learners: Longitudinal Evidence from Mexican Secondary-school Classrooms. System, 61, 20-30. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2016.07.006

Izquierdo, J. Simard, D., & Garza, G. (2015). Multimedia Instruction & Language learning Attitudes: A Study with University-students. Revista Electrónica de Investigación Educativa, 17(2), 101-115. (http://goo.gl/0UNNTf) (2016-04-30).

Izquierdo, J., Aquino, S., & al. (2014). Prácticas y competencias docentes de los profesores de inglés: Diagnóstico en secundarias públicas de Tabasco [Instructional Practices and Teaching Competencies of EFL Teachers: Evidence from Public Secondary Schools in Tabasco]. Sinéctica, 42, 1-25. (https://goo.gl/nrYmy6) (2016-04-30).

Jeon-Ellis, G., Debski, R., & Wigglesworth, G. (2005). Oral Interaction around Computers, in the Project-oriented CALL Classroom. Language Learning & Technology, 9, 121-145. (http://goo.gl/G1q6Hc) (2016-04-30).

Johnson, L., Adams Becker, S., Estrada, V., & Freeman, A. (2015). NMC Horizon Report: 2015 K-12 Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium (http://goo.gl/S8Io6x). (2016-04-30).

Lan, Y.J., Sung, Y.T., Cheng, C.C., & Chang, K.E. (2015). Computer-supported Cooperative Prewriting for enhancing Young EFL learners’ writing performance. Language Learning & Technology, 19(2), 134-155. (http://goo.gl/efq31H) (2016-04-30).

Leakey, J., & Ranchoux, A. (2006). BLINGUA. A Blended Language Learning Approach for CALL. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 19, 357-372. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588220601043016

Lin, H. (2015). A Meta-synthesis of Empirical Research on the Effectiveness of Computer-mediated Communication (CMC) in SLA. Language Learning & Technology, 19(2), 85-117. (http://goo.gl/ezQcCx) (2016-04-30).

Macaro, E., Handley, Z., & Walter, C. (2011). A Systematic Review of CALL in English as a Second Language: Focus on Primary and Secondary Education. (State-of-the-Art Article). Language Teaching, 45(1), 1-43. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444811000395

Mackey, A., & Gass, S. (2005). Second Language Research. Methodology and Design. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Plass, J., & Jones, L. (2005). Multimedia Learning in Second Language Acquisition. In R.E. Mayer (Ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia (pp. 467-488). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Raby, F. (2007). A Triangular Approach to motivation in Computer Assisted Autonomous Language Learning (CAALL). ReCALL, 19, 181-201. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344007000626

Sagarra, N., & Zapata, G. (2008). Blending Classroom Instruction with Online Homework: A Study of Student Perceptions of Computer-assisted L2 Learning. ReCALL, 20, 208-224. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344008000621

Schwienhorst, K. (2002). The State of VR: A Meta-Analysis of Virtual Reality Tools in Second Language Acquisition. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 15(3), 221-239. https://doi.org/10.1076/call.15.3.221.8186

Taylor, R.P., & Gitsaki C. (2003). Teaching WELL in a Computerless Classroom. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 16, 275-294. https://doi.org/10.1076/call.16.4.275.23412

Thouin, M. (2014). Réaliser une recherche en didactique. Montreal: Multimondes.

World Bank (2007). Ampliar oportunidades y construir competencias para los jóvenes. Una agenda para la educación secundaria. Bogotá: Banco Mundial y Mayol Ediciones.

Yun, J. (2011). The Effects of Hypertext Glosses on L2 Vocabulary Acquisition: A Meta-analysis. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 24(1) 39-58. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2010.523285



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La educación pública en diversos países está experimentando una serie de reformas que favorecen la integración de la tecnología en la educación pública y el aprendizaje del inglés a una temprana edad. El presente estudio mixto, examinó el empleo de la tecnología en las prácticas pedagógicas cotidianas de los profesores de inglés en la educación secundaria pública y los recursos tecnológicos de los que disponen normalmente en sus escuelas. Para la fase cuantitativa se empleó un diseño descriptivo-exploratorio, a través de un cuestionario tipo Likert aplicado a 28 profesores y 2.944 alumnos en 17 municipios del sureste mexicano. Para la cualitativa, se empleó un estudio de múltiples casos con un sub-grupo de seis profesores del cual se recolectó información a través de observaciones de clases, entrevistas con docentes y directivos, y visitas a las instalaciones de las escuelas. El empleo de análisis no-paramétrico con los datos cuantitativos y de agregación categórica con los datos cualitativos permitió identificar algunos recursos multimedia y de comunicación móvil que los profesores tienden a emplear de manera cotidiana en el aula. No obstante, diversos factores relacionados con aspectos propios de la educación pública y el contexto escolar influyeron para que los profesores prefirieran sus propios medios tecnológicos tales como ordenadores portátiles, teléfonos inteligentes y materiales multimedia a los disponibles en su institución.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) han favorecido el desarrollo de un sinnúmero de oportunidades de enseñanza-aprendizaje (Felix, 2008; Johnson, Adams Becker, Estrada, & Freeman, 2015). Para el aprendizaje de segundas lenguas (L2), las TIC pueden emplearse para exponer a los estudiantes a la lengua meta a través de una amplia gama de actividades de comprensión y producción (Izquierdo, 2014; Plass & Jones, 2005), crear condiciones de aprendizaje más allá de lo convencional (Chapelle, 2002; Hulstijn, 2000), y favorecer el interés de los estudiantes en el aprendizaje (Izquierdo, Simard, & Garza, 2015; Lan, Sung, Cheng, & Chang, 2015). Estos argumentos han sentado las bases epistemológicas para que la educación superior explore la integración de materiales tecnológicos en la modalidad de enseñanza-aprendizaje híbrida (Leakey & Ranchoux, 2006; Sagarra & Zapata, 2008), a distancia (Compton, 2009; Harker & Koutsantoni, 2005) y auto-aprendizaje de L2s (Figura & Jarvis, 2007; Raby, 2007). En la educación básica, organismos regionales e internacionales están realizando constantes cambios curriculares e inversiones considerables para promover el empleo de las TIC en los distintos niveles educativos y el aprendizaje del inglés a una temprana edad (Johnson & al., 2015; Macaro, Handley, & Walters, 2011; World Bank, 2007).

