Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Studentteacher relationships are vital to successful learning and teaching. Today, communication between students and teachers, a major component through which these relationships are facilitated, is taking place via social networking sites (SNS). In this study, we examined the associations between studentteacher relationship and studentteacher Facebookmediated communication. The study included Israeli middle and highschool students, ages 1219 years old (n=667). Studentteacher relationships were compared between subgroups of students, based on their type of Facebook connection to their teachers (or the lack of such a connection); their attitudes towards a policy that prohibits Facebook connection with teachers; and their perceptions of using Facebook for learning. Regarding students' attitudes towards banning studentteacher communication via SNS and towards using Facebook for learning, we found significant differences between three groups of students: those who do not want to connect with their teachers on Facebook, those who are connected with a teacher of theirs on Facebook, and those who are not connected with a teacher of theirs but wish to connect. Also, we found significant associations between studentteacher relationship and studentteacher Facebookmediated communication. We argue that in the case of studentteacher Facebookmediated communication, there is a gap between students' expectations and inpractice experience. The key to closing this gap lies in both policy and effective implementation.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Social networking sites (SNS), like Facebook, have been widely adopted and have changed the way people around the world communicate with each other. SNS educational usages have been extensively discussed, however mostly with regards to their pedagogical benefits (Greenhow & Askari, 2017; Manca & Ranieri, 2017). In this study, we take a different approach for examining the role of SNS in education, as we explore student-teacher relationship in real life and their relationship to student-teacher SNS-based communication. The underlying assumption for this line of investigation is twofold. First, student-teacher relationships are vital to successful learning and teaching (Birch & Ladd, 1998; Davis, 2003; Hamre & Pianta, 2001; Sabol & Pianta, 2012). Secondly, SNS are first and foremost intended to facilitate social interactions. Hence, the focus on student-teacher relationships via SNS is a more natural area of research with reference to these platforms. Furthermore, as social uses are an integral part of today’s new media, it is important to highlight these aspects of students’ and teachers’ everyday digital life (Gutiérrez & Tyner, 2012).

Some intriguing questions have been raised regarding student-teacher connections on SNS and their effects on student-teacher relationships in real-life, and vice versa (Manca & Ranieri, 2017). Even the very term used in many SNS to describe connected users, friends”, may challenge the common student-teacher hierarchy, as traditionally teachers are allowed some power over their students even when close relationship between the two are developed (Ang, 2005; Vie, 2008). Notwithstanding, as a result of blurring of time and space boundaries (MacFarlane, 2001; Scardamalia & Bereiter, 2006), teachers’ role at large is constantly changing in the information era. SNS-based communication plays a major role in this change, extending the scope and setting in which teachers and students communicate, even more than traditional online platforms such as learning management systems. This may affect, in turn, mutual perceptions and beliefs (Mazer, Murphy, & Simonds, 2009), thereby changing student-teacher relationships and traditional hierarchical structures in schools.

For this reason, school authorities and policymakers have been pondering about their position regarding student-teacher SNS-based communication, often banning teacher-student communication via SNS altogether. In Israel, where the study reported in this article was conducted, the Ministry of Education first adopted such a banning policy; however, about a year and a half later, the regulation was refined, emphasizing the educational benefits of SNS, and allowing restricted SNS-related communication (Israeli Ministry of Education, 2011, 2013). Internationally, banning teacher-student SNS-mediated communication is an issue of debate in many countries. Teacher-student communication via social media was barred in several regions in the US and in Australia (Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment, 2016; Schroeder, 2013) while other regulators have chosen to warn rather than ban, as in the case of Ireland, where it is formally stated that “Teachers should […] ensure that any communication with pupils/students […] is appropriate, including communication via electronic media, such as e-mail, texting and social networking sites” (The Teaching Council, 2016: 7). Public discussion on teacher-student communication via SNS reflects the complex nature of this issue and demonstrates the difficulty in adapting novelties in large-scale systems and organizations. However, most policies are not based on empirical evidence.

In this study, we focus on the secondary school population that was under-researched until very recently (Hew, 2011) and only in recent years this population has started to be studied (Asterhan & Rosenberg, 2015; Blonder & Rap, 2017; Fewkes & McCabe, 2012). Hence, our objective is to explore the relationships between students’ perceptions of teacher-student relationship and student-teacher Facebook-mediated communication. We pose the following research questions:

• How is student-teacher communication facilitated on Facebook?

• What are students’ attitudes towards a banning policy of SNS-mediated communication with teachers?

• What are students’ attitudes towards the use of Facebook for learning?

• How is student-teacher Facebook-friendship characterized de-facto?

• What are the differences in students’ perceptions of student-teacher relationships, based on the following variables? a) Type of student-teacher Facebook-connection; b) Types of Facebook-mediated communication; c) Attitudes towards SNS-banning policy; d) Attitudes towards the use of Facebook for learning; and e) The teachers’ profile type used to connect with students.

2. Methodology

Data was collected anonymously using an online questionnaire that was distributed via schools’ communication platforms (with the assistance of educators and schools), social networking sites (mostly Facebook and Twitter), and various relevant professional and personal mailing lists. Our target population was students in lower and higher secondary schools. Informed consent was attained through the online questionnaire.

The timing of the questionnaire distribution is important to understand, as a few months prior to this period, the Israeli Ministry of Education had modified its policy regarding SNS, allowing limited Facebook-based connections between students and teachers via groups and only for learning purposes; before that, any teacher-student SNS-based communication was prohibited.

2.1. Research variables2.1.1. Independent variables

• Communication via Facebook. We asked about the initiation of the student-teacher Facebook-connection and the means by which it is facilitated (in case a connection existed), e.g., Facebook groups, private chat, users’ Wall, and Event pages. Also, we asked about the type of teacher’s profile preferred by students to connect with (whether connected or wished to be connected). Additionally, we asked whether the teacher with whom the student is, or wants to be, connected is a homeroom teacher or not.

• Attitudes towards Facebook-use in Education. We measured students’ attitudes towards Facebook usage for learning and their level of agreement with a banning policy (that is, when student-teacher interactions via SNS are prohibited).

2.1.2. Dependent variables: Teacher-student relationship

Students’ perception of a teacher-student relationship was based on the three axes of Ang’s (2005) TSRI framework, namely Satisfaction (refers to experiences reflecting positive experiences between students and teachers), Instrumental Help (when students refer to teachers as resource persons, such that they might approach for advice, sympathy, or help), and Conflict (referring to negative and unpleasant experiences between students and teachers).

2.2. Instruments and procedure

We used an adapted version of the Teacher-Student Relationship Inventory (TSRI), originally developed to measure teacher-student relationships as reported by teachers regarding a given student, using 14 items graded on a 5-point Likert scale (1: completely disagree, 5: completely agree) (Ang, 2005). The questionnaire was translated to Hebrew and changed to measure a student’s perceptions of teacher-student relationship regarding a given teacher. For example, the item I enjoy having this student in my class was translated to “I think this teacher is enjoying having me in his/her class”. The full, adapted questionnaire appears in Table 1 (see next page). We will refer to this new version as TSRI-S.

The TSRI was implemented as part of an online survey, using Google Forms. Within this form, students were asked about their current use of, and their connections with teachers via Facebook. Following their answers, they were guided to choose a teacher to whom they will refer while replying TSRI, based on the following four groups of students:

• Students who have an active Facebook account and are connected to a current teacher of them. These students filled out the questionnaire regarding a current teacher with whom they are connected on Facebook.


Hershkovizt Forkosh-Baruch 2017a-62671-en029.jpg

• Students who have an active Facebook account, are not connected to a current teacher, but are interested in such a connection. These students filled out the questionnaire regarding a current teacher with whom they would like to be connected on Facebook.

• Students who have an active Facebook account, are not connected to any current teacher, and are not interested in such a connection. These students filled out the questionnaire regarding an arbitrary current teacher of theirs.

• Students who do not have an active Facebook account filled out the questionnaire regarding an arbitrary teacher.

We also asked about participants’ views on positive aspects of student-teacher connections using Facebook. Participants who indicated that they were already connected to one of their teachers, and those who indicated they wished to be connected to one of their teachers, were also asked the following question: “How [does/could] this connection on Facebook is/be helpful to you?”.

2.3. Population

Altogether, 667 students participated in this study. They were between 12-19 years of age (M=14, SD=1.6). There were 403 females (60%) and 264 males (40%). As a result of the ubiquitous accessibility to the online form, participants were from all over Israel.

2.4. Analysis

As some of the variables were not normally distributed, we used non-parametric comparison tests, specifically Mann-Whitney U Test and Kruskal-Wallis H Test, using IBM SPSS software, Version 23. Participants’ responses to the open-ended items were coded using the directed content analysis method (Hsieh & Shannon, 2005), with variables derived from the Ang’s (2005) framework.

3. Findings

We divided the research population (n=667) into four sub-groups of students:

• Connected students (n=67, 10%), who have at least one of their current teacher as a Facebook-friend.

• Wannabe Connected students (n=124, 19%), who do not have any of their current teacher as a Facebook-friend, but would like one of their current teacher to be a Facebook-friend.

• Not Wannabe Connected students (n=396, 59%), who do not have any of their current teacher as a Facebook-friend and do not wish to have on.

• Not on Facebook students (n=80, 12% of students), who do not have an active Facebook account.

