Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to show the results derived from a sample of students who were enrolled in different bachelor degree programs offered by the University of Sonora in Mexico. There was a double objective for this study. First, to identify cyber activist students through the answers gathered through a questionnaire taken electronically using as inclusion criteria the presence of high and medium levels of participation and commitment in different actions undertaken in four topic areas (environment, academic, social and citizen issues, and human rights). As a second objective, and after selecting three unique cases of cyber activist students, inflexion points were determined in the activities performed by these youngsters in digital social networks. Using personal narrative as a methodological strategy, the students described how they interact with others through different digital networks. Among the first categories identified in the indepth interviews are: interaction history (use, access and availability of technology at a young age), and active participation about topics of interest in social networks (organization and the perceptions of achievements made). As main findings, there are the availability of these resources from a young age, personal motivation in participating in diverse topics, enjoyment of expressing one’s opinion freely, electronic participation as a way to commit to a cause, and not joining an organization while participating.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of affairs

The impact that technological tools have today in the general population is well known, in particular, it is young people who actively participate through Social Networking Sites (SNS) as part of their daily lives. They do it in order to communicate, to be entertained, to learn and to participate in their civic, political or cultural reality.

In a study conducted over 21 countries, recent statistics on the use of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) show that people have integrated themselves into the use of Internet, in particular through the use of social media through smartphones. These technological tools have become the most popular and most used among individuals under 30 with some degree of higher education (Pew Research Center, 2012). By 2013 in Mexico, 34.4% of households had Internet access (an increase of 12.8% compared to 2012); of all Internet users, 38.6% were young adults between the ages of 18 to 34, and 39.6% used SNS (INEGI, 2014).

This has produced a culture among young people in which it is possible to identify elements of ICT integration in everyday activities in order to organize, communicate, create content, play games, discuss, chat and even encourage others to participate (Castells, 2014). In this way, young people are building their reality of emerging issues and collective interests through active participation in SNS; however, only a few are placing themselves as in control of content management, virtual community organization, and data compilation.

In all these activities, participation1 is a nodal concept that becomes salient; it is a form of interaction among individuals sharing ideas and values in which each one seeks to influence the other. In the case of young people, digital media usage is being used increasingly intensively in order to generate participation. The integration of digital media has created new ways of participating, or a participatory culture (Jenkins et al, 2009). Participating through different networks and digital platforms allows them to denote different forms of engagement, which are categorized as medium or low level by some authors (Castells, 2014; De-Ugarte, 2007). Furthermore, communities are created in which the decision to continue participating and belonging is made because of emotion, closeness and level of commitment they have to the topic (Royo-Vela & Casamassima, 2010).

According to Serna (1997) –who takes up what Clauss Offe proposed– participation by young adults has the following features: it revolves around new issues or ideologies, seeks action and immediate results, the reason why their relationship with the topic is not long term, participates in a community without losing the subjects’ individuality, organizes horizontally, and uses the technological means available.

Recently, some authors have used different terms when it comes to refer to types of participation: standing out among them are the youth, the effective, the social, the political, and the civic ones. Youth participation is considered as such when there are young people in general, as a segment of the population, who carry it out, whether they are students or not. Conversely, when there is involvement in decision- making, this is called effective participation (Krauskopf, 2000). Social participation engages in issues with peers and seeks to support mainstream topics while political and civic participation are linked to exercising the right to vote and interaction with political parties or well-consolidated political groups (Balardini, 2005).

Meanwhile, Henriquez (2011) mentions that changes in the form of communication and organization enable new ways of social participation. One of them is cyber-activism in which young people use technology, especially the Internet, to organize activities, discuss, share information, participate and express their dissatisfaction on issues with which they identify themselves. De Ugarte (2007) adds that cyber-activism is all forms of social participation that occur via ICTs which are seeking to change the current situation through mobilization and militancy. This concept of cyber-activism has received several names, from click-activism, online activism, e-activism, digital activism, online activism, network activism, to digital social movements. However, just like participation, cyber-activism is horizontally organized around new issues and it looks for results such as changes in mentality. Based on a review of several authors who have researched these issues, Table 1 shows the similarities and differences between participation and cyber- activism and how commitment is perceived in both.

Having identified the main characteristics of participation, cyber- activism and the role that commitment plays, the aim of this study is to determine the number of students considered to be cyber activists in a university population, based on the following criteria:


Draft Content 369470688-44287-en010.jpg

a) Young adults who participate through signing, joining, or subscribing to causes, petitions or groups and to manage or share information (Cardoso, 2014; Castells, 2014; McCaughey & Ayers, 2003) related to the four selected topics.

b) Young people who report having a medium or high level of commitment to these issues.

c) Those who participate via Internet or in both places, online and on the streets.

All of the above criteria are related to the topics identified by theorists as related to cyber-activism which are: environmental, ecological and animal rights (Barranquero, 2012, Henríquez, 2011), social and civic issues (Castells, 2014; Henriquez, 2011), human rights (McCaughey & Ayers, 2003; Henríquez, 2011), and educational /academic issues (Castells, 2014; Henríquez, 2011).

There is an important list of authors who have addressed the issue of political participation among citizens through the use of SNS and/or Internet to access political information, as in the case of the studies of Xenos and Moy (2007) on the US population, or those who have addressed the youth protests as a central element for political change, as in the case of studies carried out in Chile by Valenzuela, Arriaga and Scherman (2012) and in Mexico with the «Yo Soy 132» movement (Diaz, 2013). However, these studies have focused on the civic behavior and political education of young people, or have analyzed how these events influence electoral processes, election of candidates and their understanding of political parties. These authors have not been considered in this classification, nor has the criterion of political subject in carrying out the classification of young cyber-activists, considering that another approach and analysis is needed to deepen the political education of young people; thus, the authors referred to in the classification do not consider political issues as belonging to cyber-activists.

Young university students belong to a generation that has been characterized by the constant use of technology in their daily lives. Nonetheless, this study, and taking into account the points already mentioned, wants to determine what this participation, which is established by a sample of university students interacting with others through different technological means, is like. Specifically, the present study’s main concern is to deepen and understand, what features do identified cyber-activists have in common? And what are the elements or turning points in the activities that they develop in the interaction with others that allows them to be presented as cyber-activists?

2. Methods and material

The method used for this study combines two types of techniques: a questionnaire with closed ended questions, and in-depth interviews. First, the questionnaire served as a starting point for selecting students with greater participation and medium-high level of commitment from a sample of students from the Universidad de Sonora (UNISON) which is participating in the project «Jóvenes y cultura digital. Nuevos escenarios de interacción social»2 (Youth and Digital Culture: New scenarios of social interaction). The questionnaire section chosen for this work relates to the level of involvement and commitment young university students have with certain topics and online-platforms. The two questions asked were the following: Select the issues with which you have some kind of involvement and the level of commitment you have with this (these) topic(s)? On that question you can select up to nine topics: 1) environment, ecology, and animal welfare, 2) educational/academic, 3) work and employment, 4) Artistic/Cultural 5) leisure, fun and entertainment, 6) Social and civic problems, 7) Human rights, 8) Political, and 9) Religious. The level of commitment that could be selected on this questionnaire by each subject was: high, medium, low, or none; the latter corresponding to no involvement or commitment at all.

