Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Given the importance of new technologies in the classroom, especially in today’s information and communication societies, and following European Union recommendations to promote media literacy, this article reflects the need to educate not only in technical and efficient applications of communication technologies but also in their civic and responsible use, thus promoting participatory and deliberative processes which are the lifeline of a functioning democracy. The Greek dream of «isegoria», everyone’s right to speak, can become a reality in a digital culture, yet the highly selective use of communication technology can have the opposite effect: new forms of socialization can contribute to the expansion of «echo chambers» or «digital niches», shrinking communication spaces in which the right to speak dissociates itself from the responsibility to listen critically to what arises from a more open, plural and public sphere. One of the goals of education in a digital culture is precisely to diminish this trend that authors such as Sunstein, Wolton and Cortina have detected in recent years. This article proposes educational guidelines to avoid this bias by using communication technology to promote digital citizenship and the ethical values sustained by democratic societies.

Download the PDF version

1. Digital Niches: an obstacle to democratic citizenship in information societies

Given the communication flow that is flooding our technically advanced societies, the need to learn habits or cognitive mechanisms to filter and select messages is increasingly evident. Developing such mechanisms, if based on good criteria, is one of the clearest indications of autonomy in communication, in other words media or audiovisual citizenship (Conill & Gozálvez, 2004).

Internet triggers our active, selective nature the moment we connect to the medium. However, an excessive interest in building up and preserving personal selection devices can be counterproductive especially if the habit is solipsistic. The cognitive revolution attributed to the Internet can foment cognitive regression if our only information sources in the world are those we extract from cyberspace or an audiovisual space after restrictively selecting the type of information we had previously wanted to receive.

From the comfort of our homes, the Internet allows us to receive an audiovisual supply of information (entertainment, services...) that we requested beforehand. The Net opens up a personal world of predesigned communication. A range of people from MIT researcher N. Negroponte to Bill Gates predict the arrival of a «Daily Me», a newspaper that will be sent to us via Internet; a communications package whose components (local news, sports events...) will have already been chosen in advance. The «Daily Me» will be followed by the «TV Me», and within a few years we will walk into our living rooms and say what we want to see, and a screen will pop up to help us choose a video that interests us1. The convergence of TV and Internet will make traditional television as we know it redundant; phone companies are already building the appropriate infrastructure that will impose flexibility and individual selectivity on a fully on-demand television.

The audiovisual skills of Internet users will be so customized that, according to Sunstein (2003), our cognitive system will disregard the option of checking and evaluating heterogeneous knowledge and unpredictable information, which will undermine the building of shared, debated social experiences and democratic citizenship. The Internet propitiates individualization and immersion in «digital niches», («ever-smaller niches») or countless media bubbles. These niches are transforming us into cells isolated from a huge web of information that we find quite foreign, strange and distant.

C.R. Sunstein examines the threats to a deliberative democracy that arise from a selective capability powered by the Net. The possibility of such a negative outcome Is shown in the latest research: the Net is transforming television in such a way that teenagers interviewed by the «Center for the Digital Future» do not even understand the idea of watching TV via scheduled programmes, given that they watch it on their computer screens and, increasingly, on portable devices (Castells, 2009: 100). These devices make viewing more comfortable and entertaining, but the increasing ability of the audiovisual consumer to filter what gets through to him spells danger for the smooth running of any system deemed to be democratic. A plural, democratic society should not only promote freedom when faced by overreaching government (by limiting its ability to censor and ensuring that it respects individual choice to the utmost). Freedom requires public initiatives, education and training measures to limit apparently reasonable individual decisions (to digitally customize and filter the extensive audiovisual flow) that could eventually deteriorate the social web and the freedom of citizens.

Sunstein also says that individual filtering of information may lead to loss of access to public information of general interest, which is cause enough for reflection on our democratic responsibilities.

As Moeller states (2009), technology is changing the way we receive and understand information. The Internet is reinforcing the current trend to know exactly what it is that a person wants to see, read or hear rather than stick to what editors and producers have chosen. However, Moeller continues, «the fascination with the transformational effect of all this allows you to forget that old journalism is expensive yet still essential» (Moeller, 2009: 72). Organizations defending press freedom have seen their authority and influence decline worldwide and their very existence questioned. So-called old journalism might be reports filed by, for example, Anna Politkovskaya or the German journalists who died on the same day in Afghanistan. These journalists who fought to guarantee freedom of expression cannot readily be replaced by «citizen journalists», even though they deploy photographs, videos and blogs, and may post significant news items on the Net (such as blogs that reported the U.S. government’s disarray in the wake of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans).

A free democracy works, paradoxically, because citizens come into contact with news and material they had not previously seen (Sunstein, 2003: 20). Unplanned encounters without prior appointment, so to speak, are essential to democracy because they put the person in contact with significant points of view or issues that may be important for human and civic education, but which had not been selected or filtered «a priori».

A democracy also requires the majority of citizens (or a large number of them) to have common, similar communication experiences. Cultural and informative diversity -postmodern multiplicity- is a significant value but with limitations: it loses value if it leads to social fragmentation and prevents citizens from facing up to ordinary problems in a civic way. The dangers of fragmented communication (digital or audiovisual) are bigger as nations become more global, and are also affecting the construction of a cosmopolitan citizenship2.

Filtering technologies that allow you to screen information specific to the network society can dangerously undermine the two fundamentals of any political system of freedom: civic participation and deliberation for social and human development. A functioning democratic order will be in serious trouble if the filtering processes of communication are radicalized and spread indiscriminately across the Net. If citizens restrict their digital consumption, they are giving up exposure to different opinions, especially those that deal with common issues (political, socio-moral, cultural...) necessary for public life or for sound public opinion. The new forms of online socialization are often new ways of strengthening existing social ties by direct relationships with friends, family or old acquaintances (Castells, 2003). They are also a constant opportunity to contact like-minded people about hobbies, ideologies, different tastes and cultural preferences. Such forms of socialization (as developed with the help of social networks) boost «network-empowered citizenship» provided the user does not bury himself in a particular social group and succumb to a kind of techno-socializing experiment that will isolate him from the general social problems or challenges that our global world requires us to confront.

The danger of misuse of social networks is made clear when the conditions for democratic citizenship are destroyed, and the communication flow leads to the setting up of «digital islands» in which people only share experiences with those who have similar interests, and ignore other issues that directly or indirectly affect them as members of a global, pluralistic society. Plurality is undoubtedly one of the axiological foundations of mature democracies which can degenerate into a type of «multiple digital inbreeding».

As Bilbeny (1997) said of our digital age that actions aimed at selection and filtration on the Net could lead to a general or partial cognitive regression rather than a cognitive revolution. It is essential to be aware of this danger and fight it on the educational front.

The Internet provides effective filtering systems to select only the opinions you want to hear, read the articles and comments of politicians in line with your own ideological thinking, and use the type of communication (sports, arts, politics, economics...) that will reaffirm and reinforce your symbolic universe.