Las TIC evolucionan tan rápidamente, que en la actualidad existe un vasto número de opciones y recursos didáctico-tecnológicos para el aprendizaje de L2s. Estas herramientas son cada vez más sofisticadas, y se encuentran fácilmente disponibles para investigadores, docentes y estudiantes (Cerezo, Baralt, Suh, & Leow, 2014). Recien­temente, un meta-análisis realizado por Golonka, Bowles, Frank, Richardson y Freynik (2014) identificó 18 macrocategorías de TIC para el aprendizaje de una L2, excluyendo tecnologías convencionales como ordenadores portátiles, CD, DVD, etc. Debido al acelerado crecimiento de las TIC, pueden encontrarse también meta-análisis que exploran el potencial de tecnologías tan especializadas como la comunicación móvil (Lin, 2015), glosarios (Yun, 2011), sistemas de gestión de la información (Cerezo & al., 2014), aprendizaje móvil (Burston, 2015) y realidad virtual (Sch­wienhorst, 2002).

A pesar del gran número de recursos tecnológicos y estudios científicos que analizan su potencial educativo, Felix (2005: 146) señala que «las TIC y su impacto en el aprendizaje de L2s han sido principalmente analizadas en la educación superior». Al respecto, Macaro y colaboradores (2011) manifiestan que, debido a las inversiones y cambios curriculares en la educación básica, se requiere de investigaciones que analicen el empleo de las TIC en las escuelas públicas donde un creciente número de niños y adolecentes aprenden una L2. A la fecha, la revisión de la literatura revela que en estos contextos educativos, los estudios relacionados con las TIC y el aprendizaje de L2s han tomado dos vertientes. Un grupo de estudios investiga las prácticas pedagógicas que pueden fortalecerse a través del uso de tecnologías existentes pero que los profesores no emplean comúnmente (Guénette & Lyster, 2013; Lan & al., 2015). Otros estudios exploran tecnologías experimentales para favorecer los procesos que regulan el desarrollo de una L2 (Allen, Crossley, Snow, & McNamara, 2014; Edwards, Pemberton, Knight, & Monoghan, 2002). Con respecto a los tipos de tecnologías en estas investigaciones, una revisión de 117 estudios publicados entre 1991 y 2010 señala básicamente tres recursos tecnológicos: multimedia, la comunicación móvil, e Internet (Macaro & al., 2011). Según Macaro y sus colegas (2011), estos estudios ilustran cómo el empleo de las TIC puede favorecer procesos cognitivos, psicológicos y socio-afectivos inherentes al aprendizaje de una L2 en niños y adolescentes. Por su parte, Felix (2004) identificó que otros estudios se centran en las actitudes de los docentes y estudiantes hacia el empleo de la tecnología y el aprendizaje de lenguas. En estos estudios, los estudiantes perciben la tecnología como un recurso valioso para expandir los conocimientos adquiridos en el aula. De los docentes, se reportan actitudes positivas para con el uso de las TIC al considerar que éstas favorecen el interés de los alumnos en el aprendizaje de lenguas (Durán-Fernández & Barrio-Barrio, 2007).

Si bien los trabajos hacen evidente el potencial de las TIC para el aprendizaje de L2s en la educación pública de niños y estudiantes, aún se cuenta con pocas evidencias científicas que permitan identificar las TIC que se han integrado en las prácticas pedagógicas cotidianas de los profesores de inglés en la educación pública (Felix, 2004; Macaro & al., 2011). En España, Durán-Fernández y Barrio-Barrio (2007) demuestran que el interés de más de 100 profesores de educación básica en las TIC no conlleva necesariamente a la integración de éstas en el aula. Bax (2003) y Chambers y Bax (2006) argumentan que el empleo cotidiano de las TIC en la práctica pedagógica enfrenta una serie de desafíos tales como lineamientos curriculares, logística y la formación tecno-educativa. En el caso del aprendizaje de L2s en niños y adolecentes, los retos emergen de las particularidades del contexto escolar de la educación pública (He, Puakpong, & Lian, 2015). En consecuencia aún se necesitan estudios que permitan comprender los recursos tecnológicos que los profesores en las escuelas públicas integran en su diario quehacer docente (Egbert & Yang, 2004; Macaro & al. 2011; Jeon-Ellis, Debski, & Wigglesworth, 2005; Taylor & Gitsaki 2003). Ante esta necesidad, el estudio que se presenta analiza las TIC que se encuentran disponibles para los profesores de inglés en la educación básica, y describe cómo éstos las emplean día a día para promover el aprendizaje del inglés en la educación secundaria. El estudio se realizó en el contexto de la educación básica mexicana, donde diversas reformas curriculares se han puesto en marcha para favorecer la integración de las TIC en las escuelas públicas y el aprendizaje del inglés a una temprana edad (Izquierdo, Aquino, García, Garza, Minami, & Adame, 2014; Izquierdo, García, Garza, & Aquino, 2016). En este contexto, se analizan los recursos tecnológicos que los profesores emplean cotidianamente para favorecer el aprendizaje del inglés como lengua extranjera en las secundarias públicas.

