Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The impact that Information and Communications Technologies have in the way today’s young people communicate and interact is unquestionable. This impact also affects the educational field, which is required to respond to the needs of twenty first century students by training them in acquiring new skills and strategies to deal with a changing and uncertain future. In this study, which involved 2,054 university students from all Spanish Universities, it delved into the knowledge of networking strategies and tools used by these students for the effective development of communication processes and the implementation of strategies for collaboration and communication. It has been developed a nonexperimental quantitative methodology and the technique used for collecting information was a questionnaire. The results show that all of them use the Internet to communicate and they have a great use of basic tools to collaborate and interact, but they prefer social networks for being in contact with their peers and establishing relationships. It has been found that students do not have the idea of the Internet as a place to learn. This fact implies new challenges to be solved by Universities, to optimize the possibilities of the networks and institutional platforms as an environment to learn collaboratively.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

In recent years the Internet has become, above all, a huge provider of tools that have been developed to enable user participation and communication among those users. Tim O´Reilly defined Web 2.0 as the new paradigm regarding how we use the Internet, in which tools are platforms for users to use and which foster communication (O´Reilly, 2005). When O’Reilly penned this reflection in 2005, the main tools were blogs and wikis, which had transformed how information was published and shared. While this in itself was considered a communication revolution, the social networks boom in 2009-2010 (Observatorio de Redes Sociales, 2011) has further enhanced the idea of the web as a platform in which communication is the fundamental component. The Internet, the network of networks, has always provided communication among its users through tools like email, forums, and chat rooms. These applications have served to broaden and diversify the channels of communication to the extent that today’s web, based on communication and mobile technologies, is considered to be Web 3.0 (Kolikant, 2010), which goes beyond the definition of a semantic web.

Whatever definition we choose to adopt, what we believe to be important is that the way we have been communicating and relating to each other over the web in recent years is what has changed our online behavior. The new channels and ways of communication have led to changes in various environments, which means that there are implications for education which need to be valued. If today’s environment has changed in this way, the obvious question is what can we, in the world of education, do to enable students to learn to develop the basic skills required for online communication. This is important not only at the professional level, encouraging young people to cope well in a changing environment but also at the personal level since online communication also affects how young people build their own identities (Bernete, 2010).

An additional consideration is that today’s university students are known as “digital natives” (Prensky, 2001), because they were born into a technology environment and, therefore, have developed specific skills and attitudes which condition their learning. The “digital native” concept has had a knock-on effect on the world of education, although it has been surpassed in subsequent terms, like “digital resident” coined by White and Le Cornu (2011). Indeed, terms abound as Gisbert and Esteve (2011) show, e.g., “digital learners”, “Generation Y” (Lancaster & Stillman, 2002; Jorgensen, 2003; McCrindle, 2006) “Generation C” (Duncan-Howell & Lee, 2007) or “Google Generation” (Rowlands & Nicholas, 2008) all of which underlines how important it is to understand that today’s university students represent a generation that was born into a world that had already been transformed by technology where the rules of the game are different, especially when working with information. Hence, the normal development, values, and history of this generation are technology driven. Students do not learn better with ICT because they are digital natives, although they do find it easier to move in these digital environments. Nevertheless, we do need to work with students on basic information management and the development of communication skills.

Prensky (2009) indicates that his description in 2001 is interesting, but that the revolution of webs means that we should really be talking about “digital wisdom” if we are to understand that human beings have to draw on their natural capacities with existing technologies because they increase and enhance the opportunities for communication and collaboration.

Whether or not we call them digital natives, what we have is a generation that uses technologies differently. Various studies have thrown up data of interest:

• 26.25 million Spaniards connect to the Internet regularly; 1.45 million more than in 2013. Of these, 20.6 million connect up every day, i.e., 78% are constantly connected (Fundación Telefónica, 2014).

• Children aged 10 to17 years mainly use instant messaging (Whatsapp) to communicate, while they use the Internet in general for school tasks and to search for information (Spanish Home Office, 2014).

• Youngsters who frequently use social networks are those who also use other types of tools like blogs and wikis (García-Jiménez, López de Ayala, & Catalina-García, 2013).

• 53.2% of teenagers between 14 and 16 mention new contacts with whom they are in touch mainly online, so this technology is acting as a mechanism for socialization and support of these friendships (Sánchez-Vera, Prendes, & Serrano, 2011).

• Those who make the most use of social networks are also those who are most frequently active online when seeking and sharing contents (García-Jiménez & al., 2013).

• University students have a positive attitude toward social networks (especially Facebook) for educational purposes and for keeping in contact with colleagues (Espuny, González, Lleixá, & Gisbert, 2011).

As we saw earlier, the importance of ICTs in how young people communicate today is beyond question. So the time is ripe to ask whether the way young people use the web affects their learning, which leads us to the idea of the PLE (Personal Learning Environment). PLE is an issue that has been catching researchers’ attention (Chaves, Trujillo & López, 2015). The concept joins two foci of research: student centered learning processes, and how technologies affect or may affect them.

While some authors take a more technological approach to PLEs (Mödritscher & al., 2011), others, like Castañeda and Adell (2013), adopt a more pedagogical stance, in which the PLE is understood not only as a set of tools but also as information processing the connections established with other people and the creation of knowledge itself. Thus, a PLE would comprise three fundamental parts (Castañeda & Adell, 2011):

• Reading tools and strategies through which information is accessed and managed.

• Reflection tools and strategies related to the places where I write and participate.

• Relation tools and strategies related to the environments in which I am in contact with others.

It is the last category that interests us in this paper. Within it, we can include the concept of Personal Learning Network (PLN) to refer to the tools, mechanisms, and activities that we set in motion when communicating with others, when we share resources and when we exchange information (Castañeda & Adell, 2013; Marín & al., 2014). The great advantages of the web are the communication possibilities that it affords. This is important because knowing what tools and strategies university students use means we can devise the strategies to improve their skills as well as provide better online relations concerning their future professional development. PLE theory states that the personal environment that we all have can help us to self-regulate our learning, from setting our goals to a final self-evaluation (Chaves & al., 2015).

This view of the PLE is linked to the idea of a society in constant change that demands updates as well as ongoing, lifelong training to adapt to those changes (Coll & Engel, 2014).

The research we present here stems from the project known as CAPPLE (Competences for Lifelong Learning based on the use of PLEs. Analysis of future professionals and proposals for improvement). The project is funded by the Spanish Ministry for Economy and Competitiveness, and its main aim is to study and learn more about the PLEs of final year students in all subjects at Spanish universities. The starting point is the need to train future professionals in the use of telematic tools and learning strategies so that they are in a better position to create and take advantage of the best opportunities throughout their professional lives (Prendes, 2013).

2. Materials and methods

2.1. Aims

The aim of this paper is to obtain a deeper knowledge of the online strategies and tools that students use, especially in the area of communication. We seek to answer the question: What type of online strategies and tools do university seniors (final year) use to communicate and collaborate with others? Hence, the objectives to meet are:

• To ascertain and describe how final year university students use telematic tools for online communication and collaboration.

• To analyze students’ online preferences and tools when carrying out group projects along with the importance they give to various aspects proper to learning and online collaboration.

• To observe the data and results obtained concerning the sex of the participants and the branch of knowledge to which they belong.

2.2. Research design

The research is empirical and seeks to gather information of a descriptive type with no between group comparisons and no manipulation of variables. It is therefore non-experimental, of an exploratory nature, and uses a questionnaire to collect the data (Ato & al., 2013, Pardo, Ruiz, & San Martín, 2015).

The research was carried out in five work phases between 2013-2017 (Prendes, Castañeda, Ovelar, & Carreras, 2014): a theoretical review of PLEs and earlier studies; design and validation of the tool; data collection; data analysis; and, description of the participating students’ PLEs.

2.3. Sample

The study was comprised of 2054 final year degree students at Spanish universities. Females accounted for 69.67% and males for 30.33%. Since it would have been impossible to access the whole population because volunteer students were targeted, the sampling was non-probabilistic. Although the sample is broad, it is not representative, and no inferences can be made for the population as a whole. The graph below shows the distribution of the participants by area of knowledge.