To determine the students who showed traits of cyber- activism, the results of activities such as signing up to, joining or subscribing to causes, petitions, or groups, and managing or sharing information, having a medium or high engagement on these issues, involvement through Internet or both on the Internet and on the streets were also considered, all the latter related to topics such as the environment, ecology and animal protection, social and civic issues, human rights, and education/academic problems.

Out of the total sample from UNISON (713 participating students), only 13 met the established criteria.

The second technique was in-depth interviews following an interviewing guide also used in the previously mentioned project; under the design of a single case study. The main objective at this stage was that, through a narrative method, students explain how the process of interaction in networks and platforms takes place and to derive turning points3 that can assist as categories of analysis for subsequent studies. The interview guide consists of 35 open questions, so that the interviewee could express his or her opinion freely. Even though the initial contact with the thirteen students was via email, only three of them replied. Despite the low participation among selected students, it was considered appropriate to continue the study because of the exploratory nature of this second stage, and the relevance of the responses obtained with the three participants.


Draft Content 369470688-44287-en011.jpg

3. Analysis and results

At first, after identifying the cyber-activist students (N=13), it is possible to point out that eight of them are female, and five are male and their ages range from 19 to 26. An important feature is that a large percentage of these students also work (9), while only four are entirely devoted to studying. From the department with the highest representation to the lowest, they were enrolled in the Schools of Social Sciences and Economics and Administrative Sciences (3 each), the School of Engineering (2), Biological and Health (2), and Humanities and Fine Arts with two students as well, while the least represented is the School of Natural Sciences with one student.

Inquiries about digital platforms used to protest showed that the SNS Facebook (named by all of them) is an important means for communicating and sharing information, inviting and/or calling for events, and even requests to join groups or other associations. They also indicated that they use email continuously (8), but employ newer platforms like Twitter (3) and Instagram to a lesser extent (1).

Regarding their affiliation, none of the Internet activists are incorporated into any organization or formal institution, but they participate as independent citizens.

Among the results perceived by this group of young adults the following are included: citizen awareness (6), followed by actions on the Internet (5), walking, creating documents or holding a demonstration to show discontent (2), and one reported having achieved the creation or modification of a law. Only one participant mentioned, as another type of result, upsetting others by writing that «offenses by ignorant people who believe that you are the ignorant».

By matching the four topics identified as theoretically related to cyber-activism with the level of commitment, it was found that there is a higher percentage of medium to high, as shown in table 2.

In a second stage, when examining the in-depth interviews conducted with three of these students (two men and a woman) the fact that they are studying and working stands out, besides from actively participating in online social networks. Their studies are under the social sciences umbrella and are senior undergraduate students (table 3).


Draft Content 369470688-44287-en012.jpg

The parents’ level of education and socioeconomic status are two variables that indicate family capital regarding access to electronic goods from an early age, in this regard, educational level is located at HE level, highlighting that in two cases, where parents had associate degrees, an older brother had already reached a university level of education; second line relatives (uncles), or parents had university studies, leading to the suggestion that students belonging to this group are second generation higher eduation students. Regarding the socioeconomic status, they report being part of either middle or upper middle class, this means that although it is true that they do not belong to the upper class in the social stratification, their lives are characterized by having access to mobile phones with Android or iOS operating systems, as well as a desktop and a laptop computer. They are connected daily via cellphone and other devices, and especially have had easy access to Internet and computers from an early age.

Regarding the first category, interaction history, the following stands out: their first encounters with technology occur through video games and begin during childhood at home or with friends, school and internet cafés are the second place where they kept in touch with technology, stressing as a major factor that the high schools they attended promote active participation in topics of educational (one case), political (one case) and of general interest (one case).

In the category of active participation in social networks, there are several matching areas across the three students. They point out being aware that their participation is active on forums or wikis because they frequently give their opinions on the four topics (environment, education, citizenry and social issues, and human rights). However, each student mentions at least two more issues of participation and personal interest. For example, in the case of student 1, he adds the issue of politics and labor; student 2, added politics, religion, science and sports, and the third student repeats labor and scientific topics, adding arts and entertainment (games), so it is considered that altogether, there are at least six issues addressed by each of them (table 2). The interviewees confirm that they give their opinion on a frequent basis, especially on social problems that arise, as they are motivated primarily by the proximity of these issues to their lives. One of them states that it was a discomfort with a problem the student was facing which lead to his constant participation.

On the other hand, it is important to observe a critical stance in relation to the undergraduate program, because two of the students are in Communication Sciences making references, for example, to information management as for instance «there are several versions of the same news stories because reality can be interpreted in different ways».

Concerning the perception they have of their participation and impact on digital networks, the female student believes that the contribution made by feedback is valuable, while the two male students said they were not satisfied with such efforts, student 1 said in relation to the low response obtained from commenting online: «No, not completely. Because if what I write, I could..., the feelings I express in those words when I am telling all my acquaintances that something is wrong and only few people respond to that call or feel the same way that I do. Very few, I think that is why».

Meanwhile, student 2 expresses discomfort associated with the small amount of time devoted to this activity: «No. I feel I could contribute more, but for work reasons I cannot contribute more on social networks. Like I said, I get up, go online in the morning, the short break I have, say, at nine I start to ... I get up at eight and I have an hour or two, no more, that I can go online in the morning. I get back until five in the afternoon or so. And from five until ten or eleven, that’s how long I have. And yes I would like to stay in touch longer».

However, all three agree on the importance of achieving change through an intensive interaction in digital social networks. They believe that if there were no ICTs, they would seek other forms of traditional active participation (newspapers, posters, murals, and demonstrations). Another point of view where the interviewees agree is that they do not approve of the laws of several countries seeking to control the Internet.

In relation to their affiliation to groups or organizations, one of them belongs to one and organizes different actions as a result. In reference to the perceived impact and consolidation of their actions, two students have acknowledged that their projects (group or personal) have extended to other national or foreign groups. One says that only a few projects have managed to become reality, but some others have not. However, the female student indicates that only group projects have actually become a reality, adding that with the actions taken they have managed to help the people concerned. Another student stated that the projects that have been successful have achieved informing people of the current situation.

Regarding the freedom with which they act in networks, the three students agree that they their work in digital social networks has not been censored. Yet, one interviewee indicates that, because of copyright, he did get censored. Concerning the laws of several countries seeking to control the Internet, two of the interviewees (a man and a woman) consider that freedom of speech would be violated. The third student indicates that part of society will cease to be informed of issues that may concern them. Finally, they agree that their work as a person involved in intense and frequent activity in digital social networks does not involve costs, so they see this as very convenient.