3.1. Independent variables3.1.1. Communication means

Among the Connected group (n=67), Group-based communication (either in open or closed Groups) was the most popular, with 33 students (49%) using it, followed by private chatting with the teacher, with 24 students (36%) mentioning using it. About a third of the students (22 of 67) mentioned hitting Like on teacher’s status updates, and about fifth of the students (14 of 67) mentioned commenting on the teacher’s updates. Less popular were communicating via Event pages (13%, 9 of 67), media upload/tagging/commenting (12%, 8 of 67), and writing on the teacher’s wall (4%, 3 of 67). All students mentioned at least one communication means, meaning that none of them keeps the connection to their teacher strictly passive.

3.1.2. Attitudes towards a banning policy

We asked students to what degree do they agree with a banning policy that prohibs any student-teacher connection via SNS. Considering only those students who had an opinion on that topic (n=482 of 667), 63% of the students (304 of 482) agreed or tended to agree with a banning policy, and 37% disagreed or tended to disagree with it (178 of 482). Analysis at the sub-group level, revealed that about 75% of the Not Wannabe Connected students (215 of 285) agreed or tended to agree with a banning policy while only 31% of the Connected group (19 of 49) and 39% of the Wannabe Connected group (29 of 94) agreed or tended to agree with it. This difference is striking and is statistically significant, with +*(2)=71.3, at p<0.001. Comparing the Connected and Wannabe Connected groups results in a non-significant difference, with Chi2(1)=0.9, at p=0.34.

3.1.3. Attitudes towards using Facebook for learning

We asked participants whether they think Facebook could be used for learning (without mentioning specific applications). Overall, 52% (349 of 667) responded with a Yes and 48% (318 of 667) responded with a No.

Regarding students who have Facebook accounts (n=587, 340 females and 247 males) in the Connected group, 57% of the students (38 of 67) thought that Facebook can be used for learning, compared to 77% of the Wannabe Connected group (95 of 124) and 47% of the Not Wannabe Connected group (185 of 496). This difference is statistically significant, with c2(2)=34.2, at p< 0.001. Results are summarized in Table 2. Note the significant difference in answers between the Connected and the Wannabe Connected groups with Chi2(1)=8.1, at p<0.01.

3.1.4. Friendship parameters

Of the Connected students (n=67), 25 (37%) were connected to their teacher’s personal profile and the same number – connected to their teacher’s professional profile. Additional 17 students (25%) did not know to which type of teacher profile they were connected. Of that group, 25 students (37%) were connected to their homeroom teacher while the remaining (42 students, 63%) were connected to a disciplinary teacher who is not their homeroom teacher. Altogether, 17 students (25%) stated that they were the ones initiating the Facebook connection, 23 students (34%) mentioned that the teacher was the one to initiate the connection, and the remaining 27 students (40%) did not remember who initiated the connection.


Hershkovizt Forkosh-Baruch 2017a-62671-en030.jpg

Of the Wannabe Connected students (n=124), 24 (19%) stated that they would like to connect to their teacher’s personal profile and about the same number stated they would like to be connected to their teacher’s professional profile (26 of 124, 21%); the rest (60%, 74 of 124) did not have a preference about which teacher’s profile to connect to. Also, 57 students (46%) stated that they wished to connect with their homeroom teacher, and the remaining (67 students, 54%) wished to connect with a disciplinary teacher who is not their homeroom teacher. The difference between the two groups regarding the type of teacher’s profile to whom they are connected or wish to be connected (omitting the “Don’t know/Don’t care” options) is not statistically significant, with Chi2(1)=0.04, at p=0.84.

3.2. Dependent variables3.2.1. Reliability test and descriptive statistics

Reliability test for the adapted version resulted with high scores for Satisfaction (5 items, M=3.75, SD=1.1, Cronbach’s ?=0.88), Instrumental Help (5 items, M=2.75, SD=1.2, ?=0.87), and Conflict (4 items, M=1.65, SD=0.9, ?=0.88), all with n=667. Satisfaction and Conflict axes are highly skewed (their skewness values are: 0.92, 1.74, respectively) while Instrumental Help is rather normally distributed with the exception being a peak at the 1-value (skewness value of 0.14).

3.2.2. TSRI and de-facto connection on Facebook

We now compare between the distribution of TSRI axes across the four groups of students: Connected, Wannabe Connected, Not Wannabe Connected, Not on Facebook (n=667). The statistics are summarized in Table 3.

Satisfaction is significantly different between groups, with Chi2(3)=14.3, at p< 0.05, as well as Instrumental Help, with chi2(3)=38.5, at p<0.001. Conflict is not significantly different, with Chi2(3)=0.9, at p=0.83; comparisons utilized Kruskal Wallis H Test. For post-hoc tests, we ran pairwise Mann-Whitney U tests, using Bonferroni correction for multiple tests (i.e., dividing a by 6). Findings indicate that Satisfaction was only different between the Wannabe Connected and Not Wannabe Connected groups (Z=3.74, at p<0.01), with a higher mean for the former and an effect size of r=0.16.

Instrumental Help was different within three pairs of groups: Connected and Wannabe Connected (higher for the latter, with Z=3.10, at p<0.05), Wannabe Connected and Not Wannabe Connected (higher for the former, with Z=5.79, at p<0.01), and Not Wannabe Connected and Not on Facebook (higher for the latter, with Z=3.33, at p<0.05) with effect sizes of 0.22, 0.25, 0.15, respectively. Therefore, the mean for Instrumental Help was higher for students who wished to Facebook-connect with one of their teachers in comparison with those who were already connected to a teacher.

3.2.3. TSRI and communication type


Hershkovizt Forkosh-Baruch 2017a-62671-en031.jpg

Mann-Whitney U test on each of TSRI axes, comparing between using/not-using each communication means separately, revealed significant differences only in the case of using Groups and only for the Satisfaction and Conflict axes. The mean Satisfaction for students who communicate in groups with their teachers (n=33) was 4.07 (SD=0.59), compared with 3.36 (SD=1.22) for students who do not communicate in groups with their teachers (n=34), with Z=2.7, at p<0.05; this denotes an effect size of r=0.28. The mean Conflict for students who communicate in Groups with their teachers (n=33) was 1.37 (SD=0.55), compared with 1.77 (SD=0.9) for students who do not communicate in Groups with their teachers (n=34), with Z=2.02, at p<0.05; this denotes an effect size of r=0.25. In other words, students who communicate with their teachers via Facebook Groups feel more satisfied and less conflicted with their teachers in comparison with those students who do not communicate using Groups. There was no significant difference in Instrumental Help, with Z=0.40, at p=0.69.

3.2.4. TSRI and attitudes towards banning policy

For understanding differences in TSRI axes between students who agreed or tended to agree with the banning policy (n=304) and those who disagreed or tended to disagree with it (n=178), we ran a Mann-Whitney U test. The only significant difference was found in Instrumental Help, which was higher for students who disagreed or tended to disagree with a banning policy in comparison with those who agreed or tended to agree with it. This difference has an effect size of r=0.15. The results are summarized in Table 4.

3.2.5. TSRI and attitudes towards Facebook for learning

For understanding differences in TSRI axes between students who think Facebook can be used for learning (n=349) and those who do not (n=318), we ran a Mann-Whitney U test. Results are summarized in Table 5. Significant differences were found in Satisfaction and Instrumental Help; both were higher for students who believe that Facebook can be used for learning compared to those who do not believe so. These differences have effect sizes or r=0.08 and r=0.11, respectively.

3.2.6. TSRI and teacher profile

In the Connected group, 25 students are connected to their teacher using the teacher’s personal profile and 25 are connected using the teacher’s professional profile. Running the Mann-Whitney U test, we found no significant difference in any of the TSRI axes. Results are summarized in Table 6.


Hershkovizt Forkosh-Baruch 2017a-62671-en032.jpg

In the Wannabe Connected group, there are 24 students who want to connect with their teacher using the teacher’s personal profile and 26 who want to connect using the teacher’s professional profile. Running the Mann-Whitney U test, we found a significant difference with a medium effect for Satisfaction. Students who would like to connect with their teacher through the teacher’s personal profile feel more satisfied with that teacher than the students would like to connect with the teacher through a professional profile. Results are summarized in Table 6.

3.3. Perceived and actual contribution to students


Hershkovizt Forkosh-Baruch 2017a-62671-en033.jpg

We now report on an analysis of the students’ open-ended responses to the questions regarding the actual/potential contribution of communicating with their teachers on Facebook, which were coded by Satisfaction and Instrumental Help; these categories are not mutually exclusive. Of the 124 responses received by the Wannabe Connected students, 44 (40%) were coded as Satisfaction-related, and 76 (70%) were coded as Instrumental Help-related. Hence, the reasons for wishing to connect with teachers on Facebook were mostly on a practical level. For example:

“[The teacher] could update me easily and quickly about things that happened when I didn’t come [to school]” (S344, F:14).

“[The teacher] could help me in the afternoon with school stuff if I needed help” (S87, M:12).

“That way, we could talk with the teacher and ask questions – it’d be much more comfortable than giving him a call” (S307, M:14).

“Things that you want to say to the teacher personally and you’re too shy – it’s possible using Facebook” (S586, M:17).


Hershkovizt Forkosh-Baruch 2017a-62671-en034.jpg

Still, a measurable amount of the responses indicated anticipation of a feeling of Satisfaction from this connection, as may be evident in the following examples:

“[The teacher] could ask me how I am, that’s kinda nice” (S344, F:14).