Gutierrez-Porlan et al 2018a-62681-en035.jpg

2.4. The tool

A questionnaire that was used, was built on theoretical models of PLEs (Castañeda & Adell, 2011, 2013), self-regulated learning (Anderson, 2002; Martín, García, Torbay, & Rodríguez, 2007; Midgley & al., 2000; Pintrich, Smith, García, & McKeachie, 1991) and communication and ICT competences (Prendes & Gutiérrez, 2013).

The questionnaire was subjected to a three-step validation procedure: expert judgment cognitive interviews and pilot study. Finally, psychometric tests were applied to test for the reliability of the scale, returning a Cronbach alpha of reliability of 0.944.

The questionnaire was comprised of 48 items. It was administered through email. The final version and the complete validation process can be found in Prendes and others (2016). In the following link, we will find the full questionnaire: https://goo.gl/ta93A8.

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Data analysis

Consistent with the research approach, a descriptive analysis was made; and the results of which, regarding the communication and strategy tools and collaborative work used by the students interviewed, are given below (as percentages). Due to the very nature of the variables (they are all categorical), and with the idea of going a step further in the research, associations were made using contingency tables and Pearson’s X2 test for the independence of the chi-squared statistic and the contingency coefficient C.

3.2. Results3.2.1. Online communication and use of tools

None of the students interviewed stated that they did not communicate online. The most popular tool for communication is email (79.12%), followed by social network tools (75.52%). It was determined that the use of social networks is associated with students’ interest in learning X2 (9, 2047)=796.934a, p<0.001, c=0.529 and with their preference to publish new information they generate on social networks X2 (9, 2054)=387.805a, p<0,001, c=0.399.

Regarding areas of knowledge, students of Health Sciences use email the most (80.95%), while those in Engineering and Architecture use it least (76.47%). Regarding sexes, females (81.01%) state that they use basic tools for communication, which is more than males (75.19%).

If we address the use of social media tools about the various areas of knowledge, we find that students of Social and Legal Sciences top the list (79.47%), while students of Engineering and Architecture are at the bottom (63.32%). By gender, females again make greater use of social network tools for communication (78.48%) than do males (68.53%).

When asked about the value they give to the criticisms and opinions of other users when communicating online, two-thirds (66.85%) of the interviewees claim that they take these into account. No differences were found according to sex or to the area of knowledge to which they belong.

3.2.2. Use of tools to favor collaboration and interaction with others

The following results take us a step further into aspects of communication, and they add to our knowledge of students’ preferred tools when collaborating and interacting with others (social network tools, emails, chats, video conferences, messaging).

The general data show that students prefer messaging tools (41.19%), followed by email (27.65%) and then social media tools (25.85%). Less than 6% opted for video conferencing. If we break down the data into areas of knowledge, the highest percentages correspond to messaging tools in all cases, with Engineering and Architecture at the top (42.96%) and Health Sciences at the bottom.

One result that stands out is that students of Social and Legal Sciences declare a preference for social network tools, which they rate second, over email, which occupies second place in all the other areas. Overall, the percentages –both the highest and the lowest– are very similar, and the largest difference was found in the above item (social network tools), with 29.24% in Social and Legal Sciences versus 19.13% for Engineering and Architecture. The opposite occurs for emails with Social and Legal Sciences returning the lowest figure (24.91%) versus the highest in Sciences (32.77%) and Engineering and Architecture (30.69%). By sexes, messaging tools score the highest, with females (42%) slightly ahead of males (39.33%).

It is also seen that females (88.8%) attribute more importance to interaction with others in group work than males (81.2%) and that the difference is significant, ?2 (3, 2054)=22.53, p<.001.

Noteworthy are the differences in the use of email and chats, with females choosing as their second option tools that have a social network, followed in third place by email, while for males the order is inverted.

Students were asked about their tool preferences when carrying out group work. The tools included Google Drive, Social Networks, the Virtual Environments of their universities, wikis, and blogs. Graph 2 shows that the responses “almost always” and “always” place Google Drive as the most used tool for group work.

When the data are considered in the light of area of knowledge, Google Drive continues to be the tool most used in all areas, especially in Engineering and Architecture (71.48%) and in Social and Legal Sciences (68.70%). Almost ten percentage points lower come to Arts and Humanities (59.09%) and Social Sciences (59.66%). Social network tools (Twitter, Facebook...) continue to appear in second place in all areas and are used mostly by students of Health Sciences (28.98%) and Arts and Humanities (28.25%). They are least used in Engineering and Architecture, where the percentage is just half that of the areas mentioned above (14.80%). Virtual environments like Moodle or Sakai for project work occupy third place in all the areas of knowledge. Sciences (13.03%) and Engineering and Architecture (10.83%) are the areas where the virtual campus platforms are most preferred, with percentages that are not too distant from those for the social networks (20.08% and 14.63% respectively). In the case of Engineering and Architecture, the difference is just 3.5 percentage points. Blogs occupied the fourth place for Arts and Humanities (4.22%), ahead of wikis, but this was the only area of knowledge in which this occurred. In Health Sciences (0.84%) and Engineering and Architecture (0.84%), blogs receive less support as a tool to use in group projects.


Gutierrez-Porlan et al 2018a-62681-en036.jpg

3.2.3. Preferences and aspects valued when working in groups

Finally, we asked students about aspects they prioritize when working in teams: “building together”, “interacting with others” and “resource sharing”. The majority of the students considered all three aspects as being priorities (always/almost always or often). “Building together” is always/almost always of importance for 58.08%, and often of importance for 29.99%, giving a total of 88.07%. Sharing resources scored almost the same (87.98%), with always/almost always scoring 48.64%, and often 39.34%. The chance of “interacting with others” was also given priority with always/almost always scoring 53.70%, and often 32.81%, making a total of 86.51%. Regarding sexes, there are some notable differences regarding what is of priority when working in groups. More females responded “always/almost always” over “often” in all three cases than do males. So males’ responses varied less than females’ for these aspects. Another finding of interest is that 90.64% of the females interviewed considered “building together” a priority (64.29% always/almost always and 26.35% often), while for males thought the main priority in working in groups is “resource sharing”, with 85.88% always responding/almost always or often). The differences are significant: ?2 (3, 2054)=30.07, p<.001.

The order of priority students assign to working together varies according to the area of knowledge. Except for Social and Legal Sciences, the aspect most prioritized by students (always/almost always or often) is “resource sharing”. Students of Social and Legal Sciences valued “building together” highest, with 91.13% always responding/almost always or often.

Table 1 shows the results by area of knowledge for the accumulation of always/almost always and often responses.


Gutierrez-Porlan et al 2018a-62681-en037.jpg

4. Discussion and conclusions

From the data in the previous section and considering the research, theory and aims presented in this paper, we are able to draw the conclusions given below about students’ online communication processes as well as their preferred tools when collaborating online with their companions.

Not communicating online is not an option for the students who participated in our research. This matches with the studies carried out by the Fundación Telefónica (2014) which reported that millions of Spaniards today are connected up to the Internet and use this connectivity as a mechanism to socialize and start friendships (Sánchez-Vera & al., 2011).

Concerning Aims 1 and 2 stated at the beginning of the paper, we affirm that both basic Internet tools (email) and social network tools are used by the vast majority of the students interviewed for communication purposes. It is important to note how the use of social media is associated with increased student learning motivation, which offers clues and new possibilities for university institutions and teachers alike.

Going a step further into communication processes, when incorporating collaboration strategies it should be kept in mind that in general students prefer instant messaging tools, according to the data provided by the Spanish Home Office (2014), which show that instant messaging is the tool most used by Spanish adolescents. Besides instant messaging, our findings show that email and social media tools are also used by the majority of the students interviewed, while the least used tools are video conferencing and chats, in spite of the possibilities that these offer for collaboration. Instant messaging and social network tools are leading to a decline in the use of more traditional telematic tools, like wikis, video conferences or chats (García-Jiménez & al., 2013).

While Web 2.0 brought about a new paradigm of communication (O’Reilly, 2005), the social networks boom meant new channels of communication (Kolikant, 2010). Our study is in line with the above ideas, with the majority of the participants responding that their main channel of communication with companions is via social networks, that they take into consideration the online comments of others and that these networks serve to connect with people with the same learning aims. They, therefore, use the Internet and social networks intensively, as was also reported by Espuny and others (2011).