In a subsequent work, Sunstein (2007) insists on the precautions to be taken with the expansion of the blogosphere. The study refers to an interesting experiment in the state of Colorado (USA) in 2005 in which they chose some 60 adults from different states to form groups of five or six people. The groups were asked to deliberate on three controversial, political and social issues: Should states allow civil unions between same-sex couples? Should employers initiate positive action to give preference to members of traditionally disadvantaged groups? Should the U.S. sign an international agreement to combat global warming?

The groups were organized according to the mainstream ideology of their home state, divided into groups of liberals3 and conservatives. The results went according to plan: the discussions and dialogues acted as a springboard for more extreme views instead of moderating them. In almost all cases, people became entrenched in more uniform positions after talking with like-minded people («like-minded others»). Disagreements lessened or disappeared after a mere 15-minute dialogue. The experiment also highlighted a second effect: aside from intensifying differences, it homogenized similarities. Liberal and conservative groups similarly outlined their different beliefs, after taking them to more extreme positions.

The Internet (rather than traditional media) makes it much easier for citizens to repeat the Colorado experience, says Sunstein. For example, anyone who doubts the credibility of global warming (or the Holocaust...) can find extensive material to justify his doubts on the Internet and confirm (strengthen or radicalize) their beliefs, to the exclusion of opposite or alternative opinions. However, it is also true that the Internet is a home for different viewpoints and news that would otherwise remain invisible, silenced or crushed beneath the general debate, as I will discuss later. One of the main tasks of education in digital and audiovisual culture is, I believe, to fight against «multiple digital inbreeding» created by digital niches or electronic echo chambers4. Inbreeding in this context refers to the tendency to cluster in virtual families that are more or less stable through new technologies. These families group together according to partial, sporadic beliefs or ideological preferences, and thus neglect those common issues that form the core of public interest. Educational institutions, by contrast, can harness the vast argumentative potential of communication technologies to promote learning in a plural, autonomous and civic form.

The fascination for new technologies as political utopia, as an agent of social change, can be a false dream since it is not the technology itself but the social, cultural, educational and political projects that guide its uses; only these projects can produce desirable social change. From the point of view of personal relationships, the abuse of the Internet is an interactive incentive for solitude coupled with a certain degree of narcissism rather than for moral and civic autonomy (Twenge & Campbell, 2009).

However, are the new technologies really responsible for the bleak outlook we portray for modern, post-conventional citizenship? Could it be that they open us up to a new form of relationship, a new socialization process, which requires us to treat them with special care in the educational sphere?

2. Media literacy and civic values: some educational proposals

It is not our intention to portray an apocalyptic scene tinged with defeatism, among other things because dwelling on the pessimistic gives rise to the bad omens that will only encourage apathy and inactivity. Moreover, sociologists specializing in the social impact of the Net, such as Castells, argue that new technologies do not lock people up at home but activate their sociability, and are a key element in users’ personal, political and professional autonomy (Project Internet Catalonia, 2007)5.

Yet, it is best to be warned, especially from an educational viewpoint, against the hazards and technologically amplified biases denounced by authors like Sunstein (2007), A. Cortina (2003), Sartori (2005) and Wolton (2000). It never hurts to develop educational initiatives against threatening and socially harmful prejudices, and civically responsible uses of new communication technologies to foment moral, democratic autonomy in a younger generation.

Castells recognizes that the Net produces a certain autism in «mass self-communication». Castells (2009:102) quotes a study by the «Pew Internet & American Life Project», whereby 52% of bloggers write primarily for themselves, while 32% do so for their audience. So, «to some extent, an important part of this form of mass self-communication is more like electronic autism rather than real communication».

How can the dangers of autism or antisocial individualism in a network society be diminished? How can one prevent autism and «multiple digital inbreeding»? What are the educational conditions necessary for the network-empowered citizenship to become an audiovisual, digital citizenship?

The proposals for innovations in formal education that our new global and technologically communicated environment demands are the following:

2.1. Reinterpretation of the concept of education

Digital culture provides the conditions for a new interpretation or revision of the concept of education, surpassing technical instruction and old- or new-style encyclopedism (De Pablos, 2003), and in line with the classic movements of educational renewal (Aznar & al., 1999; Trilla, 2001, Nuñez & Romero, 2003; Gimeno Sacristán & Carbonell, 2003). Education in the ethical and civic values of democratic societies, and within new information and communication societies, means revitalizing cooperative educational programmes (Torrego, 2006); this education needs to update models that rely on activity (or interactivity) and student experiences, once teachers’ academic authority and function are redefined (Colom, 2002). It is vital to raise teachers’ capability and involve stakeholders, parents as well as students, in the educational process. It is most to educate learning minds in a constant, imaginative invitation to action so that students feel positively compelled to take part in the adventure of knowledge and personal skills development. This will help them take control of the critical assimilation of knowledge or the reflexive assumption of norms and regulated values of coexistence. The School 2.0 has to be seen as a renewed commitment to this form of educational thinking (Sancho & Correa, 2010).

2.2. Learning 2.0 and integrated digital literacy

Since School 2.0 assumes the revision of the concept of knowledge and access to it (more horizontal, interactive and reciprocal), it can simultaneously act as a platform for a richer understanding of the public sphere, that which concerns us all on a social, global level. School 2.0 can help by educating on the public sphere, connecting students on matters of common interest. To counter the danger of a restrictive or endogamous use of social networks, the school may seek to impart knowledge of a broader social reality, increasing sensitivity and experience from other points of view. Knowledge of others through the Net can be exploited to favour a global, cosmopolitan citizenship, encouraging critical and creative thinking, awakening student activity for cooperation and interaction (Gutierrez, 2003). The European Commission has established resolutions that urge all member states to promote media literacy «one of the prerequisites for full and active citizenship, and to prevent and reduce the risk of exclusion from the community» (Aguaded-Gómez, 2010). In this regard, the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change has developed a media literacy programme in conjunction with universities worldwide, and media organizations and international institutions such as the UN and UNESCO (Moeller, 2009)6.

2.3. Empowering audiovisual citizenship

Educational institutions should evidently be open to new communication technologies, not only as mechanisms for learning and the pursuit of knowledge, but as an opportunity to reflect on the social uses of such technology, with the means to strengthen audiovisual and media citizenship in this field (Conill & Gozálvez, 2004). For examples, school curriculums should allow discussion of blog content, video games or advertisements that diminish the quality of democracy, or which are questionable from the civil rights perspective (gratuitous acts of violence, contradictory content that undermines the dignity of certain social sectors...). Likewise, schools should be a platform for detecting the standard image that the media portray of children and the youth. Schools can evaluate media perceptions of young people as they become more involved with communication technology; they are no longer passive receivers but are actively reconstructing their identities based on relationships with their surroundings (Buckingham 2005; 2008). Schools, in their attempt to spread critical thinking, cannot miss this opportunity to introduce into the classroom good life models, images of identity and ways of perceiving and valuing the world that are hidden by media discourse, to make these models more explicit and to encourage reflection and dialogue on them.

