Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This article develops insights and generates new lines of inquiry into young children’s digital lives in China and Australia. It brings to dialogue findings from a national study of young children's digital media use in urban settings in China with findings from studies in Australia. This is not presented as a direct comparison, but rather as an opportunity to shed light on children’s digital lives in two countries and to account for the impact of context in relatively different social and cultural circumstances. The article outlines findings from a study of 1,171 preschool-aged children (3 to 7-year-olds) in six provinces in China, including the frequency of their use of television, early education digital devices, computers, tablet computers and smartphones, music players, e-readers and games consoles. It also focuses on various activities such as watching cartoons, using educational apps, playing games and participating in video chat. Methods included a multistage sampling process, random selection of kindergartens, a weighted sampling process, the generation of descriptive data and the use of linear regression analysis, and a chi-square test. The study demonstrates the significance of a range of factors that influence the amount of time spent with digital media. The contrast with Australian studies produces new insights and generates new research questions.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Young children’s digital practices present parents, educators and policymakers with a significant social challenge, but remain under-researched. This article outlines findings from a study of the digital practices of 1,171 preschool-aged students (3 to 7-year-olds) in China, and these findings are then considered dialogically with findings of available studies in Australia. We do not present this as a scientific comparison, but rather as an opportunity to provide context to understand the data from China and to develop new research questions. This approach has proved valuable to us as scholars conducting research in China and Australia because it sheds light on children’s digital lives in different social and cultural circumstances. The article presents a literature review before outlining the data from China in detail. It then provides some findings from available Australian studies. Our approach draws on Bakhtin’s theory of dialogism (1984) to suggest that understanding local data is enhanced by discussing findings from other contexts. Our approach has limitations because while the data from China was gathered and analysed by the lead author, the Australian findings are from a small number of limited secondary source studies. Despite this limitation, the article generates interesting propositions about young children’s digital lives in China.

1.1. Literature review

Children’s digital experiences have emerged as a worldwide issue not only because screen media has become an everyday part of many children’s lives, but because digital lives begin at ever younger ages (Holloway, Sefton-Green, & Livingstone, 2013). Data from EU Kids Online indicates an increase in young children’s Internet use in recent years. In some countries, for example, Sweden, Belgium and the Netherlands, almost 70% of students aged 3 to 4 go online (Holloway, Sefton-Green, & Livingstone, 2013). Mobile devices, especially touchscreen media, provide young children with easier digital access than was previously available (Thorpe & al., 2015; Marsh & al., 2016). In the United States, the percentage of young children’s mobile device use increased sharply from 38% to 72% in just two years from 2011 to 2013, reflecting the introduction of tablet computers (Common Sense Media, 2011, 2013).

The rapid uptake of digital technologies by young children is not just a Western phenomenon. In China, there were more than 1.18 million children aged from 6 to 11 using the Internet in 2015, particularly via smartphones (CNNIC, 2016). Research conducted in China shows that although television still dominates young children’s screen time, touch screen media is available in almost every household (Li & Wang, 2014; Yu, 2016; Yang, Wang, & Zhu, 2016). These significant changes have caused concern in China. A sample survey in Nanchang, Jiangxi Province (Yu, 2016) indicates 51% of parents of young children hold negative attitudes towards touchscreen media, with concerns about vision health, social interaction and Internet addiction. Research shows that youngsters have always been seen as more vulnerable to media and technologies than older children (Paik & Comstock, 1994; Ostrov, Gentile, & Mullins, 2013; Radesky & al., 2016). However, there is perhaps more concern about children’s digital media use than is warranted. For instance, reporting on a survey conducted in Beijing, Li & Wang (2014) argue young children’s lives have not been overly occupied by digital media. They found that children’s daily total time for playing with toys, outdoor activities, and reading is 2.5 times greater than engagement with media.

Along with China’s fast-paced economic development, people in China are living through significant social changes, including changes to childhood contexts. The one-child policy has changed since 2013, potentially altering the family structure (Chen & al., 2016). Furthermore, fierce labor market competition reinforces parents’ pressure and leads them to privilege their children’s education (Chi, Qian, & Wu, 2012; Chen, 2015). These authors suggest early education starts from the moment a baby is born, with significant uptake of educational toys and early education curricula which potentially impacts Chinese young children’s education, entertainment, and parenting.

Meanwhile, there has been limited research on the impact of socio-economic demography on young children’s digital media use in China, which is of concern, given significant disparities in household income in China. As scholars have argued, to effectively understand children’s media use, it should be located within familial, economic and geographic contexts (Jordan, 2016; Calvert & Wilson, 2008). In one Chinese study, Li, Zhou and Wu (2014) investigated media use of 1,195 infants aged between 3 to 6 in Ningbo, Zhejiang province and found that time spent on television is associated with children’s age, family income and parents’ education. Li, Zhou and Wu (2014) suggest that minors from lower income families or families where parents have less formal education tend to watch more television. Meanwhile, children living with grandparents or those from higher-income families spend more time playing video games. These results are in accord with those found by Western scholars (Huston & al., 1999; Anand & Krosnick, 2005). Overall, though research about young children’s digital lives in different socioeconomic situations is still limited in China and internationally.

1.2. Research question

China is a developing country with unbalanced economic development, and children’s media use is likely different across regions. However, no large national survey has ever been conducted. Secondly, the amount of research related to this topic is sparse in China, and most studies simply provide descriptive data. Thirdly, it is difficult to find data on Chinese young children’s digital media use in English, which hinders international scholars from understanding the situation in China, or making comparisons to Western data.

Therefore, this research draws a national picture of young children’s digital media use at home in urban China. The first question focuses on the kinds of digital media children access at home since household ownership of digital media reflects values, requirements, and preferences of each family. Questions about usage patterns and predictors provide a general understanding of young children’s digital media behavior and disparities between different demographic variables. We also ask how parents in China value different kinds of digital media and what rules they have for children’s usage as it has been shown that young children’s media exposure is strongly related to parents’ mediation strategies (Wu & al., 2014; Nikken & Schols, 2015). These data provide a better understanding of digital childhoods in China; placing them in dialogue with available studies from Australia enables preliminary discussion about similarities and differences between the East and West in the context of the globalized media industries.

2. Methodology

Data about 1,171 preschoolers’ (aged 3 to 7) media use was collected in China by the lead author through a parent-report questionnaire from April 2017 to June 2017. A multistage sampling process was conducted in mainland China. Initially, 27 provinces were clustered into three categories according to indicators reflecting the regional economic development and education quality, which include GDP, education funding, number of kindergartens, teacher and student ratio. Four municipalities (Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin and Chongqing) directly under the Central Government were excluded due to incomparable population and level of development. This stratification provides a better representation of diversities in economics, education, and geography. Next, six provinces were chosen randomly in each category, and the best-developed city was chosen since access to kindergartens was more possible in those cities. Lastly, a random kindergarten was chosen in each city and questionnaires were sent to all the preschoolers and completed by one of each child’s primary caregivers. The overall response rate is as high at 78%, as teachers in every class asked parents for help to support the study.

Table 1 shows the sampling result in each city. As the number of students and response rate differ in each kindergarten, a weighted sample according to preschooler population size in each region was used to achieve a more reliable representation.

To understand the digital lives of Chinese young children, descriptive data such as average time spent and frequency of media usage were represented. A linear regression analysis was conducted to explore important predictors of time spent on different kinds of media, and a chi-square test was used to see how parents’ attitudes toward different media vary among different social-economic status groups.


Gou Dezuanni 2018a-69568-en020.jpg

Australian studies discussed include the longitudinal study of Australian children (AIFS, 2016), and studies on children’s television viewing (ACMA, 2015), young children’s mobile touchscreen media use (Coenen & al., 2015), and parents’ beliefs about their young children’s screen time and physical activities (Hamilton & al., 2015). The findings from these studies are placed into dialogue with the findings from China to provide a deeper understanding of the Chinese data. Bakhtin’s dialogic approach (1984) suggests acts of interpretation are inevitably relational and productive where they recognise opportunities for dynamic interaction of concepts and ideas. He suggests dialogic relationships are an almost universal phenomenon, permeating all human speech and all relationships and manifestations of human life, everything that has meaning and significance’ (Bakhtin, 1984: 40). We have been inspired by this line of thinking in our interpretation of findings from the Chinese data, not just to gain greater insight into the Chinese data, but to generate new questions about young children’s use of digital media in different social and cultural contexts.