It can be seen that the web is increasingly becoming a space for learning and for connecting with other people we find interesting, and this helps students to adapt their Personal Learning Environments (Coll & Engel, 2014) and to build their own digital identity Bernete (2010). In a similar vein, it should be noted that students also consider reading other students’ blogs as an important factor.

Google Drive is par excellence the preferred tool when students are working on group projects. This tool is followed by social network tools. Notably, the universities’ virtual classrooms are not among students’ preferred tools when working in groups, even though all the students interviewed are part of these. While there are other tools used less frequently than the virtual classroom (wikis or blogs), the virtual classroom remains some distance behind Google Drive or social networks. Furthermore, the more complex the online possibilities offered and the greater the user involvement required, e.g., link managers, the lower the interest on the part of the students, to the extent that these possibilities are scarcely used.

Although students spend a lot of time connected and online, there are many tools about which they know little or nothing, and they devote more time to those with which they familiar (White & Le Cornu, 2010).

But beyond the tools used are the motivations of students to collaborate with others. We find the greatest to be the possibility of building together and resource sharing, which are essentially Web 2.0 aspects.

Another aim of this research was to observe the data about gender and area of knowledge. While the responses show a certain homogeneity, some of the differences found between gender are worth noting. For example, females use tools with social networks more. By area of knowledge, we find that students of Social and Legal Sciences use the web for communication most, and those from Engineering and Architecture use it the least. Many Social and Legal Science degrees draw heavily on communication. The communicative and collaborative processes developed in these degrees are fostered by the universities themselves, which, we believe, explains this finding. In the same vein, we find some differences in the usage of tools that foster collaboration and interaction, since students from Social and Legal Sciences again differ from those from Engineering and Architecture, especially in their preferred messaging tools, similar to the findings by sex. It is interesting to note how, again, Social and Legal Sciences students respond differently regarding preferences when working in teams. For these students, the possibility of “building together” comes first, while in the other areas of knowledge, “resource sharing” is the main preference. This leads us to reflect on the different approaches employed within the degree courses themselves for collaborative work.

The students in this survey are online and view social networks positively (Espuny & al., 2011). Now the key is to go a step further and to make use of the spaces in which students are relating and socializing so that these become true learning opportunities.

As elements belonging to a social institution, universities have a lot to contribute in this respect, since the web offers huge opportunities for communication and collaboration that are currently being wasted because of a lack of knowledge as to how to incorporate them into educational processes. There is also a large difference between the digital competence students perceive they have acquired at university and that demanded by the professional world.

The results of our study show that our students are beginning to see the web as a learning space, so the moment is ripe for institutions of higher education to enhance and reaffirm this vision.

Funding agency

This study is supported by the research Project “Competences for Lifelong Learning based on the use of PLEs. Analysis of future professionals and proposals for improvement” (CAPPLE) (Ref. EDU2012-33256), funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness over the period 2013 to 2017 (FEDER).

References

Anderson, P. (2002). Assessment and development of executive function (EF) during chilhood. Child Neuropsychology, 8(2), 71-82. https://doi.org/10.1076/chin.8.2.71.8724

Ato, M., López, J.J., & Benavente, A. (2013). Un sistema de clasificación de los diseños de investigación en psicología. Anales de Psicología, 29(3), 1038-1059. http://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.29.3.178511

Bernete, F. (2010). Usos de las TIC, relaciones sociales y cambios en la socialización de las y los jóvenes. Revista de Estudios de Juventud, 88, 97-114. (https://goo.gl/McdVTv).

Castañeda, L., & Adell, J. (2011). El desarrollo profesional de los docentes en entornos personales de aprendizaje (PLE). In R. Roig & C. Laneve (Eds.), La práctica educativa en la Sociedad de la Información: Innovación a través de la investigación. [La pratica educativa nella Società dell’informazione: L’innovazione attraverso la ricerca] (pp. 83-95). Alcoy: Marfil.

Castañeda, L., & Adell, J. (Eds.) (2013). Entornos personales de aprendizaje: claves para el ecosistema educativo en Red. Alcoy: Marfil.

Chaves, E., Trujillo, J.M., & López, J.A. (2015). Autorregulación del aprendizaje en entornos personales de aprendizaje en el Grado de Educación Primaria de la Universidad de Granada. Revista de Formación Universitaria, 8(4), 63-76. http://doi.org/10.4067/S0718-50062015000400008

Coll, C., & Engel, A. (2014). Introducción: los Entornos Personales de Aprendizaje en contextos de educación formal. Cultura y Educación, 26(4), 617-630. http://doi.org/10.1080/11356405.2014.985947

Duncan-Howell, J.A., & Lee, K.T. (2007). M-Learning: Innovations and initiatives: Finding a place for mobile technologies within tertiary educational settings. In R. Atkinson, C. McBeath, K. Soong-Swee, & C. Cheers (Eds.), Ascilite. Singapore. (https://goo.gl/69Lc4M).

Espuny, C., González, J., Lleixá, M., & Gisbert, M. (2011). Actitudes y expectativas del uso educativo de las redes sociales en los alumnos universitarios. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento, 8(1), 171-185. https://doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v8i1.839

Fundación Telefónica (Ed.) (2014). La Sociedad de la Información en España, 2014. (https://goo.gl/pHMBKe).

García, A., López-de-Ayala, M.C., & Catalina, B. (2013). The influence of social networks on the adolescents’ online practices. [Hábitos de uso en Internet y en las redes sociales de los adolescentes españoles]. Comunicar, 41, 195-204. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-19

Gisbert, M., & Esteve, F. (2011). Digital Learners: La competencia digital de los estudiantes universitarios. La Cuestión Universitaria, 1(7), 48-59. (https://goo.gl/iBdakg).

Jorgersen, B. (2003). Baby boomers, Generation X and Generation Y?: Policy implications for defence forces in the modern era. Foresight, 5(4), 41-49.

Kolikant, D. (2010). Digital natives, better learners? Students’ beliefs about how the Internet influenced their ability to learn. Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 1384-139.

Lancaster, L.C., & Stillman, D. (2002). When generations collide. Who are they. Why they class. How to resolve the generation puzzle at work. Collins Business, New York.

Marín, V., Negre, F., & Pérez, A. (2014). Entornos y redes personales de aprendizaje (PLE-PLN) para el aprendizaje colaborativo. Comunicar, 42(21), 35-43. https://doi.org/10.3916/C42-2014-03

Martín, E., García, L.A., Torbay A., & Rodríguez, T. (2007). Estructura factorial y fiabilidad de un cuestionario de estrategias de aprendizaje en universitarios: CEA-U. Anales de Psicología, 23, 1-6. (https://goo.gl/q1LvT2).

McCrindle, M. (2006). New generations at work: Attracting, recruiting, retaining and training generation Y. McCrindle Research. (https://goo.gl/P4gMEu).

Midgley, C., Maehr, M., Hruda, L., Anderman, E., Anderman, L., Freeman, … Urdan, T. (2000). Manual for the Paterrns off Adaptive Learrning Scales. Michigan: University of Michigan. (https://goo.gl/RCcZBw).

Ministerio del Interior (Ed.) (2014). Encuesta sobre hábitos de uso y seguridad de Internet de menores y jóvenes en España. (https://goo.gl/PRhKkH).

Mödritscher, F., Krumay, B., El Helou, S., Gillet, D., Nussbaumer, A., Albert, D., … Ullrich, C. (2011). May I Suggest? Comparing Three PLE Recommender Str Bagies. Digital Education Review. (https://goo.gl/zMjnSD).

Observatorio de Redes Sociales (2011). Informe de resultados del Observatorio de Redes Sociales, 3a oleada. The Cocktail Analysis. Febrero (https://goo.gl/XqJg1O).

O’Reilly, T. (2005). What Is Web 2.0. Pattern Recognition, 30(1), 0-48. (https://goo.gl/sNV04s).

Pardo, A., Ruiz, M.A., & San-Martín, R. (2015). Análisis de datos en ciencias sociales y de la salud I. Madrid: Síntesis.