“[The teacher] is just an interesting and quite a cool guy, it’s just interesting for me what he’s doing when he’s not teaching” (S280, M:14).

“Teachers can participate in the lives of their students” (S560, F:16).

“It can strengthen the relationship between the teacher and the students and to cause the student to count on his teacher” (S592, F:17).

Of the 37 responses of the Connected students, 10 (27%) were coded as Satisfaction-related, and 31 (84%) were coded as Instrumental Help-related. While Instrumental Help is still the more frequent category among this group as well, the gap between this axis and the Satisfaction axis widened. To clarify the difference in distribution of these two categories between the two groups of participants, we performed a discriminant analysis; this statistical test was chosen due to the fact that the coding categories were interrelated, that is, a student’s response could be coded in both categories. The emerging discriminant function significantly differentiated between the Connected and the Wannabe Connected students, with Wilk’s ?=0.94, ?2(2)=10.9, at p<0.01.

4. Discussion and conclusions

In this article, we explored students’ perceptions of student-teacher relationship in an era in which both parties are able to communicate via social networking sites (SNS). Recall that the original purpose of SNS was to promote social, interpersonal connections and communication. As suggested in this study, such connections and communication might also have important implications in the educational context. Overall, about 10% of our population had a teacher who was teaching them and with whom they were connected on Facebook, against the official policy which prohibited (and still prohibits) student-teacher friendship via SNS, demonstrating the need of students and teachers to connect in various out-of-class settings.

The most popular means of communication between the connected students and their teachers was via Facebook Groups, as shown in previous studies (Asterhan & Rosenberg, 2015). Students and teachers find Facebook Groups to be appropriate as they offer an easy one-to-many communication along with a relatively high level of privacy and a better separation of their learning-related discussions and their personal activity (Kent, 2014). Many studies have highlighted the educational benefits of such groups (Ahern, Feller, & Nagle, 2016; Da-Silva & Barbosa, 2015; Miron & Ravid, 2015; Rap & Blonder, 2016). We extend this literature by referring to the benefits of groups with regard to student-teacher relationship at large. This is evident, for example, by higher levels of Satisfaction and lower levels of Conflict for students who communicated with their teachers via Facebook Groups, compared to those students who were connected to their teachers on Facebook but did not communicate with them via groups. Interestingly, no difference in Instrumental Help was found between these two modes, which might indicate that students use private channels to discuss personal issues with their teachers (Hershkovitz & Forkosh-Baruch, 2013).

While about three-quarters of the Not Wannabe Connected students agreed or tended to agree with a policy that bans student-teacher communication via SNS, less than 40% of the Wannabe Connected students and less than a third of the connected students agreed or tended to agree with it. Hence, some students are interested in strengthening connections with their teachers outside school boundaries, and when doing so, they prefer to use platforms they already know and are competent in their usage (Deng & Tavares, 2013; Jang, 2015). On the other hand, we found that only about a half of the students believe that Facebook can be used for learning, in line with previous studies (Mao, 2014).

The difference in attitudes between the Connected and the Wannabe Connected groups highlights the difference between expected benefits from a Facebook-friendship of students with their teachers and the de-facto benefits. Students tend to perceive social media as an informal space used mainly for socialization, rarely in formal learning settings (Sánchez, Cortijob, & Javed, 2014; Selwyn, 2009); hence, due to their very nature as social virtual spaces, they should be examined through these lenses.

We also found some interesting results regarding the Wannabe students, which scored in the Instrumental Help axe higher than the connected students. Also, students who wished to connect to the teacher’s personal profile scored in the Satisfaction axe higher than those who wished to connect to a professional profile. This may indicate the need for students to broaden the relationship with their teachers beyond the traditional, school-related setting, to the new online environments, extending real-life experiences (Hershkovitz & Forkosh-Baruch, 2013; Kert, 2011).

Nevertheless, in practice such satisfying expectations are not always fulfilled. Besides policy, educational processes should be the key to a safe, effective implementation of SNS by teachers and students (Stornaiuolo, DiZio, & Hellmich, 2013). This should be achieved via an open dialogue between all the relevant stakeholders, including policy-makers, practitioners, teachers, and students, and based on empirical data. The key role of the students in this discourse is not to be underestimated, as they are the leading force and natural inhabitants of SNS.

Based on our findings, we suggest that future research on this topic include wider and more diverse samples from different countries and cultures, as well as different types of SNS. This will assist in understanding how different social norms related to the education milieu are reflected in the SNS array; as a result, educational policies related to SNS may be better grounded in a local cultural context. Still, SNS are part of a wider, global phenomena; therefore, it is vital to examine their educational implications in a wider, international context, and to explore whether this situation reciprocates with educational settings.

Of course, this study is not without limitations. First, our research sample, attained from viral distribution of an online questionnaire, may be biased to some degree (Sax, Gilmartin, & Bryan, 2003); however, as recent studies show, online and traditional self-report questionnaires might be equivalent, and the former is perceived by participants as more protective of their anonymity (Ward, Clark, Zabriskie, & Morris, 2014; Weigold, Weigold, & Russell, 2013). In addition, this study was conducted in Israel, under some special circumstances related to an official policy of the Ministry of Education banning student-teacher connections via SNS; hence, participating students who were de-facto connected to their teachers were violating regulations. Therefore, results may be biased.

References

Ahern, L., Feller, J., & Nagle, T. (2016). Social Media as a Support for Learning in Universities: An Empirical Study of Facebook Groups. Journal of Decision Systems, 25(1), 35-49. https://doi.org/10.1080/12460125.2016.1187421

Anderson, A., AlDoubi, S., Kaminski, K., Anderson, S.K., & Isaacs, N. (2014). Social Networking: Bounda-ries and Limits - Part 1: Ethics. TechTrends, 58(2), 25-31. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11528-014-0734-9

Ang, R.P. (2005). Development and Validation of the Teacher-student Relationship Inventory Using Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis. The Journal of Experimental Education, 74, 55-73. https://doi.org/10.3200/JEXE.74.1.55-74

Asterhan, C., & Rosenberg, H. (2015). The Promise, Reality and Dilemmas of Secondary School Teacher-student Interactions in Facebook: The Teacher Perspective. Computers & Education, 85, 134-148. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2015.02.003

Birch, S.H., & Ladd, G.W. (1998). Children's Interpersonal Behaviors and the Teacher-child Relationship. Developmental Psychology, 34(5), 934-946. https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.34.5.934

Blonder, R., & Rap, S. (2017). I like Facebook: Exploring Israeli High School Chemistry Teachers’ TPACK and Self-efficacy Beliefs. Education and Information Technologies, 22(2), 697-724. https://doi:10.1007/s10639-015-9384-6

Da-Silva, A., & Barbosa, M.P. (2015). Facebook Groups: The Use of Social Network in the Education. In The Seventeenth International Symposium on Computers in Education (Setubal, Portugal) (pp. 185-188). https://doi: 10.1109/SIIE.2015.7451673

Davis, H.A. (2003). Conceptualizing the Role and Influence of Student-teacher Relationships on Children's Social and Cognitive Development. Educational Psychologist, 38(4), 207-234. http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15326985EP3804_2

Deng, L., & Tavares, N.J. (2013). From Moodle to Facebook: Exploring Students' motivation and Experiences in Online Communities. Computers & Education, 68, 167-176. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.04.028

Fewkes, A.M., & McCabe, M. (2012). Facebook: Learning Tool or Distraction? Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 28(3), 92-98. https://doi.org/10.1080/21532974.2012.10784686

Greenhow, C., & Askari, E. (2017). Learning and Teaching with Social Network Sites: A Decade of Research in K-12 Related Education. Education and Information Technologies, 22(2), 623-645. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-015-9446-9

Gutiérrez, A., & Tyner, K. (2012). Media Education, Media Literacy and Digital Competence. [Educación para los medios, alfabetización mediática y competencia digital]. Comunicar, 19(38), 31-39. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-03

Hamre, B., & Pianta, R. (2001). Early Teacher-child Relationships and the Trajectory of Children’s School Outcomes through Eighth Grade. Child Development, 72(2), 625-638. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00301

Hershkovitz, A., & Forkosh-Baruch, A. (2013). Student-teacher Relationship in the Facebook Era: The stu-dents' Perspective. International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning, 23(1), 33-52. https://doi.org/10.1504/IJCEELL.2013.051765

Hew, K.F. (2011). Students’ and Teachers’ Use of Facebook. Computers in Education, 27(2), 662-676. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2010.11.020

Hsieh, H.F., & Shannon, S.E. (2005). Three Approaches to Qualitative Content Analysis. Qualitative Health Research, 15(9), 1277-1288. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732305276687Israeli

Israeli Ministry of Education (2013). Director General Communication, Instruction 6.1-1: Using Social Networking Sites and Online Collaborative Communities in the Education System [in Hebrew]. Jerusalem, Israel. (https://goo.gl/Yfb5J0) (2017-05-01).

Jang, Y. (2015). Convenience Matters: A Qualitative Study on the Impact of Use of Social Media and Col-laboration Technologies on Learning Experience and Performance in Higher Education. Education for Information, 31(1-2), 73-98. https://doi.org/10.3233/EFI-150948

Kent, M. (2014). What's on your mind? Facebook as a Forum for Learning and Teaching in Higher Education. In M. Kent & T. Leaver (Eds.), An Education in Facebook? Higher Education and the World's Largest Social Network (pp. 53-60). New York: Routledge.