3. Findings from the Chinese study

3.1. Digital media in the lives of young children

Young children in urban China are surrounded by digital media at home. In a typical family, there are 1.42 televisions1, 0.69 early educational tablets2, 0.70 desk computers, 1 laptop, 0.83 tablets, 2.96 smartphones, 0.5 music players, 0.17 e-readers and 0.15 game consoles. 93.2% of families own at least one computer (pc or laptop), 65.9% of them have tablets, and 52.1% bought early educational tablets for their child. Only 3.6% of families have no television while the percentage of families without any e-reader or game console is high at 84.8% and 90% respectively.

3.2. Usage patterns and predictors3.2.1. Usage patterns

Table 2 shows average time spent on each kind of digital media when asked about media consumption for the previous day. Over 99% of infants use at least one digital device on both weekdays and weekends and the average total screen time is 63 minutes and 88 minutes respectively. 14.2% of children exceed 2 hours’ total screen time on weekdays while 26.7% exceed 2 hours per day on weekends. Television is the most frequently used, followed by smartphones, tablets and early educational tablets.

Although a large proportion of kids in the study never use early educational tablets (46.9%), computers (47%), tablets (39.4%), and especially game consoles (91%), only 9.7% never use smartphones. Table 2 also indicates that tablets and smartphones are the most popular and most often used mobile devices for young children. When a tablet is available for infants, they spend more time on it than other media, except for television.


Gou Dezuanni 2018a-69568-en021.jpg

Table 3 shows minors mostly watch children’s television programs and cartoons on tablets and smartphones. Youku, iQiyi and Tencent Video are their favorite video apps, as listed by parents. Nearly half of young children (47.9%) play games on tablets while 38.2% play games on smartphones. The most popular games among kids are Talking Tom, Carrot Fantasy, Pop Star and girls’ dressing games. Several games listed by parents might be considered by other parents as inappropriate for the age group, including Plants vs. Zombies and King of Glory.

Parents identify the use of educational apps more often than other categories of apps. For instance, «Jiliguala» for learning English, «Wukong Shizi» for learning Chinese, «My numbers» for numeracy, video apps such as «Himalayas» to listen to stories, and there are also some integrated early educational apps combining cartoons, gaming, singing and ‘common sense’ education, such as «Baby Bus», «Xiao Banlong» and «Shima Shima Tora no Shimajiro» (from Japan). Tablets are used more often than smartphones for accessing educational apps (44.4% compared to 28.5%). However, 41.5% use smartphones to make phone calls or video chat. WeChat, the most popular social media in China, is listed by some parents as young children’s favorite app.


Gou Dezuanni 2018a-69568-en022.jpg

3.2.2. Predictors of usage patterns

Another aspect of digital media use investigated were the factors influencing the amount of time spent with digital media. Table 4 shows the linear regression analysis result of the main time factors. Here we consider four potential reasons: (1) Children’s demographic variables like gender (1=boy, 0=girl) and age (months). (2) Family socioeconomic status such as parents’ education and yearly family income. (3) Family structure including sibling presence (1=yes, 0=no) and whether the child is mainly taken care of by parents or grandparents (1=parents, 0=grandparents), and (4) Region (1=Shanghai, 0=other regions).

Gender and age do not have much influence on young children’s screen time. However, older children are likely to spend more time on computers than younger children.


Gou Dezuanni 2018a-69568-en023.jpg

Young children whose mothers have higher degrees spend less time on television, early educational tablets and smartphones. Total screen time also decreases with higher education, although fathers’ education seems to have little effect. Family income is significantly related to how much digital media a family accesses (r=0.327, p<.001), which means that young children from higher-income families may have more access to different digital media. Time spent on digital media does not have any association with family income, though, except for television. These results indicate that mother’s education and, to some extent, family income are predictors of screen time use.

Sibling presence is an important variable in relation to screen time on television. Since 35.4% parents claim that they might use media as a babysitter because they do not have enough time to take care of their children, raising more children may lead to lack of time. In addition, compared with other media, television is more appropriate for siblings to watch together while other media are usually used alone.

In China, 64.4% of young children are taken care of by parents while 33% are cared for by grandparents. A very small proportion of young children are raised by nannies (0.5%) or other people (1.9%). As shown in Table 4, time spent on television and smartphones increases if grandparents take the child care. The chi-square test found that parents are more likely to set strict rules than grandparents for smartphone use (?2=9.98, df=3, p=0.019) which may lead to young children’s moderate use.

In this research, different regions relate to the difference in economic development and investment in education. However, large disparities are only found between Shanghai and other regions. In Shanghai, one of the best-developed cities in China, young children tend to spend more time on new technology like tablets. The average time spent on tablets in Shanghai (24.9 min) is more than twice compared with other districts (9.8 min). Furthermore, as shown in Table 4, time spent on tablets is not determined by family income, but by region, which indicates that parents in developed districts may have more open attitudes toward new technologies.

3.3. Other activities in young children’s lives

Table 5 represents young children’s average time spent on non-digital activities. In China, large numbers of preschoolers spend their whole day in kindergarten. The average school time on weekdays can be as long as 7 hours 23 minutes, 5 days a week. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner are all included in kindergarten time. 46.6% of children take on after-school training like English, Maths, dancing, musical instruments and other activities. On weekends they spend nearly an hour on outdoor activities and with toys, which implies that young children in China undertake significant physical activities. Worries about excessive screen media taking up recommended physical time may be overstated for most Chinese young children.

3.4. Parents’ attitude and rules on digital media


Gou Dezuanni 2018a-69568-en024.jpg

The data indicate that parents act as gatekeepers in young children’s digital media use. 82.5% say they download apps for their children and 86.5% check the quality of apps before allowing their children to use them. However, using digital media as babysitters is sometimes inevitable due to lack of time or the need to occupy or distract small children in public places. Only 38.1% of parents state that they seldom or never leave their baby alone with media. Thus, parents make rules for children’s media use which also reflect their attitude towards different digital media.

Parents believe digital media can be both helpful and harmful to young children. Smartphones and game consoles are blamed for causing harm by most parents while early educational tablets are more valued (see supplementary table at https://bit.ly/2xn5gYE). Chinese parents tend to pay attention to the educational function of media, while the role of entertainment is less important. Therefore, they make rules for media content and time spent with television, computers, tablets, and smartphones, but there are fewer rules about using early educational tablets.

Demographic variables like parents’ education, family income, and region are important indicators of parents’ opinion on digital media. Respondents with higher incomes and higher degrees or those from more developed regions are more likely to hold positive attitudes towards tablets and smartphones. However, as shown in Table 6, parents with less education are more likely to believe in the educational value of early educational tablets (mother: p<.01, father: p<.01). Children whose parents achieve higher degrees are more likely to be nonusers of early educational tablets.

4. Australian studies

Gou Dezuanni 2018a-69568-en025.jpg

As noted, there is only a small amount of data about young Australian children’s use of digital media at home. The best available data is from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, which outlines screen time use and parental attitudes for a cohort of several thousand children, but the study is limited because the cohort was aged 4-5 in 2004 when the study commenced, and the data is therefore from a previous era. The 2016 report provides comparative data for the cohort from 2004 to 2012, when the same children are aged 12-13. When aged 4-5, the parents reported their children watched an average of 119 minutes of television per day on weekdays and 131 minutes on weekends. In 2012, at age 12-13, this same cohort of infants was watching 116 minutes of television per weekday and 151 minutes on the weekend (AIFS, 2016: 106). The data also shows that in families with higher levels of education, children were less likely to watch television for more than two hours a day, especially on weekdays. As 4-5-year-olds, 42% of children whose parents were not university educated watched more than 2 hours of television per day, compared with 32% for children in families where a parent was university educated. In 2004, parents reported that their 4-5-year-old infants used home computers for an average of 14 minutes per day. 6.5% used computers for more than an hour per day on weekdays and 19 minutes on weekends (families were not asked about electronic game use). In 2012, the same cohort of children reported that they used electronic games or computers for an average of 88 minutes per day on weekdays and 107 minutes on weekends. The study shows that by age 12-13, the cohort was using screens for an average of about three hours on weekdays and four hours on weekends.