Pintrich, P., Smith, D., Garcia, T., & McKeachie, W.J. (1991). A manual for the use of the motivated strategies of learning questionnaire (MSLQ). National Center for Research to Improve Postsecondary Teaching and Learning, Ann Arbor, MI. Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

Prendes, M.P, Castañeda, L., Solano, I., Roig, R., Aguiar, M.P., & Serrano, J.L. (2016). Validation of a questionnaire on work and learning habits for future professionals: Exploring Personal Learning Environments. Relieve, 22(2). http://doi.org/10.7203/relieve.22.2.7228

Prendes, M.P. (2013). CAPPLE: Explorando los PLE de los futuros profesionales. In L. Castañeda & J. Adell (Eds.). Entornos Personales de Aprendizaje: claves para el ecosistema educativo en Red (pp. 173-175). Alcoy: Marfil.

Prendes, M.P., & Gutiérrez, I. (2013). Competencias tecnológicas del profesorado en las universidades españolas. Revista de Educación, 361, 196-222. http://doi.org/10.4438/1988-592X-RE-2011-361-140

Prendes, M.P., Castañeda, L., Gutiérrez, I., & Sánchez, M.M. (2015). Personal Learning Environments in Future Profesionals: No natives or residentes, just survivors. Proceedings of III International Conference of Behaviors, Education and Psichology. New York, 14-16 diciembre.

Prendes, M.P., Castañeda, L., Ovelar, R., & Carrera, X. (2014). Componentes básicos para el análisis de los PLE de los futuros profesionales españoles: en los albores del Proyecto CAPPLE. Edutec, 47. http://doi.org/10.21556/edutec.2014.47.139

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6. http://doi.org/10.1108/10748120110424816

Prensky, M. (2009). H. Sapiens digital: From digital immigrants and digital natives to digital wisdom. Journal of Online Education, 5(3), 1-9. (https://goo.gl/MBN4oI).

Rowlands, I., & Nicholas, D. (2008). Information behaviour of the researcher of the future. London. University College of London. (https://goo.gl/iYkXBD).

Sánchez-Vera, M.M., Prendes, M.P., & Serrano, J.L. (2011). Modelos de interacción de los adolescentes en contextos presenciales y virtuales. Edutec, 0, 35. http://doi.org/10.21556/edutec.2011.35.414

White, D., & Le-Cornu, A. (2011). Visitors and residents: A new typology for online Engagement. First Monday, 16(9). http://doi.org/10.5210/fm.v16i9.3171



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El impacto que las tecnologías de la comunicación tienen en la forma en la que los más jóvenes de hoy en día se comunican y relacionan es incuestionable. Dicho impacto afecta también al campo educativo, al que se le exige que dé respuesta a las necesidades de los estudiantes del siglo XXI, formándoles en la adquisición de habilidades y estrategias para afrontar un futuro cambiante y lleno de incertidumbre. En este estudio, en el que han participado 2.054 estudiantes universitarios de todas las universidades españolas, se profundiza en el conocimiento de las estrategias y herramientas en red empleadas por estos estudiantes para el desarrollo efectivo de los procesos comunicativos y colaborativos. Se ha realizado un diseño de investigación no experimental, de tipo exploratorio basado en el uso del cuestionario como instrumento de recogida de información. Los resultados muestran un mayor uso por parte del alumnado de herramientas básicas de Internet para el trabajo colaborativo mientras que para estar en contacto con sus compañeros y establecer relaciones prefieren las redes sociales. Se ha encontrado que no existe por parte de los estudiantes una concepción de la Red como espacio de aprendizaje, por lo que se plantean nuevos retos a resolver por parte de la institución universitaria de cara a que sus estudiantes optimicen las posibilidades de la Red como lugar en el que aprender colaborativamente.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Si por algo se caracteriza la red en los últimos años es por la gran cantidad de herramientas que se han desarrollado y que permiten la participación y comunicación entre usuarios. O´Reilly (2005) definió la Web 2.0 como el nuevo paradigma respecto a la manera en que utilizamos Internet, en la cual las herramientas se convierten en plataformas que se caracterizan por la participación de los usuarios y las posibilidades de comunicación que suponen. En 2005, cuando se produjo esta reflexión, se hablaba principalmente de herramientas como blogs y wikis, que habían transformado la forma de publicar y compartir información. Si entonces se consideraba que existía una revolución comunicativa, el boom de las redes sociales en los años 2009-10 (Observatorio de Redes Sociales, 2011), no hace sino profundizar en la idea de que la Red es una plataforma a través de la cual la comunicación se convierte en un componente fundamental. Internet, al ser una red de redes, siempre ha posibilitado la comunicación de los usuarios, a través de herramientas como el email, el foro o los chats, y estas aplicaciones de red social han venido a ampliar y diversificar los canales de comunicación. Tanto es así, que esta web, basada en la comunicación y en el uso de las tecnologías móviles, es considerada como la Web 3.0 (Kolikant, 2010), alejando la clasificación de 3.0 que se había relacionado más bien con la definición de web semántica.

Más allá de la denominación que adoptemos, lo que consideramos relevante es el hecho de que en los últimos años la manera en la que nos comunicamos y relacionamos en la Red ha transformado la forma en la que nos desenvolvemos en línea. Los nuevos canales y las nuevas formas de comunicarnos han posibilitado transformaciones en distintos entornos, lo que hace necesario valorar las implicaciones que todo esto tiene a nivel educativo, si el entorno en el que vivimos se ha transformado de este modo, cabe preguntarse qué podemos hacer desde la educación para que los alumnos aprendan a desarrollar las habilidades básicas para comunicarse a través de Internet. No solo a nivel profesional, para que en el futuro sean capaces de desenvolverse en este entorno cambiante, sino también a nivel personal, ya que la comunicación en red afecta incluso a los procesos de construcción de la identidad de los jóvenes (Bernete, 2010).

Debemos considerar además, que la generación de estudiantes que se encuentra en nuestras universidades ha sido denominada como «nativos digitales» (Prensky, 2001), considerando que estas generaciones han nacido con las tecnologías como parte de su entorno natural, y por tanto, desarrollan habilidades y actitudes específicas que condicionan su manera de aprender. El concepto de «nativo digital» ha tenido repercusión en las esferas académicas, aunque ha sido superado por otras denominaciones posteriores, como la de «residente digital» realizada por White y Le-Cornu (2011). De hecho, existen numerosos términos como los que recogen Gisbert y Esteve (2011) en su trabajo, en el que hablan de las distintas denominaciones que pueden recibir los «digital learners», como la «Generación Y» (Lancaster & Stillman, 2002; Jorgensen, 2003; McCrindle, 2006) «Generación C» (Duncan-Howell & Lee, 2007) o «Google Generation» (Rowlands Nicholas, 2008), que en definitiva nos hablan de que lo importante es entender que el alumnado que hoy tenemos en las aulas universitarias representa una generación que nació en un mundo transformado por las tecnologías, en el que las reglas del juego han cambiado, especialmente cuando se trabaja con información, y por ello esta generación desarrolla su entorno normal de desarrollo, valores e historia, a través de las tecnologías. No aprenden mejor con TIC por ser nativos digitales, aunque es cierto que tienen más facilidad para adaptarse a estos entornos digitales, hay que trabajar con ellos los procesos básicos de gestión de la información y el desarrollo de habilidades comunicativas. El mismo Prensky (2009) indica que la clasificación que realizó en 2001 es interesante, pero que la revolución de las redes es tal, que deberíamos hablar de «sabiduría digital», para entender que el ser humano ha de hacer uso de sus capacidades naturales con las tecnologías existentes, ya que estas aumentan e incrementan las oportunidades de comunicación y colaboración.

Los denominemos nativos digitales o no, lo que sí es cierto es que encontramos una generación que se desenvuelve con las tecnologías de forma distinta. Diferentes estudios han revelado algunos datos de interés:

• 26,25 millones de españoles acceden regularmente a Internet, 1,45 millones más que en 2013. De ellos, 20,6 millones se conectan diariamente, es decir, el 78% del total viven conectados (Fundación Telefónica, 2014).

• Los menores entre 10 y 17 años utilizan principalmente la mensajería instantánea (Whatsapp) para comunicarse en Internet a nivel general para trabajos escolares y buscar información en red (Ministerio del Interior, 2014).

• Los jóvenes que utilizan frecuentemente las redes sociales son los que más utilizan otro tipo de herramientas como blogs y wikis (García-Jiménez, López-de-Ayala, & Catalina-García, 2013).

