Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This paper explores the creation and content of apps about Donald Trump (n=412) published in Google Play between June 2015 and January 2018. The relevance of the study stems from both its objectives and its methodology. On the one hand, the aim was to characterise the profile, motivations and purposes of the developers of Donald Trump apps; and on the other, to identify the main features of the discourses in the most downloaded apps. The study relied on two resources: a qualitative questionnaire of open questions for developers (n=376), and a quantitative analysis of the content of apps that exceeded 5,000 downloads (n=117). The questionnaire identified the influence of political current affairs in the developers’ ideological and economic motivations, while the content analysis revealed the trends found over time, as well as the themes, discourses and ideological positioning of the most popular apps about Donald Trump. The findings provide an empirical basis for how the content of these apps was articulated with the news; the influence of content that went viral; hegemonic discourses; and the role played by developers of new expressive, commercial, informative and persuasive proposals in the intersection between mobile apps and political campaigns.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Mobile devices have a significant impact on all areas of everyday life and are now new mass media channels capable of meeting multiple needs (Ahonen, 2008). The services provided through these devices are based on applications (apps), which increase the original functions of mobile devices and are accessible on distribution platforms. The most well-known platforms are the App Store (for iOS-based devices) and Google Play (for Android devices), both of which have grown significantly in recent years. Google Play, for example, has gone from offering 30,000 apps in March 2010 to providing more than 3,500,000 apps in December 2017 (Statista, 2017).

The information available on Google Play and a questionnaire administered to all the app developers that made up the sample (n=376) were used in order to build the profile and identify the purposes of content creators. The questionnaire used open-ended exploratory questions since it sought information about a specific area, but the interviewees' possible responses were not known beforehand.Three fundamental aspects were addressed: development characteristics (people linked to the project, infrastructure and production times), motivations, and purposes (reasons for choosing this media channel and topic). Responses to the questionnaire were received from 74 of the 376 developers. The exploratory analysis of response rates was based on previous theoretical frameworks on the creation of political content for the internet (Neys & Jansz, 2010):

• RQ1. What are the profiles, motivations, and purposes of creators of Donald Trump apps?

• RQ2. What type of message is conveyed in the most downloaded Donald Trump apps, and what are the main features of their discourse?

The objective of the study is therefore twofold. Firstly, it provides an approach to one of the less visible aspects of the Trump phenomenon which has not yet received scholarly attention, due to its novelty and uniqueness. Secondly, it addresses the current methodological challenge involved in research focused on apps and app developers (Light, Burgess, & Duguay, 2016), and proposes some elements to build an analytical model.

2. Material and methods

2.1. Strategy and sample collection

The Google Play search engine and Sensor Tower, an app monitoring tool, were used to identify and select the sample. The App Store platform was not included due to its opacity. It does not provide some pieces of data which were essential for this study, such as the number of times a particular app has been downloaded.

The keyword “Donald Trump” was used for the search, which was completed by linked terms suggested by the platform. The sample included 412 apps published from June 2015, when Donald Trump announced his intention to run as a candidate in the Republican Party primary, until January 2018, when he had been president for one year. Based on this list, a database was created that contained all the information provided by the platform on each of the apps. The analysis contained in the study was limited by the reliability of the data provided by the platform. The results were first classified according to the number of downloads (based on the range of downloads available in the platform).

As shown in Table 1 (see the next page), the apps about Trump were estimated to have exceeded 37 million downloads by the end of May 2018. The distribution of apps according to their number of downloads was uneven, as 99.2% of the estimated downloads were concentrated in a quarter of the sample (n=117).

2.2 Procedures

The twofold focus of this study, app creators and app messages, involved the use of different methods. A qualitative questionnaire was developed based on the app's database to determine the profile of the developers, whereas a coding sheet for quantitative content analysis was employed to analyse the message.

The information available on Google Play and a questionnaire administered to all the app developers that made up the sample (n=376) were used in order to build the profile and identify the purposes of content creators. The questionnaire used open-ended exploratory questions since it sought information about a specific area, but the interviewees' possible responses were not known beforehand.Three fundamental aspects were addressed: development characteristics (people

linked to the project, infrastructure and production times), motivations, and purposes (reasons for choosing this media channel and topic). Responses to the questionnaire were received from 74 of the 376 developers. The exploratory analysis of response rates was based on previous theoretical frameworks on the creation of political content for the internet (Neys & Jansz, 2010):

• Recording purpose. The developer wanted to provide an information service about Trump and his activities.

• Expressive purpose. The developer stressed that the medium was unique as an expressive vehicle.

• Persuasion purpose. The developer sought to express an opinion, participate in a public debate, or generate a climate of opinion around Trump.

• Engagement purpose. The developer intended to promote a specific action in the political or social context.

• Commercial purpose. The developer’s strategy was using topical issues that go viral to obtain financial gains, visibility, self-promotion or app promotion.

• Entertainment purpose. The developers intended to provide entertainment to the users of their applications.

• Self-realisation purpose. The developers did not consider the connotations conveyed by the content and created the app for educational or hedonistic purposes.

The quantitative analysis of the apps and the definition of the discursive variables were both framed within the idea of the computational turn (Berry, 2012), which advocates the need for the social sciences and the humanities to build specific theoretical tools to identify the discursive features of apps. The analysis was only applied to the most popular apps (n=117), which were those that exceeded 5,000 downloads as of 31 May 2018.

Two associated researchers did the coding using a coding sheet for quantitative content analysis recorded in a codebook. The inter-coder reliability was measured using Cohen's Kappa coefficient for each of the variables to increase the integrity of the process (Riffe, Lacy, & Fico, 2005). The following variables were collected:

a) Thematic approaches (K=0.91). These approaches were developed by using the references and prior sample analysis. The resulting classification included: popularity, physical appearance, private life, entrepreneur, presidential candidate, president of the United States, and political initiatives (both national and international).

b) Discourse type (K=0.86). Four categories were used (Haigh & Heresco, 2010): escapist (discourse that is not linked to reality, which provides an unreal or a merely viral construction); informative (discourse that offers information about Trump's activities, such as his presidential campaign); meaningful (discourse intended to give an opinion); and dramatic-satirical (discourse that highlights emotional elements with an ironic purpose). The initial results suggested the need to include a fifth category: circumstantial (a discourse that used the popularity of Trump as a character, but without proposing a complementary construction).

c) Discourse focus (K=0.79). An analysis was made to see if the characters (Trump, Hillary, etc.), topics (United States immigration, health and so on) and events linked to current affairs (presidential elections, and the construction of a wall on the border with Mexico, among others) played a leading role.

d) Ideological positioning (K=0.94). The aim was to identify whether Trump (as an individual) and/or Trump’s actions were portrayed in a positive, negative or neutral way.

3. Results

3.1. Profile, motivations and purposes of app developers3.1.1. Profile of the developers

The developers (n=376) were classified according to the total number of apps they had published on Google Play Store (Wang, Liu, Guo, Xiangqun, Miao, Guoai, & Jason, 2017), and were related to the number of downloads for the apps in the sample (Table 1).

Table 2 relates the activity of the developers to the popularity of the Trump apps they had published. This relationship was not clear from the available data. The relationship between both variables showed that “developers who created more apps are likely to have more accumulated installs” (Wang & al., 2017: 167). However, this statement should not be taken to include commercial apps when their content or theme has ideological or political premises. The data obtained in this study show that the distribution of downloads for the apps was even across the different types of profiles, with a tendency for active developers to obtain a greater number of downloads.

Another aspect of interest was that the number of apps and developers in terms of creating content was not constant, since only 31 of the developers published more than one Trump app. This divergence between the creators’ app publishing activities, and their Trump apps shows that the latter were circumstantial, heterogeneous and discontinuous, rather than being part of an ideological mobilisation strategy.

The questionnaires reflected that for the majority of the apps created by sporadic or moderately active developers, creators had teams of 1 or 2 people, while the developers that qualified as active or prolific involved teams of more than 5 members. Specialist development tools were largely used. An analysis of the most popular apps (n=117) using code comparison tools (Wang, Guo, Ma, & Chen, 2015), detection of third-party libraries (Ma, Wang, Guo, & Chen, 2016) and a formal content analysis identified similarities (interface, game mechanics, aesthetic elements, etc.) among 84 of the 117 apps (71.7%). These coincidences revealed a relatively simple rationale for the creation of contents, based on virality and popular genres, with slight aesthetic variations to secure the maximum number of downloads as quickly as possible. The development times of the apps also showed disparate values that were proportionally distributed between 1-6 days, between 1-3 weeks and between 1-3 months. The two extreme values were found for Trump Dab Simulator 2K17 (GadenDetErMig), which the developer claimed to have created in 30 minutes, and Border Clash (Catta Games), which took its single developer 13 months to complete.

