Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Universal access to the Internet among young people has been accompanied by new opportunities associated with online developments and practices, but the problematic use of the digital environment also involves threats. In the current scientific literature, there is no clear consensus on the definition of the behaviors that could arise from inappropriate use of the Web, which, as an attempt, is defined with the term addiction. This article combines a qualitative-quantitative approach, based on a competitive national research project, aiming to identify the main threats posed by digital immersion of Spanish youth between 12 and 17 years old. On the one hand, results obtained from this research confirm the discomfort experienced by young people when they have to be offline during a certain period of time, especially in those intensive users of social networks. On the other hand, it has been shown how damaged or conflicting family relationships lead individuals from 15 years old to spend more time connected to the Internet in an attempt to supplement or protest against their family interactions. This study confirms several trends already mentioned in the specialized literature, and presents new findings that suggest possible future lines of investigation on early detection of cyberpathologies.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

In a very short period of time Internet has become widespread, especially among the young. Data reveals almost universal access, 91.8%, for those aged between 10 and 15 and up to a 97.4% for those aged between 16 to 24 (INE, 2013). At the same time, there is a remarkable increase in the number of social networking site profiles. As of December 31st, 2012, Facebook in Spain alone amounted to over 17 million (Internet World Stats, 2013), which represents 37.6% of the total population. Besides their extensive use of the Internet, the young are considered to be the age group that is most vulnerable to developing problematic Internet use as they are at a critical stage –adolescence– as regards defining their identities and in a period of insecurity, confusion and instability that can lead them to escape into the world of Internet and social networks with adults hardly noticing it. This outlook has drawn academic interest to detect possible addictions, even if this term does not receive general consensus.

1.1. Problematic use of or addiction to the Internet. Conceptualization and measurement issues

The problem of referring to problematic use of or addiction to the Internet and identifying who is developing those behaviors stems from the different interpretations, sometimes blurred, applied to these terms. Establishing whether Internet is actually used problematically together with the different content, services and apps available online (Bergmark & al., 2011; Kim & Haridakis, 2009; Echeburúa, 1999), especially those activities linked to a reward (Kim & Davis, 2009), constitutes one of the most contentious issues. In this sense, Shapira & al. (2003) found a positive association between Internet addiction and some psychiatric illnesses, such as pathological gambling, sexual deviations or compulsive shopping. Nevertheless, empirical research often avoids this question due to its problematic conceptualization.

Understanding problematic use as lack of control in engaging with the Internet which implies distress and negative consequences on a daily basis (Echeburúa & Corral, 2010; Shapira & al., 2003), some authors have drawn attention to the abusive use of the Internet as a problem in itself (Lee & Stapinski, 2012). With regard to the young, some empirical research shows that spending so much time online may have negative consequences for on habits and daily routines as well as in personal relationships in general (Armstrong & al., 2000; Douglas & al., 2008). At the same time, the variety of content and services provided through the Internet, together with the multitask character of online activity as shown in several research papers (Kaiser Foundation, 2005; 2010; Gross, 2004), challenges the fact that excessive use may turn into a reliable indicator of problematic Internet use.

Linked to the problematic use is the perception of discomfort if use is not possible. Labrador and Villadongos (2010) suggest this reaction being comparable to addiction symptoms. Nonetheless, Carbonell & al. (2012) note the importance of being careful when using this term, because questionnaires might in fact show «concern» or «perception» instead of addictive use.

In this regard, Espinar and López (2009) report youth being attracted by the Internet and making excessive use of it linked to entertainment, while at the same time they acknowledge discomfort if no access to the Web is available, because this may imply having to look for substitutes for spending time. However, this Internet use should not be taken directly as problematic. Additionally, empirical research has shown the perception of problems associated to Internet use may evolve with age (Carbonell & al., 2012; Labrador & Villadongos, 2010) as well as with own experience (Griffiths, 2000), while some authors only notice temporary addiction to online games (Van-Roij & al., 2010).

There are still many inconsistencies when referring to problematic Internet use (Bergmark & al., 2011) and there is also little knowledge of the interrelation of its different dimensions as well as with the factors which may predict it. Therefore, these limitations make approaching the prevalence and real meaning of problematic use applied to national samples more complex.

1.2. Factor associated with problematic Internet use

Several studies have focused on connecting time as a predictor to pathological Internet use (Armstrong & al., 2000; Leung, 2004; Yang & Tung, 2007; Douglas & al., 2008; Labrador & Villadongos, 2010; Muñoz-Rivas & al., 2010). Additionally, it is suggested that intensive use of the Internet may vary depending on the reasons for connecting and the prevalence of previous socio-pathologies.