2. Materiales y método

El estudio consistió en una investigación mixta de triangulación. Este enfoque «emplea el método cuantitativo y cualitativo de forma complementaria para compensar las debilidades inherentes en cada uno de ellos» (Cresswell, 2009: 213). En la fase cuantitativa, se empleó un diseño descriptivo-exploratorio para la recolección de datos a través de una encuesta Likert (Mackey & Gass, 2005). Con la finalidad de identificar las TIC utilizadas cotidianamente en las clases, la encuesta se administró a los docentes que impartían la asignatura de inglés en el tercer grado de secundaria así como a sus alumnos. La fase cualitativa contempló un estudio de casos múltiples (Cresswell, 2013), con una submuestra de los profesores de la fase cuantitativa. Debido a que su realización conlleva la recopilación de información en el contexto mismo de los participantes a través de diferentes instrumentos (Cresswell, 2013; Thouin, 2014), para cada profesor, se efectuaron observaciones longitudinales en el aula, visitas a sus centros educativos, y entrevistas con los docentes y los directivos de las escuelas.

2.1. Contexto y participantes

Inicialmente, se contactaron aproximadamente 100 profesores en las secundarias estatales, generales y técnicas en el sureste mexicano. En estas escuelas, los profesores de inglés cubren el mismo contenido curricular, horas de enseñanza y objetivos de aprendizaje. El estudio se realizó específicamente en el tercer grado, ya que en este nivel los estudiantes completaron el máximo número de horas de inglés en el currículo nacional; en consecuencia, los profesores deben haber consolidado las competencias comunicativas en inglés de esos alumnos con diversos recursos educativos, incluyendo las TIC (Izquierdo & al., 2014).

La tabla 1 presenta los datos demográficos de los 28 profesores de inglés que participaron voluntariamente en la fase cuantitativa y sus estudiantes. Todos los docentes eran hablantes nativos del español mexicano y realizaron sus estudios de inglés como lengua extranjera en México, así como estudios de pre-grado en la enseñanza del inglés. Además, contaban con un mínimo de dos años de experiencia docente en la enseñanza del inglés en el tercer grado de secundaria, conocían el currículo nacional y estaban informados de las políticas educativas que favorecen la integración de las TIC en la educación básica. Sus escuelas se encontraban en 17 municipios en cinco zonas geo-políticas del sureste mexicano con diferentes perfiles socio-económicos. Por su parte, los estudiantes eran hispanohablantes que habían completado todos sus estudios de educación básica en el sistema público mexicano.

En la fase cualitativa, solo seis profesores decidieron participar en todas las fases del estudio de caso. Sus datos demográficos se presentan en la tabla 1. Además de los perfiles educativos y laborales presentados en el párrafo anterior, durante las entrevistas, estos profesores demostraron actitudes positivas en re­lación a las TIC para la enseñanza del inglés. Al respecto, sus directivos comentaron que estos profesores se caracterizaban por un alto grado de compromiso con su desarrollo profesional y el desarrollo de prácticas docentes innovadoras.

2.2. Cuestionario

Para indagar cuantitativamente en el empleo de las TIC en las prácticas docentes de los profesores, se desarrolló un cuestionario con una escala Likert de cuatro valores: nunca, raramente, algunas veces, frecuentemente. Los principios epistemológicos y fases de conceptualización emanaron de una revisión de la literatura donde se identificaron los componentes metodológicos que guiaron el diseño de cuestionarios Likert en estudios anteriores (Fabila, Minami, & Izquierdo, 2012). Primero, se desarrolló una serie de ítems considerando los recursos tecnológicos que Macaro y sus colegas (2011) identificaron en la revisión de los estudios existentes: multimedia (ítems 2, 4, 12), comunicación móvil (items 7, 13, 16), e Internet (ítems 3, 9, 10, 11), además del empleo de recursos tecnológicos como computadoras, tablets, etc. (ítems 1, 5, 6, 8, 14, 15). Los ítems se distribuyeron aleatoriamente en dos secciones: Sección A (ítems 1-8) y B (9-16). Para validar las respuestas de los participantes al interior del instrumento, se elaboraron dos versiones. Ambas contenían los mismos ítems, pero presentados en orden inverso. Para triangular los datos en torno al fenómeno en cuestión, se empleó la triangulación de fuentes (Thouin, 2015). Por lo tanto, se presentaron los mismos ítems en la encuesta de los profesores y estudiantes, y se realizaron ajustes semánticos. Por ejemplo, el ítem 1 del cuestionario docente enunciaba «Ayudo a los alumnos cuando tienen problemas tecnológicos». En la encuesta del estudiante, el ítem 1 enunciaba «El profesor ayuda a los alumnos cuando tienen problemas tecnológicos».