3.1.2. Purposes involved in creating an app

The questionnaires revealed that developers had three reasons for creating apps. Firstly, a pragmatic one, insofar as this line of work involved a lower investment in terms of production and distribution compared to other options. Secondly, they had an expressive purpose, as the apps was perceived as being unique means of conveying a different opinion or discourse compared to other options, mainly due to their narrative peculiarities, or the platform or distribution channel they used. And thirdly, there was an interest in using these apps as self-promotion tools. As noted by Box10, “in addition to offering a funny interpretation, we wanted to prove that we could successfully develop high-quality applications” (Box10, Whack the Trump).

The developers largely chose to develop games (286 apps, 69%) and entertainment apps (72,17%), as opposed to other categories that were in the minority (54,13%). This trend was accentuated even further when considering the estimated downloads by gender. The apps that did not correspond to the two main categories (games, 70% of the total downloads; and entertainment, 25% of the total downloads) accounted for only 5% of the total downloads of the sample. This data set provides information to establish the optimal way for the developers to achieve their objectives.

3.1.3. Why Trump?

The constant presence of Trump in the media was key for the developers who used his popularity as a source of inspiration: “we took advantage of internet trends and memes to create content” (The Meme Buttons, Real Trump Button).

Figure 2 shows the influence between political current affairs and the publication of apps. It also indicates that the campaign of the 2016 presidential elections (when Trump was already the official Republican party candidate), and the first months of Trump’s presidency (from August 2016 to March 2017) were the time periods in which almost half of the sample was concentrated (202 apps, 49%).

3.1.4. The developers’ purposes

The developers' reasons for creating an application about Trump were focused on various areas. The most frequent was merely entertainment, as “the application didn't have any deeper meaning, aside from the fact that it is a simple runner with a celebrity” (Josh Barton, Trump Countdown), or the interest in spreading a message inspired by “a concern about the idea of building the wall” (Ignacio Rabadán, Chili for Trump). In this vein, some developers said: “the main reason was to lampoon Trump and make fun of one of his outrageous statements (Mexico wall)” (Esayitch, Taco Trump Down). This communication potential was important both inside and outside the United States: “everybody is talking about Trump, and American politics is influencing everybody around the world. So as I can’t vote in America, I can at least make fun of what they are doing” (Rudie Productions, Trump Escape).

Despite this general trend, other developers stated that their Trump app was for information purposes but also had several additional aims. The official campaign applications and the Political Action Committees (America First and Great America) offered news about Trump, and provided information about geo-localised campaign events, organised door-to-door information activities, and donations. The same purpose was sought by another set of apps, although with a more critical intention. These allowed users “to have a record of the things Trump said that was easy to search” (Marshall Gordon, Trump Tweets Archive); as one of the developers said “his tweets about immigration inspired me to make a game to satirically ‘make fun’ of him” (Catta Games, Border Clash).

The aim to provide information was usually combined with a persuasive or engaging purpose. The official applications obviously went beyond a purely informative purpose, since they reinforced a positive view of Trump with a further engaging motive. However, apps that provided a negative construction of the candidate worked at different levels. The expressive capacity of the apps was combined with a sense of frustration, as stated by Rudie Productions: “I felt frustrated with the current politics all over the world and wanted to contribute something to the critique” (Rudie Productions, Trump Escape); or, as in the case of Marshall Gordon, “it was made to call out Trump on lies and hypocrisy” (Marshall Gordon, Trump Tweets Archive). The purpose of apps such as Boycott Trump was to create a climate featuring “a unified grassroots movement centred on holding companies and individuals that help Trump in any way accountable” (Democratic Coalition Against Trump).

The commercial or viral purpose also mobilised a large number of developers. As claimed by one of them, “the figure of Trump attracts a lot of people, and that means consumers” (Yunus Kulyyev, Trump'em!). Along these lines, another developer argued: “I used Donald Trump as a character because I felt that it would encourage more people to play the game as he was, and still is, a controversial figure” (Josh Barton, Trump Countdown). This trend was seen in the apps that were available in the database which exceeded 5,000 downloads (n=117). A line of distribution of the content can be identified through free apps (100%) that relied on advertising (87.3%) or purchases within the apps (34.9%) to obtain their revenues.

3.2. Message analysis3.2.1. Thematic approaches

The popularity of the character (n=65) and his running as a presidential candidate (n=25) were the most popular reasons when compared with the rest, which were in the minority: political initiatives (n=14), president of the United States (n=5), entrepreneur (n=4), physical appearance (n=4) and private life (n=0). The majority of approaches subscribed to the logic of viral promotion that had been pointed out by the developers and was behind their specific uses. The more common option involved using the image of Trump without altering the essence of the original content. Existing resources and codes were used to simplify this work in similar apps such as soundboards (10), spoof calls (6) or mainly, versions of popular games (73), including Angry Birds, Super Mario Bros or Mahjong, among others.

The combination of the most recurrent approaches, popularity, and choices, explain the main peaks in the production of apps shown in Figure 2. The average number of apps published monthly in the stage when Trump announced he would run as a presidential candidate was 21.1, and it declined as the circumstances that made him popular (the novelty of his presence in the political sphere and the presidential campaign) were no longer current. Thus, the monthly average of Trump apps after his inauguration as president decreased to 14.2 apps.

3.2.2. Discourse focus

The analysis of the discourse focus was based on three aspects: characters, themes, and events. The central character of the search, Donald Trump, was obviously the leading figure in the apps in the sample. Political campaigns can currently be personalised (Garzia, 2017), which explains the high average number of apps published in the periods when the primary and the presidential elections took place. The political figure that appeared most frequently (after Trump) was his main political rival, Hillary Clinton (14). Other Democratic politicians were also featured in the apps, albeit more symbolically (Barack Obama, Bernie Sanders), as well as some non-US political figures (Vladimir Putin, Kim Jong-Un). Trump's personal circle was not much in evidence, and none of the apps analysed mentioned other Republican politicians. The hegemonic status of Trump in his own party was reflected in the app Trump on Top (IDC Games), which involved a fight between two sides: Republican and Democratic politicians. One side was made up of characters who were Democratic politicians, including Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, and Joe Manchin. The other side was composed of different characters that all referred to Trump (Entrepreneur, Trumpoline, SuperTrump). This reflected the perception of the heterogeneous Democratic leadership as opposed to the homogeneous leadership on the Republican side.

The analysis of specific issues and events revealed the ambiguous nature of this type of content. There were hardly any direct references to particular events, except for two important ones: the presidential election in the United States (n=24), and the proposal to build a wall on the border with Mexico (n=10). The discourse on the US presidential election adopted a confrontation perspective, while in the discourse related to the wall, most apps provided satirical or critical views about the building process of the wall, its demolition, and attempts to cross it. These constructions lacked complexity, but their repeated use indicated their significance within the overall themes being addressed.

3.2.3. Types of discourses

The narratives contained in the Donald Trump apps mainly focused on a circumstantial discourse (37.6%), followed by those that used dramatic-satirical (28.2%), escapist (18.8%), and meaningful (13.7%) discourses, and almost anecdotally, some of the discourses were provided for information purposes (1.7%). There were a series of apps (56.4%) circumstantial and escapist in their approach that sought to make their creators visible within the platform by using viral self-promotion techniques. Another group (41.9%) adopted an editorial strategy (dramatic-satirical and meaningful) to create a negative construction of the character, exploring the discursive capacities of this channel. It should also be noted that the apps were rarely used for information purposes about social and political actors. In contrast, it was particularly interesting to see how the discourses evolved over time in the three major segments identified by the study, as shown in Figure 3 (next page).

Two trends were identified in the publication of apps over the different periods. The first was the growth in the number of apps linked to viral strategies and an aseptic (circumstantial and escapist) construction of Donald Trump. The second trend reflected the reverse process, as largely editorial apps (dramatic-satirical and meaningful) were found. It was observed that the discourses pivoted around support or political confrontation in the campaign periods (primary and presidential elections), and later shifted to a more commercial view, banking on Trump’s popularity as US president and focused on content monetisation and self-promotion.

3.2.4. Ideological positioning

The apps that portrayed a neutral representation of Donald Trump were in the majority (68.3%), compared to those that advocated a negative (28.2%) or a positive (3.4%) view. This distribution points to a correlation between circumstantial and escapist discourses together with a positioning that exposed their interest in using Trump for commercial or satirical ends, rather than for ideological purposes. This pattern is shown in Figure 4 over the period of the sample (see next page).