Several research results point to the fact that problematic use of the Web is linked to specific communication apps (Carbonell & al., 2012), particularly those used to look for new friends online, chat and social networking sites (Kuss & al., 2013; Viñas & al., 2002; Lee & Stapinski, 2012; Valkenburg & Peter, 2007; Acier & Kern, 2011). García & al. (2013) confirm the use of these communication platforms directly associated to the time spent online. Other authors suggest the problematic use of the Internet being associated to communication of identity disorders (Carbonell & al., 2012), for instance through the adoption of avatars (Wan & Chiou, 2006), which allows the user to pretend to be someone else (Carbonell & al., 2012; Douglas & al., 2008).

However, from the Uses and Gratification theory, it is underlined that media effects are driven by reasons of use which, in turn, may vary from one individual to another, and Valkenburg and Peter (2011) conclude that even the same technologies might be used either positively or negatively. Kuss and Griffiths (2011) suggest that introvert and extrovert young people are heavy users of interactive digital networks, to the extent that the former use them as social compensation tools, while the latter seem to use them as a way to enlarge their social relationships. The same authors point to the fact that both personalities are more likely to risk addiction. These results show how problematic use is not particularly linked to a specific tool usage, but on the contrary to the problematic relationship established with it, which may be explained as a way of to escaping other types of day-to-day problems.

Finally, other factors linked to problematic Internet use are connected with the offline world, such as family relationships, although little attention has been paid on this respect so far. Unsatisfactory family relationships (Liu & al., 2012; Viñas & al., 2002; Lam & al., 2009), communication with family (Liu & al., 2012; Park & al., 2008) and a high level of conflict in parent and children relationships (Yen & al., 2007) have been associated with intensive and problematic use of the Internet, through which minors may distance themselves from family conflicts (Douglas & al., 2008).

2. Methods

The combination of methodologies is the option chosen in this work with the aim of, firstly, approaching Internet uses and online social tools of preference by Spanish youngster between 12 and 17 years old; and, secondly to assess their connection behavior through their own testimonies. At the same time, it was proposed to identify main online activities which could entail a problematic use of the Web.

The first hypothesis (H1) establishes that young people experience stress or distrust through lack of use, especially among those with high connectivity habits and uses of online tools and particularly the social ones. The second hypothesis (H2) establishes that low interaction with parents increases stress in young people when faced with lack of connectivity.

2.1. Qualitative stage

This phase allowed the researchers to test opinions of young people as well as to elaborate the national survey which follows. Therefore, eight focus groups were conducted between the months of June and July, 2011, at national level, representing students enrolled in public and private secondary education (ESO, aged 12-16) and High School (Bachillerato, aged 16-18).

The study worked with mixed-gender groups separated by age into pre-adolescents and adolescents, considered operatively as individuals aged between 12-14 years old and between 15-17 years old. Six state secondary schools were selected, located in Andalusia (1), Catalonia (2), Madrid (2), Murcia (1), as well as two privately-owned but state-funded establishments found in Galicia (1) and Aragon (1).

Once the centers were selected, researchers got in contact with school principals to ask them to identify the students, and informed parental consent was also asked. Focus groups lasted one hour and included six students on average. They were directed by a moderator who was in charge of addressing and conducting the discussion around uses and risks of the Internet.

All the focus groups were recorded and transcribed in full and verbatim. After reviewing and editing the texts of the transcriptions, they underwent an initial segmentation process that was in accordance with their semantic importance as per the objectives of our research. ATLAS.ti software was used to help with this task. They were encoded, taking into account who was talking, their gender and their age. Then, they were automatically processed, generating 14 semantic codes, nine linked to uses, (daily use, amusement, dating, friendship, appropriate content, active appropriate use, passive appropriate use, family education and family relationship) and five linked to risks and control procedures after being tested by the members of the research group. A very large percentage was consistent with the categories extracted from five discussion groups in a previous research project limited to young people in the Madrid region of Spain (García, 2010). At the same time, these categories were compared with two initial focus groups with a view to establishing that they were valid and dovetailed with this project.

These categories were used in the discourse analysis and later discussion. As a result, several analytical inconsistencies were observed, mainly due to the differences found between active and passive uses, even though in the available literature on Internet users there is an established division among those active users who generate content and the passive, who draw on other’s creativity (Holmes, 2011; Schaedel & Clement, 2010; Taraszow & al., 2010; Livingstone & Haddon, 2008).

2.2. Quantitative stage

The data presented in this study comes from a representative statistical auto-administered survey of young 12-17- year olds attending school at the level of «Educación Secundaria Obligatoria» (ESO), years 1 to 4, and «Bachillerato» (High School equivalent level) in the Spanish State, with the exception of Ceuta, Melilla and Balearic Islands throughout the 2011/2012 academic year.

The data for preparing the sampling frame and the selection of the sample was extracted from the statistics published by the Spanish Ministry of Education (students) and from those compiled from the web pages of each of the Autonomous Communities analyzed (educational establishments). In total, the study universe would consist of 2,227,191 students at ESO and Bachillerato level from a total of 6,053 state, private and state-funded private educational establishments for secondary education and Bachillerato.