A study conducted by the Australian Communications and Media Authority of 1,137 adult respondents with children aged 0-4 in 2015 suggests their children watch 114 minutes of free to air television per day, which is comparable to the 2004 study data (ACMA, 2015: 5). The ACMA study shows that 5-12-year-olds watched 80 minutes of free to air television per day and overall, youngsters aged 0-14 watched 33 minutes less per day of free to air television in 2013, compared to 2001, reflecting children’s engagement with digital technologies. The study also shows that 77% of parents said they time-restrict their kids television viewing and 99% of parents said it was important their children watch age appropriate programs (ACMA, 2015: 13).

Coenen’s study of mobile device use (2015) surveyed Australian parents of 159 children aged 0-5 and showed that 62.1% of children watched television for more than 30 minutes per day on weekdays and 65.8% on weekends. The next most used devices were tablet computers, with 25.8% greater than 30 minutes use on weekdays and 31.3% on weekends. Hamilton and others (2015) conducted a small study of 20 parents of 2-5-year-olds to better understand parents’ views about physical activity and screen time. Parents in their study argued that limiting screen time promotes physical activity, improves mental wellbeing and stimulates creativity through play. Neumann’s study (2015) of the home digital environments of 69 2-4 year olds in Australia surveyed parents and found that the children used television for a mean time of 80 minutes per day, tablet computers for 20 minutes per day, mobiles phones for 10 minutes, the internet for about 8 minutes per day and games consoles for about 5 minutes per day.

5. Placing the Chinese and Australian findings in dialogue with each other

We are not presenting these ‘comparisons’ as scientific assessments, but rather as an opportunity to generate new lines of inquiry. Perhaps most interestingly, the findings suggest young Chinese children spend less time on screens on both weekdays and weekends than young children in Australia. Chinese children’s total screen time use per weekday is 63 minutes and on weekends is 88 minutes, while kids in Australia watch television for 114 minutes per day (ACMA, 2015), and use other devices in addition to this (Coenen & al., 2015, Neumann, 2015). It is interesting to consider explanations for this disparity. Firstly, children in China are involved in long hours of formal education at a younger age than Australian children, perhaps providing Australian children with more time to access screen media. Secondly, the Chinese results indicate that children with more siblings might spend more time on television which also increases the total screen time. As most Chinese young children (61.5%) are still the only child in their families, they may have less screen time than Australian children who generally grow up with siblings. Thirdly, we can speculate that children in China spend less time with digital media because of parents’ attitudes to the benefits and harms of media. While it is impossible to make direct comparisons about attitude from the available data, significant numbers of both Chinese and Australian parents believe it is important to be involved in their children’s media use through playing a gatekeeping role, and both have concerns about the possible harmful effects of screen time.

Another surprising result of this study is Chinese parents’ emphasis on the educational functions of digital media, with most parents believing in the value of educational tablets for early education. While there is increasing emphasis on educational performance at younger ages in Australia, our sense is that there remains greater emphasis on educational achievement in China. There are some possible explanations for this that will benefit from further study. Firstly, there is a tradition for Chinese parents to attach importance to academic performance and employment, secondly, the one-child policy may have increased parents’ expectations on the only child, and they are willing to devote everything they can to enhance their children’s education. Thirdly, the growing competition in the labor market in China encourages parents to start children’s education as early as possible, to assist them to be competitive amongst their peers. Finally, commercial companies have foreseen the huge profit in the children’s early education market and vigorously advertise their products.

Another significant observation from the two data sets that warrants further investigation is that there seems to be a similar amount of tablet and smartphone use by young children in China and Australia. Chinese parents report that 20.6% of children use tablet computers on weekdays and 28.5% on weekends, and 41% of kids use smartphones on weekdays and 50.3% on weekends. Of those that use them, the average time on tablets is 31 minutes on weekdays and 46 minutes on weekends; for smartphones, it is 22 minutes on weekdays and 25 minutes on weekends. In Australia, according to Coenen’s study, tablets are used more than 30 minutes a day by 25.8% of minors on weekdays and 31.3% on weekends. It is more difficult to make a comparison with smartphones with the available data, but only 38.7% of young Australian children never use a smartphone on weekdays, and 43.8% never use them on weekends. Therefore, in both countries, it seems that at least half of all minors use smartphones for up to 30 minutes on the weekend and over a quarter use tablets for more than 30 minutes in both countries on the weekend.

Another similarity between the two countries is the type of content children access, within the context of globalized cultural experiences of childhood. As Appadurai (1996) suggests, mediascapes and ideoscapes are two closely related dimensions of global culture flows. In Australia, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) is by far the most popular provider of children’s media content (ACMA, 2015), broadcasting and digitally distributing content internationally. In China, while Channel 14 from China Central Television broadcasts 20 hours a day and carries Chinese children’s cartoons, it also broadcasts many popular international children’s programs that are also available to Australian children on the ABC: Teletubbies, Peppa Pig, Thomas the Tank Engine and so on. These productions are introduced to both Chinese and Australian youngsters and their parents along with Western knowledge, norms, and values, and then become part of their childhoods. Although there are some differences between young Chinese and Australian children’s everyday digital media experiences, there are also signs that global flows of entertainment and information are bringing their ‘Eastern’ and ‘Western’ experiences of childhood closer together.

There are some obvious limitations to this study, and this restricts the extent to which findings may generate new theories or explanations. It focuses on childhood and digital media use in urban China, but there are still huge gaps between urban and rural districts in China including in economic development, family routine, culture, and technology consumption. Likewise, the limited nature of the data from Australia makes it difficult to speak with confidence about young Australian children’s experiences of digital media, especially across a range of socio-economic and geographic circumstances. The real benefit we have seen in bringing these disparate studies together is to generate new research questions. While this article has aimed to move scholarship towards a better understanding of digital childhoods in China and Australia, a great deal is still to be learnt about the complexities of young children’s ever-evolving digital media experiences.

Notes

1 The “Annual Report on Development of China’s Radio, Film, and Television” suggests the proportion of digital television users in a city like Shanghai could be as high as 91.74%. Thus, television in this research mainly refers to digital television.

2 Early educational tablets include devices similar to the LeapFrog system found in Western countries. In China, the system is called the “Early Education Machine” (direct translation).

3 Short for reference. Comparing male and female screen time and nominal variables are converted to dummy variables to use linear regression to compare the differences between groups. The coefficient number for television is 46”, meaning males watch television for 0.46 minutes more than females.

References

ACMA (2015). Children’s television viewing-research overview. Sydney: Australian Communications and Media Authority. https://goo.gl/8SEiuS

AIFS (2016). The longitudinal study of Australian children. Annual Statistical Report 2015. Melbourne:

Anand, S., & Krosnick, J. (2005). Demographic predictors of media use among infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. American Behavioral Scientist, 48(5), 539-561. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764204271512

Appadurai, A. (1996). Modernity at large cultural dimensions of globalization. Minneapolis (USA): University of Minnesota Press. https://goo.gl/HheGZ9

Australian Institute of Family Studies. https://goo.gl/r6n9r1

Calvert, S.L., & Wilson, B.J. (2008). The handbook of children, media, and development. Chichester (UK); Malden (USA): Wiley-Blackwell. https://goo.gl/ERwr1r

Chen, B.B., Wang, Y., Liang. J., & Tong, L. (2016). And baby makes four: Biological and psychological changes and influential factors of firstborn’s adjustment to transition to siblinghood. Advances in sychological Science, 24(6), 863-873. https://goo.gl/nMzjyX

Chen, H. (2015). The alienation tendency and reform of family expansion education investment. Modern Primary and Secondary Education, 31(8), 5-8. https://goo.gl/oBYH4S

Chi, W., Qian, X.Y, & Wu, B.Z. (2012). An empirical study of household educational expenditure burden in urban China. Tsinghua Journal of Education, 33(3), 75-82. https://goo.gl/z9EV5B

CNNIC (2016). Chinese young people’s online behavior Annual Report 2015. Beijing: China Internet Network Information Centre. https://goo.gl/1f1TU9

Coenen. P., Erin, H., Amity, C., & Leon, S. (2015). Mobile touch screen device use among young Australian children: First results from a national survey. Proceedings 19th Triennial Congress of the IEA, Melbourne 9-14 August, 2015. https://goo.gl/3LgcvW

Common Sense Media (2011). Zero to eight: Children’s Media Use in America. https://goo.gl/n4Cm2k

Common Sense Media (2013). Zero to eight: Children’s Media Use in America 2013. https://goo.gl/T2YtR1

Hamilton, K., Hatzis, D., Kavanagh, D., & White, J. (2015). Exploring parents’ beliefs about their young child’s physical activity and screen time behaviours. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24(9), 2638-2652. https://goo.gl/eBVKDJ

Holloway, D., Green, L., & Livingstone, S. (2013). Zero to eight: Young children and their Internet use. LSE, London: EU Kids Online. (https://goo.gl/MNAAPT).