• Entre los 14 y los 16 años el 53,2% de los alumnos menciona contactos nuevos con los que se relaciona principalmente en Internet, de modo que el medio tecnológico sirve como mecanismo de socialización y apoyo de estas amistades (Sánchez-Vera, Prendes, & Serrano, 2011).

• Aquellos que hacen un uso más intensivo de las redes sociales son quiénes realizan con más frecuencia actividades en la Red, como buscar y compartir contenidos (García-Jiménez & al., 2013).

• Los alumnos universitarios tienen una actitud positiva respecto a utilizar las redes sociales (sobre todo Facebook) con finalidad educativa y para mantenerse conectados con sus compañeros (Espuny, González, Lleixá, & Gisbert, 2011).

Como veíamos anteriormente, la importancia que las Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación tienen en la forma en la que lo más jóvenes se comunican hoy en día es un fenómeno incuestionable. Llegados a este punto es el momento de plantearse si los usos que estos hacen de la Red tienen repercusión en su aprendizaje. Ahí, el concepto de Entornos Personales de Aprendizaje (PLE: Personal Learning Environments) está despertando de forma gradual el interés de muchos investigadores (Chaves, Trujillo, & López, 2015), ya que une dos focos principales de investigación, los procesos de aprendizaje centrados en el alumno y cómo las tecnologías influyen o pueden influir en el mismo.

Aunque existe un enfoque más tecnológico de los PLE (Mödritscher & al., 2011), otros autores como Castañeda y Adell adoptan un enfoque más pedagógico en el que se entiende el PLE no solo como un conjunto de herramientas sino también como el procesamiento de la información, las conexiones que se establecen con otras personas y la propia creación de conocimiento.

Así pues, un PLE estaría compuesto por tres partes fundamentales (Castañeda & Adell, 2011):

• Herramientas y estrategias de lectura, a través de las cuales accedemos y gestionamos información.

• Herramientas y estrategias de reflexión, referidos a los sitios en donde escribo y participo.

• Herramientas y estrategias de relación, referido a los entornos en donde me relaciono con los demás.

Es la última catalogación, herramientas y estrategias de relación, las que ocupan el interés de este artículo. En ella podemos incluir el concepto de Personal Learning Network (PLN), para referirnos a las herramientas, mecanismos y actividades que ponemos en funcionamiento cuando nos comunicamos con los demás, cuando compartimos recursos y cuando intercambiamos información (Castañeda & Adell, 2013; Marín & al., 2014). Si algo permite la Red es precisamente la posibilidad de comunicarnos unos con otros, y se hace relevante pues, el saber qué herramientas y qué estrategias utilizan los alumnos universitarios, de tal modo que podamos establecer estrategias para mejorar estas habilidades y propiciar mejores relaciones en red de cara a su futuro desarrollo profesional. La teoría sobre PLE nos dice que este entorno que cada persona tiene puede llevarnos a autorregular nuestro propio aprendizaje, desde fijarnos nuestros objetivos hasta el proceso final de auto-evaluación (Chaves & al., 2015).

Esta visión de PLE está vinculada con la idea de una sociedad en constante cambio que nos pide una actualización, una formación permanente a lo largo de toda la vida, como una necesidad constante de adaptación a dichos cambios (Coll & Engel, 2014).

La investigación que presentamos en este artículo toma como punto de partida el proyecto «CAPPLE: Competencias para el aprendizaje permanente basado en el uso de PLEs (Entornos Personales de Aprendizaje): Análisis de los futuros profesionales y propuestas de mejora». Este proyecto está financiado por el Ministerio español de Economía y Competitividad y su objetivo principal se centra en el conocimiento y estudio de los PLE de los estudiantes de último curso de todas las ramas de conocimiento de las universidades españolas. Se parte de la necesidad de formar a los futuros profesionales para el uso de herramientas telemáticas y estrategias de aprendizaje que les permitan crear y aprovechar las mejores oportunidades de desarrollo profesional durante el resto de sus vidas (Prendes, 2013).

2. Material y métodos

2.1. Objetivos

El objetivo de este artículo es profundizar en el conocimiento de las estrategias y herramientas en red empleadas por los estudiantes, específicamente para el ámbito de la comunicación. De este modo tratamos de dar respuesta a la pregunta ¿qué tipo de estrategias y herramientas en red usa el alumnado universitario de último curso para comunicarse y colaborar con otros? Por tanto, se propone el logro de los siguientes objetivos:

• Conocer y describir el uso que los alumnos de último curso universitario hacen de las herramientas telemáticas para la comunicación y la colaboración en red.

• Analizar las preferencias y herramientas en red utilizadas por el alumnado en la realización de proyectos grupales y la importancia que estos otorgan a diferentes aspectos propios del aprendizaje y la colaboración a través de las redes.

• Observar el comportamiento de los datos y los resultados obtenidos en función del género de los participantes y de la rama de conocimiento a la que pertenecen.

2.2. Diseño de la investigación

Esta investigación de corte empírico, trata de recoger información de tipo descriptiva, sin establecer comparaciones entre grupos ni manipular variables. Por tanto, se ha realizado un diseño de investigación no experimental, de tipo exploratorio basado en el uso del cuestionario como instrumento de recogida de información (Ato & al., 2013; Pardo, Ruiz, & San-Martín, 2015).

La investigación se llevó a cabo durante los años 2013-2017, desarrollándose en cinco fases de trabajo (Prendes, Castañeda, Ovelar, & Carreras, 2014): revisión teórica sobre los PLEs y estudios desarrollados previamente, diseño y validación del instrumento, recogida de información, análisis de los datos y descripción del PLE de los alumnos universitarios españoles participantes.

2.3. Muestra

En este estudio se ha contado con una muestra 2.054 estudiantes universitarios españoles de último curso de Grado universitario. De los estudiantes participantes un 69,67% se corresponde con mujeres y un 30,33% con hombres. Puesto que no todos los elementos poblacionales tuvieron la oportunidad de ser elegidos ya que se seleccionó la muestra acudiendo a estudiantes voluntarios, se realizó un muestreo no-probabilístico por conveniencia, el cual nos indica que la muestra participante es amplia pero no representativa, hecho que no permite establecer inferencias al resto de la población. En la siguiente gráfica se muestra la distribución de los participantes por rama de conocimiento.


Gutierrez-Porlan et al 2018a-62681 ov-es035.jpg

2.4. Instrumento

El instrumento empleado ha sido el cuestionario, construido a partir de modelos teóricos sobre PLE (Castañeda & Adell, 2011, 2013), aprendizaje autorregulado (Anderson, 2002; Martín, García, Torbay, & Rodríguez, 2007; Midgley & al., 2000; Pintrich, Smith, García, & McKeachie, 1991) y comunicación y competencias TIC (Prendes & Gutiérrez, 2013).

Para su validación se utilizó un triple procedimiento que incluyó: juicio de expertos, entrevistas cognitivas y un estudio piloto. Finalmente, se realizaron pruebas psicométricas con la intención de conocer la fiabilidad de la escala de medida, concretamente encontramos una fiabilidad de 0.944 en la prueba de Alfa de Cronbach.

El cuestionario utilizado quedó formado por 48 preguntas, se administró a través de Survey Monkey utilizando el correo electrónico como vía principal de difusión y su versión final, así como todo el proceso de validación del mismo se puede consultar en Prendes, Castañeda, Solano, Roig, Aguiar y Serrano (2016). En el siguiente enlace se puede encontrar el cuestionario completo en https://goo.gl/GQi89E.

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Análisis de datos

En coherencia con el tipo de investigación planteada, se ha realizado un análisis descriptivo recogiendo a continuación los resultados (en porcentajes) de mayor relevancia referidos a las herramientas y estrategias de comunicación y trabajo colaborativo empleadas por los estudiantes entrevistados. Por la propia naturaleza de las variables (todas categóricas) y, con la intención de dar un paso más, se han realizado asociaciones, se han utilizado tablas de contingencia y la prueba de X2 de Pearson sobre independencia con el estadístico ji-cuadrado y la medida de asociación coeficiente de contingencia C.