4. Discussion and conclusions

The controversial popularity of Donald Trump in the American political sphere, and its manifestations in other countries, have spawned efforts to define a new political context, in an attempt to recognise the elements that contributed to his victory in the US presidential elections of 2016 (Rodríguez-Andrés, 2018; Azari, 2017). This phenomenon is intertwined with a new plane of the media ecosystem, namely mobile applications, where links are made that are currently studied in academic research (Aguado, Martínez, & Cañete-Sanz, 2015). This paper provides an interpretation of this intersection through two research questions related to the messages produced and the creators of those messages. The creators of app content in the sample have heterogeneous profiles, although some common trends were identified. There were four major types of developers, according to their level of production. This may have involved creating apps of higher or lower formal quality, but was unrelated to their success after being published on Google Play. The largest number of apps came from sporadic and moderately productive developers (71.6%).

The purposes of these developers in creating the apps were either economic or ideological. For the majority of them, the revenues from creation and distribution, or directly produced by the app as it went viral, were part of the logic of “earned media”. This is the same economic logic that led US television channels to provide comprehensive coverage on Donald Trump without any editorial control (McIntyre, 2018: 109). In the same vein, this was the rationale used by one of the main architects of “fake news” about Donald Trump, Beqa Latsabidze, who stated that he had no political motive; he was just following the money (McIntyre, 2018: 121). However, very few developers reported on whether they had obtained the expected results from these apps, although the creators of one of the most popular ones –Dump Trump (Daydream)– identified its viral nature as a key element to its success. In contrast, the least popular motivation, ideological positioning, was found to occur unevenly. Interestingly, the neutral apps that parodied Trump had more downloads than the apps that were markedly critical. In these cases, the developers favoured applications that created content (images, videos, memes, etc.) to be shared on social networks in order to go beyond the borders of the app ecosystem.

The developers’ intentions were reflected, both consciously and unconsciously, in the apps' discourse. One of the main characteristics was that the apps simplified discourses, both by the use of caricature (aesthetics) and satire (message). It was therefore confirmed that the most popular set of apps (n=117) proposed archetypes and clichés through graphic humour. In this process, two issues of interest were identified. The first was that the apps with a more critical discourse were in the minority (both in number and the quantity of downloads) compared to those that opted for greater simplification and virality. This trend can be explained by using the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion (Petty & Cacioppo, 1986). This was also seen in the case of games on social networks (Schulze, Schöler, & Skiera, 2014), because when users searched for apps merely for their enjoyment, they did not seek something more profound, or which could be used outside the scope of entertainment. The second question of interest was that the apps proliferated in parallel to the latest news. Since creation processes have become more automated and simplified, developers were able to obtain some kind of benefit (financial gain, prestige or self-realisation). This was directly linked to three converging vectors: the influence of current affairs on the users' behaviour when consuming news on a mobile device (Westlund, 2015); the “prosumer” and “produser” logics attached to the digital environment (Bruns, 2012); and the controversial practice of cloning in mobile apps (Crussel, Gibler, & Chen, 2012).

The increasingly neutral content of the apps (shown in Figure 4) meant that it was not permeated by the news to the same extent that both the developers and apps themselves were. By cross-referencing the data presented in Figures 2 and 3, it could be seen that the apps dealt with the most topical issues. It has been confirmed that the current affairs of a given period were diluted in the sample; the message contained in the apps, therefore, was a simple construction based on stereotypes, rather than being based on issues related to the political agenda. The failure to include specific issues was only overcome (according to the data from the most popular apps) during the presidential election and when a proposal was made by Trump to build a wall on the US-Mexico border, a phenomenon that articulated cross-border public opinion (Meneses, Martín-del-Campo & Rueda-Zarate, 2018). These factors indicated that there was no specific political discourse (other than a few isolated initiatives), and that the majority of the apps took advantage of political current affairs to gain virality and influence. Therefore, the ideological positioning in app discourse resulted from a direct critique on the part of the less productive developers, which became weakened and leaned towards cathartic and timeless positions (Figure 4). All in all, they moved away from the trends mostly found in the social networks, which privileged basic, visceral and uncivil discourses (Ott, 2017). In view of the above, two future lines of research can be outlined: firstly, conducting a detailed analysis of the discourse in politically-focused apps and, secondly, investigating the penetration and modes of reception of the political contents disseminated through mobile apps.

In short, Trump's popularity in the mobile app ecosystem derived from the combination of a series of apparently unrelated factors: the developers’ motive of self-promotion; their interest in experimenting with new expressive formulas; the social, political and media importance of the political figure involved; and the simplified creation process and the current use of app content. However, while this set of features shapes the dynamics of the political content created in app distribution platforms, these ultimately adhere to the rationale that “there is no business like show business”.

Funding Agency

This paper is the result of the R & D & i Research Project “Politainment in the post-truth environment: new narratives, clickbait and gamification” (CSO2017-84472-R), funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness. It has also resulted from an agreement under the Training Programme for University Lecturers (FPU 14/05297), funded by the Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport. The article was translated into English by Julian Thomas.


Draft Content 597641155-71777-en011.jpg


Draft Content 597641155-71777-en012.jpg


Draft Content 597641155-71777-en013.jpg


Draft Content 597641155-71777-en014.jpg


Draft Content 597641155-71777-en015.jpg


Draft Content 597641155-71777-en016.jpg

References

Aguado, J.M., Martinez, I.J., & Cañete­Sanz, L. (2015). Tendencias evolutivas del contenido digital en las aplicaciones móviles. profesional de la información, 24(6), 787­795. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2015.nov.10

Ahonen, T. (2008). Mobile as 7th of the Mass Media : Cellphone, cameraphone, Iphone, smartphone. Londres: Futuretext.

Azari, J.R. (2016). How the news media helped to nominate Trump. Political Communication, 33, 677-680. https://doi.org/10.1080/10584609.2016.1224417

Berrocal, S., Redondo, M., & Campos, E. (2013). Una aproximación al estudio del infoentretenimiento en Internet: Origen, desarrollo y perspectivas futuras. AdComunica, 4, 63-79. https://doi.org/10.6035/2174-0992.2012.4.5

Berry, D.M. (2012). Introduction: Understanding the digital humanities. In Berry D.M. (Eds.), Understanding digital humanities. (pp.1-20). London: Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230371934_1

Boase, J., & Humphreys, L. (2018). Mobile methods: Explorations, innovations, and reflections. Mobile Media & Communication, 6(2), 153-162. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050157918764215

Bruns, A. (2012). Reconciling community and commerce? Collaboration between produsage communities and commercial operators. Information, Communication & Society, 15(6), 815-835. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2012.680482

Carroll, J.K., Moorhead, A., Bond, R., LeBlanc, W.G., Petrella, R.J., & Fiscella, K. (2017). Who uses mobile phone health apps and does use matter? A Secondary data analytics approach. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 19(4), e125. https://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.5604

Crescenzi-Lanna, L., & Grane-Oro, M. (2016). An analysis of the interaction design of the best educational apps for children aged zero to eight. [Análisis del diseño interactivo de las mejores apps educativas para niños de cero a ocho años]. Comunicar, 46, 77-85. https://doi.org/10.3916/C46-2016-08

Crussell, J., Gibler, C., & Chen, H. (2012). Attack of the clones: Detecting cloned applications on android markets. European Symposium on Research in Computer Security, 37-54. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-33167-1_3

De-Aguilera, M., & Casero-Ripollés, A. (2018). ¿Tecnologías para la transformación? Los medios sociales ante el cambio político y social. Presentación, Icono 14, 16(1), 1-21. https://doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v16i1.1162

Garzia, D. (2017). Personalization of politics between television and the Internet: Leader effects in the 2013 Italian parliamentary election. Journal of Information Technology & Politics 14(4), 403-416. https://doi.org/10.1080/19331681.2017.1365265

Gomez-Garcia, S., & Cabeza, J. (2016). El discurso informativo de los newsgames: el caso Bárcenas en los juegos para dispositivos móviles. Cuadernos.Info, 38, 137-148. https://doi.org/10.7764/cdi.38.593

Gunwoong, L. & Raghu, T.S., (2014). Determinants of mobile apps' success: Evidence from the app store market. Journal of Management Information Systems, 31(2), 133-170. https://doi.org/10.2753/MIS0742-1222310206

Haigh, M., & Heresco, A. (2010). Late-night Iraq: Monologue joke content and tone from 2003 to 2007. Mass Communication & Society 13(2), 157-173. https://doi.org/10.1080/15205430903014884

Katz, J.E. (2008). Handbook of mobile communications studies. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. https://doi.org/10.7551/mitpress/9780262113120.001.0001

Light, B., Burgess, J., & Duguay, S. (2016). The walkthrough method: An approach to the study of apps. New Media & Society, 20(3), 881-900. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444816675438

Ma, Z., Wang, H., Guo, Y., & Chen, X. (2016). Libradar: Fast and accurate detection of third-party libraries in Android apps. In Proceedings of the 38th International Conference on Software Engineering Companion (ICSE ’16), 653-656. https://doi.org/10.1145/2889160.2889178

Martin, J.A. (2014). Mobile media and political participation: Defining and developing an emerging field. Mobile Media & Communication, 2(2), 173-195. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050157914520847

McCabe, W., & Nelson, R. (23/03/2016). App store data offers unique insights into the 2016 Presidential Race. [Mensaje en un blog]. https://bit.ly/2ccpGW3

McIntyre, L. (2018). Posverdad. Madrid: Cátedra.