Hong, Y.X., & Dong, X.Y. (2015). From ‘the death of childhood’ to children’s ‘digital enclosure’. Journalism Lover, 12, 34-37. https://goo.gl/WB8Laq

Huston, A., Wright, J., Marquis, J., Green, S., & Dannemiller, J.L. (1999). How young children spend their time: Television and other activities. Developmental Psychology, 35(4), 912-925. https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.35.4.912

Jordan, A.B. (2016). Presidential Address: Digital media use and the experience(s) of childhood: Reflections across the generations. Journal of Communication, 66(6), 879-887. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcom.12265

Li, H., Zhou, Z.K., & Wu, X.P. (2014). Investigation of the media use among children aged 3 to 6 years, Shanghai Research on Education, 5, 57-59. https://goo.gl/eFhqad

Li, M.Y, & Wang, Q. (2014). Investigation of three- to- six- year-old children’s use of multimedia at home in Beijing. Journal of Education Studies, 6, 95-102. https://goo.gl/iYEFr1

Marsh, J., Lydia, P., Dylan, Y., Julia, B., & Fiona. S. (2016). Digital play: A new classification. Early Years, 36(3), 242-253. https://doi.org/10.1080/09575146.2016.1167675

Neumann, M.M. (2015). Young children and screen time: Creating a mindful approach to digital technology. Australian Educational Computing, 30(2). https://goo.gl/dCH6ea

Nikken, P., & Schols, M. (2015). How and why parents guide the media use of young children. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24(11), 3423-3435. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-015-0144-4

Ostrov, J.M., Gentile, D.A., & Mullins, A.D. (2013). Evaluating the effect of educational media exposure on aggression in early childhood. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 34(1), 38-44. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2012.09.005

Paik, H., & Comstock, G. (1994). The effects of television violence on antisocial behavior: A meta-analysis. Communication Research, 21(4), 516-546. https://doi.org/10.1177/009365094021004004

Radesky, J., Peacock-Chambers, E., Zuckerman, B., & Silverstein, M. (2016). Use of mobile technology to calm upset children: Associations with social-emotional development. JAMA Pediatrics, 170(4), 397-399. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.4260

Sefton-Green, J., Marsh, J., Erstad, O., & Flewitt, R. (2016). Establishing a research agenda for the digital literacy practices of young children: A white paper for COST Action IS1410. https://goo.gl/UiNF91

Thorpe, K., Hansen, J., Danby, S., Zaki, F.M., Grant, S., Houen, S.,… Given, L.M. (2015). Digital access to knowledge in the preschool classroom: Reports from Australia. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 32, 174-182. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.04.001

Wu, C.S.T., Fowler, C., Lam, W.Y.Y., Wong, H.T., Wong, C.H.M., & Loke, A.Y. (2014). Parenting approaches and digital technology use of preschool age children in a Chinese community. Italian Journal of Pediatrics, 40, 44. https://doi.org/10.1186/1824-7288-40-44

Yang, X., Wang, Z., & Zhu, L. (2016). Electronic media use guidelines for young children. Studies in Early Childhood Education, 11, 24-37. https://goo.gl/PPzUe3

Yu, M. (2016). Preschoolers’ touch screen media use in Nanchang. Radio & TV Journal, 2, 131-132. https://goo.gl/oiRFfc



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Este artículo desarrolla ideas y genera nuevas líneas de investigación sobre las vidas digitales de los niños en China y Australia, en discusión con las conclusiones de estudios nacionales sobre el uso de los medios digitales por parte de los niños en entornos urbanos en China y Australia. El trabajo gira en torno al mundo digital de los niños en los dos países, analizando el impacto del contexto en ámbitos sociales y culturales significativamente diferentes. El estudio abarca una muestra de 1.171 niños de 3 a 7 años, de seis provincias de China, presentando la frecuencia de uso de televisión, dispositivos digitales en la educación temprana, ordenadores, tabletas y teléfonos inteligentes, reproductores de música, libros electrónicos y videoconsolas. También se enfoca en diversas actividades como ver dibujos animados, usar aplicaciones educativas, jugar a videojuegos y participar en videollamadas. Los métodos incluyeron un proceso de muestreo multietapa, con selección aleatoria de jardines infantiles, un proceso de muestreo ponderado, la generación de datos descriptivos y el uso del análisis de regresión lineal, y una prueba de chi-cuadrado. El estudio demuestra la importancia del rango de factores que influyen en la cantidad de tiempo que pasan con los medios digitales. El contraste con los estudios australianos produce nuevos conocimientos y genera nuevas preguntas de investigación.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Las prácticas digitales de los niños presentan un desafío social significativo a padres, educadores y responsables políticos y siguen siendo poco investigadas. Este artículo describe los hallazgos de un estudio sobre prácticas digitales de 1.171 niños chinos, que se consideran de forma dialógica con los hallazgos de los estudios disponibles en Australia. No se presentan como una comparación científica, sino como una oportunidad para ofrecer un contexto para comprender los datos de la población china y para desarrollar nuevas preguntas de investigación. Este enfoque nos ha resultado valioso como académicos que realizan investigaciones en China y Australia porque arroja luz sobre las vidas digitales de los niños en diferentes circunstancias sociales y culturales. Nos fundamentamos en la teoría del diálogo de Bakhtin (1984) para sugerir que la comprensión de los datos locales se mejora al discutir los hallazgos de otros contextos. Nuestro enfoque tiene limitaciones porque, aunque los datos de China fueron recopilados y analizados por los autores, los hallazgos australianos provienen de estudios de fuentes secundarias. A pesar de esta limitación, el artículo genera propuestas interesantes sobre las vidas digitales de los niños en China.

1.1. Revisión de la literatura

Las experiencias digitales de los niños han surgido como un problema mundial no solo porque los medios digitales se han convertido en parte cotidiana de la vida de muchos niños, sino porque las vidas digitales comienzan cada vez a edades más tempranas (Holloway, Sefton-Green, & Livingstone, 2013). Los datos de EU Kids Online (Unión Europea) indican un incremento en el uso de Internet en los últimos años. En algunos países, como Suecia, Bélgica y Países Bajos, casi el 70% de los niños de 3 a 4 años están conectados (Holloway, Sefton-Green, & Livingstone, 2013). Los dispositivos móviles, especialmente los de pantalla táctil, brindan a los niños un acceso digital más fácil que el disponible anteriormente (Thorpe & al., 2015; Marsh & al., 2016). En los Estados Unidos, el porcentaje del uso de dispositivos móviles de niños aumentó considerablemente del 38% al 72% en solo dos años, entre 2011 y 2013, respondiendo a la introducción de las tabletas (Common Sense Media, 2011; 2013).