3.2. Resultados3.2.1. Comunicación a través de la Red y uso de herramientas

Respecto a la comunicación que los alumnos participantes realizan a través de la Red, se ha encontrado que no hay ningún alumno que afirme no comunicarse a través de las redes. La herramienta más empleada para comunicarse es el correo electrónico (79,12%), seguida de las herramientas de red social (75,52%). Determinando que ese uso de redes sociales para comunicarse está asociado al interés del alumno por aprender X2 (9, 2047)=796.934a, p<.001, c=0.529 y a su preferencia para publicar nueva información generada en redes sociales X2 (9, 2054)= 387.805a, p<.001, c=0.399.

Teniendo en cuenta las diferentes ramas de conocimiento, es en Ciencias de la Salud donde se hace un mayor uso del correo electrónico (80,95%), mientras que Ingeniería y Arquitectura constituye el porcentaje más bajo, con un 76,47%. Si se incorpora la variable de género, se puede afirmar que las participantes de género femenino (81,01%) reconocen usar herramientas básicas para la comunicación en un grado mayor que los participantes del género masculino (75,19%).

Por su parte, abordando el uso de herramientas de red social en relación con las diferentes ramas de conocimiento, se puede comprobar que la rama donde se detecta un mayor uso sería la rama de Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas (79,47%), mientras que en Ingeniería y Arquitectura se encuentra el índice de menor uso (63,32%). Respecto a la perspectiva de género, cabría decir que de nuevo las participantes de género femenino llevan a cabo un mayor uso de herramientas con red social para la comunicación (78,48%) comparándolo con los participantes de género masculino (68,53%).

En la pregunta sobre las valoraciones otorgadas a las críticas y opiniones de otros usuarios cuando se comunican en red, encontramos que más de la mitad (66,85%) de los encuestados reconoce que sí tiene en cuenta dichas aportaciones. En relación a este aspecto no se han encontrado diferencias de respuestas en cuanto al género o a la rama de conocimiento a la que pertenecen.

3.2.2. Uso de herramientas para favorecer la colaboración e interacción con otros

Dando un paso más en cuanto a aspectos comunicativos y con la intención de conocer más sobre la preferencia en cuanto a las herramientas para colaborar e interaccionar con otros (herramientas con red social, correo electrónico, chats, videoconferencia, mensajería) encontramos los siguientes resultados.

Los datos generales muestran que los alumnos prefieren la utilización de herramientas de mensajería (41,19%), seguidas por el correo electrónico (27,65%) y las herramientas con red social (25,85%). El porcentaje de alumnos que opta por la videoconferencia y por los chats no alcanza el 6%. En los datos desglosados por ramas de conocimiento los porcentajes más altos corresponden a las herramientas de mensajería como preferencia principal en todas ellas, encabezados por Ingeniería y Arquitectura (42,96%), siendo la rama de Ciencias de la Salud los que menor porcentaje de preferencia le otorgan.

Como dato relevante se puede observar el caso de las Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas, en donde las herramientas con red social son la segunda opción por delante del correo electrónico, mientras que en el resto de ramas la segunda opción es el correo electrónico. En unos datos homogéneos tanto en los porcentajes más altos como en los porcentajes más bajos, se puede destacar que la mayor diferencia porcentual se encuentra precisamente en este ítem, herramientas con red social, que en el campo de Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas presenta un porcentaje de 29,24% mientras que en Ingeniería y Arquitectura es de 19,13%. En el caso del correo electrónico ocurre lo contrario, siendo el porcentaje más bajo de preferencia las Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas (24,91%) y el más alto el de Ciencias (32,77%) e Ingeniería y Arquitectura (30,69%). Los datos en cuanto al género nos muestran que las herramientas de mensajería son las que mayor porcentaje obtienen siendo ligeramente mayor en el caso de las mujeres (42%) que en el de los hombres (39,33%).

Se observa además que las mujeres (88,8%) consideran la interacción con otros en el trabajo grupal como algo más importante que los hombres (81,2%), siendo esta diferencia significativa, ?2 (3, 2054)=22.53, p<.001.

Cabe destacar las diferencias en el caso del uso del correo electrónico y el chat, ya que las mujeres prefieren como segunda opción las herramientas con red social y como tercera opción el correo electrónico, mientras que en los hombres el orden se invierte, siendo la segunda opción el correo electrónico y la tercera opción la de las herramientas de red social.

A continuación, se preguntó a los alumnos por su preferencia de herramientas para desarrollar trabajos grupales. Entre las herramientas por las que se preguntó se encuentra Google Drive, Redes Sociales, Entornos Virtuales de su universidad, wikis y blogs. En el gráfico 2 se observan las respuestas de los alumnos en las categorías casi siempre-siempre encontrando que Google Drive es la herramienta más utilizada para la realización de tareas grupales.

Cuando se observan los datos en relación a la rama de conocimiento encontramos que Google Drive sigue siendo la herramienta más utilizada en todas las ramas, específicamente en las ramas de Ingeniería y Arquitectura (71,48%) y en las de Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas (68,70%). Con 10 puntos aproximadamente por debajo en el porcentaje encontramos Artes y Humanidades (59,09%) y Ciencias de la Salud (59,66%). Las herramientas con redes sociales (Twitter, Facebook...), que se siguen posicionando como la segunda tipología de herramientas más utilizadas en todas las ramas, tienen una mayor representación entre el alumnado de Ciencias de la Salud (28,98%) y Artes y Humanidades (28,25%). La rama de conocimiento en donde menos se utilizan las redes sociales es la de Ingeniería y Arquitectura con un porcentaje que representa la mitad de los obtenidos en las ramas mencionadas anteriormente, únicamente un 14,8%. Hemos de destacar que en lo referido al uso de los entornos virtuales como Moodle o Sakai para la realización de proyectos, esta opción sigue siendo la tercera en todas las ramas de conocimiento. Destacan a este respecto Ciencias (13,03%) e Ingeniería y Arquitectura (10,83%), en donde las plataformas de campus virtual cobran una presencia mayor, no encontrándose muy alejadas en términos porcentuales de la preferencia de uso de las redes sociales (20,08% y 14,63% respectivamente). Esto sucede principalmente en la rama de Ingeniería y Arquitectura en la que este uso está separado por tan solo 3,5 puntos. En cuanto a la herramienta de blog se ha encontrado que la rama de Artes y Humanidades pasa a ser la cuarta herramienta más utilizada por los alumnos (4,22%) poniéndose por delante de las wikis y siendo en la única rama de conocimiento en la que se produce este cambio. En las ramas de Ciencias de la Salud (0,84%) e Ingeniería y Arquitectura (0,84%) el blog se prefiere en menor medida como herramienta para la realización de proyectos en grupo.


Gutierrez-Porlan et al 2018a-62681 ov-es036.jpg

3.2.3. Preferencias-aspectos que valoran para realizar proyectos en equipo

En último lugar se profundizó en qué aspectos priorizan cuando trabajan en equipo: «construir de forma conjunta», «interaccionar con otros» y «compartir recursos». Los tres aspectos por los que se ha preguntado han sido destacados por la mayoría del alumnado como cuestiones prioritarias para ellos en gran medida (siempre/casi siempre y a menudo). «Construir de forma conjunta» es un aspecto que los alumnos valoran siempre/casi siempre (58,08%) y a menudo (29,99%) en un 88,07% de los casos. Con el mismo porcentaje que en el caso anterior (87,98%) encontramos que «compartir recursos» es también un aspecto prioritario siempre/casi siempre (48,64%) y a menudo (39,34%) para los alumnos participantes. La posibilidad de «interaccionar con otros» es también destacada por los alumnos como algo que priorizan siempre/casi siempre (53,70%) y a menudo (32,81%) en un 86,51% de los casos. Desde la perspectiva de género se observan algunas diferencias notables en lo que para los alumnos encuestados es más o menos prioritario a la hora de trabajar en grupo. Es destacable cómo en el caso de las respuestas femeninas los tres aspectos por los que se ha preguntado tienen un porcentaje mayor en la categoría «siempre/casi siempre» que en la categoría «a menudo», en comparación con las respuestas ofrecidas por el género masculino. Así pues, en lo que se refiere a las respuestas del género masculino, la diferencia entre la frecuencia con la que priorizan los aspectos por los que se preguntó, es mucho más suave que en el caso de las chicas. Otro dato destacable en más del 90% de las chicas entrevistadas, concretamente un 90,64%, es que considera como aspecto prioritario siempre/casi siempre (64,29%) y a menudo (26,35%) «construir de forma conjunta» mientras que para la parte masculina de la encuesta el aspecto más prioritario en el trabajo en grupo es «compartir recursos» (un 85,88% se encuentra en las categorías de siempre/casi siempre y a menudo), siendo estas diferencias significativas, ?2(3, 2054)=30.07, p<.001.