Meneses, M.E., Martín-del-Campo, A., & Rueda-Zárate, H. (2018). #TrumpenMexico. Transnational connective action on Twitter and the border wall dispute. [#TrumpenMéxico. Acción conectiva transnacional en Twitter y la disputa por el muro fronterizo]. Comunicar, 26(55). https://doi.org/10.3916/C55-2018-04

Neys, J., & Jansz, J. (2010). Political Internet games: Engaging an audience. European Journal of Communication, 25(3), 227-241. https://doi.org/10.1177/0267323110373456

Ott, B.L. (2017). The age of Twitter: Donald J. Trump and the politics of debasement. Critical Studies in Media Communication, 34(1), 59-68. https://doi.org/10.1080/15295036.2016.1266686

Petty, R.E., & Cacioppo, J.T. (1986). Communication and persuasion: Central and peripheral routes to attitude change. New York: Springer. https://doi.org/10.2307/1422805

Riffe, D., Lacy, S., & Fico, F. (2014). Analyzing media messages. Using quantitative content analysis in research. New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203551691

Rodriguez-Andres, R. (2018). Trump 2016: ¿Presidente gracias a las redes sociales? Palabra Clave, 21(3), 831-859. https://doi.org/10.5294/pacla.2018.21.3.8

Schulze, C., Schöler, L., & Skiera, B. (2014). Not all fun and games: Viral marketing for utilitarian products. Journal of Marketing, 78(1), 1-19. https://doi.org/10.1509/jm.11.0528

Shankland, S. (2008). Obama releases iPhone recruiting, campaign tool. [Mensaje en un blog]. https://cnet.co/2NL9IY6

Silva-Rodriguez, A., & Lopez-Garcia, X. (2017). Visión retrospectiva de la investigación sobre comunicación y periodismo móvil en España. In De-Lara-Gonzáles, A. & Arias-Robles, F. (Eds.), Mediamorfosis: Perspectivas sobre la innovación en periodismo (pp.106-117). Elche: Universidad Miguel Hernández. https://bit.ly/2xfBbqq

Statista (Ed.) (2017). Number of available applications in the Google Play Store from December 2009 to June 2018. [Portal estadístico online]. https://bit.ly/2mOe6UQ

Taipale, S. & Fortunati, L. (2014). Capturing methodological trends in mobile communication studies. Information, Communication & Society, 17(5), 627-642. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2013.862562

Tau, B. (2012). Obama campaign launches mobile app. [Mensaje en un blog]. https://politi.co/2p6bTaD

Wang, H., Guo, Y., Ma, Z., & Chen X. (2015). Wukong: A scalable and accurate two-phase approach to Android app clone detection. Proceedings of ISSTA ’15, 71-82. https://doi.org/10.1145/2771783.2771795

Wang, H., Liu, Z., Guo, Y., Xiangqun, C., Miao, Z., Guoai, X., & Jason, H. (2017). An Explorative Study of the Mobile App Ecosystem from App Developers’ Perspective. International World Wide Web Conference Committee, 163-172. https://doi.org/10.1145/3038912.3052712

Westlund, O. (2015). News consumption in an age of mobile media : Patterns, people, place, and participation. Mobile Media & Communication, 3(2), 151-159. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050157914563369

Yamamoto, M., Kushin, M.J., & Dalisay, F. (2013). Social media and mobiles as political mobilization forces for young adults: Examining the moderating role of online political expression in political participation. New Media & Society 17(6), 880-898. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444813518390



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Esta investigación explora la creación y el mensaje de las apps sobre Donald Trump publicadas en la plataforma Google Play desde junio de 2015 hasta enero de 2018 (n=412). El interés del estudio proviene tanto de sus objetivos como de su metodología. Por un lado, se pretende detectar el perfil, motivaciones y propósitos de los desarrolladores de apps sobre la figura de Donald Trump y, por otro, identificar los principales rasgos de los discursos de las apps más descargadas. La investigación se ha desarrollado en dos frentes: un cuestionario cualitativo de preguntas abiertas a desarrolladores (n=376) y un análisis cuantitativo de contenido del mensaje de las apps que superaron las 5.000 descargas (n=117). El cuestionario ha identificado la influencia de la actualidad política en los desarrolladores y sus motivaciones de corte ideológico y económico mientras que el análisis de contenido ha revelado la tendencia y evolución de los temas, discursos y el posicionamiento ideológico de las apps más populares sobre Donald Trump. Los resultados establecen una base empírica en relación a la articulación del mensaje de las apps con la actualidad informativa, la influencia de los contenidos virales, los discursos hegemónicos y el rol de los desarrolladores de nuevas propuestas expresivas, comerciales, informativas y persuasivas en la conjunción de los ecosistemas de aplicaciones móviles y las campañas políticas.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

El impacto de los dispositivos móviles en todos los ámbitos de la vida cotidiana los sitúa como un nuevo medio de comunicación de masas (Ahonen, 2008) que satisface un elevado número de necesidades. Su oferta de servicios se centraliza en las plataformas de distribución de aplicaciones (a partir de ahora, apps) que incrementan las funciones originales de cada dispositivo móvil. Las plataformas más conocidas que han experimentado un significativo crecimiento en los últimos años son App Store (para dispositivos basados en iOS) y Google Play (para dispositivos Android). Por ejemplo, Google Play ha pasado de ofrecer 30.000 apps en marzo de 2010 a superar los 3.500.000 en diciembre de 2017 (Statista, 2017).

Esta situación responde al interés de los desarrolladores y las posibilidades de negocio en un sector emergente y estable (Gunwoong & Raghu, 2014). La discusión académica al respecto ha abierto un conjunto de frentes tan amplio como el fenómeno en sí (Katz, 2008), reconociendo sus características distintivas como campo de investigación autónomo (Taipale & Fortunati, 2014) con nuevas propuestas metodológicas (Boase & Humphreys, 2018). En ese contexto, la investigación sobre apps es una línea emergente (Light, Burgess, & Duguay, 2016) que se ha centrado en ámbitos como la salud (Carroll, Moorhead, Bond, LeBlanc, Petrella, & Fiscella, 2017), educación (Crescenzi-Lanna & Grane-Oro, 2016) o comunicación (Westlund, 2015; Silva & López, 2017). Este conjunto de usos cristalizó en la práctica política con la apuesta de Obama por el uso de apps en las campañas de 2008 y 2012 (Shankland, 2008; Tau, 2012).

Una lectura que se ha complementado con el rol de las apps en relación con el activismo (Yamamoto, Kushin, & Dalisay, 2013), la participación electoral (Martin, 2014) o la sátira política (Gómez-García & Cabeza, 2016). Las elecciones norteamericanas de 2016 culminaron este proceso reflejando la popularidad de los diferentes aspirantes a través de su presencia en las plataformas de distribución de apps (McCabe & Nelson, 2016), confirmando así la relevancia de este nuevo escenario y sus contenidos que se inscriben en un contexto más amplio que reconoce la capacidad transformativa de los medios sociales digitales (De-Aguilera & Casero-Ripollés, 2018).

Partiendo de ese escenario, este trabajo explora la construcción de la figura de Trump en el ecosistema de aplicaciones para dispositivos móviles. Sobre este objeto de estudio se articularon dos preguntas de investigación en el marco del «infoentretenimiento» en Internet (Berrocal, Redondo, & Campos, 2013):

• PI1. ¿A qué perfil, motivaciones y propósitos responden los creadores de apps sobre la figura de Donald Trump?

• PI2. ¿Qué tipo de mensaje plantean las apps más descargadas sobre Donald Trump y cuáles son los principales rasgos de su discurso?