Kert, S.B. (2011). Online Social Network Sites for K-12 Students: Socialization or Loneliness. International Journal of Social Sciences and Education, 1(4), 326-339. (https://goo.gl/tnKUok) (2017-05-01).

MacFarlane, A.G. (2001). Information, Knowledge and Technology, In H.J. Van-der-Molen (Ed.), Virtual University? Educational Environments of the Future (pp. 41-49). London: Portland Press. (https://goo.gl/RQhFyH) (2015-07-01).

Manca, S., & Ranieri, M. (2017). Implications of Social Network Sites for Teaching and Learning: Where We Are and Where We Want to Go. Education and Information Technologies, 22(2), 605-622. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-015-9429-x

Mao, J. (2014). Social Media for Learning: A Mixed Methods Study on High School Students’ technology affordances and perspectives. Computers in Human Behavior, 33, 213-223. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.01.002

Mazer, J.P., Murphy, R.E., & Simonds, C.J. (2009). The Effects of Teacher Self-disclosure via Facebook on Teacher Credibility. Learning, Media and Technology, 34(2), 175-183. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439880902923655

Ministry of Education. (2011). Director General Communication, Instruction 9.4-10: Education to Protectedness, to Ethics Keeping and to Appropriate and Wise Behavior on the Web [in Hebrew]. Jerusalem, Israel. (https://goo.gl/4H1ceN) (2017-05-01).

Miron, E., & Ravid, G. (2015). Facebook Groups as an Academic Teacher Aid: Case Study and Recommendations for Educators. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 18(4), 371-384. (https://goo.gl/QEoduq) (2015-07-01).

Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment (2016). Standard of Practice. (https://goo.gl/8EcwiE) (2017-05-01).

Rap, S., & Blonder, R. (2016). Let’s Face(book) it: Analyzing Interactions in Social Network Groups for Chemistry Learning. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 25(1), 62-76. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-015-9577-1

Sabol, T.J., & Pianta, R.C. (2012). Recent Trends in Research on Teacher-child Relationships. Attachment & Human Development, 14(3), 213-231. https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14616734.2012.672262

Sánchez, R.A., Cortijo, V., & Javed, U. (2014). Students' Perceptions of Facebook for Academic Purposes. Computers & Education, 70, 138-149. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.08.012

Sax, L.J., Gilmartin, S.K., & Bryan, A.N. (2003). Assessing response rates and nonresponse bias in Web and paper surveys. Research in Higher Education, 44(4), 409-432. (https://goo.gl/GKEw2x) (2017-05-01).

Scardamalia, M., & Bereiter, C. (2006). Knowledge Building: Theory, Pedagogy, and Technology. In K. Saw-yer (Ed.), Cambridge Handbook of the Learning Sciences (pp. 97-118). New York: Cambridge University Press. (https://goo.gl/5DtF9h) (2015-07-01).

Schroeder, M. (2013). Keeping the ‘Free’ in Teacher Speech Rights: Protecting Teachers and their Use of Social Media to Communicate with Students beyond the Schoolhouse Gates. Journal of Law and Technology, 19(2), 1-128. (https://goo.gl/ZeMlwG) (2017-05-01).

Selwyn, N. (2009). Faceworking: Exploring Students' Education-related Use of Facebook. Learning, Media and Technology, 34(2), 157-174. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439880902923622

Stornaiuolo, A., DiZio, J.K., Hellmich, E.A. (2013). Expanding Community: Youth, Social Networking, and Schools. [Desarrollando la comunidad: jóvenes, redes sociales y escuelas]. Comunicar, 20(40), 79-87. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-08

The Teaching Council (2016). Code of Professional Conduct for Teachers (2nd Edition, 2012). Maynooth, Ireland. (https://goo.gl/BtL0GJ) (2017-05-01).

Vie, S. (2008). Digital Divide 2.0: ‘Generation M’ and Online Social Networking Sites in the Composition Classroom. Computers and Composition, 25(1), 9-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compcom.2007.09.004

Ward, P., Clark, T., Zabriskie, R., & Morris, T. (2014). Paper/pencil versus Online Data Collection: An Exploratory Study. Journal of Leisure Research, 46(1), 84-105.

Weigold, A., Weigold, I.K., & Russell, E.J. (2013). Examination of the Equivalence of Self-Report Survey-based Paper-and-pencil and Internet Data Collection Methods. Psychological Methods, 18(1), 53-70. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0031607

Young, K. (2011). Social Ties, Social Networking and the Facebook Experience. International Journal of Emerging Technologies and Society, 9(1), 20-34. (https://goo.gl/cZTQYj) (2015-07-01).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La relación profesoralumno es crucial para un aprendizaje y una enseñanza exitosos. Actualmente, la comunicación entre alumnos y profesores –factor esencial que facilita estas relaciones– sucede a través de las redes sociales. En la presente investigación examinamos las asociaciones entre la relación alumnoprofesor y la comunicación alumnoprofesor mediatizada por las redes sociales. La muestra incluyó a alumnos israelíes de educación media y secundaria de 1219 años de edad (n=667). Se comparó la relación alumnoprofesor entre subgrupos de alumnos de acuerdo al tipo de conexión con sus profesores en Facebook (o la falta de conexión), sus actitudes hacia la prohibición de conexión por Facebook con los profesores, y sus percepciones acerca del uso de Facebook para el aprendizaje. Con respecto a las actitudes de los alumnos en relación a la prohibición de comunicación alumnoprofesor vía redes sociales, así como el uso del Facebook para estudiar, encontramos diferencias significativas en tres grupos de alumnos: aquellos que no se interesan por conectarse con sus profesores en Facebook, aquellos que se conectan con sus profesores en Facebook, y aquellos que no están conectados con sus profesores, pero que desean hacerlo. Encontramos asociaciones significativas en la relación alumnoprofesor y la comunicación alumnoprofesor mediatizada por Facebook. En esta última existe una brecha entre las expectativas del alumno y la experiencia práctica. La clave para cerrar esa brecha se basa en las normas y la implementación efectiva.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Las redes sociales, como Facebook, han sido adoptadas extensivamente, y han cambiado la forma en que se comunican las personas. Los usos educacionales de las redes han sido discutidos a gran escala, sin embargo, estas discusiones se refieren mayormente a los beneficios pedagógicos (Greenhow & Askari, 2017; Manca & Ranieri, 2017). En este estudio abordamos un criterio diferente para examinar el rol de las redes sociales en la educación, dado que exploramos la relación estudiante-profesor en la «vida real» y su relación en las comunicaciones estudiante-profesor basadas en las redes. Se han considerado dos supuestos subyacentes para esta línea de investigación. En primer lugar, que las relaciones estudiante-profesor son vitales para un aprendizaje y enseñanza exitosos (Birch & Ladd, 1998; Davis, 2003; Hamre & Pianta, 2001; Sabol & Pianta, 2012). En segundo lugar, las redes sociales están ante todo destinadas a facilitar las interacciones sociales. Por ende, el enfoque sobre las relaciones estudiante-profesor a través de las redes es un área de investigación más natural con respecto a estas plataformas. Más aún, dado que los usos sociales forman parte integral de los «nuevos medios» de la actualidad, es importante destacar estos aspectos de la vida digital cotidiana de los estudiantes y de los profesores (Gutiérrez & Tyner, 2012).

Algunas preguntas intrigantes surgieron respecto de las conexiones estudiante-profesor en redes sociales y sus efectos sobre las relaciones estudiante-profesor en la «vida real» y viceversa (Manca & Ranieri, 2017). Incluso el término en sí, «amigos», usado en diversas redes sociales para describir usuarios conectados, puede desafiar la jerarquía común de profesor-estudiante, dado que tradicionalmente se acepta que los profesores ejerzan cierto poder sobre sus estudiantes, aún si se desarrollan relaciones estrechas entre ambos (Ang, 2005; Vie, 2008).

Independientemente, el rol de los profesores en general está cambiando constantemente en la era de la información, como resultado de que los límites de tiempo y espacio se están esfumando (MacFarlane, 2001; Scardamalia & Bereiter, 2006). Las comunicaciones basadas en las redes sociales desempeñan un papel muy importante en este cambio, extendiendo el alcance y estableciendo en qué términos se comunican los profesores con los estudiantes, aún más que las plataformas tradicionales en línea, tales como los sistemas de gestión de aprendizaje. A su vez, esto puede efectuar las percepciones mutuas y las creencias (Mazer, Murphy, & Simonds, 2009), cambiando así las relaciones y estructuras jerárquicas tradicionales entre estudiantes y profesores en las escuelas.

Por esta razón, las autoridades escolares y los responsables por establecer las políticas han estado reflexionando sobre sus posiciones respecto de las comunicaciones estudiante-profesor basadas en las redes sociales, a menudo prohibiendo totalmente las comunicaciones profesor-estudiante a través de las redes sociales. En Israel, donde fue conducido el estudio al que se refiere este artículo, el Ministerio de Educación primero adoptó esta política de prohibición, pero un año y medio después el reglamento fue corregido, poniendo el énfasis en las posibilidades educativas de las redes sociales, permitiendo comunicaciones restringidas relacionadas con las redes sociales (Ministerio de Educación de Israel, 2011, 2013). En una perspectiva internacional, la prohibición de comunicaciones profesor-estudiante mediante redes sociales es un tema de debate en muchos países. Las comunicaciones profesor-estudiante mediante las redes fueron prohibidas en diversas regiones de los EEUU y en Australia (Departamento de Educación, Formación y Empleo de Queensland, 2016; Schroeder, 2013), en tanto que otros educadores han preferido advertir en lugar de prohibir, como es el caso de Irlanda, donde se establece formalmente que «los profesores deben […] asegurar que toda comunicación con alumnos/estudiantes […] sea apropiada, incluyendo comunicaciones mediante medios electrónicos, como e-mail, mensajes de textos y sitios de redes sociales» (Consejo de Enseñanza, 2016: 7).