Respecto a los datos obtenidos en este ítem en relación a las diferentes ramas de conocimiento podemos destacar que los aspectos que son considerados como prioritarios por los alumnos varían de orden dependiendo de la rama de conocimiento. En todas ellas, excepto en Ciencias Sociales, el aspecto que los alumnos consideran como más prioritario (siempre/casi siempre y a menudo) es la posibilidad de «compartir recursos». Hemos de destacar que en la rama de Ciencias Sociales el aspecto valorado en mayor medida como prioritario por los alumnos es la posibilidad de «construir de forma conjunta» con un 91,13% de los alumnos en torno a las categorías de (siempre/casi siempre y a menudo).

En la siguiente tabla resaltamos el comportamiento de los datos por rama de conocimiento de forma acumulada en las categorías siempre/casi siempre y a menudo.


Gutierrez-Porlan et al 2018a-62681 ov-es037.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Partiendo de los datos que acabamos de presentar y a la luz de las investigaciones, teoría y objetivos presentados en este artículo, se extraen a continuación una serie de conclusiones tanto en los referido a los procesos comunicativos que los estudiantes llevan a cabo en red como a las herramientas y preferencias para colaborar con sus compañeros a través de las redes.

El alumnado participante en nuestra investigación no contempla la posibilidad de no comunicarse a través de las redes. Estos datos contrastan con los estudios llevados a cabo en el contexto español por la Fundación Telefónica (2014) en el que afirman que millones de españoles viven conectados hoy en día siendo además esta posibilidad de conexión un mecanismo para la socialización y la creación de amistades (Sánchez-Vera & al., 2011).

Con respecto a los objetivos uno y dos presentados al inicio de este artículo podemos decir que tanto las herramientas básicas de Internet (email) como las herramientas de red social son utilizadas por la gran mayoría de los estudiantes participantes con finalidades comunicativas. Es importante destacar cómo el uso de redes sociales se asocia con un aumento de la motivación de los estudiantes para aprender lo que ofrece pistas y nuevas posibilidades tanto a la institución universitaria como al profesorado.

Dando un paso más en los procesos comunicativos, y cuando se trata de poner en marcha estrategias para la colaboración, los alumnos prefieren principalmente herramientas de mensajería instantánea tal y como también se contempla en los datos ofrecidos por el Ministerio de Interior (2014) en el que se destaca la mensajería instantánea como la herramienta más empleada por los adolescentes españoles. Además de la mensajería instantánea, los datos nos han mostrado que el correo electrónico y las herramientas con red social también son empleadas por la mayoría del alumnado participante, encontrándose en último lugar y con un escaso nivel de utilización por parte de los estudiantes la videoconferencia y el chat a pesar de las potencialidades que ambas tienen para la colaboración. Encontramos a este respecto que herramientas como las redes sociales o la mensajería instantánea están dejando en desuso a otras herramientas telemáticas más tradicionales como pueden ser las wikis, la videoconferencia o los chats (García-Jiménez & al., 2013).

Si la llegada de la Web 2.0 trajo consigo un nuevo paradigma a la hora de comunicarse (O’Really, 2005), el boom de las redes sociales permitió diversificar los canales de comunicación (Kolikant, 2010). Nuestro estudio conecta con las ideas anteriores al comprobar que la mayoría del alumnado que completó nuestro cuestionario destaca principalmente que están en contacto con sus compañeros a través de redes sociales, que tienen en cuenta lo que otros dicen de ellos a través de la Red y que estas redes les sirven para conectar con personas con sus metas de aprendizaje, haciendo, tal y como también se encontró en las investigaciones de Espuny y otros (2011) un uso intensivo de Internet y redes sociales. A este respecto se observa cómo la Red se va conformando como un espacio para aprender y conectar con gente que nos resulta interesante ayudando a los alumnos en los procesos de adaptación de su Entorno Personal de Aprendizaje (Coll & Engel, 2014) y a la construcción de su identidad digital Barnete (2010). En línea con lo anterior es destacable cómo la lectura de blogs de otros estudiantes también es contemplada por parte del alumnado participante como un factor importante para ellos.

La herramienta por excelencia que los alumnos eligen para realizar proyectos en grupo es Google Drive, seguida de las herramientas de red social. Hay que destacar cómo el aula virtual de la universidad, a pesar de ser una herramienta de la que todos los alumnos encuestados forman parte, no es una preferencia para ellos a la hora de hacer proyectos en grupo. Destacamos por tanto en relación al aula virtual que, aunque hay otras herramientas que se usan en menor medida (wikis o blogs), se encuentra bastante alejada de Google Drive o de las herramientas con red social. Por otra parte, cuando las posibilidades que Internet ofrece para colaborar se vuelven más complejas y requiere por parte del usuario una implicación mayor, como es por ejemplo el uso de gestores de enlaces, el interés mostrado por estos es más bajo siendo el uso que se hace de las mismas escaso.

Aunque los alumnos pasan tiempo conectados y en red, hay muchas herramientas que son prácticamente desconocidas para ellos encontrando que las herramientas a las que dedican más tiempo son las que realmente saben utilizar (White & Le-Cornu, 2010).

Más allá de las herramientas empleadas y, adentrándonos en las motivaciones que los alumnos encuentran para colaborar con otros, se destaca en mayor medida la posibilidad de construir de forma conjunta interactuando con otros y la opción de compartir recursos, aspectos que se encuentran en la esencia de la Web 2.0.

Otro de los objetivos del presente artículo ha sido observar los datos en relación tanto al género como a las distintas ramas de conocimiento; si bien los datos nos muestran cierta homogeneidad en las respuestas dadas por los estudiantes de nuestro estudio, destacamos, con respecto al género, algunas de las diferencias encontradas como es en el uso de las herramientas con red social siendo las mujeres las que mayor uso hacen de las mismas. Entre las ramas de conocimiento son los estudiantes de Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas los que más utilizan la Red para efectos comunicativos mientras que los estudiantes de Ingeniería y Arquitectura son los que la usan en menor medida. Las titulaciones universitarias que se engloban en el marco de las Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas en las que la comunicación es la base de muchas de ellas y en las que el desarrollo de procesos comunicativos y colaborativos se fomenta desde la propia universidad, es a nuestro juicio, la explicación a este resultado. En esta misma línea encontramos algunas diferencias con respecto al uso de herramientas para favorecer la colaboración e interacción con otros ya que de nuevo encontramos diferencias entre los estudiantes de Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas, e Ingeniería y Arquitectura sobre todo con respecto a las preferencias por las herramientas de mensajería, la misma diferencia que se encuentra con respecto al género. Es interesante observar cómo de nuevo la rama de Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas vuelve a tener distintos resultados dentro del apartado de preferencias a la hora de realizar trabajos en equipo, siendo para estos alumnos la principal preferencia la posibilidad de «construir de forma conjunta» mientras que para el resto de ramas lo es la posibilidad de «compartir recursos», lo que nos lleva de nuevo a reflexionar en los distintos enfoques dentro de las propias titulaciones con respecto a lo que supone la realización de proyectos de colaboración.

Los estudiantes universitarios que han formado parte de nuestro estudio están en Red y además muestran una actitud positiva hacia la utilización de redes sociales (Espuny & al., 2011). La clave está ahora en dar un paso más y aprovechar los espacios en los que los alumnos se están relacionando y socializando para llegar a convertirlos en verdaderas oportunidades de aprendizaje.

La institución universitaria tiene una gran labor a este respecto ya que Internet ofrece grandes oportunidades de comunicación y colaboración que se están perdiendo por no saber aprovecharlas e integrarlas en los procesos educativos. Además de lo anterior, existe una gran diferencia entre la competencia digital que los estudiantes universitarios perciben que han recibido en la Universidad y lo que el mundo laboral está demandando. Los datos ofrecidos nos muestran que nuestros alumnos comienzan a ver la Red como espacio de aprendizaje, es por tanto el momento de ampliar y afianzar esa visión desde la institución educativa superior.