De esta forma, el objetivo de esta investigación es doble. Por un lado, se ofrece una aproximación a uno de los aspectos menos visibles del fenómeno Trump que, por su novedad y singularidad, todavía no ha recibido atención académica. Por otro lado, se responde al actual desafío metodológico que implica la investigación sobre apps y sus desarrolladores (Light, Burgess, & Duguay, 2016) proponiendo, además, elementos para configurar un modelo de análisis.

2. Material y métodos

2.1. Estrategia y recopilación de la muestra

La búsqueda y selección de la muestra se realizó a través del motor de búsqueda de Google Play y Sensor Tower, una herramienta de monitorización de apps. No se incluyó App Store por la opacidad de la plataforma, que no refleja datos esenciales para esta investigación como, por ejemplo, el número de descargas de una app.

La búsqueda se realizó a través de un término clave (Donald Trump) y se completó con las referencias vinculadas a partir de las sugerencias de la propia plataforma. La muestra comprendió 412 apps publicadas desde junio de 2015, cuando Donald Trump anunció su candidatura a las primarias del partido republicano, hasta enero de 2018, cuando cumplía un año como presidente. Este listado permitió elaborar una base de datos con toda la información que ofrecía la plataforma sobre cada una de las apps. Los límites del análisis de esta investigación provienen de la fiabilidad de los datos proporcionados por la propia plataforma. La primera clasificación de los resultados respondió al número de descargas (de acuerdo a las franjas que reconoce la plataforma).

La Tabla 1 presenta la estimación de que las apps que empleaban la figura de Trump habían superado los 37 millones de descargas a finales de mayo de 2018. Además, la distribución de apps en relación a su número de descargas plantea un reparto desigual en el que el 99,2% de la estimación de descargas se concentra en una cuarta parte de la muestra (n=117).

2.2 Procedimientos

El doble interés de la investigación –creadores y mensajes– implicó métodos diferentes. A partir de la base de datos de apps, se desarrolló un cuestionario cualitativo para determinar el perfil de los desarrolladores y una ficha de análisis cuantitativo de contenido, para el análisis del mensaje.

La construcción del perfil y la identificación de las motivaciones de los creadores de contenido parten de la información disponible en Google Play y de un cuestionario propuesto a todos los desarrolladores de las apps que componían la muestra (n=376). Su construcción se fundamentó en preguntas abiertas de tipo exploratorio, ya que se buscaba información sobre un hecho concreto sin conocer con antelación todas las posibles respuestas. Se abordaban tres aspectos fundamentales: características del desarrollo (personas vinculadas al proyecto, infraestructura y tiempos de producción), motivaciones y propósitos (para apostar por esta fórmula y temática). El cuestionario recibió respuesta de 74 de los 376 desarrolladores. La interpretación -exploratoria por la tasa de respuesta- se basó en marcos teóricos previos sobre la creación de contenidos políticos para Internet (Neys & Jansz, 2010):

• Propósito informativo. El desarrollador quería ofrecer un servicio informativo sobre la figura de Trump y su actividad.

• Propósito expresivo. El desarrollador incidía en la singularidad del medio como vehículo expresivo.

• Propósito persuasivo. El desarrollador buscaba expresar una opinión, participar en el debate público o generar un clima de opinión en torno a Trump.

• Propósito movilizador. El desarrollador pretendía estimular una actuación específica en el contexto político o social.

• Propósito comercial. El desarrollador participaba de la estrategia de emplear temas de actualidad con una lógica viral para obtener beneficios económicos, visibilidad o autopromoción propia o de la app.

• Propósito lúdico. El desarrollador pretendía ofrecer un entretenimiento a los usuarios de sus aplicaciones.

• Autorrealización. El desarrollador no consideró las connotaciones del contenido y lo creó con un propósito formativo o hedonístico.

El análisis cuantitativo de las apps y la definición de las variables discursivas se enmarcaron en el turno computacional (Berry, 2012) que plantea la necesidad, por parte de las ciencias sociales y las humanidades, de construir utillajes teóricos específicos para identificar los rasgos discursivos de las apps. El análisis solo se aplicó a las apps más populares (n=117) que fueron aquellas que superaron las 5.000 descargas a 31 de mayo de 2018.

La codificación se realizó por dos investigadores asociados a través de una ficha de análisis de contenido cuantitativo reglamentada en un libro de códigos. Se midió la fiabilidad inter-codificadores empleando el coeficiente Kappa de Cohen a cada una de las variables para incrementar la integridad del proceso (Riffe, Lacy, & Fico, 2005). Se recogieron las siguientes variables:

a) Enfoques temáticos (?=0,91). La elaboración de los enfoques parte de la bibliografía de referencia y un análisis previo de la muestra. La división que se estableció fue la siguiente: popularidad, físico, vida privada, empresario, candidato a la presidencia, presidente de los Estados Unidos e iniciativas políticas (internacionales y nacionales).

b) Tipo de discurso (?=0,86). Se partió de cuatro categorías (Haigh & Heresco, 2010): escapista (discursos no vinculados con la realidad y que ofrecen una construcción irreal o meramente viral); informativa (se ofrece información sobre las actividades de Trump como, por ejemplo, su campaña presidencial); intencional (cuando se pretende ofrecer una opinión); y satírica (se subrayan elementos emocionales con un propósito irónico). Los primeros resultados aconsejaron incorporar una quinta categoría: circunstancial (se recurre a la popularidad del personaje, pero sin proponer una construcción complementaria).

c) Foco del discurso (?=0,79). Se analizaba si el protagonismo se localizaba en personajes (Trump, Hillary, etc.), temas (la inmigración o la sanidad en Estados Unidos) o eventos vinculados a la actualidad informativa (elecciones presidenciales o la construcción de un muro en la frontera con México entre otros).

d) Posicionamiento ideológico (?=0,94). Se trataba de identificar la lectura de las acciones o la figura de Trump en una propuesta positiva, negativa o neutral.

3. Resultados

3.1. Perfil, motivaciones y propósitos de los desarrolladores de apps3.1.1. Perfil de los desarrolladores

Se clasificó a los desarrolladores (n=376) en función del total de apps que habían publicado en Google Play (Wang, Liu, Guo, Xiangqun, Miao, Guoai, & Jason, 2017) y se les relacionó con el número de descargas que habían obtenido las apps de la muestra (Tabla 1).

La Tabla 2 relaciona la actividad de los desarrolladores con la popularidad de las apps sobre Trump que habían publicado. Un aspecto que no presenta una correspondencia clara a partir de los datos disponibles. La relación entre ambas variables planteaba que «cuantas más apps hayan creado, mayores serán las posibilidades de que sean populares» (Wang & al., 2017: 167). Sin embargo, esta afirmación conviene revisarla fuera del contexto de apps comerciales cuando su contenido o temática tiene premisas ideológicas o políticas. Los datos obtenidos en esta investigación reflejan que la distribución de descargas de las apps es equitativa en los diferentes tipos de perfiles con una tendencia de los desarrolladores activos a obtener un mayor número de descargas.

Otro aspecto de interés es que el número de apps y desarrolladores no implicó continuidad en la creación de contenidos ya que solo 31 de los desarrolladores publicaron más de una app sobre Trump. Esta divergencia entre la actividad de publicación de apps y las relacionadas con Trump las señala más como una iniciativa de carácter circunstancial, heterogéneo y discontinuo que como una estrategia de movilización ideológica.

Por otro lado, los cuestionarios reflejan que la mayoría de las apps que provenían de desarrolladores esporádicos o moderados estaban compuestos por equipos de 1 o 2 personas, mientras que los desarrolladores calificados como activos o prolíficos conformaban equipos de más de 5 integrantes. Además, las herramientas de desarrollo empleadas eran, principalmente, especializadas. Sin embargo, un análisis de las apps más populares (n=117) empleando herramientas de comparación de código (Wang, Guo, Ma, & Chen, 2015), detección de librerías de recursos (Ma, Wang, Guo, & Chen, 2016) y un análisis formal de contenido identificó similitudes (interfaz, mecánicas de juego, elementos estéticos, etc.) entre 84 de las 117 apps (71,7%). Estas coincidencias revelan una lógica relativamente simple en la creación de contenidos que apostaban por la viralidad y géneros populares con leves variaciones estéticas para optar al máximo número de descargas con la mayor rapidez posible.

Paralelamente, los tiempos de desarrollo de las apps presentan valores dispares que se distribuyen proporcionalmente entre 1-6 días, entre 1-3 semanas y entre 1-3 meses. Los valores extremos se sitúan entre Trump Dab Simulator 2K17 (GadenDetErMig), cuyo desarrollador declaró haber tardado 30 minutos, y los 13 meses que reconoce haber empleado el único desarrollador de Border Clash (Catta Games).