4. Discussion and conclusions

In general, it can be concluded that the young participants classified as cyber-activists can be found in any academic department, actively participating despite having to work and study at the same time in most cases. These young adults are enthusiastic about the work they perform through digital platforms because it revolves around topics of personal interest and considered as new issues.

Nevertheless, this participation, even when presented as active, involves a medium level of commitment, reflecting the few developed activities, i.e., they are active and involved in all topics, but not devoted or do not go into details about specific actions. Castells (2014) indicates that when young people participate in an online social movement or in a related activity, even when actively involved, their commitment is limited.

The way they organize is horizontal, meaning that it relies on their peers to organize and spread information, but does not have a vertical hierarchy with leaders who decide for them, they make decisions collectively and look for each voice to be heard. As evidence of this, it was found that very few subjects characterized as cyber-activists belong to an association or formal organization.

The use of Facebook as a central platform agrees with McCaughey and Ayer’s (2003) proposal, who mention that activists, not just cyber-activists, have used the new types of media to promote movements, media that captures a larger number of potential participants. Also, Gil-de-Zúñiga, Jung and Valenzuela (2012) found that Facebook and social networks are used by all university cyber-activists to check the news, access alternative information or discuss with others about topics of interest, which could increase the commitment of individuals and their participation in community issues. In this sense, as stated by Garcia, Del-Hoyo and Fernández (2014), cyber-activism falls precisely into the possibilities for any individual to have a global impact through dialogue, as in the case of Facebook, not only as a means of communication, but also the means by which to carry out a form of social participation and global activism.

On the other hand, observing the results obtained and reported by this group of cyber-activists, this agrees with Krauskopf (2000) and Balardini (2005) on the participation and pursuit of immediate results. Also, Castells (2014) and Cardoso (2014) sustain that young people seek change of consciousness, not more profound changes.

The turning points that can be obtained from the in-depth interviews are: use of these tools at an early age through video games, also school, particularly high school, plays a very important role awakening interest in various topics, but this interest is also associated to the educational process in which students are engaged just as it is expressed through labor concerns (being young people who are about to graduate from university), scientific advances and caring for the environment as part of a general university culture, and sport and arts as their own personal interest associated with their age. In active participation in social networks, the right to speak freely, the use of electronic participation as a way to engage with causes, and non-affiliation to organizations when participating commonly stand out.

We also found that there is a presence of middle and upper middle class individuals, as stated by Hernández, Robles and Martínez (2013), that this phenomenon has a process of declassing, that is, the authors note how their motivation to participate is coupled with proximity to the topics, mainly where they perceive injustices such as job-related issues, where, as one of the participants said, there are low wages and exploitation of labor.

Overall, the interviewees have shown a critical view on the use of Internet. They agree that changes can be achieved interacting through social networks and disagree with countries’ intention to control the Internet.

In conclusion and as a reflection, it is important to recognize that, within the limitations of qualitative studies using of interviews, generalization of these traits to other populations is low. This is commonly known, as what is gained in depth is lost in generalization, especially from claims that may arise when analyzing three students, from which it was intended to derive analysis categories for further studies.

However, once this limitation is recognized, it is important to note that this small group is part of a larger sample of 713 students, which has been systematically studied for the past three years. Thus, it is possible to affirm from these studies that, while only a small portion of this sample has characteristics of cyber-activists, the overall sample presents important features of active participation in the topics mentioned (González, Durand, Hugues, & Yanez, 2015), sharing similar traits to these thirteen students. This is the case in terms of high identification with digital culture, socioeconomic level ranging from middle to upper middle class, and good educational level in their parents being among the most significant elements (González, Hughes, & Urquidi, 2015). On the other hand, those of us who work with issues of social sciences know it is not easy to voluntarily obtain participation from young adults for several reasons, including the already-mentioned resistance to institutional participation and distrust in the use of personal information, or simply apathy about the usefulness of what they think and that others might use. These issues are not minor and have been consistently identified by other researchers.

Notes

1 The term participation is understood and taken from the definition provided by Lima (1988) as a personal interactive process which is consensual and spontaneous for the common good, where it seeks to obtain a goal (usually the transformation of social relations), there is adherence to the ideas and values of a community, tasks, functions and roles within it are carried out.

2 Project funded by the National Council of Science and Technology (CONACYT) in Mexico. Basic Science Call No. 178329 in charge of the technical direction of Dr. Delia Crovi. The questionnaire used is derived from this project and could be revised in Crovi y Lemus (2014).

3 The concept of turning point was taken up from Yair (2009).

References

Balardini, S. (2005). ¿Qué hay de nuevo, viejo? Una mirada sobre los cambios en la participación política juvenil. Santiago de Chile: CEPAL.

Barranquero, A. (2012). Redes digitales y movilización colectiva. Del 15-M a las nuevas prácticas de empoderamiento y desarrollo local. In M. Martínez, & F. Sierra (Coords.), Comunicación y desarrollo. Prácticas comunicativas y empoderamiento local (pp. 377-400). Madrid: Gedisa.

Calderón, F. & Szmukler, A. (2014). Los jóvenes en Chile, México y Brasil ‘Disculpe la molestia, estamos cambiando el país’. Vanguardia Dossier, 50, 89-93.

Cardoso, G. (2014). Movilización social y medios sociales. Vanguardia Dossier, 50, 17-23.

Castells, M. (2012). Redes de indignación y esperanza. Madrid: Alianza.

Castells, M. (2014). El poder de las redes. Vanguardia Dossier, 50, 8-13.

Crovi, D., & Lemus, M.C. (2014). Jóvenes estudiantes y cultura digital: una investigación en proceso. Virtualis, 9, 36-55. (http://goo.gl/8emHtj) (11-12-2014).

De-Ugarte, D. (2007). El poder de las Redes. Grupo Cooperativo de las Indias. (http://goo.gl/QqEuCq) (26-09-2014).

Díaz, C. (2013). Tres miradas desde el interior de #YoSoy132. Desacatos, 42, 233-243. (http://goo.gl/ASl3W9) (18-09-2014).

García, M.C., Del-Hoyo, M., & Fernández, C. (2014). Jóvenes comprometidos en la Red: El papel de las redes sociales en la participación social activa. Comunicar, 43(XXII), 35-43. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-03

Gardner, H., & Davis, K. (2013). The App Generation. How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Gil-de-Zúñiga, H., Jung, N., & Valenzuela, S. (2012). Social Media Use for News and Individuals’ Social Capital, Civic Engagement and Political Participation. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 17, 319-336. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.10836101.2012.01574.x

González, G., Durand, J.P., Hugues, E., & Yanez, M. (2015). La interacción de los estudiantes de la Universidad de Sonora a través de plataformas digitales y redes sociales. III Congreso Internacional de Investigación Educativa de la Universidad de Costa Rica. (http://goo.gl/a3ZVXe) (10-02-2015).

González, G., Hugues, E., & Urquidi, L. (2015). Rasgos de expresión de la cultura digital en una muestra de estudiantes de la Universidad de Sonora en México. XXIII Jornadas Universitarias de Tecnología Educativa en la Universidad de Extremadura. Badajoz.