La rápida adopción de las tecnologías digitales por la infancia no es solo un fenómeno occidental. En China, más de 1,18 millones de niños entre los 6 y 11 años usaron Internet en 2015, particularmente a través de teléfonos inteligentes (CNNIC, 2016). La investigación realizada en China muestra que, aunque la televisión todavía domina el tiempo de pantalla de los niños, los medios con pantalla táctil están disponibles en casi todos los hogares (Li & Wang, 2014; Yu, 2016; Yang, Wang, & Zhu, 2016). Una encuesta aplicada en Nanchang (Yu, 2016) indica que el 51% de los padres tienen actitudes negativas hacia los medios con pantalla táctil, preocupados por la salud de la visión, la interacción social y la adicción a Internet. La investigación muestra que los niños pequeños son más vulnerables a los medios y las tecnologías que los más mayores (Paik & Comstock, 1994; Ostrov, Gentile, & Mullins, 2013; Radesky & al., 2016).

Sin embargo, tal vez haya más preocupación sobre el uso de los medios digitales por parte de los niños de lo que está justificado. Por ejemplo, Li y Wang (2014) sostienen que la vida de los niños de Pekín no está demasiado influenciada por los medios digitales, descubrieron que el tiempo total diario que los niños pasan jugando con juguetes, actividades al aire libre y lectura es 2,5 veces mayor que la interacción con los medios.

Junto con el acelerado desarrollo económico, los ciudadanos chinos están viviendo cambios sociales significativos, incluidos cambios en los contextos infantiles. La política de un solo hijo ha cambiado desde 2013, lo que podría alterar la estructura familiar (Chen & al., 2016). Además, la feroz competencia en el mercado laboral refuerza la presión de los padres y los lleva a privilegiar la educación de sus hijos (Chi, Qian, & Wu, 2012; Chen, 2015).

Entre tanto, ha habido una investigación limitada sobre el impacto socioeconómico de la demografía en el uso de los medios digitales por parte de los niños en China, lo cual es motivo de preocupación dadas las importantes disparidades en los ingresos familiares en China. Para comprender efectivamente el uso de los medios por parte de los niños, debe ubicarse dentro de contextos familiares, económicos y geográficos (Jordan, 2016; Calvert & Wilson, 2008). Li, Zhou y Wu (2014) investigaron el uso de 1.195 niños chinos de entre 3 y 6 años, y descubrieron que el tiempo pasado ante la televisión está asociado con su edad, el ingreso familiar y la educación de los padres. También sugieren que los niños de familias de bajos ingresos o familias donde los padres tienen un menor nivel educativo tienden a ver más televisión. Mientras tanto, los niños que viven con sus abuelos o aquellos de familias con mayores ingresos pasan más tiempo jugando a videojuegos. Estos resultados concuerdan con los hallados por académicos occidentales (Huston & al., 1999; Anand & Krosnick, 2005). Sin embargo, la investigación sobre las vidas digitales de los niños en diferentes situaciones socioeconómicas es aún limitada tanto en China como internacionalmente.

1.2. Pregunta de investigación

Hay tres aspectos importantes que dificultan la investigación en este campo: en primer lugar, China es un país con un desarrollo económico desequilibrado, y es probable que el uso de los medios por parte de los niños sea diferente en cada región. En segundo lugar, la cantidad de investigaciones es escasa en China y la mayoría de los estudios simplemente brindan datos descriptivos. En tercer lugar, es difícil encontrar datos en inglés, lo que dificulta a los académicos internacionales comprender la situación en China o hacer comparaciones con datos occidentales.

Por lo tanto, esta investigación dibuja una imagen nacional del uso de medios digitales por parte de los niños en los hogares de la China urbana. La primera pregunta se centra en el tipo de medios digitales a los que los niños acceden en el hogar dado que la propiedad familiar refleja valores, requisitos y preferencias de cada familia. Las preguntas sobre los patrones de uso y predictores proporcionan una comprensión general del comportamiento con los medios digitales de los niños y las disparidades entre las diferentes variables demográficas. Otra cuestión fundamental es cómo los padres en China valoran diferentes medios digitales y qué reglas establecen para su uso entre los más pequeños, porque se ha demostrado que la exposición de los niños está fuertemente relacionada con las estrategias de mediación de los padres (Wu & al., 2014; Nikken & Schols, 2015). Estos datos proporcionan una mejor comprensión de la infancia digital en China y ponerlos en comparación con los estudios disponibles de Australia permite un debate preliminar sobre las similitudes y diferencias entre Oriente y Occidente en el contexto de las industrias globalizadas de los medios.

2. Metodología

La investigación recopiló datos sobre el uso de medios de comunicación por parte de 1.171 niños chinos, mediante un cuestionario realizado por padres entre abril y junio de 2017. Se llevó a cabo un proceso de muestreo multietapa en China. 27 provincias se agruparon en tres categorías de acuerdo con indicadores que reflejan el desarrollo económico regional y la calidad de la educación, que incluyen el PIB, la financiación de la educación, el número de jardines de infancia, y la proporción entre docentes y estudiantes. Cuatro municipios (Pekín, Shanghai, Tianjin y Chongqing) directamente bajo el control del gobierno central fueron excluidos debido a que no pueden ser comparados dada su población y nivel de desarrollo. Esta estratificación proporciona una mejor representación de las diversidades en economía, educación y geografía. A continuación, se eligieron seis provincias al azar en cada categoría y se eligió la ciudad más desarrollada, ya que el acceso a las guarderías era más probable en esas ciudades. Por último, se eligió un jardín de infancia al azar en cada ciudad y se enviaron cuestionarios a todos los preescolares para ser completados por uno de sus educadores. La tasa de respuesta general fue del 78%.

La Tabla 1 muestra el resultado del muestreo en cada ciudad. Como el número de estudiantes y la tasa de respuesta difieren en cada jardín de infancia, se utilizó una muestra ponderada de acuerdo con el tamaño de la población de preescolar en cada región para lograr una representación más confiable.


Gou Dezuanni 2018a-69568 ov-es020.jpg

Para comprender la vida digital de los niños chinos se calcularon datos descriptivos, como el tiempo promedio y la frecuencia de uso de los medios. Se realizó un análisis de regresión lineal para explorar predictores importantes del tiempo empleado en diferentes tipos de medios, y se utilizó una prueba de chi-cuadrado para ver cómo las actitudes de los padres hacia diferentes medios varían entre los diferentes grupos de estatus socioeconómico.

Los estudios australianos analizados incluyen un trabajo longitudinal de niños australianos (AIFS, 2016) y estudios sobre el consumo televisivo de los niños (ACMA, 2015), el uso de la pantalla táctil móvil (Coenen, Erin, Amity, & Leon, 2015) y las creencias de los padres sobre el tiempo de uso de pantalla y actividades físicas de los niños (Hamilton & al., 2015). Las conclusiones de estos estudios se ponen en comparación con las conclusiones de China para proporcionar una comprensión más profunda de los datos chinos. El enfoque dialógico de Bakhtin (1984) sugiere que los actos de interpretación son inevitablemente relacionales y productivos cuando reconocen oportunidades para la interacción dinámica de conceptos e ideas, destacando que las relaciones dialógicas «son un fenómeno casi universal, que impregna todo el discurso humano y todas las relaciones y manifestaciones de la vida humana, todo lo que tiene sentido y significado» (Bakhtin, 1984: 40).

3. Resultados del estudio chino

3.1. Medios digitales en la vida de los niños

Los niños de la China urbana están rodeados de medios digitales en sus hogares. En una familia típica, hay 1,42 televisores1, 0,69 tabletas educativas tempranas2, 0,70 ordenadores de sobremesa, un ordenador portátil, 0,83 tabletas, 2,96 teléfonos inteligentes, 0,5 reproductores de música, 0,17 libros electrónicos y 0,15 videoconsolas. El 93,2% de las familias posee al menos un ordenador, el 65,9% de ellas tienen tabletas y el 52,1% compró tabletas educativas tempranas para sus hijos. Solo el 3,6% de las familias no tienen televisión, mientras que el porcentaje de familias sin ningún libro electrónico o videoconsola es del 84,8% y 90%, respectivamente.

3.2. Patrones de uso y predictores3.2.1. Patrones de uso

La Tabla 2 muestra el tiempo de uso de distintos medios digitales respecto al consumo el día anterior. Más del 99% de los niños usan al menos un dispositivo digital durante la semana y los fines de semana, y el tiempo total promedio de consumo de pantallas es de 63 minutos y 88 minutos respectivamente. El 14,2% de los niños supera las dos horas delante de la pantalla de lunes a viernes, mientras que el 26,7% supera las dos horas diarias los fines de semana. La televisión es la más utilizada, seguida de teléfonos inteligentes, tabletas y tabletas educativas.