3.1.2. Motivaciones para crear una app

Los cuestionarios identifican una triple lógica de creación por parte de los desarrolladores. En primer lugar, una intención pragmática en cuanto suponía una inversión inferior para su producción y distribución frente a otras fórmulas. En segundo lugar, un propósito expresivo porque se percibía la singularidad de las apps para transmitir una opinión o un discurso diferente respecto a otras opciones, gracias, principalmente, a sus peculiaridades narrativas, plataforma de uso o canal de distribución. Por último, se aprecia un interés en emplear las apps como herramientas de autopromoción ya que «además de una lectura cómica, queríamos demostrar que podemos desarrollar aplicaciones exitosas de calidad» (Box10, Whack the Trump).

Los desarrolladores apostaron, principalmente, por crear juegos (286,69%) y apps vinculadas al entretenimiento (72,17%) frente a otras categorías (54,13%) que conformaron un resto minoritario y disperso. Esta tendencia se acentúa aún más si atendemos también a la estimación de descargas por género. Las apps que no se correspondían con las dos categorías principales (juegos, 70% del total de descargas y entretenimiento, 25%) solo supusieron el 5% de las descargas totales de esta muestra. Un conjunto de datos que permite establecer, desde el punto de vista de los desarrolladores, cuál era la forma óptima de lograr sus objetivos.

3.1.3. ¿Por qué Trump?

La presencia constante de Trump en los medios de comunicación fue clave para los desarrolladores que expresaban su popularidad como fuente de inspiración: «aprovechamos las tendencias de Internet y de los memes para crear contenido» (The Meme Buttons, Real Trump Button).

La Figura 2 refleja la influencia entre actualidad política y publicación de apps. Además, constata que el periodo de la campaña de las elecciones presidenciales de 2016 (ya como candidato oficial del partido republicano) y los primeros meses de la presidencia de Trump (de agosto de 2016 a marzo de 2017) conforman un segmento temporal que concentró casi la mitad de la muestra (202 apps, 49%).

3.1.4. Propósitos de los desarrolladores

Las motivaciones de los desarrolladores para crear una aplicación empleando a Trump como referencia se concentraron en diferentes vectores. Los más frecuentes son la mera diversión puesto que «la aplicación no tenía ningún significado más profundo aparte del hecho de que un famoso que se presentaba como candidato» (Josh Barton, Trump Countdown) o el interés por difundir un mensaje propiciado por «un malestar ante la idea de construir el muro» (Ignacio Rabadán, Chili for Trump). En esta lógica, algunos desarrolladores pretendían «satirizar a Trump y burlarse de una de sus declaraciones escandalosas, como las referidas al muro de México» (Esayitch, Taco Trump Down). Este potencial comunicativo se señalaba tanto dentro como fuera de Estados Unidos: «todo el mundo está hablando de Trump, y la política estadounidense está influenciando a todo el planeta; como no puedo votar en Estados Unidos, al menos puedo burlarme de lo que están haciendo» (Rudie Productions, Trump Escape).

A pesar de esta generalización, otros desarrolladores concretaban un propósito informativo sobre Trump a la hora de publicar sus apps que, a su vez, respondía a diferentes fines. Por un lado, las aplicaciones oficiales de la campaña o de los Comités de Acción Política –America First y Great America– ofrecían noticias sobre Trump y facilitaban la localización de actos de la campaña a través de geolocalización, organización de acciones informativas puerta a puerta y donaciones. El mismo propósito, aunque con una intención más crítica, perseguía otro conjunto de apps que permitían «tener un registro de las cosas que dijo Trump» (Marshall Gordon, Trump Tweets Archive) o «visibilizar sus tuits sobre inmigración» (Catta Games, Border Clash).

La apuesta informativa se combinaba, habitualmente, con un propósito persuasivo o movilizador. Obviamente, las aplicaciones oficiales superaban su intención informativa, ya que reforzaban una visión positiva complementada con una lógica movilizadora. Sin embargo, las apps que respondían a una construcción negativa del candidato planteaban diferentes niveles. Por un lado, se combinaba la capacidad expresiva de las apps con una frustración «con la política actual en todo el mundo y quise contribuir con algo a la crítica» (Rudie Productions, Trump Escape) o con la intención de «poner en evidencia a Trump sobre sus mentiras e hipocresía» (Marshall Gordon, Trump Tweets Archive). Por último, se planteaba la construcción de un clima de movilización a través de la app como, por ejemplo, con Boycott Trump, que se inscribía en «que contará con un movimiento de base unificado centrado en empresas de cartera e individuales que ayuden a Trump a rendir cuentas de cualquier manera» (Democratic Coalition Against Trump).

El propósito comercial o viral también movilizó a un elevado número de desarrolladores porque «la figura de Trump atrae a mucha gente y eso significa más consumidores» (Yunus Kulyyev, Trump’em!) o el uso de «Donald Trump como personaje porque sentí que alentaría a más personas a jugar el juego y porque sigue siendo una figura controvertida» (Josh Barton, Trump Countdown). Esta tendencia es reforzada por la información extraída de las apps que superaron las 5.000 descargas (n=117) disponibles en la base de datos. Se identifica una línea de distribución del contenido a través de apps gratuitas (100%) que confiaban sus ingresos a la publicidad (87,3%) o a las compras dentro de las apps (34,9%).

3.2. Análisis del mensaje3.2.1. Enfoques temáticos

La popularidad del personaje (n=65) y su participación como candidato a las elecciones presidenciales (n=25) son los encuadres más frecuentes frente al carácter minoritario del resto: iniciativas políticas (n=14), presidente de los Estados Unidos (n=5), empresario (n=4), físico (n=4) y vida privada (n=0). Los enfoques mayoritarios suscriben la lógica de promoción viral que habían señalado los desarrolladores y concreta sus usos. La fórmula habitual empleaba la imagen de Trump sin alterar la esencia del contenido original. Se aprovechaban recursos y códigos existentes para simplificar este trabajo -como se ha señalado en un epígrafe anterior- en apps similares como «soundboards» (10), bromas de llamada falsa (6) o, principalmente, versiones de juegos populares (73) como Angry Birds, Super Mario Bros o Mahjong entre otros.

La combinación de los enfoques más recurrentes -popularidad y elecciones- explica los principales picos de producción de apps que se reflejaban en el Gráfico 2. La media de publicación de apps durante su etapa como candidato a la presidencia fue de 21,1 que fue disminuyendo a medida que desaparecieron las condiciones que favorecieron esa popularidad –novedad del personaje en la esfera política y campaña presidencial–. De este modo, la media de apps que empleaba a Trump como referente tras su investidura como presidente disminuyó a las 14,2 apps al mes.

3.2.2. Foco de discurso

El análisis del foco del discurso se centraba en tres aspectos: personajes, temas y eventos. Resulta obvio que el personaje central de la búsqueda -Donald Trump- asume el protagonismo principal en las apps de la muestra. Un proceso que se inscribe en las nuevas formas de personalización de las campañas políticas (Garzia, 2017) y que explica la elevada media de publicación de apps durante la etapa de primarias y las elecciones presidenciales. En ese sentido, el personaje político más frecuente tras Trump es Hillary Clinton (14), como su principal rival política. De forma más testimonial aparecen otros políticos demócratas (Barack Obama o Bernie Sanders) junto a otras figuras políticas (Vladimir Putin o Kim Jong-Un).

El círculo personal de Trump apenas recibe importancia. Por otro lado, en ninguna de las apps analizadas se hace mención a otros políticos del partido republicano. Esta hegemonía de Trump en su propio partido la refleja una app como Trump on Top (IDC Games), que plantea un combate entre políticos republicanos y demócratas. Un bando está compuesto por políticos demócratas como Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama o Joe Manchin. El otro bando lo conforman diferentes encarnaciones de Trump (Empresario, Trumpoline, SuperTrump, etc.). En fin, un reflejo de la percepción de la heterogeneidad del liderazgo demócrata frente a la homogeneidad del bando republicano.

El análisis de temas y eventos específicos señaló la inconcreción en este tipo de contenidos puesto que apenas había referencias directas, aunque hay dos eventos destacados: las elecciones a la presidencia de los Estados Unidos (n=24) y la propuesta de construir un muro en la frontera con México (n=10). En el primer caso, el discurso se centraba en la perspectiva de confrontación mientras que, en el segundo, la mayor parte de las apps planteaban una lectura satírica o crítica sobre el proceso de construcción del muro, su demolición o los intentos de franquearlo. Las construcciones planteadas carecían de complejidad, pero su reiteración señala su importancia en el conjunto de temas que se abordaban.