Henríquez, M. (2011). Clic Activismo: redes virtuales, movimientos sociales y participación política. F@ro, 13, 28-40.

Hernández, E., Robles, M.C., & Martínez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos y culturas cívicas: sentido educativo, mediático y político del 15M. Comunicar, 40(XX), 59-67. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-06

INEGI (2014). Módulo sobre disponibilidad y uso de las tecnologías de la información en los hogares, 2014 (http://goo.gl/0exYcI) (14-04-2015).

Jenkins, H., & al. (2009). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century. Chicago: The MIT Press.

Krauskopf, D. (2000). Dimensiones críticas en la participación social de las juventudes. Participación social y política de los jóvenes en el horizonte del nuevo siglo. San José (Costa Rica): CLACSO.

Lima, B. (1988). Exploración teórica de la participación. Buenos Aires: Hvmanitas.

McCaughey, M., & Ayers, M. (Eds.) (2003). Cyberactivism: Online Activism in Theory and Practice. New York: Routledge.

Morduchowicz, R. (2012). Los adolescentes y las redes sociales: La construcción de la identidad juvenil en Internet. Buenos Aires: FCE.

Pew Research Center (2012). Social Networking Popular across Globe. Arab Publics more Likely to Express Political Views Online. (http://goo.gl/jBUP9L) (21-08-2014).

Royo-Vela, M., & Casamassima, P. (2010). The Influence of Belonging to Virtual Brand Communities on Consumers’ Affective Commitment, Satisfaction and Word-of-mouth Advertising. The Zara Case. Online Information Review, 35, 517-542. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/14684521111161918

Serna, L. (1997). Globalización y participación Juvenil. En búsqueda de elementos para la reflexión. Buenos Aires: CODAJIC (http://goo.gl/OiTI8R) (26-10-2014).

Valenzuela, S., Arriagada, A., & Scherman, A. (2012). The Social Media Basis of Youth Protest Behavior: The Case of Chile. Journal of Communication, 62, 299-314. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01635.x

Winocur, R. (2006). Internet en la vida cotidiana de los jóvenes. Revista Mexicana de Sociología, 68(3). (http://goo.gl/y5Q3Df) (28-10-2014).

Xenos, M., & Moy, P. (2007). Direct and Differential Effects of the Internet on Political and Civic Engagement. Journal of Communication, 57, 704-718. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.14602466.2007.00364.x

Yair, G. (2009). Cinderellas and Ugly Ducklings: Positive Turning Points in Students’ Educational Careers – Exploratory Evidence and a Future Agenda. British Educational Research Journal, 35(3), 351-370. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01411920802044388

Yanez, M. (2015). La participación de jóvenes universitarios a través de distintas plataformas digitales ¿una forma de ciberactivismo? (Tesis de pregrado). México: Universidad de Sonora.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Se presentan resultados derivados de una muestra de estudiantes que asisten a las diversas licenciaturas que ofrece la Universidad de Sonora en México. El objetivo fue doble, en un primer momento, identificar a estudiantes ciberactivistas a través de las respuestas obtenidas de un cuestionario aplicado de manera electrónica, utilizando como criterios de inclusión la presencia de puntajes medios y altos en el nivel de participación y compromiso en las diversas acciones emprendidas en cuatro temas (medio ambiente, académicos, problemas sociales y ciudadanos, y derechos humanos). En un segundo momento y a partir de la selección de tres casos únicos de estudiantes ciberactivistas, se determinaron puntos de inflexión en las actividades desarrolladas por estos jóvenes en las redes sociales digitales, utilizando como estrategia metodológica la narrativa de los propios estudiantes cuando interactúan con otros en las redes. Entre las categorías iniciales en las entrevistas en profundidad se encuentra: la historia de interacción (uso, acceso y disposición de la tecnología desde temprana edad), y la participación activa en las redes sociales sobre temas de interés (organización y percepción de logros alcanzados). Como principales hallazgos se encuentra la disposición de estos recursos desde temprana edad, la motivación personal en los diversos temas, el gusto para expresarse de manera libre, la participación electrónica como forma de comprometerse con las causas, y la no afiliación a organizaciones al participar.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

Para nadie es desconocido el impacto que las herramientas tecnológicas tienen hoy en día en la población en general; especialmente, son los jóvenes quienes participan de manera activa en las redes sociales digitales como parte de su cotidianidad. Lo hacen para comunicarse, para entretenerse, para aprender y para participar en su realidad ciudadana, política o cultural.

Las estadísticas recientes sobre el uso de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) demuestran, en un estudio realizado a nivel mundial en 21 naciones, que la población se ha integrado al uso de Internet, en particular al uso de redes sociales por medio de los teléfonos inteligentes, constituyéndose estas herramientas tecnológicas como las más populares y utilizadas entre los sujetos menores de 30 años y con educación universitaria (Pew Research Center, 2012). En México, para el 2013, el 34,4% de los hogares contaba con acceso a Internet (con un aumento del 12,8% en comparación con 2012). De todos los usuarios de Internet, el 38,6% eran jóvenes de 18 a 34 años y el 39,6% utilizaba redes sociales (INEGI, 2014).

Esto ha generado una cultura entre los jóvenes en la cual es posible identificar elementos en la integración de las TIC en actividades cotidianas para organizarse, comunicarse, generar contenido, jugar, debatir, chatear e incluso convocar a otros a participar (Castells, 2014). De esta manera, los jóvenes están construyendo su realidad en temas emergentes y de interés colectivo, a través de la participación activa en las redes. Sin embargo, sólo algunos están colocándose en la cima del manejo de los contenidos, de la organización de las comunidades virtuales y de la concentración de la información.

En todas estas actividades, la participación1 es un concepto nodal que cobra importancia, y es entendida como una forma de interacción entre individuos que comparten ideas y valores por medio de la cual se busca influir en el otro. En el caso de los jóvenes, se utilizan cada vez con mayor intensidad los medios digitales para llevarla a cabo, generando nuevas formas de participación, o una cultura participativa (Jenkins & al., 2009). El participar a través de diferentes redes y plataformas digitales permite que los jóvenes denoten diferentes modalidades de compromiso, los cuales se categorizan como de nivel medio o bajo por algunos autores (Castells, 2014; De-Ugarte, 2007). Además, se crean comunidades en donde la decisión de seguir participando y perteneciendo se debe a la emoción, a la cercanía y al compromiso que tienen con el tema (Royo-Vela & Casamassima, 2010).

La participación que llevan a cabo los jóvenes, según Serna (1997) –quien retoma lo propuesto por Clauss Offe– tiene las siguientes características: gira en torno a ideologías o temas novedosos, busca la acción y el resultado inmediato por lo cual su relación con el tema no es de largo plazo, participa en una comunidad sin perder su individualidad, se organizan de manera horizontal, y utilizan los medios tecnológicos disponibles.