Gou Dezuanni 2018a-69568 ov-es021.jpg

Aunque un gran porcentaje de niños en el estudio nunca usa tabletas educativas (46,9%), ordenadores (47%), tabletas (39,4%) y especialmente videojuegos (91%), solo el 9,7% nunca usa teléfonos inteligentes. La Tabla 2 también indica que las tabletas y los teléfonos inteligentes son los dispositivos móviles más populares y usados con más frecuencia. Cuando hay una tableta disponible, pasan más tiempo en ella que con otros medios, a excepción de la televisión.

La Tabla 3 muestra que los niños generalmente miran programas para niños y dibujos animados en tabletas y teléfonos inteligentes. Youku, iQiyi y Tencent Video son sus aplicaciones de vídeo favoritas. Casi la mitad de los niños (47,9%) juegan en tabletas, mientras que el 38,2% lo hacen en teléfonos inteligentes. Los juegos más populares entre los niños son Talking Tom, Carrot Fantasy, Pop Star y juegos de vestir para niñas. Varios juegos apuntados por los padres son considerados por otros padres como inapropiados para el grupo de edad, incluyendo Plants vs. Zombies y King of Glory.


Gou Dezuanni 2018a-69568 ov-es022.jpg

Los padres identifican el uso de aplicaciones educativas con más frecuencia que otras categorías. Por ejemplo, Jiliguala para aprender inglés, «Wukong Shizi» para aprender chino, «My Numbers» para aritmética, aplicaciones de vídeo como «Himalayas» para escuchar historias, y también hay algunas aplicaciones educativas que combinan dibujos animados, juegos, canto y educación de «sentido común», como «Baby Bus», «Xiao Banlong» y «Shima Shima Tora no Shimajiro» (de Japón). Las tabletas se usan con más frecuencia que los teléfonos inteligentes para acceder a aplicaciones educativas (44,4% en comparación con 28,5%). Sin embargo, el 41,5% usa teléfonos inteligentes para hacer llamadas telefónicas o videollamadas. WeChat, la red social más popular en China, aparece en la lista de algunos padres como la aplicación favorita de los niños.

3.2.2. Predictores de patrones de uso

Otro aspecto investigado del uso de medios digitales consistió en los factores que influyen en la cantidad de tiempo que los usan. La Tabla 4 muestra el resultado del análisis de regresión lineal de los principales factores de tiempo. Se consideran cuatro posibles razones: 1) Variables demográficas de los niños como el género (1=niño, 0=niña) y la edad (meses); 2) Estado socioeconómico de la familia, como la educación de los padres y el ingreso familiar anual; 3) Estructura familiar que incluye la presencia de hermanos (1=sí, 0=no) y si el niño es cuidado principalmente por padres o abuelos (1=padres, 0=abuelos); 4) Región (1=Shanghai, 0=otras regiones).


Gou Dezuanni 2018a-69568 ov-es023.jpg

El género y la edad no tienen mucha influencia en el tiempo de uso de pantallas por los niños. Sin embargo, es probable que los niños más mayores pasen más tiempo con los ordenadores que los niños más pequeños.

Los niños cuyas madres tienen un título superior pasan menos tiempo con la televisión, tabletas educativas y teléfonos inteligentes. El tiempo de consumo de pantalla total también disminuye en el caso de tener estudios de educación superior, aunque la educación de los padres parece tener poco efecto. Los ingresos familiares están significativamente relacionados con la cantidad de medios digitales a los que accede una familia (r=0,327, p<,001), lo que significa que los niños de familias de mayores ingresos pueden tener más acceso a diferentes medios digitales. Sin embargo, el tiempo pasado con medios digitales no tiene ninguna asociación con los ingresos familiares, a excepción de la televisión. Estos resultados indican que la educación de la madre y, hasta cierto punto los ingresos familiares, son predictores del tiempo de uso de pantalla.

La presencia de hermanos es una variable importante en relación con el tiempo ante la pantalla de televisión. Dado que el 35,4% de los padres afirman que podrían usar los medios como niñera porque no tienen suficiente tiempo para cuidar a sus hijos, criar a más niños puede llevar a la falta de tiempo. Además, en comparación con otros medios, la televisión es más apropiada para que los hermanos la vean juntos, mientras que otros medios se usan estando solos.

En China, el 64,4% de los niños son atendidos por sus padres, mientras que el 33% son cuidados por sus abuelos. Una pequeña proporción de niños son criados por niñeras (0,5%) u otras personas (1,9%). Como se muestra en la Tabla 4, el tiempo de consumo de televisión y teléfonos inteligentes aumenta si los abuelos cuidan al niño. La prueba de chi-cuadrado demostró que los padres son más propensos a establecer reglas estrictas para el uso de teléfonos inteligentes cuando se comparan con los abuelos (?2=9,98, df=3, p=0,019), y esto puede conducir al uso moderado de estos dispositivos por parte de los niños.

En esta investigación, las diferentes regiones se relacionan con diferencias en el desarrollo económico y la inversión en educación. Solo se encuentran grandes disparidades entre Shanghai y otras regiones. En Shanghai, los niños tienden a dedicar más tiempo a las nuevas tecnologías, como las tabletas. El tiempo usando tabletas (24,9 minutos) es más del doble en comparación con otros distritos (9,8 minutos). El tiempo usando tabletas no está determinado por los ingresos familiares, sino por la región, lo que indica que los padres en los distritos desarrollados pueden tener actitudes más abiertas hacia las nuevas tecnologías.

3.3. Otras actividades en la vida de los niños

La Tabla 5 representa el tiempo que los niños pasan realizando actividades no digitales. El tiempo promedio en la escuela los días entre semana puede ser de hasta 7 horas, 23 minutos, 5 días a la semana. El 46,6% de los niños participa en actividades después de la escuela, como inglés, matemáticas, baile, o instrumentos musicales. Los fines de semana pasan casi una hora en actividades al aire libre y con juguetes, lo que implica que realizan actividades físicas significativas.


Gou Dezuanni 2018a-69568 ov-es024.jpg

3.4. Actitud de los padres y normas sobre los medios digitales

Los datos indican que los padres actúan como guardianes en el uso de los medios digitales por parte de los niños. El 82,5% dice que descarga aplicaciones para sus hijos y el 86,5% comprueba la calidad de las aplicaciones antes de permitir que sus hijos las usen. Sin embargo, usar medios digitales como niñeras a veces es inevitable debido a la falta de tiempo o a la necesidad de ocupar o distraer a los niños en lugares públicos. Solo el 38,1% de los padres afirman que rara vez o nunca dejan a su hijo solo usando los medios. Por lo tanto, los padres establecen normas para el uso de los medios por parte de sus hijos.

Los padres creen que los medios digitales pueden ser útiles y dañinos para los niños. Los teléfonos inteligentes y las videoconsolas son considerados dañinos por parte de la mayoría de los padres, mientras que las primeras tabletas educativas son mejor valoradas (https://bit.ly/2xn5gYE). Los padres chinos tienden a prestar atención a la función educativa de los medios, mientras que el papel del entretenimiento es menos importante. Por lo tanto, establecen reglas para el contenido de los medios y el tiempo que pasan con la televisión, los ordenadores, las tabletas y los teléfonos inteligentes, pero hay menos reglas sobre el uso de las tabletas educativas.

Las variables demográficas como la educación de los padres, los ingresos familiares y la región son indicadores importantes de la opinión de los padres sobre los medios digitales. Los encuestados con mayores ingresos y grados educativos más altos, o aquellos de regiones más desarrolladas tienen más probabilidades de tener una actitud positiva hacia las tabletas y teléfonos inteligentes. Sin embargo, como se muestra en la Tabla 6, los padres con menos nivel educativo son más propensos a creer en el valor educativo de las tabletas (madre: p<,01, padre: p<,01), que los padres con mayor nivel educativo.