Draft Content 624916237-54551 ov-es011.jpg

2.3. Observaciones

Para documentar cualitativamente el empleo de las TIC en las prácticas cotidianas de los docentes, se realizaron observaciones longitudinales en las aulas. Las «observaciones constituyen un instrumento que permite analizar detalladamente las prácticas de enseñanza-aprendizaje en el salón de clases» (Mackey & Gass, 2005: 186). Desde esta perspectiva, se videograbaron cinco clases de cada profesor en el mismo grupo durante dos meses. Durante estos meses, todos los profesores estaban cubriendo el mismo contenido curricular: comidas y hábitos alimenticios. Este criterio nos permitió observar de manera comparativa cómo los profesores integraban las TIC al desarrollar el mismo contenido curricular. En total, se grabaron 30 clases de aproximadamente 50 minutos cada una. Estas clases fueron analizadas por cinco integrantes del equipo de investigación empleando rúbricas de observación que se desarrollaron con los ítems de las encuestas docentes. Posteriormente, las percepciones de los observadores se discutieron en grupos focales, donde se llegó a una conclusión en torno a cada dimensión del cuestionario para cada docente.

2.4. Entrevistas

Los seis profesores y un administrativo de cada escuela participaron en una entrevista semidirigida. Según Mackey y Gass (2005: 173), «este instrumento favorece la indagación de un fenómeno que no es directamente observable». Su diseño contempla un grupo de preguntas iniciales, pero el entrevistador tiene la libertad de profundizar aspectos que emergen durante la interacción con el entrevistado. Esta característica «permite la recolección de información más allá de las ideas preconcebidas por los investigadores» (Mackey & Gass, 2005: 173). Sobre la base de estos criterios, las entrevistas se desarrollaron alrededor de cinco dimensiones: primero, las reformas curriculares de la educación básica; segundo, la importancia del aprendizaje del inglés a una temprana edad; tercero, el potencial de las TIC para favorecer tal aprendizaje; cuarto, la infraestructura tecnológica de las escuelas; y finalmente, el desarrollo profesional de los profesores de inglés en la educación pública. Por solicitud de los entrevistados, no se grabaron las entrevistas. Dos integrantes del equipo de investigación entrevistaron a los docentes y directivos en sesiones separadas. Al final de la entrevista, se registraron los comentarios más relevantes de los entrevistados.

2.5. Visitas in situ

Para conocer la infraestructura tecnológica, los investigadores visitaron las instalaciones de las escuelas de los seis profesores. Cada visita duró una hora aproximadamente. Dos integrantes del equipo de investigación y el profesor de inglés recorrieron las bibliotecas, salas informáticas o aulas equipadas con TV, proyectores o algún artefacto tecnológico. Durante las visitas, se recolectó información acerca de los lineamientos de acceso a las instalaciones, capacitación tecno-pedagógica, acceso a Internet, recursos y materiales didácticos disponibles para el aprendizaje del inglés, así como equipo complementario disponible como impresoras y escáners. Al final de la visita, se registraron los comentarios más relevantes de los entrevistados y los aspectos tecnológicos más sobresalientes de la infraestructura tecnológica de la escuela.

3. Resultados cuantitativos

A continuación se describe, primero, el proceso de validación estadística del instrumento. Posteriormente, se presentan las respuestas de los participantes según las categorías de análisis. Las tablas 2 y 3 muestran la distribución porcentual de los 28 profesores y sus 2.944 estudiantes en las escalas de valor de cada ítem del cuestionario. En la descripción de resultados, se consideran conjuntamente los porcentajes de las categorías «frecuentemente/algunas veces» ya que reflejan un empleo sostenido de la tecnología. De igual forma, los porcentajes de las categorías «nunca/raramente» se reportan de manera adicional al reflejar un empleo infrecuente de la tecnología.

Por la naturaleza ordinal de las escalas de valor del cuestionario, las respuestas de los participantes en las versiones de la encuesta se validaron empleando análisis Mann-Whitney (Fields, 2005). Estos revelaron consistencia en las respuestas de los ítems presentados en las tablas 2 y 3 independientemente de la versión del cuestionario, con una probabilidad mayor a .05. En consecuencia, los datos fueron analizados conjuntamente. Por su parte, el Alfa de Cronbach confirmó un alto grado de consistencia interna en el cuestionario de los docentes, y un grado de consistencia moderado en las respuestas de los estudiantes.