Since formal education also includes the analysis of social networks to avoid bias and prejudice, it can also warn against the criminal uses of networks that threaten users’ dignity and privacy; the school deploy its new technological resources to encourage global contacts of a cognitive and socio-moral interest, with schools that are near or far, as well as with other educational or supportive organizations. In short, the necessary introduction of communication technology in elementary or high schools should not focus on purely technical aspects, as its social scope is equally important and affects vital aspects of society such as interpersonal relations and democratic, civic values.

To empower audiovisual or media citizenship is to educate citizens not only in the autonomous use of media whose applications can bring us closer to freedom, for example through the ability to identify and address new forms of servility, but also to educate citizens in the media (including, of course, the Net as an interactive medium of communication). This involves reinforcing the condition of the individual citizen through the use of media and new technologies, because communication technology is undoubtedly a valuable tool for the healthy democratic condition of nations, promoting civic participation and critical information. In short, appealing to citizens in this context is to talk about citizenship in the media or digital field, but also about how citizenship is achieved or enhanced thanks to the use of communication technology. Although the terms are closely related, it is necessary to distinguish between being an audiovisual citizen and a citizen with (of, through, with the assistance of) communication technology. These two dimensions need to be taken into account in the elementary or high school spheres, and require urgent attention in our media society.

2.4. Inclusion of the ethical dimension: human development and global justice

Expanding on the previous point, educational innovation will necessarily encourage «third-level empathy», that is, an assumption and understanding of other broader points of view in accordance with the concept of reversible, universal dignity (beyond empathy with the other direct contact, or the next one in the same social surrounding). 2.0 Learning relates to a model of key cosmopolitan justice linked to the new concept of sustainable human development, for the educational dimension of a human being that is so crucial and unavoidable for an emancipatory transformation to take place. Including the ethical dimension in techno-communicative training breathes life into digital or media citizens, and disseminates the values of civic ethics that are profoundly democratic in audiovisual and digital culture.

In reference to discursive ethics (Cortina, Escámez & Perez-Delgado, 1996), and based on current UN proposals for human development, and hermeneutic and critical methodology, we present some guidelines on the education of an integral, civic use of communication technology. Elementary and high schools are great places to foster human development and an overall global sense of justice, integrating values such as:

- Freedom, a classroom analysis of digital spaces for civic and, of course, peaceful engagement (freedom as participation), considering the consequences for privacy and the freedom of others, reflecting on the dangers to one’s own privacy or integrity arising from certain Net practices (freedom and independence), encouraging students’ critical thinking, searching for and analyzing news of public interest in an online newspaper (freedom as autonomy), studying how access to information and communication technology increases people’s capacity to build on projects and live better lives (freedom as development, as proposed by A. Sen, 2000), understanding the extent to which access to certain socially relevant information is a mechanism for avoiding servility or new forms of servitude (freedom as a non-denomination, according to the concept of freedom coined by Ph. Pettit, 1999).

- Equality, prompting awareness of and closing the digital divide by facilitating access to communication technologies (equal opportunities), as the 2.0 School aims to do by; exposing websites, blogs or YouTube videos that impinge on the people’s dignity and propagate the inferiority of cultural or ethnic groups, the disabled, the elderly or women (equality in dignity)...

- Solidarity, involving a school with a local association for cooperation and development via the Internet, starting with e-mail correspondence between students of different backgrounds; discussing ways to use social networks that connect the needs and rights of others, by e-mail campaigns to demand justice in a particular case, or collaborating online with initiatives for sustainable development and preservation of nature.

- Dialogue and respect, reflecting on the benefits and limits of tolerance in democratic societies, especially concerning digital culture, encouraging active listening, openness to different views or to those not previously selected by the student in their Internet interactions, assessing the consequences of copyright infringement on the Internet, or quoting text without crediting its author, reflecting on the new concept of friendship that arises in different social networks, and the minimum standards of courtesy to those who make it worthwhile to use them.

3. Conclusion

Civic education in a digital culture attempts to adapt the flow of technological communication by opening minds to others, in the constant search for new experiential and mental horizons, especially with regard to civic participation, social interest and key cosmopolitan justice. Education that is technologically blended is an opportunity for expansion and enrichment in the experiential field, but it has yet to fully engage the student citizen, the future builders of our social and human reality. In the end, technology has to be seen for what it is, a medium, a tool for pursuing very different aims and purposes, ranging from solipsism or «digital inbreeding» to a network-empowered citizenship that is completely democratic, a kind of citizenship that relies on the intensification of communicative human beings.

Notes

1 Statements by Bill Gates gathered by C.R. Sunstein (2003). In 2007, Gates reaffirmed these predictions, as reported by Reuters. He said that this revolution would be possible thanks to the explosion of video content on the Net and the alliance between computers and televisions. In 2010, Spain took its first steps to market the TV model «Sony Internet TV».

2 See Nussbaum (1999) and Cortina (1997).

3 Progressive enclaves, according to a related category.

4 The «echo chamber» metaphor is significant: it is a chamber in which only one person hears what he utters or what those around him utter.

5 www.ouc.edu/in3/pic/esp

6 Other interesting resources for digital literacy, the critical understanding of media and education for active use are: www.understandmedia.com/; www.educomunicacion.org/; www.euromedialiteracy.eu/.

References

Aguaded, J.I. (2010). La Unión Europea dictamina una nueva Recomendación sobre alfabetización mediática en el entorno digital en Europa. Comunicar, 34; 7-8.

Aznar, P. (Coord.) (1999). Teoría de la educación. Un enfoque constructivista. Valencia: Tirant lo Blanch.

Bilbeny, N. (1997). La revolución en la ética. Barcelona: Anagrama.

Buckingham, D. (2005). Constructing the Media Competent Child: Media Literacy and Regulatory Policy in the UK. Medien Pädagogik, 11; 1-14 (www.medienpaed.com/05-1/buckingham05-1.pdf) (27-09-2005).

Buckingham, D. (2008). Más allá de la tecnología. Aprendizaje infantil en la era de la cultura digital. Buenos Aires: Manantial.

Castells, M. (2003). La Galaxia Internet. Barcelona: Mondadori.

Castells, M. (2009). Comunicación y poder. Madrid: Alianza.

Colom, A. (2002). La (de)construcción del conocimiento pedagógico. Nuevas perspectivas en Teoría de la educación. Barcelona: Paidós.

Conill, J. & Gozálvez, V. (Coords.) (2004). Ética de los medios. Una apuesta por la ciudadanía audiovisual. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Cortina, A. (1997). Ciudadanos del mundo. Madrid: Alianza.

Cortina, A. (2003). Construir confianza. Madrid: Trotta.

Cortina, A., Escámez, J. & Pérez-Delgado, E. (1996). Un mundo de valores. Valencia: Generalitat Valenciana.