Gou Dezuanni 2018a-69568 ov-es025.jpg

4. Estudios australianos

Como se señaló, hay pocos datos sobre el uso de los medios digitales por parte de los niños australianos en el hogar. La mejor información proviene del estudio longitudinal de niños australianos, que describe el uso del tiempo que pasan ante la pantalla y las actitudes de los padres para una muestra de varios miles de niños, pero el estudio es limitado porque la muestra tenía entre 4 y 5 años en 2004 cuando comenzó el estudio; los datos son, por lo tanto, de una era anterior. El informe de 2016 ofrece datos comparativos para la muestra de 2004 a 2012, cuando estos mismos niños tienen entre 12 y 13 años. Cuando tenían entre 4 y 5 años, los padres informaron que sus hijos vieron un promedio de 119 minutos de televisión por día entre semana y 131 minutos, los fines de semana. En 2012, a la edad de 12-13 años, esta misma cohorte de niños estaba viendo 116 minutos de televisión al día entre semana y 151 minutos el fin de semana (AIFS, 2016: 106). Los datos también muestran que, en las familias con niveles educativos más altos, los niños tenían menos probabilidades de mirar televisión durante más de dos horas al día, especialmente los días de entre semana. Cuando tenían de 4 a 5 años, el 42% de los niños cuyos padres no tenían educación universitaria veían más de dos horas de televisión al día, en comparación con el 32% de los niños de familias donde un padre tenía estudios universitarios. En 2004, los padres informaron que sus niños de entre 4 y 5 años usaban los ordenadores del hogar por un promedio de 14 minutos al día. El 6,5% usaba los ordenadores por más de una hora al día, entre semana, y 19 minutos, los fines de semana. En 2012, la misma muestra de niños informó que usaban juegos electrónicos u ordenadores por un promedio de 88 minutos por día entre semana y 107 minutos, los fines de semana. El estudio muestra que a la edad de 12-13 años, los niños usaban pantallas durante un promedio de tres horas diarias entre semana y cuatro horas, los fines de semana.

Un estudio realizado por la Autoridad Australiana de Medios y Comunicaciones (ACMA), con la participación de 1.137 encuestados adultos con niños de 0 a 4 años en 2015, sugiere que sus hijos ven 114 minutos de televisión al día, lo que es comparable a los datos del estudio de 2004 (ACMA, 2015: 5). El estudio de ACMA muestra que los niños de 5 a 12 años vieron 80 minutos de televisión abierta y, en general, los niños de 0 a 14 años vieron 33 minutos menos por día de televisión abierta en 2013, en comparación con 2001, lo que refleja la interacción de los niños con tecnologías digitales. El estudio también muestra que el 77% de los padres dijeron que limitaban el tiempo de visualización de televisión de sus hijos y el 99% de los padres dijeron que era importante que sus hijos miren programas apropiados para la edad (ACMA, 2015: 13).

El estudio de Coenen y otros (2015), sobre el uso de dispositivos móviles, encuestó a padres australianos de 159 niños de 0 a 5 años y mostró que el 62,1% de los niños veían la televisión durante más de 30 minutos al día entre semana y un 65,8%, los fines de semana. Los siguientes dispositivos más utilizados fueron las tabletas, con un 25,8% más de uso que los 30 minutos entre semana y un 31,3% los fines de semana. Hamilton y otros (2015) realizaron un pequeño estudio de 20 padres de niños de 2 a 5 años para comprender mejor las opiniones de los padres sobre la actividad física y el tiempo frente a la pantalla. En su estudio, los padres argumentaron que limitar el tiempo de pantalla promueve la actividad física, mejora el bienestar mental y estimula la creatividad a través del juego. El estudio de Neumann (2015) de los entornos digitales en el hogar de 69 niños de entre 2 y 4 años en Australia encuestó a los padres y descubrió que los niños veían televisión durante un tiempo medio de 80 minutos al día, tabletas durante 20 minutos, teléfonos móviles por 10 minutos, Internet durante 8 minutos al día y videoconsolas durante 5 minutos al día.

5. Comparativa de los hallazgos chinos y australianos

Tal vez lo más interesante es que los hallazgos sugieren que los niños chinos pasan menos tiempo ante las pantallas que los de Australia. El uso del tiempo total de pantalla de los niños chinos entre semana es de 63 minutos y los fines de semana de 88 minutos, mientras que los niños australianos ven la televisión durante 114 minutos al día (ACMA, 2015) y usan otros dispositivos (Coenen & al., 2015; Neumann, 2015). Los niños chinos participan más horas en educación formal a una edad más temprana que los niños australianos, lo que otorga a los niños australianos más tiempo para acceder a los medios. En segundo lugar, los resultados chinos indican que los niños con más hermanos pueden pasar más tiempo viendo televisión, lo que también aumenta el tiempo total ante la pantalla. Como la mayoría de los niños chinos (61,5%) todavía son los únicos hijos en sus familias, es posible que pasen menos tiempo ante la pantalla que los niños australianos que, generalmente crecen con sus hermanos. En tercer lugar, los niños en China pasan menos tiempo usando los medios digitales debido a las actitudes de los padres hacia los beneficios y perjuicios de los medios. Si bien es imposible hacer comparaciones directas sobre la actitud a partir de los datos disponibles, un número significativo de padres chinos y australianos creen que es importante involucrarse en el uso de los medios por parte de sus hijos al desempeñar un papel de guardián y ambos tienen preocupaciones sobre los posibles efectos nocivos de tiempo que pasan ante la pantalla.

Otro resultado sorprendente es el énfasis de los padres chinos en las funciones educativas de los medios digitales, puesto que la mayoría de los padres cree en el valor de las tabletas educativas. Si bien hay un énfasis cada vez mayor en el rendimiento educativo en Australia, sigue habiendo un mayor énfasis en los logros educativos en China. Hay algunas explicaciones posibles que podrían dirigir un estudio posterior. En primer lugar, existe una tradición en la que los padres chinos le dan importancia al rendimiento académico y al empleo; en segundo lugar, la política de un solo hijo puede haber aumentado las expectativas de los padres sobre el único hijo por lo que están dispuestos a dedicarse, en todo lo que sea posible, a mejorar la educación de sus hijos. En tercer lugar, la creciente competencia en el mercado laboral en China alienta a los padres a comenzar la educación de los niños tan pronto como sea posible, para ayudarlos a ser competitivos entre sus pares. Finalmente, las compañías comerciales han previsto las enormes ganancias en el mercado de educación temprana para niños y publicitan vigorosamente sus productos.

Otra observación significativa de los datos comparativos que justifica una mayor investigación es que parece haber una cantidad similar de tabletas y teléfonos inteligentes por parte de niños en China y Australia. Los padres chinos señalan que el 20,6% de los niños usan tabletas entre semana y el 28,5% los fines de semana; y el 41% de los niños usa teléfonos inteligentes entre semana y el 50,3%, los fines de semana. De aquellos que los usan, el tiempo promedio usando tabletas es de 31 minutos entre semana y 46 minutos los fines de semana; para teléfonos inteligentes, son 22 minutos entre semana y 25 minutos los fines de semana. En Australia, las tabletas se usan durante más de 30 minutos al día por el 25,8% de los niños entre semana y el 31,3% los fines de semana. Es más difícil hacer una comparación con teléfonos inteligentes con los datos disponibles, pero solo el 38,7% de los niños australianos nunca usan un teléfono inteligente entre semana y el 43,8% nunca los usa los fines de semana. Por lo tanto, en ambos países, parece que al menos la mitad de los niños usan teléfonos inteligentes hasta 30 minutos durante el fin de semana y más de una cuarta parte usan tabletas más de 30 minutos en ambos países durante el fin de semana.

Otra similitud entre los dos países es el tipo de contenido al que acceden los niños, en el contexto de las experiencias culturales globalizadas. Como sugiere Appadurai (1996), los paisajes mediáticos y los paisajes ideológicos son dos dimensiones relacionadas de los flujos de la cultura global. En Australia, la Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) es el proveedor más popular de contenido multimedia para niños (ACMA, 2015), al difundir y distribuir digitalmente contenido internacionalmente. En China, mientras que el Canal 14 de la Televisión Central transmite 20 horas al día y distribuye dibujos animados, también transmite programas infantiles internacionales disponibles para niños australianos en ABC: Teletubbies, Peppa Pig, Thomas the Tank Engine y otras más. Estas producciones se presentan a los niños y a sus padres junto con el conocimiento, las normas y los valores occidentales, y se convierten en parte de su infancia. Aunque existen algunas diferencias entre las experiencias cotidianas de los medios digitales por parte de los niños en China y Australia, también hay indicios de que los flujos mundiales de entretenimiento e información acercan sus experiencias «orientales» y «occidentales» de la infancia.