De manera reciente, algunos autores han utilizado diversos nombres para hacer referencia a los tipos de participación; entre ellas destacan la juvenil, la efectiva, la social, la política y la ciudadana. Se considera «participación juvenil» cuando son en general los jóvenes, como segmento de la población, quienes llevan a cabo dicha participación, sean estudiantes o no. En cambio, se le da el nombre de participación efectiva cuando existe un involucramiento en la toma de decisiones (Krauskopf, 2000). Es de índole social cuando se involucran en temas con sus pares y buscan apoyar la corriente principal (mainstream). Mientras, la participación política y ciudadana se ve ligada a ejercer el derecho a votar y a la interacción con partidos o agrupaciones políticas consolidadas (Balardini, 2005).

Por su parte, Henríquez (2011) menciona que los cambios en la forma de comunicación y de organización permiten nuevas formas de participación social. Una de estas formas es el ciberactivismo en el cual los jóvenes usan la tecnología, en especial Internet, para organizar actividades, discutir, compartir información, participar y expresar su descontento sobre temas con los que se identifican. De-Ugarte (2007) agrega que el ciberactivismo es toda forma de participación social que se da por medio del uso de las TIC, distinguiéndose porque persigue cambiar la situación actual a través de la movilización y la militancia. Este concepto de ciberactivismo ha recibido varios nombres, desde clic-activismo, activismo en línea, e-activismo, activismo digital, activismo virtual, activismo mediante el uso de redes, hasta movimientos sociales digitales. Pero, al igual que la participación, se organiza de manera horizontal alrededor de temas novedosos, buscando resultados como cambios de mentalidad. En la tabla 1 se presentan las similitudes y diferencias entre participación y ciberactivismo, y cómo se percibe el compromiso en ambos a partir de la revisión de los principales autores que han investigado estos temas.

Una vez identificadas las principales características de la participación, el ciberactivismo y el papel que juega el compromiso, se plantea como objetivo para este estudio determinar el número de estudiantes considerados como ciberactivistas en una población universitaria, a partir de los siguientes criterios:


Draft Content 369470688-44287 ov-es010.jpg

a) Jóvenes que participan con las actividades de firmar, adherirse o suscribirse a causas, peticiones, o grupos y administrar o difundir información (Cardoso, 2014; Castells, 2014; McCaughey & Ayers, 2003) en relación con los cuatro temas seleccionados.

b) Jóvenes que reportan tener un compromiso medio o alto en estos temas.

c) Aquellos que participan a través de Internet o que lo hacen en ambos espacios, es decir en Internet y en las calles.

Todos los puntos anteriores se encuentran relacionados con los temas identificados por los teóricos como relativos al ciberactivismo; éstos son: medio ambiente, ecología y protección de animales (Barranquero, 2012; Henríquez, 2011), problemas sociales y ciudadanos (Castells, 2014; Henríquez, 2011), derechos humanos (Henríquez, 2011; McCaughey & Ayers, 2003), y problemas educativos/académicos (Castells, 2014; Henríquez, 2011).

Existe una línea importante de autores que han abordado el tema de la participación política de los ciudadanos a través del uso de las redes sociales digitales y/o Internet para acceder a la información política; tal es el caso de los estudios de Xenos y Moy (2007) en población estadounidense, o bien quienes han abordado las protestas juveniles como elemento central para el cambio político, como los estudios desarrollados en Chile por Valenzuela, Arriagada y Scherman (2012) y en México con el movimiento 132 (Díaz, 2013). Sin embargo, estos estudios se han enfocado al comportamiento cívico y formación política de los jóvenes, o bien, han analizado cómo estos eventos influyen en los procesos electorales, la elección de candidatos y la apreciación de los partidos políticos. Estos autores no han sido considerados en esta clasificación, ni el criterio del tema político para llevar a cabo la clasificación de jóvenes ciberactivistas, al considerar que se requiere otro tipo de tratamiento y análisis para profundizar en la formación política de la juventud. Los autores que retomamos en la clasificación no consideran los temas políticos como propios de los ciberactivistas.

Los jóvenes universitarios pertenecen a una generación que ha sido caracterizada por el constante uso que hacen de los recursos tecnológicos en su vida cotidiana. No obstante, en este estudio, y teniendo en cuenta el planteamiento anterior, queremos determinar cómo es la participación que establece una muestra de estudiantes universitarios cuando interactúan con otros a través de los diferentes medios tecnológicos. En concreto, nuestra intención es profundizar y conocer sobre ¿cuáles son los rasgos que poseen estos sujetos que han sido reconocidos como ciberactivistas? y ¿cuáles son los elementos o puntos de inflexión en las actividades que ellos desarrollan en la interacción con otros que les permiten colocarse como ciberactivistas?

2. Material y métodos

El método seguido para este estudio combina dos tipos de estrategias: un cuestionario de preguntas cerradas, y una entrevista en profundidad. El primero, el cuestionario, el cual sirvió de punto de partida para seleccionar a los estudiantes con mayor participación y compromiso medio-alto de una muestra de estudiantes de la Universidad de Sonora (UNISON), pertenece al Proyecto «Jóvenes y cultura digital. Nuevos escenarios de interacción social»2 en el que participa dicha universidad. La sección del cuestionario, que se eligió para este trabajo, se relaciona con la participación y compromiso que tienen los jóvenes universitarios con algunos temas y plataformas. Las preguntas que se trabajaron fueron: Marca aquellos temas con los que tengas algún tipo de participación y el nivel de compromiso que tienes con este(os) temas(s). En dicha pregunta se puede seleccionar hasta nueve temas: 1) medio ambiente, ecología y protección de animales, 2) educativos/académicos, 3) trabajo y empleo, 4) artísticos/culturales, 5) ocio, diversión y entretenimiento, 6) problemas sociales y ciudadanos, 7) defensa de derechos humanos, 8) políticos, y 9) religiosos. El nivel de compromiso que podían indicar en el cuestionario de acuerdo con cada tema eran tres: alto, medio, y bajo, y la última opción correspondía al no tener ningún tipo de participación ni compromiso: nada.

Para determinar a los estudiantes que presentaban rasgos de ciberactivismo se consideraron también los resultados obtenidos en las actividades de firmar, adherirse o suscribirse a causas, peticiones, o grupos y administrar o difundir información, tener un compromiso medio o alto en estos temas, participar a través de Internet o hacerlo en ambos espacios, es decir en Internet y en las calles, todo ello relacionado con los tema de medio ambiente, ecología y protección de animales, problemas sociales y ciudadanos, derechos humanos, y problemas educativos/académicos.

Del total de la muestra de la UNISON (713 estudiantes participantes), sólo 13 poseen estas características.