De Pablos, J. (Coord.) (2003). La tarea de educar. Madrid: Biblioteca Nueva.

Gimeno-Sacristán, J. & Carbonell, J. (Coords.) (2003). El sistema educativo. Una mirada crítica. Barcelona: Praxis.

Gutiérrez, A. (2003). Alfabetización digital. Algo más que ratones y teclas. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Moeller, S. (2009). Fomentar la libertad de expresión con la alfabetización mediática mundial. Comunicar, 32; 65-72.

Núñez, L. & Romero, C. (2003). Pensar la educación. Madrid: Pirámide.

Nussbaum, M. (1999). Los límites del patriotismo: identidad, pertenencia y ciudadanía mundial. Barcelona: Paidós.

Pettit, Ph. (1999). Republicanismo. Una teoría sobre la libertad y el gobierno. Barcelona: Paidós.

Sancho, J.M. & Correa J.M. (2010). Cambio y continuidad en sistemas educativos en transformación. Revista de Educación, 352; 17-21.

Sartori, G. (2005). Homo videns. La sociedad teledirigida. Madrid: Punto de Lectura.

Sen, A. (2000). Desarrollo y libertad. Barcelona: Planeta.

Sunstein, C.R. (2003). República.com. Internet, democracia y libertad. Barcelona: Paidós.

Sunstein, C.R. (2007). Republic.com 2.0. Princeton University Press.

Torrego, J.C. & al. (2006). Modelo integrado de mejora de la convivencia. Barcelona, Graó.

Trilla, J. (Coord.) (2001). El legado pedagógico del siglo XX para la escuela del siglo XXI. Barcelona: Graó.

Twenge, J.M. & Campbell, W.K. (2009). The Narcissism Epidemic. Free Press.

Wolton, D. (2000). Sobrevivir a Internet. Barcelona: Gedisa.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Asumiendo la importancia de las nuevas tecnologías en las aulas, especialmente en las actuales sociedades de la información y la comunicación, y siguiendo las recomendaciones de la Unión Europea a favor de la alfabetización mediática, el presente trabajo reflexiona acerca de la necesidad de educar no solo en los usos técnicos y eficientes de las tecnologías comunicativas, sino también en el uso responsable y cívico de las mismas, favoreciendo así los procesos participativos y deliberativos que son el sustento de una democracia viva. El sueño griego de la «isegoría», del igual derecho de todos al uso de la palabra, puede hacerse realidad en la cultura digital, si bien es cierto que un uso hiperselectivo de la tecnología comunicativa puede producir un efecto contrario: las nuevas formas de socialización pueden contribuir a la expansión de «cámaras de eco» o «nichos digitales», es decir, espacios discursivos cada vez más reducidos en donde el derecho a decir se desvincula de la responsabilidad de escuchar críticamente lo que procede de un espacio público más abierto y plural. Una de las metas de la educación en la cultura digital es precisamente frenar esta tendencia, detectada en los últimos años por autores como Sunstein, Wolton o Cortina. En el presente artículo se proponen orientaciones educativas para evitar estos sesgos y para fomentar, mediante la tecnología comunicativa, la ciudadanía digital y los valores éticos propios de sociedades democráticas.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Los nichos digitales: un freno para la ciudadanía democrática en las sociedades de la información

Dada la avalancha comunicativa que inunda nuestras sociedades técnicamente avanzadas, es cada vez más patente la necesidad de aprender hábitos o mecanismos cognitivos de filtrado y de selección de mensajes. Desarrollar tales mecanismos, si se hace desde buenos criterios, es uno de los síntomas de autonomía en lo comunicativo, o sea, de ciudadanía mediática o audiovisual (Conill y Gozálvez, 2004).

Internet es un medio que dispara nuestro carácter activo y selectivo, pues no hay más remedio que hacerlo desde el mismo momento en el que nos conectamos a la Red. Ahora bien, un excesivo celo en construir y preservar dispositivos de selección personal puede ser contraproducente, sobre todo si se hace desde un cierto solipsismo. La revolución cognitiva atribuida a Internet puede devenir en auténtica involución cognitiva si finalmente las únicas fuentes de información del mundo son las que extraemos del ciberespacio o del espacio audiovisual tras haber seleccionado estrictamente el tipo de información que previamente deseábamos recibir.

De hecho, Internet nos permite recibir cómodamente en nuestro hogar la oferta audiovisual (informaciones, entretenimiento, servicios...) que previamente le hemos marcado. La Red nos abre a un universo comunicativo prediseñado de personal manera. No sólo Negroponte (investigador del MIT) sino también magnates como Bill Gates vaticinan la aparición de un «Daily Me», un periódico a medida, que nos será enviado vía Internet: un paquete de comunicaciones en el que sus componentes (noticias locales, deportes, sucesos...) han sido elegidos de antemano. Tras el «Daily Me» se impondrá la «TV Me», de modo que dentro de unos años, cuando entremos en la sala de estar, tan sólo diremos qué queremos ver y con la ayuda de la pantalla escogeremos un vídeo que nos interese1. La convergencia entre TV e Internet forzará la desaparición de la televisión tradicional tal como la conocemos; las compañías telefónicas ya están construyendo las infraestructuras para ello, de modo que se impondrá la flexibilidad y la individuación selectiva en una televisión totalmente a la carta. .

La dimensión audiovisual del yo será tan superespecializada y tan personalizada, según Sunstein (2003), que nuestro aparato cognitivo verá reducidas increíblemente las oportunidades para enfrentarse y contrastar conocimientos e informaciones heterogéneas y no previstas, con lo cual se tambaleará el suelo para la construcción de experiencias sociales compartidas y debatidas, es decir, para la construcción del civismo democrático. La individuación favorecida por Internet puede sumergirnos en «nichos digitales» (ever-smaller niches) o en infinidad de burbujas mediáticas, convertirnos en células aisladas de un gran tejido informacional que en conjunto nos resulta, no obstante, algo ajeno, distante y extraño.

Sunstein analiza así las amenazas para la democracia deliberativamente constituida que se derivan de una capacidad selectiva hipertrofiada por la Red. La fuerza de tales pronósticos nos la evidencian investigaciones más recientes: la Red está transformando de tal modo la televisión que los adolescentes entrevistados por el «Certer for the Digital Future» ni siquiera comprenden la idea de ver la televisión con un horario ya programado, puesto que la ven en la pantalla del ordenador y, cada vez más, en dispositivos portátiles (Castells, 2009: 100). Estos servicios incrementan la comodidad y el entretenimiento de cada cual, pero el creciente control de los consumidores audiovisuales para filtrar lo que les llega tiene sus peligros para el buen funcionamiento de un sistema democrático que se tenga por tal. Una sociedad plural y democrática no sólo ha de fomentar la libertad actuando frente al gobierno (limitando su capacidad de censura y respetando al máximo las elecciones individuales). La libertad requiere de iniciativas públicas, de medidas educativas y formativas para evitar que la suma de decisiones individuales razonables (como la decisión de personalizar y filtrar digitalmente el extenso ámbito de lo audiovisual) produzca a la larga un deterioro del tejido social y de las libertades reales de los ciudadanos.