La discusión pública respecto de las comunicaciones profesor-estudiante vía redes sociales refleja la naturaleza compleja de este tema, y en general demuestra la dificultad para adaptar novedades en sistemas y organizaciones de gran escala. Sin embargo, la mayoría de las políticas no se basan en evidencias empíricas.

En este estudio nos centramos en alumnos de escuelas secundarias, ya que hasta recientemente los estudios se hallaban en un nivel muy básico (Hew, 2011) y tan solo en los últimos años se ha comenzado a estudiar a fondo a esta población (Asterhan & Rosenberg, 2015; Blonder & Rap, 2017; Fewkes & McCabe, 2012). Por consiguiente, nuestro objetivo es explorar las relaciones entre las percepciones de los estudiantes acerca de la relación profesor-estudiante y las comunicaciones estudiante-profesor mediadas por Facebook. Formulamos las siguientes preguntas de investigación:

• ¿Cómo se facilita la comunicación estudiante-profesor en Facebook?

• ¿Cuáles son las actitudes de los estudiantes respecto de la política de prohibición de las comunicaciones a través de las redes sociales con los profesores?

• ¿Cuáles son las actitudes de los estudiantes respecto al uso de Facebook para el aprendizaje?

• ¿Cómo se caracteriza de hecho la amistad estudiante-profesor en Facebook?

• ¿Cuáles son las diferencias en las percepciones de los estudiantes respecto de las relaciones estudiante-profesor basadas en las siguientes variables?: a) Tipo de conexión estudiante-profesor en Facebook; b) Tipos de comunicaciones mediante Facebook; c) Actitudes respecto de la política de prohibición de las redes sociales; d) Actitudes respecto del uso de Facebook para aprender; e) El tipo de perfil de los profesores usado para conectarse con los estudiantes.

2. Metodología

Se recolectaron datos de forma anónima usando un cuestionario en línea que fue distribuido mediante las plataformas de comunicaciones de las escuelas –con la ayuda de los educadores y las escuelas–, los sitios de redes sociales –en su mayoría Facebook y Twitter– y diversas listas de correo profesional y personales relevantes. Nuestra población objetivo eran estudiantes en escuelas secundarias inferiores y superiores. Se obtuvo el consentimiento informado a través del cuestionario en línea.

Es importante entender el momento de la distribución del cuestionario, dado que unos meses antes de este período el Ministerio de Educación de Israel modificó su política respecto de las redes sociales, permitiendo conexiones limitadas por Facebook entre estudiantes y profesores mediante grupos y solamente para propósitos de aprendizaje, en tanto que antes de ello cualquier comunicación basada en redes entre profesores y estudiantes estaba prohibida.

2.1. Variables de investigación2.1.1. Variables independientes

• Comunicación a través de Facebook. Preguntamos acerca del inicio de la conexión por Facebook estudiante-profesor y los medios por los cuales se facilita –en caso de existir una conexión–; por ejemplo, grupos de Facebook, chats privados, «muros» de usuarios y páginas de eventos. También indagamos respecto del tipo de perfil de los profesores con los que los estudiantes prefieren conectarse –si ya están conectados o si desean conectarse–. Además, preguntamos si el profesor con el cual el estudiante está o desea estar conectado es o no un profesor de aula.

• Actitudes respecto del uso de Facebook en educación. Medimos las actitudes de los estudiantes respecto del uso de Facebook para aprender, y su nivel de acuerdo con la política de prohibición; es decir, cuando las interacciones estudiante-profesor a través de las redes sociales están prohibidas.

2.1.2. Variables dependientes: Relación profesor-estudiante

La percepción de los estudiantes respecto a la relación profesor-estudiante se basaba en los tres ejes del marco de trabajo TSRI de Ang (2005), a saber: satisfacción (refiriéndose a experiencias que reflejen actividades positivas entre estudiantes y profesores); Ayuda Instrumental (cuando los estudiantes recurren a sus profesores como personas de recursos, a los que se pueden dirigir por consejos, comprensión o ayuda); y Conflicto (refiriéndose a experiencias negativas y desagradables entre estudiantes y profesores).

2.2. Instrumentos y procedimiento

Utilizamos una versión adaptada del Modelo de relaciones profesor-estudiante (TSRI: Teacher-Student Relationship Inventory), originalmente desarrollado para medir las relaciones profesor-estudiante según fue informado por profesores respecto de un estudiante dado, usando 14 ítems calificados en una escala de Likert de 5 puntos (1: totalmente en desacuerdo, 5: completamente de acuerdo) (Ang, 2005). El cuestionario fue traducido al hebreo y modificado para medir las percepciones de los estudiantes de la relación profesor-estudiante respecto de un profesor dado. Por ejemplo, el ítem «disfruto de tener a este estudiante en mi clase» fue traducido a: «Pienso que este profesor disfruta de tenerme en su clase». El cuestionario completo adaptado aparece en la Tabla 1. Nos referiremos a esta nueva versión como TSRI-S.


Hershkovizt Forkosh-Baruch 2017a-62671 ov-es029.jpg

TSRI fue implementado como parte de una encuesta en línea, usando formularios de Google. Dentro de este formulario, se preguntó a los estudiantes acerca de su uso actual, y de sus conexiones con profesores, a través de Facebook. A continuación de sus respuestas, fueron guiados a elegir un profesor al que se dirigieron cuando respondieron al TSRI, basado en los siguientes cuatro grupos de estudiantes:

• Estudiantes que tienen una cuenta activa en Facebook y que están conectados a uno de sus profesores actuales. Estos estudiantes completaron el cuestionario respecto de uno de sus profesores actuales, con quien están conectados en Facebook.

• Estudiantes que tienen una cuenta activa en Facebook, no están conectados con uno de sus profesores actuales, pero están interesados en esa conexión. Estos estudiantes completaron el cuestionario respecto de uno de sus profesores actuales con quien desearían conectarse en Facebook.

• Estudiantes que tienen una cuenta activa en Facebook, no están conectados con ninguno de sus profesores actuales, y no están interesados en esa conexión. Estos estudiantes completaron el cuestionario respecto a un profesor actual arbitrario a ellos.

• Estudiantes que no tienen una cuenta activa de Facebook completaron el cuestionario respecto a un profesor arbitrario.

También les pedimos a los participantes su opinión acerca de los aspectos positivos de las conexiones profesor-estudiante usando Facebook. A los estudiantes que indicaron estar de hecho conectados con uno de sus profesores, y los que indicaron que desean estar conectados con uno de sus profesores, se les formularon las siguientes preguntas: «¿De qué manera le contribuye [o podría contribuir] esta conexión de Facebook?»

2.3. Población

En total 667 estudiantes participaron en este estudio. Sus edades se encontraban entre los 12 y 19 años (Media=14, Desviación Estándar=1,6), de los cuales 403 eran mujeres (60%) y 264 varones (40%). Los participantes eran de todas las áreas de Israel, como resultado de la accesibilidad ubicua al formulario en línea.

2.4. Análisis

Dado que algunas de las variables no fueron normalmente distribuidas, hemos usado pruebas de comparación no paramétricas, específicamente la prueba Mann-Whitney U y la prueba Kruskal-Wallis H, con software IBM SPSS Versión 23. Las respuestas de los participantes a los ítems abiertos fueron codificadas utilizando el método de análisis de contenido dirigido (Hsieh & Shannon, 2005), con variables derivadas del marco de Ang (2005).

3. Resultados

Dividimos la población de la investigación (n=667) en cuatro subgrupos de estudiantes:

• Estudiantes conectados (n=67, 10%), que tienen al menos uno de sus profesores actuales como amigo en Facebook.

• Estudiantes interesados en conectarse (n=124, 19%), que no tienen ninguno de sus profesores actuales como amigo en Facebook pero que les gustaría que uno de sus profesores actuales sea su amigo en Facebook.

• Estudiantes no interesados en conectarse (n=396, 59%), que no tienen a ninguno de sus profesores actuales como amigo y que no desean tenerlo.

• Estudiantes que no están en Facebook (n=80, 12% de los estudiantes) que no tienen una cuenta activa de Facebook.

3.1. Variables independientes3.1.1. Medios de comunicación

Entre el grupo conectado (n=67), las comunicaciones basadas en grupos (ya sea en grupos cerrados o abiertos) eran las más populares, con 33 estudiantes (49%) que lo usan, seguido por chats privados con el profesor, donde 24 estudiantes (36%) mencionan usarlo. Aproximadamente un tercio de los estudiantes (22 de 67) mencionaron que hicieron «Me gusta» en las actualizaciones de estado, y cerca de un quinto de los estudiantes (14 de 67) mencionaron haber comentado en las actualizaciones del profesor. Resultó menos popular comunicarse a través de la página de eventos (13%, 9 de 67), carga/etiquetado/comentarios (12%, 8 de 67), y escribir en el Muro del profesor (4%, 3 de 67). Todos los estudiantes mencionaron por lo menos un medio de comunicación, lo que significa que ninguno de ellos mantiene la conexión con su profesor estrictamente pasiva.