3.2.3. Tipos de discursos

Las propuestas narrativas de las apps que se centraron en la figura de Donald Trump plantearon su discurso de carácter circunstancial (37,6%), seguidas de las que optaron por un uso satírico (28,2%), escapista (18,8%), intencional (13,7%), con una presencia anecdótica de las de carácter informativo (1,7%). Estos datos refuerzan la perspectiva de la existencia de un conjunto (56,4%) de apps -circunstanciales y escapistas- que pretenden visibilizar a sus creadores dentro de la plataforma empleando técnicas virales de autopromoción. Otro grupo (41,9%) adoptó una estrategia editorialista -satírica e intencional- en relación con una construcción negativa del personaje, explorando las capacidades discursivas de este formato. En último lugar, se puede señalar el carácter marginal del uso informativo de las apps por parte de los actores sociales y políticos. El aspecto de mayor interés fue la evolución de los discursos en los tres grandes segmentos temporales que se han reconocido en esta investigación y que se reflejan en la Figura 3 (página siguiente).

La evolución de la publicación de apps presenta una doble tendencia. La primera es la lógica ascendente de las apps vinculadas a estrategias virales y una construcción aséptica (circunstancial y escapista) de la figura de Donald Trump. La segunda tendencia refleja el proceso inverso en las apps de corte editorialista (satíricas e intencionales). Por tanto, se observa que los discursos pivotaron de propuestas de respaldo o confrontación política en los periodos de campaña (primarias y elecciones presidenciales) a una lectura más comercial (enfocada a la monetización de contenidos y a la autopromoción) por la popularidad de Trump como presidente de los Estados Unidos.

3.2.4. Posicionamiento ideológico

Las apps con una valoración neutral de Trump son mayoritarias (68,3%) respecto a aquellas que abogaban por una visión negativa (28,2%) o positiva (3,4%). Esta distribución señala la correlación entre los discursos circunstanciales y escapistas junto a un posicionamiento ideológico que delatan el interés por emplear la figura de Trump con objetivos comerciales o satíricos más que ideológicos. Un patrón expuesto en la figura 4 sobre su evolución a lo largo del periodo de la muestra.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

La polémica popularidad de Donald Trump en el contexto político norteamericano y sus manifestaciones en otros países implican intentos por definir un nuevo contexto político que ha derivado en los intentos de reconocer los elementos que contribuyeron a su victoria en las elecciones norteamericanas de 2016 (Rodríguez-Andrés, 2018; Azari, 2017). Un fenómeno que se imbrica con un nuevo plano del ecosistema mediático –las aplicaciones móviles– cuyas conexiones forman parte de la investigación académica actual (Aguado, Martínez, & Cañete-Sanz, 2015). Esta investigación ofrece una lectura de esta intersección a través de dos preguntas de investigación que atienden a los emisores y sus mensajes.

Los creadores de contenido responden a un perfil heterogéneo, aunque con tendencias comunes. En primer lugar, la existencia de cuatro grandes tipos de desarrolladores en función de su nivel de producción. Esta adscripción planteaba una mayor o menor calidad formal de la app, pero no su éxito tras la publicación en Google Play. En cualquier caso, el mayor número de apps provenía de desarrolladores esporádicos y moderados (71,6%).

Los propósitos de estos desarrolladores responden a motivaciones económicas o de corte ideológico. El caso mayoritario -el económico- situaba los réditos de creación y distribución en la lógica de los «earned media» o en los ingresos directos que la monetización de la app promovía gracias a su viralidad. La misma lógica económica que impulsó a los canales de televisión norteamericanos a ofrecer una cobertura exhaustiva sobre Donald Trump sin ningún tipo de revisión editorial (McIntyre, 2018: 109) o a uno de los principales artífices de «noticias falsas» sobre Donald Trump, Beqa Latsabidze, que reconocía que «no tenía ninguna motivación política; simplemente buscaba conseguir dinero» (McIntyre, 2018: 121). Sin embargo, muy pocos desarrolladores precisaban si esta fórmula había tenido los resultados esperados, aunque una de las apps más populares –Trump Dump (Daydream)– señalaba el componente viral como elemento clave de su éxito.

Por otro lado, el caso minoritario –el posicionamiento ideológico– se realiza de forma desigual y, en la mayoría de los casos, de forma minoritaria, puesto que gozaron de más descargas los contenidos paródicos de corte neutral frente aquellos que pretendían establecer una crítica más acentuada. En estos casos, los desarrolladores favorecieron que las aplicaciones crearan contenido –imágenes, vídeos, memes, etc.– que se podía compartir a través de redes sociales para superar las fronteras del ecosistema de las apps.

Las intenciones de los desarrolladores se plasmaron, de forma consciente e inconsciente, en el discurso de las apps estableciendo su primera particularidad: la tendencia a la simplificación de los discursos tanto en su apuesta caricaturesca (en lo estético) y satírica (en el mensaje). En ese sentido, se confirma que el conjunto de apps más populares (n=117) proponía arquetipos y clichés en la lógica del humor gráfico. En este proceso se identificaron dos cuestiones de interés.

La primera fue que las apps con un discurso más crítico terminaban siendo minoritarias (en número y cantidad de descargas) respecto a las que apostaban por una mayor simplificación y viralidad. Esta tendencia puede explicarse atendiendo al modelo de probabilidad de elaboración (Petty & Cacioppo, 1986), que también fue observado en el caso de juegos en redes sociales (Schulze, Schöler, & Skiera, 2014), pues cuando el usuario busca apps por la diversión y el entretenimiento no tiene intención de obtener algo más profundo o de utilidad efectiva fuera de ese entorno.

Y, en segundo lugar, la consideración de que las apps proliferaron a la par que la actualidad informativa gracias a la automatización y simplificación en los procesos de creación que permitían obtener algún tipo de rédito (económico, prestigio o autorrealización). Hecho que entronca directamente con tres vectores convergentes: la influencia de la actualidad en el comportamiento desarrollado por el usuario al consumir noticias en dispositivo móvil (Westlund, 2015); las lógicas «prosumer» y «produser» adheridas al entorno digital (Bruns, 2012); y la controvertida práctica de la clonación en las apps móviles (Crussel, Gibler, & Chen, 2012).

La progresiva neutralidad de los contenidos de las apps (reflejada en la figura 4) no implicó una permeabilización a la actualidad informativa a la que tanto desarrolladores como apps sí que respondían. El cruce de los datos presentados en las Figuras 2 y 3 condiciona la publicación de apps a los temas más populares. Se constata que la actualidad del periodo se diluye en la muestra simplificando el mensaje de las apps a una construcción en torno a estereotipos más que a temas de agenda política. Esa inconcreción solo se superó –según los datos de las apps más populares– con las elecciones presidenciales y la propuesta de construcción de un muro en la frontera de Estados Unidos con México, un fenómeno que articuló a la opinión pública trasnacional (Meneses, Martín-del-Campo & Rueda-Zarate, 2018). Estos factores señalan que no se constituyó un discurso específico en el plano político más allá de un conjunto de iniciativas aisladas y el mayoritario aprovechamiento de la actualidad política en pos de la viralidad y una mayor repercusión.

Por tanto, su posicionamiento ideológico derivó de una crítica directa por parte de los desarrolladores menos productivos que disminuyó hacia posiciones catárticas y atemporales (Figura 4), alejándose de las tendencias mayoritarias de redes sociales que privilegiaron discursos simples, viscerales e incívicos (Ott, 2017). Un aspecto que permite esbozar dos de las futuras líneas de investigación que propone este artículo: el análisis pormenorizado del discurso de las apps con trasfondo político y, en segundo lugar, la penetración y modos de recepción de los contenidos políticos distribuidos a través de esta fórmula.

En definitiva, la popularidad de Trump en el ecosistema de apps para dispositivos móviles provino de la combinación de un conjunto de factores aparentemente inconexos: las intenciones de autopromoción por una parte de los desarrolladores, la experimentación con nuevas fórmulas expresivas, la relevancia social, política y mediática del personaje en el contexto en que aparece y, por último, la simplificación del proceso de creación y el uso de contenidos a través de apps en la actualidad. No obstante, este conjunto de características termina perfilando las dinámicas de creación de contenido político en las plataformas de distribución de dispositivos móviles que se adhiere a una lógica del espectáculo que subraya que no hay negocio como el negocio del espectáculo (there´s no business like show business).