La segunda estrategia fue emplear entrevistas en profundidad, bajo una guía utilizada también en el proyecto mencionado con anterioridad; bajo el diseño de un estudio de caso único. El principal objetivo en esta fase fue, que a través de un método narrativo, los estudiantes conversaran cómo ha sido su proceso de interacción en las redes y plataformas, para que a partir de ello derivar puntos de inflexión3 que puedan servir como categorías de análisis en estudios posteriores. La guía se compone de 35 preguntas abiertas, de modo que el entrevistado pudiera expresar su opinión de manera libre. Aun cuando el contacto inicial con los 13 estudiantes se hizo vía correo electrónico, sólo acudieron al llamado tres estudiantes. A pesar de la poca participación entre los estudiantes seleccionados, se consideró adecuado continuar con el estudio debido al carácter exploratorio de esta segunda etapa, y la relevancia de las respuestas obtenidas con los tres participantes.


Draft Content 369470688-44287 ov-es011.jpg

3. Análisis y resultados

En un primer momento, a partir de la identificación de los 13 estudiantes ciberactivistas, es posible destacar que ocho pertenecen al género femenino y cinco al género masculino, cuyas edades fluctúan entre los 19 a 26 años. Una característica importante es que nueve comparten sus estudios con actividades laborales, mientras que cuatro se dedican sólo a la escuela. De mayor a menor se entran inscritos en las diversas divisiones académicas, esto es, en Ciencias Sociales 3, Económicas y Administrativas 3, en las Ingenierías 2, Biológicas y de la Salud 2, Humanidades y Bellas Artes 2 y en las Ciencias Exactas y Naturales 1.

Al indagar sobre las plataformas digitales utilizadas para manifestarse, se encontró que la red social Facebook (nombrada por todos) es un medio primordial para comunicarse y compartir información, llamar y/o convocar a eventos, e incluso unirse a peticiones, grupos u otras asociaciones. También indicaron que utilizan el correo electrónico de manera continua (8), plataformas más novedosas como Twitter (3) e Instagram en menor medida (1).

Respecto a su afiliación, ninguno de los ciberactivistas se encuentran incorporado a instituciones u organizaciones formales, sino que participan como ciudadanos, de manera independiente.

Entre los resultados percibidos por este grupo de jóvenes se incluye la toma de conciencia por parte de la ciudadanía (6), seguido de acciones dentro de Internet (5), la creación de marchas, documentos de inconformidad o manifestaciones (2) y uno indicó haber logrado la creación o modificación de una ley. Respecto a algún otro resultado obtenido, tan solo un participante mencionó lograr el disgusto de otras personas al escribir que obtuvo «ofensas de gente ignorante que cree que tú [sic] eres el ignorante».

Al relacionar los cuatro temas identificados teóricamente como relativos al ciberactivismo con el nivel de compromiso, se encontró que este se ubica en mayores porcentajes entre medio a alto, como puede observarse en la tabla 2.

En un segundo momento, al examinar las entrevistas en profundidad realizadas con tres de estos estudiantes (dos hombres y una mujer) destaca que son jóvenes que comparten los estudios con una actividad laboral, aparte de participar de manera activa en las redes sociales digitales. Sus carreras de formación pertenecen a las Ciencias Sociales, y se encuentran en los últimos semestres de estudio (véase tabla 3).


Draft Content 369470688-44287 ov-es012.jpg

La escolaridad de los padres y el nivel socioeconómico son dos variables que nos indican el capital familiar respecto al acceso a bienes electrónicos desde temprana edad. En este sentido la escolaridad se ubica a nivel técnico-universitario, destacando que en dos casos, en donde los padres contaban con estudios técnicos, un hermano mayor había alcanzado ya los estudios universitarios; los parientes en segunda línea (tíos), o bien, los padres contaban con estudios a nivel superior, lo que lleva a postular que los estudiantes pertenecientes a este grupo son la segunda generación en la universidad. Respecto al nivel socioeconómico que reportan poseer las familias de estos jóvenes, se coloca entre medio a alto. Esto significa que si bien es cierto, no pertenecen al nivel más alto en la escala social, la vida de estos jóvenes se caracteriza por poseer teléfonos móviles con sistema operativo Android o iOS, así como computadora de escritorio (PC) y computadora portátil (laptop); además se conectan a diario a través del teléfono móvil y otros dispositivos, y sobre todo han contado con fácil acceso a Internet así como ordenadores desde temprana edad.

Respecto a la primera categoría, historia de interacción, se destaca lo siguiente: sus inicios con la tecnología se dan con los videojuegos y empiezan en la infancia en la casa o con amigos, la escuela es el segundo lugar en donde mantienen el uso de la misma, o bien en el cibercafé, destacando como factor importante que las escuelas en donde asistieron en el bachillerato promueven la participación activa en temas educativos (un caso), políticos (un caso) y en temas de interés en general (un caso).

Con relación a la categoría de participación activa en las redes sociales, se encuentran varios puntos coincidentes en los tres estudiantes. Ellos destacan ser conscientes de que su participación es activa en los foros o wikis porque lo hacen de manera frecuente aportando su opinión en los cuatro temas (medio ambiente, educativos, problemas sociales y ciudadanos, y defensa de derechos humanos). No obstante, cada uno de ellos refieren al menos dos temas más de participación e interés personal, por ejemplo, en el caso del estudiante 1, adiciona el tema de política y laboral; el estudiante 2, suma al de política, el tema de religión, científico y de deportes, y en la estudiante 3, se repite el tema laboral y científico, sumándose el artístico y de ocio (videojuegos), por lo cual se considera que en total, al menos son seis temas abordados por cada uno de ellos (tabla 2). Afirman los entrevistados que aportan su opinión de manera frecuente, sobre todo en los problemas sociales que se presentan, ya que ellos están motivados principalmente por la cercanía que tienen estos temas con su vida e intereses. Uno de ellos comenta que fue una inconformidad en un problema que enfrenta lo que derivó su constante participación.

Por otro lado, es importante observar una postura crítica con relación a la licenciatura de formación, debido a que dos estudiantes se encuentran en Ciencias de la Comunicación haciendo referencia por ejemplo, al manejo de la información «que hay varias versiones de una misma noticia, ya que la realidad puede ser interpretada de distintas formas».

Con relación a la percepción que tienen sobre su participación e impacto en las redes digitales, la estudiante considera que la aportación que hace a través de sus comentarios es valiosa, mientras que los dos estudiantes consideran que no están satisfechos con esa labor. El estudiante 1 responde en relación a la poca respuesta que obtiene sobre lo que comenta: «No. No del todo. Porque si lo que escribiera, lo pudiera… los sentimientos que yo expreso en esas palabras cuando estoy anunciándole a todos los conocidos que está algo mal y nada más pocas personas responden a ese ‘llamado’ o sienten ese mismo sentimiento que yo. Muy pocas. Creo que por eso».

Por su parte, el estudiante 2 manifiesta su incomodidad asociada al poco tiempo que le dedica a esta actividad: «No. Siento que podría aportar más, pero por cuestiones de trabajo no puedo aportar más en las redes sociales. Como te digo, yo me levanto, me conecto en la mañana, en lo que tengo ‘chanza’, digamos, a las nueve ya empiezo a… Me levanto a las ocho y tengo una o dos horas, nada más, que me puedo conectar en la mañana. Ya regreso hasta las cinco de la tarde más o menos. Y ya de lo que son de cinco a diez de la noche u once, es lo que puedo durar. Y sí me gustaría estar en contacto más tiempo».