3.1.2. Actitudes respecto a una política restrictiva

Preguntamos a los estudiantes en qué medida están de acuerdo con una política restrictiva que prohíba cualquier conexión profesor-estudiante a través de las redes sociales. Tomando en cuenta solamente los estudiantes que tenían una opinión sobre el tema (n=482 de 667), el 63% de los estudiantes (304 de 482) estaba de acuerdo o tendió a estar de acuerdo con la política de prohibición, y el 37% estaba en desacuerdo o tendía a estar en desacuerdo con la misma (178 de 482).

El análisis a nivel de subgrupo reveló que alrededor del 75% de estudiantes no interesados en conectarse (215 de 285) están de acuerdo o tienden a estar de acuerdo con una política de prohibición, en tanto que solamente el 31% del grupo conectado (19 de 49) y el 39% del grupo interesado en conectarse (29 de 94) están de acuerdo o tienden a estar de acuerdo con la misma. Esta diferencia es sorprendente y estadísticamente significativa, con Chi2(2)=71,3, con p<0,001. La comparación de los grupos conectados e interesados en estar conectados resulta en una diferencia no significativa, con Chi2(1)=0,9, con p=0,34.

3.1.3. Actitudes respecto al uso de Facebook para el aprendizaje

Preguntamos a los participantes si pensaban que se podría usar Facebook para aprender (sin mencionar aplicaciones específicas). En total, el 52% (349 de 667) respondió «Sí» y el 48% (318 de 667) respondió «No».


Hershkovizt Forkosh-Baruch 2017a-62671 ov-es030.jpg

Respecto de estudiantes que tienen cuentas de Facebook (n=587, de los cuales 340 son mujeres y 247 son varones), resulta interesante que en el grupo conectado, el 57% de los estudiantes (38 de 67) pensaba que es posible usar Facebook para aprender, comparado con el 77% del grupo interesado en conectarse (95 de 124) y el 47% del grupo no interesado en conectarse (185 de 496). Esta diferencia es estadísticamente significativa, con Chi2(2)= 34,2, con p<0,001 (Tabla 2). Destaca la diferencia en las respuestas entre los grupos conectados e interesados en conectarse, que es significativa, con Chi2(1)=8,1, con p<0,01.

3.1.4. Parámetros de amistad

De los estudiantes conectados (n=67), 25 (37%) estaban conectados con el perfil personal de su profesor y el mismo número conectado con el perfil profesional de su profesor. 17 estudiantes adicionales (25%) no sabían a qué perfil de profesor estaban conectados. De ese grupo, 25 estudiantes (37%) estaban conectados a su profesor del aula, los restantes (42 estudiantes, 63%) estaban conectados a un profesor disciplinario que no es su profesor del aula. En total, 17 estudiantes (25%) expresaron ser los que iniciaron la conexión de Facebook, 23 estudiantes (34%) mencionaron que el profesor fue el que inició la conexión, y los 27 estudiantes restantes (40%) no recordaban quién inició la conexión.

De los estudiantes que están interesados en estar conectados (n=124), 24 (19%) expresaron que les gustaría conectarse al perfil personal de su profesor, y alrededor de la misma cantidad expresaron que les gustaría conectarse al perfil profesional de su profesor (26 de 124,21%); el resto (60%, 74 de 124) no tenían preferencia por el perfil del profesor al que conectarse. También, 57 estudiantes (46%) expresaron que deseaban conectarse con su profesor del aula, los restantes (67 estudiantes, 54%) deseaban conectarse a un profesor disciplinario que no es su profesor del aula. La diferencia entre los dos grupos respecto del tipo de perfil del profesor al que deseaban estar conectados (omitiendo las opciones «No sé»/«No me importa») no es estadísticamente significativa, con Chi2(1)= 0,04, con p=0,84.

3.2. Variables dependientes3.2.1. Prueba de confiabilidad y estadísticas descriptivas

La prueba de confiabilidad para la versión adaptada resultó en puntajes altos para Satisfacción (5 ítems, M=3,75, DE=1,1, Cronbach ?=0.88); Ayuda Instrumental (5 ítems, M=2,75, DE =1,2, ?=0,87); y Conflicto (4 ítems, M=1,65, DE=0,9, ?=0,88), todos con n=667. Los ejes de Satisfacción y Conflicto son altamente oblicuos (sus valores de oblicuidad son -0,92 y 1,74, respectivamente), en tanto que la ayuda Instrumental se distribuye bastante normalmente, siendo la excepción un pico en el valor 1 (valor de oblicuidad de 0,14).

3.2.2. TSRI y conexión a Facebook

Se compara la distribución de los ejes de TSRI entre los cuatro grupos de estudiantes, es decir, Conectados, Interesados en estar conectados, No interesados en estar conectados, y No en Facebook (n=667) (Tabla 3).


Hershkovizt Forkosh-Baruch 2017a-62671 ov-es031.jpg

La Satisfacción es significativamente diferente entre los grupos, con Chi2(3)= 14,3, con p<0,05, como asimismo la Ayuda Instrumental, con Chi2(3)=38,5, con p<0,001. El Conflicto no es significativamente diferente, con Chi2(3)=0,9, con p=0,83; las comparaciones utilizaron la prueba Kruskal Wallis H. Para pruebas post-hoc, hemos ejecutado en pares las pruebas Mann-Whitney U, usando la corrección de Bonferroni para pruebas múltiples (es decir, dividiendo a por 6). Los resultados indican que la Satisfacción era diferente solamente entre los grupos de interesados en estar conectados y los no interesados en estar conectados (Z=3,74, con p<0,01), con una media superior para el primero y un tamaño de efecto de r=0,16.

La Ayuda Instrumental era diferente dentro de los tres pares de grupos: Los conectados e interesados en estar conectados (mayor para este último, con Z=3,10, con p<0,05), interesados en estar conectados y no interesados en estar conectados (mayor para el primero, con Z=5,79, con p<0,01), y no interesados en estar conectados y No en Facebook (superior para este último, con Z=3,33, con p<0,05) con tamaños de efectos de 0,22, 0,25 y 0,15, respectivamente. Esto es, la media de Ayuda Instrumental fue superior para estudiantes que desean conectarse en Facebook con un profesor, comparado con aquellos que de hecho están conectados con un profesor.

3.2.3. TSRI y tipo de comunicación

La ejecución de la prueba Mann-Whitney U en cada uno de los ejes de TSRI, la comparación entre usa/no usa cada uno de los medios de comunicaciones por separado, reveló diferencias significativas solamente en el caso de grupos que usan y solamente en los ejes de Satisfacción y Conflicto.

La satisfacción media para estudiantes que se comunican en grupos con sus profesores (n=33) era 4,07 (DE=0,59), comparado con 3,36 (DE=1,22) para estudiantes que no se comunican en grupos con sus profesores (n=34), Z=2,7, con p<0,05; esto denota un tamaño de efecto de r=0,28. El Conflicto medio para estudiantes que se comunican en grupos con sus profesores (n=33) era 1,37 (DE=0,55), comparado con 1,77 (DE=0,9) para estudiantes que no se comunican en grupos con sus profesores (n=34), con Z=2,02, con p<0,05; esto denota un tamaño de efecto de r=0,25. Esto es, los estudiantes que se comunican con sus profesores a través de grupos de Facebook se sienten más satisfechos y menos conflictivos con sus profesores, comparados con aquellos estudiantes que no se comunican usando grupos. La Ayuda Instrumental no presentó una diferencia significativa, con Z=0,40, con p=0,69

3.2.4. TSRI y actitudes respecto a la política de prohibición

Para comprender las diferencias en ejes de TSRI entre los estudiantes que están de acuerdo o que tienden a estar de acuerdo con la política de prohibición (n=304) y aquellos que están en desacuerdo o que tienden a estar en desacuerdo con la misma (n=178), ejecutamos una prueba Mann-Whitney U. La única diferencia significativa residía en la Ayuda Instrumental, que fue mayor para los estudiantes que están en desacuerdo o que tienden a estar en desacuerdo con la política de prohibición, comparado con aquellos que están de acuerdo o tienden a estar de acuerdo con la misma. Esta diferencia tiene un tamaño de efecto de r=0,15 (Tabla 4).


Hershkovizt Forkosh-Baruch 2017a-62671 ov-es032.jpg

3.2.5. TSRI y actitudes respecto al uso de Facebook para el aprendizaje

Para comprender las diferencias en ejes de TSRI entre los estudiantes que piensan que es posible usar Facebook para el aprendizaje y aquellos que piensan que no (n=318), ejecutamos una prueba Mann-Whitney U. Los resultados se resumen en la Tabla 5. Se hallaron diferencias significativas en Satisfacción y Ayuda Instrumental, ambos eran mayores para estudiantes que piensan que es posible usar Facebook para el aprendizaje y aquellos que piensan que no. Estas diferencias tienen tamaños de efecto o r=0,08 y r=0,11, respectivamente.