Asimismo, el filtrado individualizado de lo informativo puede repercutir, continúa Sunstein, en la desaparición del subsuelo necesario para optar libremente a informaciones públicas, de interés general, amén de suponer un obstáculo para la deliberación, la reflexión y las responsabilidades democráticas.

Como afirma Moeller (2009), la tecnología está cambiando la forma en que recibimos y comprendemos la información. Internet está reforzando la tendencia actual a buscar activamente lo que la persona desea ver, leer o escuchar, antes que atenerse a lo que han seleccionado editores o productores. Sin embargo, continúa Moeller, «la fascinación por el efecto transformador de todo esto permite olvidar que reportajes a la antigua –y caros todavía– son esenciales» (Moeller, 2009: 72). De hecho, organizaciones defensoras de la libertad de prensa han registrado pérdidas a nivel mundial, su poder e influencia menguan y su acción se ve cuestionada día a día. Reportajes a la antigua son, por ejemplo, los que realizó Anna Politovskaya o el de los periodistas alemanes que murieron el mismo día en Afganistán. Un tipo de periodismo garante de la libertad de expresión que quizás no pueda ser sustituido por el de los «periodistas ciudadanos» a pesar de que, armados de fotografías, vídeos y blogs, pueden arrojar a la Red elementos de relevancia pública (como por ejemplo los blogs que informaron de la desorganización gubernamental tras el huracán Katrina en Nueva Orleans).

El buen funcionamiento de una democracia y un sistema de libertades pasa, paradójicamente, por que los ciudadanos conozcan y entren en contacto con noticias y materiales que no han elegido previamente (Sunstein, 2003: 20). Los encuentros no planificados y sin cita previa, por así decirlo, son primordiales para la democracia puesto que ponen en contacto a la persona con puntos de vista o temas que pueden resultar significativos para su formación cívica y humana, pero que «a priori» nunca hubieran sido elegidos.

En democracia, además, se requiere que la mayoría de ciudadanos –o un gran número de ellos– tenga experiencias comunicativas comunes, análogas. La diversidad cultural e informativa –la multiplicidad posmoderna– es un valor apreciable, pero tiene sus límites: no es un valor a perseguir cuando revierte en fragmentación social y cuando impide enfrentarse de modo cívicamente común a problemas comunes. Los peligros de la fragmentación comunicativa –digital o audiovisual– son mayores a medida que las naciones se vuelven más globales. Peligros que repercuten en la construcción de una ciudadanía provechosamente cosmopolita2.

Las tecnologías para el filtrado, propias de la sociedad-red, pueden peligrosamente romper estas dos condiciones para cualquier sistema político de libertades, entendidas como participación y deliberación cívica y como desarrollo social y humano. El buen funcionamiento del orden democrático se verá en serias dificultades si los procesos de filtrado comunicativo se radicalizan y se extienden indiscriminadamente a través de la Red: si los ciudadanos, reducidos a su dimensión de consumidores digitales, renuncian a las oportunidades para enfrentarse a diferentes opiniones, sobre todo aquellas que tienen que ver con cuestiones comunes (políticas, sociomorales, culturales...) indispensables para la vida pública, o sea, para la opinión pública racional. Las nuevas formas de socialización-en-red pueden ser, y de hecho son con frecuencia, nuevos caminos para reforzar lazos sociales previos y relaciones directas entre conocidos, amigos o familiares (Castells, 2003). Son asimismo una oportunidad constante para entrar en contacto con gente afín en cuanto a aficiones, ideologías, gustos de todo tipo, preferencias culturales… Tales formas de socialización (por ejemplo, las que se desarrollan al calor de las redes sociales) se convertirán en un impulso para el civismo-en-red siempre que se cumplan ciertas condiciones. Para empezar, que uno esté dispuesto a no encasillarse en un tipo de experiencia tecno-socializante que le aísle del resto de problemas sociales generales o de los retos que nuestro mundo globalizado nos impone más allá del grupo concreto de referencia.

El peligro de cierto uso y abuso de las redes sociales se hace explícito cuando se minan los requisitos para el civismo democrático, cuando la cascada comunicacional da paso a la configuración de «islas digitales» en las que sólo se comparten experiencias previamente seleccionadas con personas análogas, desentendiéndose el usuario del resto de cuestiones que directa o indirectamente le afectan en tanto que miembro de una sociedad plural y indefectiblemente global. La pluralidad, sin duda uno de los fundamentos axiológicos de las democracias maduras, puede degenerar en una especie de «endogamia digital múltiple».

Las acciones dirigidas a la selección y filtrado a través de la Red podrían llevar a una general o parcial involución cognitiva, antes que a la revolución cognitiva que Bilbeny (1997) atribuía a nuestra época digital. Quizás sea bueno estar al tanto de este peligro para poder combatirlo educativamente como cabe.

La Red, proveedora de efectivos sistemas de filtrado, puede ponernos en contacto exclusivamente con las opiniones que queremos escuchar, con los artículos o comentarios de los políticos de nuestra cuerda ideológica, con el tipo de discurso (deportivo, artístico, político, económico...) que confirmará o reforzará nuestro universo simbólico.

En una obra posterior, Sunstein (2007) incide en las precauciones que cabe adoptar ante el avance de la «blogsfera». En este sentido, se remite a un curioso experimento realizado en 2005 en Colorado: se escogió a unos 60 ciudadanos adultos llegados de distintos estados, formando grupos de cinco o seis personas. A los grupos se les pidió que deliberaran acerca de tres cuestiones políticas y sociales controvertidas: ¿Deberían los estados permitir las uniones civiles entre parejas de un mismo sexo? ¿Deberían los empresarios iniciar acciones positivas para dar preferencia a miembros de colectivos tradicionalmente desfavorecidos? ¿Deberían los EEUU firmar un tratado internacional para combatir el calentamiento global?

Los grupos se organizaron según la ideología mayoritaria del lugar de procedencia, dividiéndose en grupos procedentes de enclaves liberales3 y conservadores. ¿Resultado? El que sería esperable según lo que hace poco hemos dicho: las discusiones y los diálogos, en vez de moderar las posiciones, actuaron como resorte de posiciones más extremas. En casi todos los casos, la gente se atrincheró en posiciones más uniformes después de hablar con gente afín (like-minded others). Los desacuerdos se redujeron o desaparecieron después de un mero diálogo de 15 minutos. Además, el experimento sacó a la luz un segundo efecto: aparte de radicalizar la diferencia, homogeneizó la analogía. Los grupos liberales y conservadores perfilaron homogéneamente sus diferentes creencias, tras conducirlas a posiciones más extremas.