Sin embargo, coinciden los tres sobre la importancia de lograr cambios a través de un trabajo intenso de interacción en las redes sociales digitales. Consideran que si no existiesen las TIC, buscarían otras formas de participación activa tradicional (periódicos, carteles, murales, y asistencia a las manifestaciones). Otro punto de vista de coincidencia entre los entrevistados es que no están de acuerdo con las legislaciones de varios países que buscan controlar Internet.

Con relación a la afiliación de ellos a grupos u organizaciones, uno de ellos pertenece y organiza diferentes acciones a partir de ello. Respecto a la percepción del impacto y consolidación de sus acciones, dos han reconocido que sus proyectos (grupal o personal) han logrado extenderse a otras agrupaciones nacionales o extranjeras. Uno de ellos comenta que solo algunos proyectos han logrado articularse, pero otros no. Mientras que la estudiante indica que sólo los proyectos grupales han logrado esta articulación, agregando que se ha conseguido favorecer a las personas interesadas con las acciones emprendidas. Otro de los estudiantes indica que los logros que han tenido los proyectos han servido para informar a las personas de la situación actual.

Respecto a la libertad con la que actúan en las redes, los tres coinciden en que no les han censurado su labor en las redes sociales digitales. Sin embargo, un entrevistado indica que por derechos de autor sí le han censurado. Con respecto a las legislaciones de varios países que buscan controlar Internet, dos de los entrevistados (hombre y mujer) consideran que sería violar el derecho a la libertad de expresión. El tercer entrevistado indica que parte de la sociedad va a dejar de estar informada de cuestiones que les pueda interesar. Finalmente, coinciden que su labor como persona que realiza una actividad intensa y frecuente en las redes sociales digitales no les supone gastos, por lo cual lo consideran conveniente.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

De manera general, se puede concluir que los jóvenes participantes en el estudio clasificados como ciberactivistas se pueden encontrar en cualquier división académica, llevando a cabo su participación de manera activa a pesar de que cumplen con una doble jornada, estudiar y trabajar en la mayoría de los casos. Son jóvenes entusiastas con la labor que realizan por medio de las plataformas digitales por estar concentrados en temas de su interés personal y considerados como los nuevos temas.

Sin embargo, esta participación aun cuando se presenta como activa, involucra un nivel de compromiso de tipo medio, reflejo de las pocas actividades desarrolladas, es decir, realizan actividades y participan en todos los temas, pero no se comprometen o no profundizan en las diversas actividades. Al respecto Castells (2014), señala que el grado de involucramiento de los jóvenes, al participar en un movimiento social en línea, o bien en una actividad relativa a ello, aun cuando participen de manera activa, es limitado.

La manera que tienen de organizarse es de tipo horizontal, es decir que confía en sus pares para organizarse y difundir información, pero no tienen una jerarquización vertical con líderes que decidan por ellos, sino que toman decisiones de manera colectiva y buscando que la voz de cada uno sea escuchada. Como prueba de ellos se encontró que muy pocos sujetos caracterizados como ciberactivista pertenecen a una asociación u organización formal.

La utilización de Facebook como plataforma central, concuerda con lo propuesto por McCaughey y Ayers (2003), quienes mencionan que los activistas, no sólo los ciberactivistas, han utilizado los medios de moda para promover los movimientos porque permiten captar un número mayor de posibles participantes. Asimismo, Gil-de-Zúñiga, Jung y Valenzuela (2012) encuentran que Facebook y las redes sociales son utilizadas por todos los universitarios ciberactivistas para revisar las noticias, tener acceso a información alternativa, o bien discutir con otros sobre temas de interés, pudiendo incrementar el compromiso de los individuos y su participación en problemas de su comunidad. En este sentido, como afirman García, Del-Hoyo y Fernández (2014), el ciberactivismo se enmarca precisamente en las posibilidades que tiene cualquier individuo de tener un impacto global en su diálogo; tal es el caso de Facebook, no sólo como un medio de comunicación, sino también el medio por el que llevar a cabo una forma de participación social y activismo global.

Por otro lado, al observar los resultados obtenidos y reportados por este grupo de ciberactivistas, concuerda con lo propuesto por Krauskopf (2000) y Balardini (2005) sobre la participación y la búsqueda de resultados inmediatos. Asimismo, Castells (2014) y Cardoso (2014) hacen referencia a que los jóvenes buscan el cambio de conciencia, no tanto cambios más profundos.

Los puntos de inflexión que es posible derivar de las entrevistas a profundidad son los siguientes: el inicio en el uso de estas herramientas a temprana edad a través de los videojuegos; a su vez la escuela, que juega un papel importante, en concreto el bachillerato, en el despertar interés por los diversos temas, interés que también se asocia al proceso de formación en el que se encuentran los estudiantes -como se expresa en las preocupaciones laborales- al ser jóvenes que se encuentran a punto de egresar de la universidad; los avances científicos y el cuidado del medio ambiente como parte de una cultura general universitaria, y el deporte y las artes como propio de un interés personal asociado a la edad. En la participación activa en las redes sociales se destaca el gusto por expresarse de manera libre, la participación electrónica como forma de comprometerse con las causas, y la no afiliación a organizaciones al participar.

También se encontró que hay una presencia de clase media y media alta, como lo mencionan Hernández, Robles y Martínez (2013); que este fenómeno tiene un proceso de desclasamiento. Mencionan los autores cómo su motivación para participar se encuentra aunada a la proximidad con los temas, principalmente en la percepción de injusticias como lo es el tema relativo al trabajo, en donde como lo manifestó un participante está mal remunerado y existe la sobreexplotación.

En general, los entrevistados han mostrado una visión crítica en el uso de Internet. Coinciden en que se pueden lograr cambios interactuando a través de las redes sociales y están en desacuerdo con la intención de los países de controlar Internet.

A modo de reflexión y cierre, es importante reconocer que dentro de las limitaciones de los estudios cualitativos bajo el uso de la entrevista, se encuentra la poca generalización de estos rasgos a otras poblaciones. Esto comúnmente se conoce como «lo que se gana en profundidad se pierde en generalización», sobre todo por las afirmaciones que pudieran derivarse al analizar tres entrevistados, de las cuales se tenía como objetivo el poder derivar categorías de análisis para estudios posteriores.