Hershkovizt Forkosh-Baruch 2017a-62671 ov-es033.jpg

3.2.6. TSRI y perfil del profesor

En el grupo Conectado, 25 estudiantes están conectados a su profesor usando el perfil personal del profesor y 25 están conectados usando el perfil profesional del profesor. La ejecución de la prueba Mann-Whitney U resultó en una diferencia no significativa de los ejes de TSRI (Tabla 6 en la página siguiente).

En el grupo Interesado en estar conectado, 24 estudiantes desean conectarse a su profesor usando el perfil personal de su profesor y 26 desean conectarse usando el perfil profesional de su profesor. La ejecución de la prueba Mann-Whitney U resultó en una diferencia significativa con un efecto mediano para la Satisfacción. Los estudiantes que desean conectarse con su profesor usando el perfil personal de su profesor se sienten más satisfechos con ese profesor que los estudiantes que desean conectarse con su profesor a través de un perfil profesional (Tabla 6 en la página siguiente).

Ahora presentamos un análisis de las respuestas abiertas de los estudiantes a las preguntas respecto de la contribución real/potencial de comunicarse con sus profesores en Facebook, las que fueron codificadas por Satisfacción y Ayuda Instrumental, no siendo estas categorías mutuamente exclusivas.

De las 124 respuestas recibidas de estudiantes interesados en conectarse, 44 (40%) fueron codificadas como relacionadas con Satisfacción y 76 (70%) fueron codificadas como relacionadas a Ayuda Instrumental. Por ende, las razones por las cuales deseaban conectarse con los profesores en Facebook eran mayormente de nivel práctico. Por ejemplo: «[El profesor] me podría actualizar fácil y rápidamente acerca de lo que sucedió cuando no estuve [en la escuela]» (S344, F:14); «[el profesor] me podría ayudar por la tarde con cosas de la escuela si necesito ayuda» (S87, M:12); «De esta forma podríamos conversar con el profesor y hacer preguntas –«me sentiría mucho más cómodo que llamándolo» (S307, M:14); «Cosas que uno quisiera decirle al profesor personalmente pero uno es demasiado tímido– es posible usando Facebook» (S586, M:17).


Hershkovizt Forkosh-Baruch 2017a-62671 ov-es034.jpg

Aun así, una cantidad mensurable de las respuestas indicaban anticipación de un sentimiento de Satisfacción proveniente de esta conexión, como se puede evidenciar en los próximos ejemplos: «[El profesor] me podría preguntar cómo estoy, eso es agradable» (S344, F:14); «[el profesor] es una persona interesante y muy copado, simplemente me interesa lo que hace cuando no está enseñando» (S280, M:14); «Los profesores pueden participar en la vida de sus estudiantes» (S560, F:16); «Puede reforzar la relación entre el profesor y los estudiantes, y causar que el estudiante cuente con su profesor» (S592, F:17).

De las 37 respuestas de los estudiantes Conectados, 10 (27%) fueron codificadas como relacionadas con Satisfacción y 31 (84%) fueron codificadas como relacionadas a Ayuda Instrumental. En tanto que la Ayuda Instrumental sigue siendo la categoría más frecuente también en este grupo, la brecha entre este eje y el eje de Satisfacción se amplió. Para clarificar la diferencia en la distribución de estas dos categorías entre los dos grupos de participantes, efectuamos un análisis discriminatorio; esta prueba estadística fue elegida debido al hecho de que las categorías de codificación estaban interrelacionadas, es decir, es posible codificar la respuesta de un estudiante en ambas categorías. La función discriminatoria emergente diferenciaba significativamente entre los estudiantes Conectados e Interesados en estar conectados, con Wilk ?=0.94, ?2(2)=10,9, con p<0,01.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

En este artículo exploramos las percepciones de los estudiantes respecto a la relación estudiante-profesor, donde ambas partes se puedan comunicar a través de las redes sociales. Tengamos presente que el propósito original de las redes sociales era promocionar conexiones y comunicaciones sociales e interpersonales. Como se sugiere en este estudio, estas conexiones y comunicaciones también pueden tener implicaciones importantes en el contexto educativo. En general, alrededor del 10% de la población ha tenido un profesor que les enseñaba y con el cual estaban conectados en Facebook, en contra de la política oficial que prohibía (y aún prohíbe) la amistad profesor-estudiante a través de las redes, demostrando la necesidad de los estudiantes y de los profesores de conectarse en diversos entornos fuera de la clase.

El medio más popular de comunicación entre los estudiantes conectados y sus profesores era a través de grupos de Facebook, como se muestra en estudios anteriores (Asterhan & Rosenberg, 2015). Tanto los estudiantes como los profesores piensan que los grupos de Facebook son apropiados, dado que ofrecen una fácil comunicación «entre uno y muchos», junto con un nivel de privacidad relativamente alto, y una mayor separación entre sus discusiones relacionadas con el aprendizaje y su actividad personal (Kent, 2014). Muchos estudios han destacado la asequibilidad educativa de estos grupos (Ahern, Feller, & Nagle, 2016; Da-Silva & Barbosa, 2015; Miron & Ravid, 2015; Rap & Blonder, 2016). Ampliamos esta literatura haciendo referencia a los beneficios de grupos con respecto a la relación estudiante-profesor en general. Esto es evidente, por ejemplo, por los niveles más altos de Satisfacción y los niveles más bajos de Conflicto para los estudiantes que se comunican con sus profesores mediante grupos de Facebook, comparados con los estudiantes que estaban conectados con sus profesores en Facebook pero que no se comunicaban con ellos a través de grupos; lo que es interesante es que no se hallaron diferencias entre estos dos modos en la Ayuda Instrumental, lo que podría indicar de que los estudiantes usan canales privados para discutir asuntos personales con sus profesores (Hershkovitz & Forkosh-Baruch, 2013).

En tanto que tres cuartos de los estudiantes no interesados en conectarse estaban de acuerdo o tendían a estar de acuerdo con una política que prohíbe comunicaciones estudiante-profesor a través de redes sociales, menos del 40% de los estudiantes Interesados en conectarse y menos de un tercio de los estudiantes Conectados, estaban de acuerdo o tendían a estar de acuerdo con ella. Por lo tanto, algunos estudiantes están interesados en reforzar las conexiones con sus profesores fuera de los límites de la escuela, y al hacerlo prefieren usar las plataformas que ya conocen y en cuyo uso son competentes (Deng & Tavares, 2013; Jang, 2015).

Por otro lado, descubrimos que solamente la mitad de los estudiantes cree que es posible usar Facebook para aprender, en línea con estudios anteriores (Mao, 2014). La diferencia de actitud entre los grupos Conectados y los grupos Interesados en conectarse destaca la diferencia entre los beneficios esperados de una amistad en Facebook entre los estudiantes con sus profesores y los beneficios reales. Los estudiantes tienden a percibir los medios sociales como un espacio informal utilizado principalmente para socializar, y raramente en entornos de aprendizaje formales (Sánchez, Cortijob, & Javed, 2014; Selwyn, 2009); por lo tanto, debido a su propia naturaleza como espacios sociales virtuales, deberían ser examinados a través de esas lentes.

También descubrimos algunos resultados interesantes respecto de estudiantes Interesados, que obtuvieron un puntaje más alto en el eje de la Ayuda Instrumental que los estudiantes Conectados. También, los estudiantes interesados en conectarse al perfil personal de su profesor tuvieron un puntaje mayor en el eje de Satisfacción que aquellos que deseaban conectarse al perfil profesional. Esto podría indicar la necesidad de los estudiantes de ampliar sus relaciones con sus profesores más allá del entorno tradicional relacionado con la escuela, hacia los nuevos entornos en línea, expandiendo las experiencias de la vida real (Hershkovitz & Forkosh-Baruch, 2013; Kert, 2011). Sin embargo, en la práctica estas expectativas de satisfacción no siempre se cumplen. Aparte de la política, los procesos educativos deben ser la clave para una implementación segura y eficiente de las redes sociales por parte de los profesores y estudiantes (Stornaiuolo, DiZio, & Hellmich, 2013). Esto debería lograrse mediante un diálogo abierto entre todas las partes interesadas relevantes, incluyendo los responsables políticos, profesionales, profesores y estudiantes, y basado en datos empíricos. El rol clave de los estudiantes en este trabajo es no ser subestimados, dado que son la fuerza motriz y los habitantes naturales de las redes sociales.

En base a nuestros hallazgos, sugerimos que una investigación futura sobre este tópico incluya ejemplos más amplios y diversos de diferentes países y culturas, como asímismo diferentes tipos de redes sociales. Esto ayudará a comprender cómo las diferentes normas sociales relacionadas con el medio educativo se ven reflejadas en el conjunto de redes, y como resultado, las políticas educativas relacionadas con redes sociales podrían estar mejor fundadas en un contexto cultural local. Sin embargo, las redes forman parte de un fenómeno global más amplio, y por lo tanto es vital examinar sus implicaciones educativas en un contexto internacional más extenso y explorar si esta situación es recíproca con los entornos educativos. Por supuesto, este no es un estudio sin limitaciones. Primero, la muestra de investigación, obtenida de la distribución viral de un cuestionario en línea, en alguna medida puede ser tendenciosa (Sax, Gilmartin, & Bryan, 2003); sin embargo, como lo demuestran estudios recientes, los cuestionarios en línea y los de autoinformes tradicionales podrían ser equivalentes, donde el primero es percibido por los participantes como más protector de su anonimato (Ward, Clark, Zabriskie, & Morris, 2014; Weigold, Weigold, & Russell, 2013). Además, este estudio fue conducido en Israel, bajo ciertas circunstancias especiales relacionadas con una política oficial del Ministerio de Educación, que prohíbe las conexiones profesor-estudiante a través de las redes sociales y, en consecuencia, los estudiantes que participaron y que estaban realmente conectados con sus profesores, estaban de hecho violando las reglamentaciones. Por lo tanto, es posible que los resultados sean aún más tendenciosos.