El uso de recursos multimedia se exploró con los ítems 2, 4 y 12. Específicamente, el ítem dos se centró en el empleo de estos recursos en combinación con el libro de texto. En la encuesta docente este ítem alcanzó el mayor número de profesores (46,4%), rebasando al número de participantes que afirmó conocer programas multimedia (32,2%) o emplear estos recursos para facilitar el aprendizaje de algún área específica de la L2 (10,7%). Por otro lado, en el cuestionario de los estudiantes solo el ítem 2 obtuvo un alto grado de confiabilidad en las respuestas, con 18,4% de los es­tudiantes. En consecuencia, los resultados revelan que los profesores solo em­plean los recursos multimedia en combinación con materiales tradicionales, sin ex­plorar otro aspecto para su uso educativo.

El empleo de la comunicación móvil o comunicación mediada por la computadora (CMC) se analizó con los ítems 7, 13 y 16, al considerar que los profesores po­dían establecer comunicación con los estudiantes empleando mensajes de texto, correos electrónicos o redes sociales. En el ítem 7, aproximadamente 46% de los do­centes indicaron comunicarse con los estudiantes por mensajes de texto. En el cuestionario de los alumnos, 14,4% confirmaron este empleo de los mensajes de texto. En relación a las redes sociales, 28,5% de los profesores indicaron sugerir su uso para practicar el inglés y 25% específicamente indicaron sugerir a sus alumnos comunicarse en inglés con sus compañeros a través de este medio.


Draft Content 624916237-54551 ov-es012.jpg

En la encuesta, los ítems 3, 9, 10 y 11 se enfocaron en el uso y promoción que los docentes hacen de Internet. Desde el inicio del estudio, los docentes expresaron no contar con este servicio en los centros educativos; en consecuencia, el ítem 9 indagó si el docente usaba Internet fuera del aula para crear materiales de aprendizaje que pudiera integrar posteriormente en su práctica docente (Egbert & Yang, 2004). En comparación a los otros ítems de esta dimensión, el 9 obtuvo el porcentaje más bajo de respuestas en el cuestionario docente (28,5%) y del estudiante (11,4%). Los ítems 10 y 11 de esta categoría obtuvieron los porcentajes de participantes más altos entre los docentes y estudiantes (57,1% y 23,3%). Estos resultados indican que, si bien el docente no genera materiales didácticos usando recursos disponibles en Internet, sí recomienda a los estudiantes explorar Internet para buscar alternativas que les permitan practicar su inglés fuera del aula.

En la encuesta, se indagó acerca del uso de recursos tecnológicos genéricos como computadoras, portátiles y tablets (ítems 1, 5, 6, 8, 14 y 15), al considerar que los docentes y estudiantes podrían estar más familiarizados con estos recursos, ya que muchos estudiantes en el sur­este mexicano re­cibieron estos equipos a través de diferentes programas nacionales. En esta di­mensión, los re­sultados indicaron porcentajes similares de respuestas en el cuestionario docente (19,1%) y del es­tudiante (21,4%) en relación a la asistencia técnica que el docente brinda a sus alumnos cuando los equipos informáticos presentan fallos du­rante la clase. En cuanto al uso docente de equipos informáticos durante las clases, 46,5% de los docentes y 14,4% de los alumnos confirmaron tal hecho en el ítem 5. Es­pecífica­mente, 25% de los do­centes y 18,2% de los estudiantes indicaron que los profesores em­plean sus equipos para llevar el control de calificaciones o tareas. La mitad de los profesores apuntaron que constantemente solicitan a sus alumnos usar sus equipos informáticos durante las clases, pero menos profesores (35,7%) afirmaron solicitar a sus estudiantes usar sus equipos fuera de clase.

4. Resultados cualitativos

Para responder a la pregunta de investigación, los datos cualitativos se presentan holísticamente empleando análisis de agregación categórica (Cresswell, 2013). Este análisis es particularmente eficaz para el procesamiento de datos en estudios de casos múltiples, ya que facilita, primero, la identificación de aspectos generales del fenómeno en estudio considerando las particularidades de todos los casos específicos analizados y, segundo, la integración de datos recabados a través de diferentes instrumentos (Cresswell, 2013). En consecuencia, este tipo de análisis permitió combinar los datos de las entrevistas, las visitas a los centros escolares, y las observaciones en dos categorías generales. La primera se enfoca en las TIC disponibles en los centros educativos. La segunda se centra en las TIC que los profesores emplean cotidianamente en el aula. En las secciones siguientes, las comillas se emplean para citar comentarios realizados por los participantes.

Con respecto al empleo de las TIC disponibles en la eduación básica, los entrevistados expresaron conocer las políticas curriculares que favorecen su uso en la educación pública. Al respecto, consideraron que «usar las TIC en la clase de inglés puede motivar a los estudiantes a aprender el idioma». No obstante, expresaron también que la infraestructura tecnológica de sus centros educativos es insuficiente para lograr la integración de las TIC en los procesos de enseñanza-aprendizaje como se espera en el currículo. En cuanto a la infraestructura, se observó que algunas escuelas realizaron adecuaciones en salones o espacios de las bibliotecas para instalar pantallas, cañones multimedia o algunas computadoras. Algunas escuelas contaban también con material multimedia en inglés o equipo multimedia bajo resguardo de la dirección escolar el cual podía ser solicitado por los maestros de inglés al momento de impartir sus clases. Sin embargo, tales solicitudes deben realizarse con antelación y bajo diversas condiciones establecidas en un reglamento de préstamo. Algunas escuelas contaban con salas informáticas que sólo estaban disponibles «para las asignaturas donde los estudiantes deben desarrollar competencias digitales, lo cual no es el objetivo central de la clase de inglés». Los profesores indicaron que su falta de conocimiento técnico para manejar equipos «tan costosos» constituye una barrera para su uso en las clases. Otros profesores indicaron que el uso de la tecnología representa una «pérdida de tiempo que puede emplearse para actividades de más provecho». Al respecto, manifiestaron también que usar los espacios equipados con tecnología requiere que los estudiantes «pierdan tiempo desplazándose e iniciando el equipo de cómputo», y «los estudiantes se distraen fácilmente al usar la tecnología».