Aplicado a nuestro tema, Internet (más que los medios de comunicación tradicionales) hace que sea mucho más fácil que los ciudadanos repitan la experiencia de Colorado, afirma Sunstein. De hecho, alguien que recela de la veracidad del calentamiento global (o de la veracidad del holocausto…) puede encontrar en la Red una inmensidad de argumentos y espacios que confirman (consolidan o radicalizan) su creencia, excluyendo cualquier material diferente o alternativo. Aunque no es menos cierto que en Internet podemos encontrar el desarrollo de posiciones y noticias que de otra forma serían invisibles, silenciadas o aplastadas en el debate general, como más adelante expondré. Precisamente uno de los grandes cometidos de la educación en la cultura digital y audiovisual es, así lo entiendo, luchar contra cierta endogamia digital múltiple creada al calor de los nichos digitales o las cámaras de eco electrónicas4. Hablar de endogamia en este contexto hace referencia a la tendencia a agruparse de forma más o menos estable, vía nuevas tecnologías, en familias virtuales según preferencias o gustos ideológicos, o según afinidades o temáticas particulares, o de acuerdo con creencias vitales o esporádicas, de un modo conjunto o alternante, y desatendiendo en consecuencia aquellos asuntos comunes que conforman el núcleo de intereses públicos. Las instituciones educativas, contrariamente, habrían de aprovechar el amplio potencial argumentativo de las tecnologías comunicativas, promoviendo el aprendizaje en un uso plural, autónomo y cívico de las mismas.

La fascinación por las nuevas tecnologías como utopía política, como agente de cambio social, puede trocarse en un sueño vano y falso, pues no es la técnica en sí misma sino los usos sociales de la misma, los proyectos culturales, educativos y políticos que la orientan, los únicos que pueden mover hacia el cambio social deseable. Desde el punto de vista de las relaciones personales, además, el abuso de Internet es un acicate para la soledad interactiva, unida a cierto narcisismo, y no tanto para la autonomía entrelazada y cívica (Twenge & Campbell, 2009).

Pero, ¿realmente es tan sombrío el panorama que nos dibujan las nuevas tecnologías en lo que al civismo posconvencional y moderno se refiere? ¿No será que éstas nos abren a una nueva forma de relación, a una nueva socialización, ante la que cabe estar preparado sobre todo en el ámbito educativo?

2. Alfabetización mediática y valores cívicos: algunas propuestas educativas

No está en nuestro ánimo retratar un panorama cercano al derrotismo apocalíptico, entre otras cosas porque recrearse en el lamento pesimista es uno de los requisitos para que los malos augurios vayan cumpliéndose, dada la inactividad a la que suelen conducir. Por otra parte, sociólogos especializados en los efectos sociales de la Red como Castells sostienen que las nuevas tecnologías no encierran a la gente en casa, sino que activan la sociabilidad y son un elemento clave para la autonomía personal, política y profesional de los usuarios (Proyecto Internet Cataluña, 20075).

Sin embargo, cabe estar prevenidos, sobre todo desde un punto de vista educativo, ante ciertos peligros y sesgos amplificados tecnológicamente y denunciados por autores como Sunstein (2007), Cortina (2003), Sartori (2005) o Wolton (2000). Nunca está de más desarrollar iniciativas educativas en contra de prejuicios tan amenazantes como socialmente nocivos, iniciativas que favorezcan, a la inversa y para el caso que nos ocupa, usos responsables y cívicos de las nuevas tecnologías comunicativas, sobre todo en ese trayecto hacia la autonomía moral y democrática de los más jóvenes.

El mismo Castells reconoce que la Red ha propiciado cierto autismo en lo que se puede llamar la «autocomunicación de masas». Cita Castells ((2009: 102) un estudio del «Pew Internet & American Life Project», según el cual el 52% de los bloggers escribe fundamentalmente para ellos mismos, mientras que el 32% lo hace para su público. De manera que «hasta cierto punto, una parte importante de esta forma de autocomunicación de masas se parece más al autismo electrónico que a la comunicación real».

En suma, ¿cómo desactivar los peligros del autismo o la individuación incívica en la sociedad-red? ¿Cómo prevenir los riesgos del autismo nombrado y lo que aquí he llamado endogamia digital múltiple? ¿Cuáles son las condiciones y los motores para un civismo-en-red, para el avance educativo hacia una ciudadanía audiovisual y digital?

De un modo breve, éstas son algunas propuestas pedagógicas, dirigidas a la educación formal, a favor de una innovación educativa como la que está exigiendo nuestro nuevo entorno global y tecno-comunicado.

2.1. Relectura del mismo concepto de educación

La cultura digital ofrece las condiciones para una nueva lectura o revisión del mismo concepto de educación, superando el instruccionismo técnico o el enciclopedismo de viejo o nuevo cuño (De Pablos, 2003), y en la línea de los clásicos movimientos de renovación pedagógica (Aznar & al., 1999; Trilla, 2001; Núñez y Romero, 2003; Gimeno-Sacristán y Carbonell, 2003). Educar en los valores ético-cívicos de las sociedades democráticas y en el seno de las nuevas sociedades de la información y la comunicación supone revitalizar los programas y modelos educativos más cooperativos y participativos (Torrego, 2006); llama a la actualización de modelos que descansan en la actividad (o interactividad) y experiencias del alumnado, por supuesto tras redefinir la autoridad académica y la función científica y orientadora del profesorado (Colom, 2002). Lo decisivo es despertar la capacidad pedagógica para implicar a los afectados en el proceso educativo, a los alumnos eminentemente pero también a los padres. Se trata de educar despertando voluntades para el aprendizaje, en una invitación constante e imaginativa a la acción de los educandos, de tal manera que se vean compelidos, incluso arrastrados más o menos gozosamente en la aventura del saber y el desarrollo de competencias personales, que sientan cierto protagonismo en la asimilación crítica de conocimientos o en la asunción reflexiva de normas y valores reguladores de la convivencia. La Escuela 2.0 ha de ser vista, entre otras cosas, como una apuesta por este modo renovado de entender la educación (Sancho & Correa, 2010).

2.2. Aprendizaje 2.0 y alfabetización digital íntegra

Puesto que la Escuela 2.0 presupone la revisión del concepto de conocimiento y del acceso al mismo (más horizontal, interactivo y recíproco), puede al mismo tiempo ser una plataforma para un conocimiento más rico del ámbito de lo público: de la «res publica», de aquello que nos interesa a todos (a nivel social y global). Puede contribuir, en este sentido, a la educación para una opinión pública razonante, conectando al alumnado en aquellos asuntos de interés común. Frente al peligro de un uso restrictivo o endogámico de las redes sociales, la escuela puede abundar en un tipo de conocimiento de la realidad social más amplio, aumentando la experiencia y sensibilidad procedente de otros puntos de vista. El conocimiento del otro desde la Red puede ser aprovechado en este sentido a favor de una ciudadanía global y cosmopolita, alentando un pensamiento crítico y creador, despertando la actividad del educando desde la cooperación y la interactividad (Gutiérrez, 2003). La Comisión Europea ha dictaminado diferentes resoluciones en las que insta precisamente a fomentar la alfabetización mediática a todos los países miembros, como «uno de los requisitos previos para lograr una ciudadanía plena y activa, prevenir y reducir los riesgos de exclusión de la comunidad» (Aguaded, 2010). En este sentido es muy provechosa la labor de la Academia Salzburgo de los Medios de Comunicación y los Cambios Mundiales, la cual ha confeccionado un programa para la alfabetización mediática juntamente con universidades de todo el mundo y en coordinación con organizaciones mediáticas e instituciones internacionales como la ONU y la UNESCO (Moeller, 2009)6.