Apoyos

Este estudio es soportado por el Proyecto de Investigación «Competencias para el aprendizaje permanente basado en el uso de PLEs (Entornos Personales de Aprendizaje): Análisis de los futuros profesionales y propuestas de mejora» (CAPPLE) (EDU2012-33256), financiado por el Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (España) (2013-2017) con Fondos FEDER.

Referencias

Anderson, P. (2002). Assessment and development of executive function (EF) during chilhood. Child Neuropsychology, 8(2), 71-82. https://doi.org/10.1076/chin.8.2.71.8724

Ato, M., López, J.J., & Benavente, A. (2013). Un sistema de clasificación de los diseños de investigación en psicología. Anales de Psicología, 29(3), 1038-1059. http://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.29.3.178511

Bernete, F. (2010). Usos de las TIC, relaciones sociales y cambios en la socialización de las y los jóvenes. Revista de Estudios de Juventud, 88, 97-114. (https://goo.gl/McdVTv).

Castañeda, L., & Adell, J. (2011). El desarrollo profesional de los docentes en entornos personales de aprendizaje (PLE). In R. Roig & C. Laneve (Eds.), La práctica educativa en la Sociedad de la Información: Innovación a través de la investigación. [La pratica educativa nella Società dell’informazione: L’innovazione attraverso la ricerca] (pp. 83-95). Alcoy: Marfil.

Castañeda, L., & Adell, J. (Eds.) (2013). Entornos personales de aprendizaje: claves para el ecosistema educativo en Red. Alcoy: Marfil.

Chaves, E., Trujillo, J.M., & López, J.A. (2015). Autorregulación del aprendizaje en entornos personales de aprendizaje en el Grado de Educación Primaria de la Universidad de Granada. Revista de Formación Universitaria, 8(4), 63-76. http://doi.org/10.4067/S0718-50062015000400008

Coll, C., & Engel, A. (2014). Introducción: los Entornos Personales de Aprendizaje en contextos de educación formal. Cultura y Educación, 26(4), 617-630. http://doi.org/10.1080/11356405.2014.985947

Duncan-Howell, J.A., & Lee, K.T. (2007). M-Learning: Innovations and initiatives: Finding a place for mobile technologies within tertiary educational settings. In R. Atkinson, C. McBeath, K. Soong-Swee, & C. Cheers (Eds.), Ascilite. Singapore. (https://goo.gl/69Lc4M).

Espuny, C., González, J., Lleixá, M., & Gisbert, M. (2011). Actitudes y expectativas del uso educativo de las redes sociales en los alumnos universitarios. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento, 8(1), 171-185. https://doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v8i1.839

Fundación Telefónica (Ed.) (2014). La Sociedad de la Información en España, 2014. (https://goo.gl/pHMBKe).

García, A., López-de-Ayala, M.C., & Catalina, B. (2013). The influence of social networks on the adolescents’ online practices. [Hábitos de uso en Internet y en las redes sociales de los adolescentes españoles]. Comunicar, 41, 195-204. https://doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-19

Gisbert, M., & Esteve, F. (2011). Digital Learners: La competencia digital de los estudiantes universitarios. La Cuestión Universitaria, 1(7), 48-59. (https://goo.gl/iBdakg).

Jorgersen, B. (2003). Baby boomers, Generation X and Generation Y?: Policy implications for defence forces in the modern era. Foresight, 5(4), 41-49.

Kolikant, D. (2010). Digital natives, better learners? Students’ beliefs about how the Internet influenced their ability to learn. Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 1384-139.

Lancaster, L.C., & Stillman, D. (2002). When generations collide. Who are they. Why they class. How to resolve the generation puzzle at work. Collins Business, New York.

Marín, V., Negre, F., & Pérez, A. (2014). Entornos y redes personales de aprendizaje (PLE-PLN) para el aprendizaje colaborativo. Comunicar, 42(21), 35-43. https://doi.org/10.3916/C42-2014-03

Martín, E., García, L.A., Torbay A., & Rodríguez, T. (2007). Estructura factorial y fiabilidad de un cuestionario de estrategias de aprendizaje en universitarios: CEA-U. Anales de Psicología, 23, 1-6. (https://goo.gl/q1LvT2).

McCrindle, M. (2006). New generations at work: Attracting, recruiting, retaining and training generation Y. McCrindle Research. (https://goo.gl/P4gMEu).

Midgley, C., Maehr, M., Hruda, L., Anderman, E., Anderman, L., Freeman, … Urdan, T. (2000). Manual for the Paterrns off Adaptive Learrning Scales. Michigan: University of Michigan. (https://goo.gl/RCcZBw).

Ministerio del Interior (Ed.) (2014). Encuesta sobre hábitos de uso y seguridad de Internet de menores y jóvenes en España. (https://goo.gl/PRhKkH).

Mödritscher, F., Krumay, B., El Helou, S., Gillet, D., Nussbaumer, A., Albert, D., … Ullrich, C. (2011). May I Suggest? Comparing Three PLE Recommender Str Bagies. Digital Education Review. (https://goo.gl/zMjnSD).

Observatorio de Redes Sociales (2011). Informe de resultados del Observatorio de Redes Sociales, 3a oleada. The Cocktail Analysis. Febrero (https://goo.gl/XqJg1O).

O’Reilly, T. (2005). What Is Web 2.0. Pattern Recognition, 30(1), 0-48. (https://goo.gl/sNV04s).

Pardo, A., Ruiz, M.A., & San-Martín, R. (2015). Análisis de datos en ciencias sociales y de la salud I. Madrid: Síntesis.

Pintrich, P., Smith, D., Garcia, T., & McKeachie, W.J. (1991). A manual for the use of the motivated strategies of learning questionnaire (MSLQ). National Center for Research to Improve Postsecondary Teaching and Learning, Ann Arbor, MI. Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

Prendes, M.P, Castañeda, L., Solano, I., Roig, R., Aguiar, M.P., & Serrano, J.L. (2016). Validation of a questionnaire on work and learning habits for future professionals: Exploring Personal Learning Environments. Relieve, 22(2). http://doi.org/10.7203/relieve.22.2.7228

Prendes, M.P. (2013). CAPPLE: Explorando los PLE de los futuros profesionales. In L. Castañeda & J. Adell (Eds.). Entornos Personales de Aprendizaje: claves para el ecosistema educativo en Red (pp. 173-175). Alcoy: Marfil.

Prendes, M.P., & Gutiérrez, I. (2013). Competencias tecnológicas del profesorado en las universidades españolas. Revista de Educación, 361, 196-222. http://doi.org/10.4438/1988-592X-RE-2011-361-140

Prendes, M.P., Castañeda, L., Gutiérrez, I., & Sánchez, M.M. (2015). Personal Learning Environments in Future Profesionals: No natives or residentes, just survivors. Proceedings of III International Conference of Behaviors, Education and Psichology. New York, 14-16 diciembre.

Prendes, M.P., Castañeda, L., Ovelar, R., & Carrera, X. (2014). Componentes básicos para el análisis de los PLE de los futuros profesionales españoles: en los albores del Proyecto CAPPLE. Edutec, 47. http://doi.org/10.21556/edutec.2014.47.139

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6. http://doi.org/10.1108/10748120110424816

Prensky, M. (2009). H. Sapiens digital: From digital immigrants and digital natives to digital wisdom. Journal of Online Education, 5(3), 1-9. (https://goo.gl/MBN4oI).

Rowlands, I., & Nicholas, D. (2008). Information behaviour of the researcher of the future. London. University College of London. (https://goo.gl/iYkXBD).

Sánchez-Vera, M.M., Prendes, M.P., & Serrano, J.L. (2011). Modelos de interacción de los adolescentes en contextos presenciales y virtuales. Edutec, 0, 35. http://doi.org/10.21556/edutec.2011.35.414

White, D., & Le-Cornu, A. (2011). Visitors and residents: A new typology for online Engagement. First Monday, 16(9). http://doi.org/10.5210/fm.v16i9.3171

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/17
Accepted on 31/12/17
Submitted on 31/12/17

Volume 26, Issue 1, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C54-2018-09
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 4
Views 2
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?