Apoyos

Este manuscrito es resultado del Proyecto de Investigación I+D+i «Politainment en el entorno de la posverdad: nuevas narrativas, clickbait y gamificación» (CSO2017-84472-R), subvencionado por el Ministerio de Economía, Industria y Competitividad del Gobierno de España. Además de un contrato del programa de Formación del Profesorado Universitario (FPU) de referencia FPU 14/05297 financiado por el Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte.


Draft Content 597641155-71777 ov-es011.jpg


Draft Content 597641155-71777 ov-es012.jpg


Draft Content 597641155-71777 ov-es013.jpg


Draft Content 597641155-71777 ov-es014.jpg


Draft Content 597641155-71777 ov-es015.jpg


Draft Content 597641155-71777 ov-es016.jpg

Referencias

Aguado, J.M., Martinez, I.J., & Cañete­Sanz, L. (2015). Tendencias evolutivas del contenido digital en las aplicaciones móviles. profesional de la información, 24(6), 787­795. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2015.nov.10

Ahonen, T. (2008). Mobile as 7th of the Mass Media : Cellphone, cameraphone, Iphone, smartphone. Londres: Futuretext.

Azari, J.R. (2016). How the news media helped to nominate Trump. Political Communication, 33, 677-680. https://doi.org/10.1080/10584609.2016.1224417

Berrocal, S., Redondo, M., & Campos, E. (2013). Una aproximación al estudio del infoentretenimiento en Internet: Origen, desarrollo y perspectivas futuras. AdComunica, 4, 63-79. https://doi.org/10.6035/2174-0992.2012.4.5

Berry, D.M. (2012). Introduction: Understanding the digital humanities. In Berry D.M. (Eds.), Understanding digital humanities. (pp.1-20). London: Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230371934_1

Boase, J., & Humphreys, L. (2018). Mobile methods: Explorations, innovations, and reflections. Mobile Media & Communication, 6(2), 153-162. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050157918764215

Bruns, A. (2012). Reconciling community and commerce? Collaboration between produsage communities and commercial operators. Information, Communication & Society, 15(6), 815-835. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2012.680482

Carroll, J.K., Moorhead, A., Bond, R., LeBlanc, W.G., Petrella, R.J., & Fiscella, K. (2017). Who uses mobile phone health apps and does use matter? A Secondary data analytics approach. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 19(4), e125. https://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.5604

Crescenzi-Lanna, L., & Grane-Oro, M. (2016). An analysis of the interaction design of the best educational apps for children aged zero to eight. [Análisis del diseño interactivo de las mejores apps educativas para niños de cero a ocho años]. Comunicar, 46, 77-85. https://doi.org/10.3916/C46-2016-08

Crussell, J., Gibler, C., & Chen, H. (2012). Attack of the clones: Detecting cloned applications on android markets. European Symposium on Research in Computer Security, 37-54. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-33167-1_3

De-Aguilera, M., & Casero-Ripollés, A. (2018). ¿Tecnologías para la transformación? Los medios sociales ante el cambio político y social. Presentación, Icono 14, 16(1), 1-21. https://doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v16i1.1162

Garzia, D. (2017). Personalization of politics between television and the Internet: Leader effects in the 2013 Italian parliamentary election. Journal of Information Technology & Politics 14(4), 403-416. https://doi.org/10.1080/19331681.2017.1365265

Gomez-Garcia, S., & Cabeza, J. (2016). El discurso informativo de los newsgames: el caso Bárcenas en los juegos para dispositivos móviles. Cuadernos.Info, 38, 137-148. https://doi.org/10.7764/cdi.38.593

Gunwoong, L. & Raghu, T.S., (2014). Determinants of mobile apps' success: Evidence from the app store market. Journal of Management Information Systems, 31(2), 133-170. https://doi.org/10.2753/MIS0742-1222310206

Haigh, M., & Heresco, A. (2010). Late-night Iraq: Monologue joke content and tone from 2003 to 2007. Mass Communication & Society 13(2), 157-173. https://doi.org/10.1080/15205430903014884

Katz, J.E. (2008). Handbook of mobile communications studies. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. https://doi.org/10.7551/mitpress/9780262113120.001.0001

Light, B., Burgess, J., & Duguay, S. (2016). The walkthrough method: An approach to the study of apps. New Media & Society, 20(3), 881-900. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444816675438

Ma, Z., Wang, H., Guo, Y., & Chen, X. (2016). Libradar: Fast and accurate detection of third-party libraries in Android apps. In Proceedings of the 38th International Conference on Software Engineering Companion (ICSE ’16), 653-656. https://doi.org/10.1145/2889160.2889178

Martin, J.A. (2014). Mobile media and political participation: Defining and developing an emerging field. Mobile Media & Communication, 2(2), 173-195. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050157914520847

McCabe, W., & Nelson, R. (23/03/2016). App store data offers unique insights into the 2016 Presidential Race. [Mensaje en un blog]. https://bit.ly/2ccpGW3

McIntyre, L. (2018). Posverdad. Madrid: Cátedra.

Meneses, M.E., Martín-del-Campo, A., & Rueda-Zárate, H. (2018). #TrumpenMexico. Transnational connective action on Twitter and the border wall dispute. [#TrumpenMéxico. Acción conectiva transnacional en Twitter y la disputa por el muro fronterizo]. Comunicar, 26(55). https://doi.org/10.3916/C55-2018-04

Neys, J., & Jansz, J. (2010). Political Internet games: Engaging an audience. European Journal of Communication, 25(3), 227-241. https://doi.org/10.1177/0267323110373456

Ott, B.L. (2017). The age of Twitter: Donald J. Trump and the politics of debasement. Critical Studies in Media Communication, 34(1), 59-68. https://doi.org/10.1080/15295036.2016.1266686

Petty, R.E., & Cacioppo, J.T. (1986). Communication and persuasion: Central and peripheral routes to attitude change. New York: Springer. https://doi.org/10.2307/1422805

Riffe, D., Lacy, S., & Fico, F. (2014). Analyzing media messages. Using quantitative content analysis in research. New York: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203551691

Rodriguez-Andres, R. (2018). Trump 2016: ¿Presidente gracias a las redes sociales? Palabra Clave, 21(3), 831-859. https://doi.org/10.5294/pacla.2018.21.3.8

Schulze, C., Schöler, L., & Skiera, B. (2014). Not all fun and games: Viral marketing for utilitarian products. Journal of Marketing, 78(1), 1-19. https://doi.org/10.1509/jm.11.0528

Shankland, S. (2008). Obama releases iPhone recruiting, campaign tool. [Mensaje en un blog]. https://cnet.co/2NL9IY6

Silva-Rodriguez, A., & Lopez-Garcia, X. (2017). Visión retrospectiva de la investigación sobre comunicación y periodismo móvil en España. In De-Lara-Gonzáles, A. & Arias-Robles, F. (Eds.), Mediamorfosis: Perspectivas sobre la innovación en periodismo (pp.106-117). Elche: Universidad Miguel Hernández. https://bit.ly/2xfBbqq

Statista (Ed.) (2017). Number of available applications in the Google Play Store from December 2009 to June 2018. [Portal estadístico online]. https://bit.ly/2mOe6UQ

Taipale, S. & Fortunati, L. (2014). Capturing methodological trends in mobile communication studies. Information, Communication & Society, 17(5), 627-642. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2013.862562

Tau, B. (2012). Obama campaign launches mobile app. [Mensaje en un blog]. https://politi.co/2p6bTaD

Wang, H., Guo, Y., Ma, Z., & Chen X. (2015). Wukong: A scalable and accurate two-phase approach to Android app clone detection. Proceedings of ISSTA ’15, 71-82. https://doi.org/10.1145/2771783.2771795

Wang, H., Liu, Z., Guo, Y., Xiangqun, C., Miao, Z., Guoai, X., & Jason, H. (2017). An Explorative Study of the Mobile App Ecosystem from App Developers’ Perspective. International World Wide Web Conference Committee, 163-172. https://doi.org/10.1145/3038912.3052712

Westlund, O. (2015). News consumption in an age of mobile media : Patterns, people, place, and participation. Mobile Media & Communication, 3(2), 151-159. https://doi.org/10.1177/2050157914563369

Yamamoto, M., Kushin, M.J., & Dalisay, F. (2013). Social media and mobiles as political mobilization forces for young adults: Examining the moderating role of online political expression in political participation. New Media & Society 17(6), 880-898. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444813518390

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/19
Accepted on 31/03/19
Submitted on 31/03/19

Volume 27, Issue 1, 2019
DOI: 10.3916/C59-2019-05
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?