Sin embargo, y una vez reconocida esta limitación, es importante señalar que esta pequeña muestra forma parte de una muestra mayor de 713 estudiantes, que se ha venido estudiando de manera sistemática durante los últimos tres años. De esta manera, es posible afirmar a partir de estos estudios que, si bien sólo una pequeña parte de esta muestra presenta características para ser clasificados como ciberactivistas, la muestra en general presenta características importantes de participación activa en los temas acotados (González, Durand, Hugues, & Yanez, 2015), compartiendo rasgos similares respecto a estos trece estudiantes. Tal es el caso de una alta identificación con la cultura digital, nivel socioeconómico entre medio y alto, y una buena posición de estudios respecto a sus padres, entre los elementos más significativos (González, Hugues, & Urquidi, 2015). Por otro lado, quienes trabajamos en temas de las ciencias sociales sabemos que no es fácil acceder de manera voluntaria a la participación con los jóvenes por varias razones, entre las que destaca precisamente la resistencia que presentan a la participación institucional y a la desconfianza en el uso de la información personal, o simplemente una apatía sobre la utilidad de lo que ellos opinen y otros usen. Estas cuestiones no son menores y han sido señaladas ya de manera consistente por otros investigadores.

Notas

1 La participación es entendida y retomada de la definición aportada por Lima (1988) como un proceso interactivo de tipo personal, de acuerdo mutuo, espontáneo por el bien común, en donde se busca obtener un fin (normalmente la transformación de las relaciones sociales), hay adhesión a las ideas y valores propios de una comunidad, se cumplen tareas, funciones y papeles dentro del mismo.

2 Proyecto financiado por el Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT) en México. Convocatoria de Ciencia Básica Nº 178329 a cargo de la dirección técnica de la Dra. Delia Crovi. El cuestionario utilizado se deriva de este proyecto y puede revisarse en Crovi y Lemus (2014).

3 El concepto de punto de inflexión es retomado por Yair (2009), quien lo postula bajo el término de «turning point».

Referencias

Balardini, S. (2005). ¿Qué hay de nuevo, viejo? Una mirada sobre los cambios en la participación política juvenil. Santiago de Chile: CEPAL.

Barranquero, A. (2012). Redes digitales y movilización colectiva. Del 15-M a las nuevas prácticas de empoderamiento y desarrollo local. In M. Martínez, & F. Sierra (Coords.), Comunicación y desarrollo. Prácticas comunicativas y empoderamiento local (pp. 377-400). Madrid: Gedisa.

Calderón, F. & Szmukler, A. (2014). Los jóvenes en Chile, México y Brasil ‘Disculpe la molestia, estamos cambiando el país’. Vanguardia Dossier, 50, 89-93.

Cardoso, G. (2014). Movilización social y medios sociales. Vanguardia Dossier, 50, 17-23.

Castells, M. (2012). Redes de indignación y esperanza. Madrid: Alianza.

Castells, M. (2014). El poder de las redes. Vanguardia Dossier, 50, 8-13.

Crovi, D., & Lemus, M.C. (2014). Jóvenes estudiantes y cultura digital: una investigación en proceso. Virtualis, 9, 36-55. (http://goo.gl/8emHtj) (11-12-2014).

De-Ugarte, D. (2007). El poder de las Redes. Grupo Cooperativo de las Indias. (http://goo.gl/QqEuCq) (26-09-2014).

Díaz, C. (2013). Tres miradas desde el interior de #YoSoy132. Desacatos, 42, 233-243. (http://goo.gl/ASl3W9) (18-09-2014).

García, M.C., Del-Hoyo, M., & Fernández, C. (2014). Jóvenes comprometidos en la Red: El papel de las redes sociales en la participación social activa. Comunicar, 43(XXII), 35-43. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C43-2014-03

Gardner, H., & Davis, K. (2013). The App Generation. How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Gil-de-Zúñiga, H., Jung, N., & Valenzuela, S. (2012). Social Media Use for News and Individuals’ Social Capital, Civic Engagement and Political Participation. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 17, 319-336. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.10836101.2012.01574.x

González, G., Durand, J.P., Hugues, E., & Yanez, M. (2015). La interacción de los estudiantes de la Universidad de Sonora a través de plataformas digitales y redes sociales. III Congreso Internacional de Investigación Educativa de la Universidad de Costa Rica. (http://goo.gl/a3ZVXe) (10-02-2015).

González, G., Hugues, E., & Urquidi, L. (2015). Rasgos de expresión de la cultura digital en una muestra de estudiantes de la Universidad de Sonora en México. XXIII Jornadas Universitarias de Tecnología Educativa en la Universidad de Extremadura. Badajoz.

Henríquez, M. (2011). Clic Activismo: redes virtuales, movimientos sociales y participación política. F@ro, 13, 28-40.

Hernández, E., Robles, M.C., & Martínez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos y culturas cívicas: sentido educativo, mediático y político del 15M. Comunicar, 40(XX), 59-67. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-06

INEGI (2014). Módulo sobre disponibilidad y uso de las tecnologías de la información en los hogares, 2014 (http://goo.gl/0exYcI) (14-04-2015).

Jenkins, H., & al. (2009). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century. Chicago: The MIT Press.

Krauskopf, D. (2000). Dimensiones críticas en la participación social de las juventudes. Participación social y política de los jóvenes en el horizonte del nuevo siglo. San José (Costa Rica): CLACSO.

Lima, B. (1988). Exploración teórica de la participación. Buenos Aires: Hvmanitas.

McCaughey, M., & Ayers, M. (Eds.) (2003). Cyberactivism: Online Activism in Theory and Practice. New York: Routledge.

Morduchowicz, R. (2012). Los adolescentes y las redes sociales: La construcción de la identidad juvenil en Internet. Buenos Aires: FCE.

Pew Research Center (2012). Social Networking Popular across Globe. Arab Publics more Likely to Express Political Views Online. (http://goo.gl/jBUP9L) (21-08-2014).

Royo-Vela, M., & Casamassima, P. (2010). The Influence of Belonging to Virtual Brand Communities on Consumers’ Affective Commitment, Satisfaction and Word-of-mouth Advertising. The Zara Case. Online Information Review, 35, 517-542. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/14684521111161918

Serna, L. (1997). Globalización y participación Juvenil. En búsqueda de elementos para la reflexión. Buenos Aires: CODAJIC (http://goo.gl/OiTI8R) (26-10-2014).

Valenzuela, S., Arriagada, A., & Scherman, A. (2012). The Social Media Basis of Youth Protest Behavior: The Case of Chile. Journal of Communication, 62, 299-314. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01635.x

Winocur, R. (2006). Internet en la vida cotidiana de los jóvenes. Revista Mexicana de Sociología, 68(3). (http://goo.gl/y5Q3Df) (28-10-2014).

Xenos, M., & Moy, P. (2007). Direct and Differential Effects of the Internet on Political and Civic Engagement. Journal of Communication, 57, 704-718. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.14602466.2007.00364.x

Yair, G. (2009). Cinderellas and Ugly Ducklings: Positive Turning Points in Students’ Educational Careers – Exploratory Evidence and a Future Agenda. British Educational Research Journal, 35(3), 351-370. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01411920802044388

Yanez, M. (2015). La participación de jóvenes universitarios a través de distintas plataformas digitales ¿una forma de ciberactivismo? (Tesis de pregrado). México: Universidad de Sonora.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/15
Accepted on 31/12/15
Submitted on 31/12/15

Volume 24, Issue 1, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C46-2016-05
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 7
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?