En relación al empleo cotidiano de las TIC en la clase de inglés, los resultados cualitativos son congruentes con los cuantitativos. Además, revelaron una brecha generacional interesante en relación al uso de las TIC. Los profesores más jóvenes tendían a emplear sus portátiles, altavoces portátiles y los recursos multimedia de sus computadoras durante las clases de comprensión oral o para favorecer la repetición de conversaciones del libro de texto. Por su parte, los profesores de mayor edad empleaban tecnologías convencionales como lectores de CD o grabadoras en el mismo tipo de actividades. Durante las observaciones de clases, se documentó a uno de los profesores más jóvenes empleando una actividad de inglés que había descargado de Internet. Este profesor frecuentemente recomendaba a sus alumnos buscar en la Red ejercicios para practicar los temas trabajados en clase.

En las aulas, se observó que la comunicación móvil es un recurso tecnológico frecuente. En sus clases, los profesores hacían referencia a mensajes de texto que habían enviado a los estudiantes para asignar trabajos extracurriculares, y mantener comunicación con los padres. Durante las entrevistas, una de las profesoras más jóvenes reportó haber implementado una clase con una actividad comunicativa usando una aplicación que permite a los alumnos crear grupos de comunicación móvil en sus teléfonos. Al respecto, consideró que este tipo de comunicación «es algo tan común entre los estudiantes, que puede aprovecharse para que practiquen el inglés». Otro profesor, de igual edad, indicó que emplea las redes sociales para comunicarse con sus alumnos, y lograr así que le escriban textos en «Spanglish para que se den cuenta de que el inglés sirve para comunicarse en la vida real».


Draft Content 624916237-54551 ov-es013.jpg

5. Discusión y conclusión

Este estudio exploró las TIC que se han integrado en las prácticas pedagógicas cotidianas y los contextos educativos de los profesores de inglés en las secundarias públicas. Los porcentajes de profesores que reportan integrar comúnmente las TIC en la enseñanza del inglés en las escuelas públicas es congruente con reportes presentados en otros contextos internacionales (Durán-Fernández & Barrio-Barrio, 2007). En otro tenor, los datos cualitativos concuerdan con reportes internacionales que hacen evidente el interés de los profesores de lenguas en fortalecer sus prácticas pedagógicas empleando las TIC (Durán-Fernández & Barrio-Barrio, 2007; Felix, 2004). Si bien los resultados indican que los docentes buscan estrategias para contrarrestar la falta de infraestructura tecnológica e integrar diversos recursos tecnológicos en el aula (Egbert & Yang, 2004; Taylor & Gitsaki, 2003), en nuestro estudio, los datos cuantitativos y cualitativos dejan en claro que el empleo sistemático de las TIC para la enseñanza del inglés en la educación secundaria pública aún se encuentra en una etapa temprana.

En la educación básica, el uso de los recursos multimedia y la comunicación móvil en las aulas comienza a cobrar fuerza (Johnson & al., 2015; Macaro & al., 2011). En el contexto observado, los recursos multimedia se emplean generalmente en combinación con el libro de texto, para sustituir tecnologías como CD o audiograbaciones. Este empleo del multimedia constituye un paso inicial, pero se encuentra muy alejado aún del potencial que tales recursos tienen para favorecer la adquisición de una L2 (Plass & Jones, 2005), sobretodo entre los jóvenes (Edwards & al., 2002). En cuanto a la comunicación móvil, los mensajes de texto constituyen un recurso tecnológico en vías de sistematización entre los participantes. Sin embargo, este recurso no favorece los procesos de adquisición del inglés a través de la decodificación o producción de mensajes en la L2 (Lin, 2015), porque los docentes se comunican con los estudiantes en la lengua materna. El uso de la L2 en tales mensajes está limitado a un par de palabras cuya finalidad es «mostrar a los alumnos que el inglés puede emplearse en la vida real».