Hay algunas limitaciones para este estudio y esto restringe la medida en que los hallazgos pueden generar nuevas teorías o explicaciones. Se centra en la infancia y el uso de los medios digitales en la China urbana, pero aún existen enormes diferencias entre los distritos urbanos y rurales en China, incluidos el desarrollo económico, la rutina familiar, la cultura y el consumo de tecnología. Del mismo modo, la naturaleza limitada de los datos de Australia hace que sea difícil hablar con confianza sobre las experiencias de los medios digitales por parte de los niños australianos, especialmente si tenemos en cuenta las circunstancias socioeconómicas y geográficas. El beneficio real que hemos visto al reunir estos estudios dispares es generar nuevas preguntas de investigación. Si bien este artículo ha tenido como objetivo avanzar hacia una mejor comprensión de la infancia digital en China y Australia, todavía queda mucho por aprender sobre las complejidades de las experiencias en medios digitales por parte de los niños, en constante evolución.

Notas

1 El Informe anual sobre el desarrollo de la radio, el cine y la televisión de China sugiere que la proporción de usuarios de televisión digital en una ciudad como Shanghai podría llegar al 91,74%. Por lo tanto, la televisión en esta investigación se refiere principalmente a la televisión digital.

2 Las tabletas educativas incluyen dispositivos similares al sistema Leap Frog que se encuentra en los países occidentales. En China, el sistema se denomina «Máquina de Educación Temprana» (traducción literal).

3 La comparación del tiempo de pantalla para niños y niñas, y las variables nominales se convierten en variables dicótomas para usar la regresión lineal en la comparación de las diferencias entre los grupos. El número de coeficiente para la televisión es «0,46», lo que significa que los niños miran la televisión durante 46 minutos más que las niñas.

Referencias

ACMA (2015). Children’s television viewing-research overview. Sydney: Australian Communications and Media Authority. https://goo.gl/8SEiuS

AIFS (2016). The longitudinal study of Australian children. Annual Statistical Report 2015. Melbourne:

Anand, S., & Krosnick, J. (2005). Demographic predictors of media use among infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. American Behavioral Scientist, 48(5), 539-561. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764204271512

Appadurai, A. (1996). Modernity at large cultural dimensions of globalization. Minneapolis (USA): University of Minnesota Press. https://goo.gl/HheGZ9

Australian Institute of Family Studies. https://goo.gl/r6n9r1

Calvert, S.L., & Wilson, B.J. (2008). The handbook of children, media, and development. Chichester (UK); Malden (USA): Wiley-Blackwell. https://goo.gl/ERwr1r

Chen, B.B., Wang, Y., Liang. J., & Tong, L. (2016). And baby makes four: Biological and psychological changes and influential factors of firstborn’s adjustment to transition to siblinghood. Advances in sychological Science, 24(6), 863-873. https://goo.gl/nMzjyX

Chen, H. (2015). The alienation tendency and reform of family expansion education investment. Modern Primary and Secondary Education, 31(8), 5-8. https://goo.gl/oBYH4S

Chi, W., Qian, X.Y, & Wu, B.Z. (2012). An empirical study of household educational expenditure burden in urban China. Tsinghua Journal of Education, 33(3), 75-82. https://goo.gl/z9EV5B

CNNIC (2016). Chinese young people’s online behavior Annual Report 2015. Beijing: China Internet Network Information Centre. https://goo.gl/1f1TU9

Coenen. P., Erin, H., Amity, C., & Leon, S. (2015). Mobile touch screen device use among young Australian children: First results from a national survey. Proceedings 19th Triennial Congress of the IEA, Melbourne 9-14 August, 2015. https://goo.gl/3LgcvW

Common Sense Media (2011). Zero to eight: Children’s Media Use in America. https://goo.gl/n4Cm2k

Common Sense Media (2013). Zero to eight: Children’s Media Use in America 2013. https://goo.gl/T2YtR1

Hamilton, K., Hatzis, D., Kavanagh, D., & White, J. (2015). Exploring parents’ beliefs about their young child’s physical activity and screen time behaviours. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24(9), 2638-2652. https://goo.gl/eBVKDJ

Holloway, D., Green, L., & Livingstone, S. (2013). Zero to eight: Young children and their Internet use. LSE, London: EU Kids Online. (https://goo.gl/MNAAPT).

Hong, Y.X., & Dong, X.Y. (2015). From ‘the death of childhood’ to children’s ‘digital enclosure’. Journalism Lover, 12, 34-37. https://goo.gl/WB8Laq

Huston, A., Wright, J., Marquis, J., Green, S., & Dannemiller, J.L. (1999). How young children spend their time: Television and other activities. Developmental Psychology, 35(4), 912-925. https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.35.4.912

Jordan, A.B. (2016). Presidential Address: Digital media use and the experience(s) of childhood: Reflections across the generations. Journal of Communication, 66(6), 879-887. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcom.12265

Li, H., Zhou, Z.K., & Wu, X.P. (2014). Investigation of the media use among children aged 3 to 6 years, Shanghai Research on Education, 5, 57-59. https://goo.gl/eFhqad

Li, M.Y, & Wang, Q. (2014). Investigation of three- to- six- year-old children’s use of multimedia at home in Beijing. Journal of Education Studies, 6, 95-102. https://goo.gl/iYEFr1

Marsh, J., Lydia, P., Dylan, Y., Julia, B., & Fiona. S. (2016). Digital play: A new classification. Early Years, 36(3), 242-253. https://doi.org/10.1080/09575146.2016.1167675

Neumann, M.M. (2015). Young children and screen time: Creating a mindful approach to digital technology. Australian Educational Computing, 30(2). https://goo.gl/dCH6ea

Nikken, P., & Schols, M. (2015). How and why parents guide the media use of young children. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24(11), 3423-3435. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-015-0144-4

Ostrov, J.M., Gentile, D.A., & Mullins, A.D. (2013). Evaluating the effect of educational media exposure on aggression in early childhood. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 34(1), 38-44. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2012.09.005

Paik, H., & Comstock, G. (1994). The effects of television violence on antisocial behavior: A meta-analysis. Communication Research, 21(4), 516-546. https://doi.org/10.1177/009365094021004004

Radesky, J., Peacock-Chambers, E., Zuckerman, B., & Silverstein, M. (2016). Use of mobile technology to calm upset children: Associations with social-emotional development. JAMA Pediatrics, 170(4), 397-399. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.4260

Sefton-Green, J., Marsh, J., Erstad, O., & Flewitt, R. (2016). Establishing a research agenda for the digital literacy practices of young children: A white paper for COST Action IS1410. https://goo.gl/UiNF91

Thorpe, K., Hansen, J., Danby, S., Zaki, F.M., Grant, S., Houen, S.,… Given, L.M. (2015). Digital access to knowledge in the preschool classroom: Reports from Australia. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 32, 174-182. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecresq.2015.04.001

Wu, C.S.T., Fowler, C., Lam, W.Y.Y., Wong, H.T., Wong, C.H.M., & Loke, A.Y. (2014). Parenting approaches and digital technology use of preschool age children in a Chinese community. Italian Journal of Pediatrics, 40, 44. https://doi.org/10.1186/1824-7288-40-44

Yang, X., Wang, Z., & Zhu, L. (2016). Electronic media use guidelines for young children. Studies in Early Childhood Education, 11, 24-37. https://goo.gl/PPzUe3

Yu, M. (2016). Preschoolers’ touch screen media use in Nanchang. Radio & TV Journal, 2, 131-132. https://goo.gl/oiRFfc

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/18
Accepted on 30/09/18
Submitted on 30/09/18

Volume 26, Issue 2, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C57-2018-08
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?