2.3. Fortalecimiento de la ciudadanía audiovisual

En este sentido, las instituciones educativas evidentemente se han de abrir de lleno a las nuevas tecnologías comunicativas, pero no sólo como mecanismo de aprendizaje y de búsqueda de conocimiento, sino como oportunidad para reflexionar acerca de los usos sociales de tales tecnologías con el fin de fortalecer la ciudadanía audiovisual o mediática en este ámbito (Conill y Gozálvez, 2004). Por ejemplo, en la escuela se ha de ofrecer dentro del currículo la oportunidad para analizar el contenido de ciertos blogs, videojuegos o anuncios publicitarios que tienen un potencial empobrecedor de la convivencia democrática o que son cuestionables desde la perspectiva de los derechos civiles básicos (es decir, enaltecimientos gratuitos de la violencia, o contenidos contrarios a la igual dignidad de las personas…). Igualmente la escuela puede ser la plataforma para percibir en común la imagen que los medios ofrecen de la identidad de niños y jóvenes, y desde ahí, analizar cómo ha de ser apreciada o valorada esa percepción que llega de los medios, teniendo siempre en cuenta que niños y jóvenes, cada vez más implicados con la tecnología comunicativa, no son receptores pasivos sino que reconstruyen activamente su identidad a partir de su relación con el entorno (Buckingham 2005; 2008). La escuela, en su intento de difundir el pensamiento crítico, no puede dejar pasar la oportunidad de traer a las aulas los modelos de vida buena, las imágenes de identidad, los modos de percibir y valorar el mundo… que se esconden tras el discurso de los medios, con el fin de hacerlos más explícitos e invitar a una reflexión o un diálogo acerca de los mismos.

Desde la educación formal cabe asimismo analizar las redes sociales con el fin de evitar sesgos o prejuicios, para alertar contra usos delictivos que atentan a la dignidad y la privacidad de las personas… La escuela puede aprovechar los nuevos recursos tecnológicos para fomentar contactos globales de interés cognitivo y sociomoral, con escuelas próximas o lejanas, con organizaciones educativas y solidarias... En fin, la introducción necesaria del fenómeno tecno-comunicativo en la escuela o el instituto no habría de centrarse en aspectos puramente técnicos, pues su radio de acción es igualmente –eminentemente– social, y su interés afecta a aspectos de la sociedad como el de las relaciones interpersonales y los valores cívicos democráticos.

Fortalecer la ciudadanía audiovisual o mediática supone, por una parte, educar en un uso autónomo de los medios, un uso que acerque a la libertad, por ejemplo mediante la capacidad para detectar y superar nuevas formas de vasallaje; pero por otra parte, educar en la ciudadanía mediática (incluyendo por supuesto a la Red como un medio de comunicación interactiva) comporta reforzar la condición ciudadana de la persona a través del uso de los medios y las nuevas tecnologías, pues sin duda la tecnología comunicativa es un valioso instrumento para la condición democrática de las gentes, favoreciendo su participación cívica y su información crítica. Es suma, apelar a la ciudadanía en este contexto es hablar de ciudadanía en el ámbito mediático o digital, pero al mismo tiempo supone hablar de ciudadanía conseguida o intensificada gracias al uso de la tecnología comunicativa. Aunque son términos estrechamente relacionados, es menester distinguir entre ser ciudadano en lo audiovisual y ser ciudadano con (desde, gracias a, con el concurso de) la tecnología comunicativa. De estas dos dimensiones puede dar cuenta o hacerse cargo, en la medida de sus posibilidades, la escuela o el instituto, un hacerse cargo que en sociedades mediáticas o sociedades-red es tan urgente como ineludible.

2.4. Inclusión de la dimensión ética: Desarrollo humano y justicia global

Ahondando en el punto anterior, una innovación educativa así entendida no puede por menos que favorecer una empatía de tercer orden, es decir, una asunción y comprensión de otros puntos de vistas más amplios de acuerdo con un concepto de dignidad reversible y universal (más allá de la empatía con el otro cercano en contacto directo, o con el otro próximo perteneciente al propio entorno social). El aprendizaje 2.0 supone una magnífica vía, entre otras cosas, para dar cuerpo a un modelo de justicia en clave cosmopolita, unido al nuevo concepto de desarrollo humano sostenible, concepto para el que la dimensión educativa del ser humano es tan decisiva e ineludible en aras de una transformación emancipatoria. Incluir la dimensión ética en la formación tecno-comunicativa ayuda a dar cuerpo a esa ciudadanía mediática o digital antes mencionada. Pero igualmente es un modo de extender los valores de una ética cívica, profundamente democrática, en la cultura audiovisual y digital.

Tomando como referente la ética del discurso (Cortina, Escámez & Pérez-Delgado, 1996) y las actuales propuestas de Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo humano, y partiendo de una metodología hermenéutica y crítica, exponemos ahora algunas orientaciones con el fin de educar en un uso integral y cívico de la tecnología comunicativa. Escuelas e institutos son un lugar magnífico para impulsar el desarrollo humano y un sentido global de la justicia al integrar valores como:

- La libertad, analizando en el aula espacios digitales para la participación cívica y por supuesto pacífica (libertad como participación); considerando en común las consecuencias de los actos propios sobre la privacidad y libertad de las demás personas; reflexionando acerca de los peligros para la propia intimidad o integridad que encierran ciertas prácticas en la Red (libertad como independencia); fomentando el pensamiento crítico del alumnado, buscando y analizando en común noticias de interés público de algún periódico electrónico (libertad como autonomía); estudiando de qué modo el acceso a la información y a la tecnología comunicativa aumenta las capacidades de los pueblos y las personas para vivir una vida más digna y realizada según los proyectos de cada cual (libertad como desarrollo, siguiendo la propuesta de A. Sen, 2000); comprendiendo hasta qué punto el acceso a ciertas informaciones socialmente relevantes es un mecanismo para evitar servilismos o nuevas formas de vasallaje (libertad como no dominación, de acuerdo con el concepto de libertad acuñado por Pettit, 1999)…

- La igualdad, incitando a conocer y disminuir la brecha digital, facilitando el acceso a las tecnologías comunicativas (igualdad de oportunidades), tal como pretende la Escuela 2.0; sacando a la luz páginas web, blogs o vídeos en YouTube que atentan contra la dignidad de las personas y destilan la idea de la inferioridad de algunas culturas o etnias, o de los discapacitados, o los ancianos, o las mujeres (igualdad en dignidad)…