Si bien aspectos metodológicos propios del diseño mixto del estudio podrían impactar la validez y confiabilidad de los resultados (Cresswell, 2009; 2013), el empleo observado de las TIC en la educación pública fue congruente en los diversos contextos estudiados, la cantidad de profesores y alumnos participantes, y la gama de instrumentos de recolección empleados. Al respecto, los datos revelan que diversos factores, propios de la educación pública, contrarrestan la integración de las TIC en las prácticas pedagógicas de los profesores de inglés de las secundarias públicas (He, Puakponk, & Lian, 2015; Johnson & al., 2015). En este tenor, un resultado sobresaliente es la falta de empleo de los pocos recursos tecnológicos disponibles en las escuelas participantes. Los docentes prefieren emplear sus recursos tecnológicos personales, y evitar con ello: la normatividad que regula el uso de las TIC institucionales, el temor de «provocar desperfectos en la tecnología de la escuela», y evidenciar su desconocimiento del funcionamiento de las TIC del contexto educativo. Estos y los resultados en otros contextos educativos (Chambers & Bax, 2006; He, Puakponk, & Lian, 2015) ponen de manifiesto la necesidad de reconsiderar los aspectos normativos, de infraestructura y capacitación relacionados con las TIC disponibles en las escuelas públicas. Aún más, nos permiten reflexionar sobre la necesidad de reconceptualizar las políticas educativas y lineamientos curriculares existentes para favorecer la integración de las TIC en las prácticas pedagógicas de la educación pública (Johnson & al., 2015; World Bank, 2007). Es evidente que, a pesar de su interés en las TIC, «los docentes no cuentan con los apoyos necesarios para poner en práctica sus ideas en el aula» (Johnson & al., 2015: 1). En otros contextos educativos con recursos tecnológicos limitados, los docentes han desarrollado prácticas pedagógicas efectivas que les permiten maximizar el empleo de los pocos artefactos tecnológicos disponibles (Egbert & Yang, 2004; Jeon-Ellis & al., 2005). Sin embargo, para lograr estas prácticas pedagógicas, los docentes requieren de una formación tecno-pedagógica apropiada (Compton, 2009; Johnson & al., 2015) y programas de investigación educativa (Taylor & Gitsaki, 2003; Guénette & Lyster, 2013) que les permitan maximizar los recursos existentes desde sus realidades educativas.

Agradecimientos

Este estudio se realizó gracias al financiamiento obtenido a través de la convocatoria de Fondos Mixtos Tabasco (TAB-2010-C19-144479) del Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología de México. Agradecemos los comentarios de Stephen Davis, Angélica Fabila, y la generosidad de los profesores, alumnos y asistentes de investigación que participaron en el proyecto.

Referencias

Allen, L.K., Crossley, S.A., Snow, E.L., & McNamara, D.S. (2014). L2 Writing Practice: Game Enjoyment as a Key to Engagement. Language Learning & Technology, 18(2), 124-150. (http://goo.gl/j6BGnN) (2016-04-30).

Bax, S. (2003). Call: Past, Present and Future. System, 31, 13-28. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0346-251X(02)00071-4

Burston, J. (2015). Twenty Years of MALL Project Implementation: A Meta-analysis of Learning Outcomes. ReCALL, 27, 4-20. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344014000159

Cerezo, L., Baralt, M., Suh, B., & Leow, P. (2014). Does the Medium Really Matter in L2 Development? The Validity of CALL Research Designs. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 27(4), 294-310. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2013.839569

Chambers, A., & Bax, S. (2006). Making CALL Work: Towards Normalisation. System, 34(4), 465-497. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2006.08.001

Chapelle, C. (2002). Computer-assisted Language Learning. In R. Kaplan (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Applied Linguistics (pp. 498-505). New York: Oxford University Press.

Compton, L. (2009). Preparing Language Teachers to Teach Language Online: A Look at Skills, Roles, and Responsibilities. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 22, 73-99. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588220802613831

Cresswell, J. (2009). Research Design. Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed-methods Approaches. Thousand, Oaks, CA: Sage.

Cresswell, J. (2013). Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design. Choosing among Five Approaches. Thousand, Oaks, CA: Sage.

Durán-Fernández, A., & Barrio-Barrio, J.F. (2007). Disposición y uso de recursos informáticos para la enseñanza-aprendizaje del inglés: Una descripción a partir de una muestra en cien centros públicos de Educación Infantil y Primaria de la Comunidad de Madrid. Porta Linguarum, 8, 193-223. (http://goo.gl/eHTyRD) (2016-04-30).

Edwards, V., Pemberton, L., Knight, J., & Monoghan, F. (2002). Fabula: A Bilingual Multimedia Authoring Environment for Children Exploring Minority Languages. Language Learning & Technology, 6(2), 59-69. (http://goo.gl/ZvBx9f) (2016-04-30).

Egbert, J., & Yang, Y.F. (2004). Mediating the Digital Divide in CALL Classrooms: Promoting Effective Language Tasks in Limited Technology Contexts. ReCALL,16, 280-291. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344004000321

Fabila, A., Minami, H., & Izquierdo, J. (2012). La escala de Likert en la evaluación docente. Acercamiento a sus características y principios metodológicos. Perspectivas Docentes, 50, 31-40. (http://goo.gl/BztbXh) (2016-04-30).

Felix, U. (2004). A Multivariate Analysis of Secondary Students’ Experience of Web-based Language Learning. ReCALL, 16, 129-141. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344004001715

Felix, U. (2005). Analysing Recent CALL Effectiveness Research - Towards a Common Agenda. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 18, 1-32. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588220500132274

Fields, A. (2005). Discovering Statistics using SPSS. London, UK: Sage.