Referencias

Ahern, L., Feller, J., & Nagle, T. (2016). Social Media as a Support for Learning in Universities: An Empirical Study of Facebook Groups. Journal of Decision Systems, 25(1), 35-49. https://doi.org/10.1080/12460125.2016.1187421

Anderson, A., AlDoubi, S., Kaminski, K., Anderson, S.K., & Isaacs, N. (2014). Social Networking: Bounda-ries and Limits - Part 1: Ethics. TechTrends, 58(2), 25-31. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11528-014-0734-9

Ang, R.P. (2005). Development and Validation of the Teacher-student Relationship Inventory Using Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis. The Journal of Experimental Education, 74, 55-73. https://doi.org/10.3200/JEXE.74.1.55-74

Asterhan, C., & Rosenberg, H. (2015). The Promise, Reality and Dilemmas of Secondary School Teacher-student Interactions in Facebook: The Teacher Perspective. Computers & Education, 85, 134-148. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2015.02.003

Birch, S.H., & Ladd, G.W. (1998). Children's Interpersonal Behaviors and the Teacher-child Relationship. Developmental Psychology, 34(5), 934-946. https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.34.5.934

Blonder, R., & Rap, S. (2017). I like Facebook: Exploring Israeli High School Chemistry Teachers’ TPACK and Self-efficacy Beliefs. Education and Information Technologies, 22(2), 697-724. https://doi:10.1007/s10639-015-9384-6

Da-Silva, A., & Barbosa, M.P. (2015). Facebook Groups: The Use of Social Network in the Education. In The Seventeenth International Symposium on Computers in Education (Setubal, Portugal) (pp. 185-188). https://doi: 10.1109/SIIE.2015.7451673

Davis, H.A. (2003). Conceptualizing the Role and Influence of Student-teacher Relationships on Children's Social and Cognitive Development. Educational Psychologist, 38(4), 207-234. http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/S15326985EP3804_2

Deng, L., & Tavares, N.J. (2013). From Moodle to Facebook: Exploring Students' motivation and Experiences in Online Communities. Computers & Education, 68, 167-176. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.04.028

Fewkes, A.M., & McCabe, M. (2012). Facebook: Learning Tool or Distraction? Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 28(3), 92-98. https://doi.org/10.1080/21532974.2012.10784686

Greenhow, C., & Askari, E. (2017). Learning and Teaching with Social Network Sites: A Decade of Research in K-12 Related Education. Education and Information Technologies, 22(2), 623-645. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-015-9446-9

Gutiérrez, A., & Tyner, K. (2012). Media Education, Media Literacy and Digital Competence. [Educación para los medios, alfabetización mediática y competencia digital]. Comunicar, 19(38), 31-39. https://doi.org/10.3916/C38-2012-02-03

Hamre, B., & Pianta, R. (2001). Early Teacher-child Relationships and the Trajectory of Children’s School Outcomes through Eighth Grade. Child Development, 72(2), 625-638. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8624.00301

Hershkovitz, A., & Forkosh-Baruch, A. (2013). Student-teacher Relationship in the Facebook Era: The stu-dents' Perspective. International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning, 23(1), 33-52. https://doi.org/10.1504/IJCEELL.2013.051765

Hew, K.F. (2011). Students’ and Teachers’ Use of Facebook. Computers in Education, 27(2), 662-676. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2010.11.020

Hsieh, H.F., & Shannon, S.E. (2005). Three Approaches to Qualitative Content Analysis. Qualitative Health Research, 15(9), 1277-1288. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732305276687Israeli

Israeli Ministry of Education (2013). Director General Communication, Instruction 6.1-1: Using Social Networking Sites and Online Collaborative Communities in the Education System [in Hebrew]. Jerusalem, Israel. (https://goo.gl/Yfb5J0) (2017-05-01).

Jang, Y. (2015). Convenience Matters: A Qualitative Study on the Impact of Use of Social Media and Col-laboration Technologies on Learning Experience and Performance in Higher Education. Education for Information, 31(1-2), 73-98. https://doi.org/10.3233/EFI-150948

Kent, M. (2014). What's on your mind? Facebook as a Forum for Learning and Teaching in Higher Education. In M. Kent & T. Leaver (Eds.), An Education in Facebook? Higher Education and the World's Largest Social Network (pp. 53-60). New York: Routledge.

Kert, S.B. (2011). Online Social Network Sites for K-12 Students: Socialization or Loneliness. International Journal of Social Sciences and Education, 1(4), 326-339. (https://goo.gl/tnKUok) (2017-05-01).

MacFarlane, A.G. (2001). Information, Knowledge and Technology, In H.J. Van-der-Molen (Ed.), Virtual University? Educational Environments of the Future (pp. 41-49). London: Portland Press. (https://goo.gl/RQhFyH) (2015-07-01).

Manca, S., & Ranieri, M. (2017). Implications of Social Network Sites for Teaching and Learning: Where We Are and Where We Want to Go. Education and Information Technologies, 22(2), 605-622. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-015-9429-x

Mao, J. (2014). Social Media for Learning: A Mixed Methods Study on High School Students’ technology affordances and perspectives. Computers in Human Behavior, 33, 213-223. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2014.01.002

Mazer, J.P., Murphy, R.E., & Simonds, C.J. (2009). The Effects of Teacher Self-disclosure via Facebook on Teacher Credibility. Learning, Media and Technology, 34(2), 175-183. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439880902923655

Ministry of Education. (2011). Director General Communication, Instruction 9.4-10: Education to Protectedness, to Ethics Keeping and to Appropriate and Wise Behavior on the Web [in Hebrew]. Jerusalem, Israel. (https://goo.gl/4H1ceN) (2017-05-01).

Miron, E., & Ravid, G. (2015). Facebook Groups as an Academic Teacher Aid: Case Study and Recommendations for Educators. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 18(4), 371-384. (https://goo.gl/QEoduq) (2015-07-01).

Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment (2016). Standard of Practice. (https://goo.gl/8EcwiE) (2017-05-01).

Rap, S., & Blonder, R. (2016). Let’s Face(book) it: Analyzing Interactions in Social Network Groups for Chemistry Learning. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 25(1), 62-76. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-015-9577-1

Sabol, T.J., & Pianta, R.C. (2012). Recent Trends in Research on Teacher-child Relationships. Attachment & Human Development, 14(3), 213-231. https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14616734.2012.672262

Sánchez, R.A., Cortijo, V., & Javed, U. (2014). Students' Perceptions of Facebook for Academic Purposes. Computers & Education, 70, 138-149. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.08.012

Sax, L.J., Gilmartin, S.K., & Bryan, A.N. (2003). Assessing response rates and nonresponse bias in Web and paper surveys. Research in Higher Education, 44(4), 409-432. (https://goo.gl/GKEw2x) (2017-05-01).

Scardamalia, M., & Bereiter, C. (2006). Knowledge Building: Theory, Pedagogy, and Technology. In K. Saw-yer (Ed.), Cambridge Handbook of the Learning Sciences (pp. 97-118). New York: Cambridge University Press. (https://goo.gl/5DtF9h) (2015-07-01).

Schroeder, M. (2013). Keeping the ‘Free’ in Teacher Speech Rights: Protecting Teachers and their Use of Social Media to Communicate with Students beyond the Schoolhouse Gates. Journal of Law and Technology, 19(2), 1-128. (https://goo.gl/ZeMlwG) (2017-05-01).

Selwyn, N. (2009). Faceworking: Exploring Students' Education-related Use of Facebook. Learning, Media and Technology, 34(2), 157-174. https://doi.org/10.1080/17439880902923622

Stornaiuolo, A., DiZio, J.K., Hellmich, E.A. (2013). Expanding Community: Youth, Social Networking, and Schools. [Desarrollando la comunidad: jóvenes, redes sociales y escuelas]. Comunicar, 20(40), 79-87. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-08

The Teaching Council (2016). Code of Professional Conduct for Teachers (2nd Edition, 2012). Maynooth, Ireland. (https://goo.gl/BtL0GJ) (2017-05-01).

Vie, S. (2008). Digital Divide 2.0: ‘Generation M’ and Online Social Networking Sites in the Composition Classroom. Computers and Composition, 25(1), 9-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compcom.2007.09.004

Ward, P., Clark, T., Zabriskie, R., & Morris, T. (2014). Paper/pencil versus Online Data Collection: An Exploratory Study. Journal of Leisure Research, 46(1), 84-105.

Weigold, A., Weigold, I.K., & Russell, E.J. (2013). Examination of the Equivalence of Self-Report Survey-based Paper-and-pencil and Internet Data Collection Methods. Psychological Methods, 18(1), 53-70. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0031607

Young, K. (2011). Social Ties, Social Networking and the Facebook Experience. International Journal of Emerging Technologies and Society, 9(1), 20-34. (https://goo.gl/cZTQYj) (2015-07-01).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/17
Accepted on 30/09/17
Submitted on 30/09/17

Volume 25, Issue 2, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C53-2017-09
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 7
Views 8
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?