- La solidaridad, conociendo e implicando a la escuela en alguna de las innumerables plataformas para la cooperación y el desarrollo de los pueblos que se prodigan en Internet; iniciando correspondencia electrónica con chicos y chicas de otros contextos alejados de las cotas de bienestar de que aquí disponemos; despertando formas de usar las redes sociales que conecten con las necesidades y derechos de los otros, en el marco de campañas electrónicas para reclamar justicia en algún caso concreto; o colaborando vía electrónica con iniciativas para el desarrollo sostenible y el cuidado de la naturaleza…

- El diálogo y el respeto, reflexionando acerca de los beneficios y los límites de la tolerancia en sociedades democráticas, sobre todo en lo concerniente a lo publicado y expresado en la esfera digital; alentando la escucha activa, invitando a la apertura ante puntos de vista diferentes o no elegidos previamente por el alumno en sus interacciones electrónicas; valorando en común las consecuencias de la violación de los derechos de autor en la Red, o de las copias sin citar del texto de otra persona; reflexionando acerca del nuevo concepto de amistad que despiertan diferentes redes sociales, y las normas mínimas de cortesía y atención al otro que vale la pena usar en ellas…

3. Conclusión

En definitiva, la educación cívica en la cultura digital trata de aprovechar el caudal tecno-comunicativo para la apertura al otro próximo y lejano, en el cultivo y la búsqueda constante de nuevos horizontes experienciales y mentales, sobre todo cuando se trata de los horizontes de la participación cívica, del interés social y de la justicia en clave cosmopolita. La educación tecnológicamente matizada es una oportunidad para la ampliación y el enriquecimiento del campo de la experiencia, ampliación que, sin embargo, ha de ser un acicate para la ciudadanía de los alumnos, los futuros constructores de la realidad social y humana. Al fin y al cabo, la tecnología ha de ser vista como lo que es, un medio, un instrumento para usos y fines muy diferentes, que van desde el solipsismo o la endogamia digital hasta un civismo-en-red, profundamente democrático, que bascula sobre la intensificación de la acción comunicativa de esos seres comunicativamente constituidos que, en definitiva, somos los humanos.

Notas

1 Declaraciones de Bill Gates recogidas por C.R. Sunstein (2003). Unos años después (en 2007), Gates confirmaba estas predicciones según informa la agencia Reuters. Esta revolución, decía, será posible gracias a la explosión de contenidos en vídeo en la Red y la alianza entre ordenadores y televisores. Tres años después de estas declaraciones y siete después de los primeros vaticinios, en nuestro país ya ha empezado a comercializarse (primavera de 2010) el modelo de televisor «Sony Internet TV».

2 Véase al respecto Nussbaum (1999) y Cortina (1997).

3 Es decir, enclaves progresistas, según una categoría más próxima.

4 La metáfora de la «echo chamber» es bien significativa: es la cámara en la que se escucha sólo lo que uno mismo pronuncia o lo que pronuncian aquellos que uno está dispuesto a oír.

5 www.uoc.edu/in3/pic/esp.

6 Otros recursos interesantes para la alfabetización digital, la comprensión crítica de los medios y la educación para el consumo activo de los mismos son: www.understandmedia.com; www.educomunicacion.org; www.euromedialiteracy.eu.

Referencias

Aguaded, J.I. (2010). La Unión Europea dictamina una nueva Recomendación sobre alfabetización mediática en el entorno digital en Europa. Comunicar, 34; 7-8.

Aznar, P. (Coord.) (1999). Teoría de la educación. Un enfoque constructivista. Valencia: Tirant lo Blanch.

Bilbeny, N. (1997). La revolución en la ética. Barcelona: Anagrama.

Buckingham, D. (2005). Constructing the Media Competent Child: Media Literacy and Regulatory Policy in the UK. Medien Pädagogik, 11; 1-14 (www.medienpaed.com/05-1/buckingham05-1.pdf) (27-09-2005).

Buckingham, D. (2008). Más allá de la tecnología. Aprendizaje infantil en la era de la cultura digital. Buenos Aires: Manantial.

Castells, M. (2003). La Galaxia Internet. Barcelona: Mondadori.

Castells, M. (2009). Comunicación y poder. Madrid: Alianza.

Colom, A. (2002). La (de)construcción del conocimiento pedagógico. Nuevas perspectivas en Teoría de la educación. Barcelona: Paidós.

Conill, J. & Gozálvez, V. (Coords.) (2004). Ética de los medios. Una apuesta por la ciudadanía audiovisual. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Cortina, A. (1997). Ciudadanos del mundo. Madrid: Alianza.

Cortina, A. (2003). Construir confianza. Madrid: Trotta.

Cortina, A., Escámez, J. & Pérez-Delgado, E. (1996). Un mundo de valores. Valencia: Generalitat Valenciana.

De Pablos, J. (Coord.) (2003). La tarea de educar. Madrid: Biblioteca Nueva.

Gimeno-Sacristán, J. & Carbonell, J. (Coords.) (2003). El sistema educativo. Una mirada crítica. Barcelona: Praxis.

Gutiérrez, A. (2003). Alfabetización digital. Algo más que ratones y teclas. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Moeller, S. (2009). Fomentar la libertad de expresión con la alfabetización mediática mundial. Comunicar, 32; 65-72.

Núñez, L. & Romero, C. (2003). Pensar la educación. Madrid: Pirámide.

Nussbaum, M. (1999). Los límites del patriotismo: identidad, pertenencia y ciudadanía mundial. Barcelona: Paidós.

Pettit, Ph. (1999). Republicanismo. Una teoría sobre la libertad y el gobierno. Barcelona: Paidós.

Sancho, J.M. & Correa J.M. (2010). Cambio y continuidad en sistemas educativos en transformación. Revista de Educación, 352; 17-21.

Sartori, G. (2005). Homo videns. La sociedad teledirigida. Madrid: Punto de Lectura.

Sen, A. (2000). Desarrollo y libertad. Barcelona: Planeta.

Sunstein, C.R. (2003). República.com. Internet, democracia y libertad. Barcelona: Paidós.

Sunstein, C.R. (2007). Republic.com 2.0. Princeton University Press.

Torrego, J.C. & al. (2006). Modelo integrado de mejora de la convivencia. Barcelona, Graó.

Trilla, J. (Coord.) (2001). El legado pedagógico del siglo XX para la escuela del siglo XXI. Barcelona: Graó.

Twenge, J.M. & Campbell, W.K. (2009). The Narcissism Epidemic. Free Press.

Wolton, D. (2000). Sobrevivir a Internet. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Back to Top
GET PDF

Document information

Published on 01/01/2011

Volume 19, Issue 1, 2011
DOI: 10.3916/C36-2011-03-04
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 19
Views 16
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?