Figura, K., & Jarvis, H. (2007). Computer-based Materials: A Study of Learner Autonomy and Strategies. System, 35, 448-468. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2007.07.001

Golonka, E., Bowles, A., Frank, V., Richardson, D., & Freynik, S. (2014). Technologies for Foreign Language Learning: A Review of Technology Types and Their Effectiveness. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 27, 70-105. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2012.700315

Guénette, D., & Lyster, R. (2013). Written Corrective Feedback and its Challenges for Pre-service ESL Teachers. The Canadian Modern Language Review, 69(2), 129-153. https://doi.org/10.3138/cmlr.1346

Harker, M., & Koutsantoni, D. (2005). Can it be as Effective? Distance versus Blended Learning in a Web-based EAP Programme. ReCALL, 17, 197-216. https://doi.org/10.1017/S095834400500042X

He, B., Puakpong, N., & Lian, A. (2015). Factors Affecting the Normalization of CALL in Chinese Senior High Schools. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 28(3), 189-201. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2013.803981

Hulstijn, J.H. (2000). The Use of Computer Technology in Experimental Studies of Second Language Acquisition: A Survey of Some Techniques and Some ongoing Studies. Language Learning & Technology, 3, 32-43. (http://goo.gl/OOlYJM) (2016-04-30).

Izquierdo, J. (2014). Multimedia Instruction in Foreign Language Classrooms: Effects on the Acquisition of the French Perfective and Imperfective Distinction. The Canadian Modern Language Review, 70(2), 188-219. https://doi.org/10.3138/cmlr.1697

Izquierdo, J. García, V., Garza, G., & Aquino, S. (2016). First and Target Language Use in Public Language Education for Young Learners: Longitudinal Evidence from Mexican Secondary-school Classrooms. System, 61, 20-30. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.system.2016.07.006

Izquierdo, J. Simard, D., & Garza, G. (2015). Multimedia Instruction & Language learning Attitudes: A Study with University-students. Revista Electrónica de Investigación Educativa, 17(2), 101-115. (http://goo.gl/0UNNTf) (2016-04-30).

Izquierdo, J., Aquino, S., & al. (2014). Prácticas y competencias docentes de los profesores de inglés: Diagnóstico en secundarias públicas de Tabasco [Instructional Practices and Teaching Competencies of EFL Teachers: Evidence from Public Secondary Schools in Tabasco]. Sinéctica, 42, 1-25. (https://goo.gl/nrYmy6) (2016-04-30).

Jeon-Ellis, G., Debski, R., & Wigglesworth, G. (2005). Oral Interaction around Computers, in the Project-oriented CALL Classroom. Language Learning & Technology, 9, 121-145. (http://goo.gl/G1q6Hc) (2016-04-30).

Johnson, L., Adams Becker, S., Estrada, V., & Freeman, A. (2015). NMC Horizon Report: 2015 K-12 Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium (http://goo.gl/S8Io6x). (2016-04-30).

Lan, Y.J., Sung, Y.T., Cheng, C.C., & Chang, K.E. (2015). Computer-supported Cooperative Prewriting for enhancing Young EFL learners’ writing performance. Language Learning & Technology, 19(2), 134-155. (http://goo.gl/efq31H) (2016-04-30).

Leakey, J., & Ranchoux, A. (2006). BLINGUA. A Blended Language Learning Approach for CALL. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 19, 357-372. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588220601043016

Lin, H. (2015). A Meta-synthesis of Empirical Research on the Effectiveness of Computer-mediated Communication (CMC) in SLA. Language Learning & Technology, 19(2), 85-117. (http://goo.gl/ezQcCx) (2016-04-30).

Macaro, E., Handley, Z., & Walter, C. (2011). A Systematic Review of CALL in English as a Second Language: Focus on Primary and Secondary Education. (State-of-the-Art Article). Language Teaching, 45(1), 1-43. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444811000395

Mackey, A., & Gass, S. (2005). Second Language Research. Methodology and Design. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Plass, J., & Jones, L. (2005). Multimedia Learning in Second Language Acquisition. In R.E. Mayer (Ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia (pp. 467-488). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Raby, F. (2007). A Triangular Approach to motivation in Computer Assisted Autonomous Language Learning (CAALL). ReCALL, 19, 181-201. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344007000626

Sagarra, N., & Zapata, G. (2008). Blending Classroom Instruction with Online Homework: A Study of Student Perceptions of Computer-assisted L2 Learning. ReCALL, 20, 208-224. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0958344008000621

Schwienhorst, K. (2002). The State of VR: A Meta-Analysis of Virtual Reality Tools in Second Language Acquisition. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 15(3), 221-239. https://doi.org/10.1076/call.15.3.221.8186

Taylor, R.P., & Gitsaki C. (2003). Teaching WELL in a Computerless Classroom. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 16, 275-294. https://doi.org/10.1076/call.16.4.275.23412

Thouin, M. (2014). Réaliser une recherche en didactique. Montreal: Multimondes.

World Bank (2007). Ampliar oportunidades y construir competencias para los jóvenes. Una agenda para la educación secundaria. Bogotá: Banco Mundial y Mayol Ediciones.

Yun, J. (2011). The Effects of Hypertext Glosses on L2 Vocabulary Acquisition: A Meta-analysis. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 24(1) 39-58. https://doi.org/10.1080/09588221.2010.523285

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/16
Accepted on 31/12/16
Submitted on 31/12/16

Volume 25, Issue 1, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C50-2017-03
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 2
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?