The second step consisted of applying stratified sampling of students by Autonomous Community, stage of education and whether it was a state-owned or privately-owned educational establishment. Over 5,000 questionnaires were collected. To ensure the representativeness of the sample by gender, age, educational level and type of center, 2,077 surveys were selected following the marked assessments for these variables. As the students needed to have parental permission to be able to complete the questionnaire, in the end there was a marginal deviation in the real sample from the theoretic student sample; therefore, elevation indices were established for the purpose of making adjustments.

The sampling error stood at ±2.2 for the worst possible case of variability in which p and q=50/50 and a 95% level of confidence, assuming simple random sampling.

The information was gathered from a classroom-based self-assessment questionnaire used between the months of September and November in 2011. The questionnaire consisted of fifty-four questions relating to types of Internet use and familial tactics of control and supervision. In order to test the comprehension of the questions posed and their consistency, a pre-test was undertaken.

Questionnaires were filtered based on the consistency of the information reported. In addition, frequency analysis or «hole count», flow analysis of the survey, validation filters, outlier controls and controls for to setting the average obtained against the planned were performed. Having obtained parental informed consent, the questionnaire was administered among interviewees after explaining to them the research purpose and requesting participation and openness as well as assuring confidentiality.

The data was analyzed using the SPSS 18 statistical program. As it is customary, the statistical significance level that indicates if the differences detected are due to chance has been set for ?2 < 0.05. A correlational analysis was applied to the available data in order to test interrelations among distress for not having access to the Internet, the perceived difficulty of being offline or having access to specific content and online apps, time of use and impact on their daily life.


Draft Content 808500302-29644-en006.jpg

3. Results

The results presented in this paper are organized around the two research hypotheses mentioned above, and combine the findings of the qualitative and quantitative phases of the study. In the following paragraphs, we first show the most significant aspects associated with the perception of discomfort because of lack of access for a certain period of time. Then, we proceed to link them in order to specify activities that could cause a perception of dependence on the Internet. Finally, personal relationships are observed, within and outside the family, for the purpose of associating them with the habits of connection.

3.1. Stress and/or discomfort perception through lack of Internet access

Approximately seven out of ten young people who answered the quantitative questionnaire consider having no access to the Internet for several days would not imply any problem for them or represent any serious problem despite the inconvenience caused by this situation (see figure 1). 70.2% of them are connected to the Internet every day or almost every day.

If we consider the number of devices used for going online, which increases the chances of exposure to the Web, it is observed that the more the ways to connect are available, the more difficult it is for youths to remain offline. One in ten young users of three or more devices expresses high discomfort when they do not have access to the Internet.


Draft Content 808500302-29644-en007.jpg

The results show that this trend is recurrent when there is a higher frequency of Internet use. In table 1, it can be seen that the difficulty to stay offline for several days increases in parallel to the time usually spent online.

Therefore, the stress perceived while for not having access to the Web increases when considering connection time. Two out of ten young people who connect more than five hours a week report feeling very bad if they are forced to stay away from the Internet for several days. In this context, if certain applications or specific services are added as a variable, the number of young who expresses distrust on stopping use of using the Internet increases. Four in ten young people would find it quite difficult not to connect to their social network every day at any time, whereas for three in ten it may be challenging not to have access to YouTube.

3.1.1. Online activities associated with a perception of problematic Internet use

It is observed that social networking sites produce increased attachment to the Web and may lead to a perception of dependency. Facebook and Tuenti are, without any doubt, the most commonly used tools among young people, since nine out of ten young people uses them and 75% check them very often. The most requested online activities are: sharing videos (48.6%), surfing a range of websites (45.7%), and downloading different kinds of files including music (37.1%).

After coding the ideas raised in the focus groups, activities referred to by young were connected to entertainment. Sharing different kinds of files, uploading photos and tagging them or chatting with friends online are some of the examples of daily use of the Internet with the purpose of amusement.

There are also some other online activities that could be included in this context: 68.5% of young people use the Internet very often to listen to music and 35.5% watch TV online. Regarding the media consumption, boys do connect more often than girls to watch movies or series, to watch TV or search for information related to series and/or artists. Downloading television programs is a general activity among the interviewees. 60.5% of young aged between 12 to 14 and 71.2% of them who are in the 15 to 17 years-old range normally download TV programs they were unable to watch live due to incompatibility of schedules or because they prefer to have privacy to watch the audiovisual content they really like.

During the qualitative phase, participants reported that one of the main uses attributed by them to the Internet is watching TV either through the computer or the console. This finding is associated with the use of social networking sites, because very often these digital and interactive platforms host the debate on the most popular followed series.

The data collected during fieldwork reveals that each household member may have their own computer while the family usually has only one TV set per household. Participants in the focus groups confirm that their parents or other adults set limits on the consumption of inappropriate television content. Nevertheless, when they go online this control decreases.

3.2. Personal relationships

Although there is a trend to link the discomfort caused by the absence of Internet with problematic offline relationships and communication problems, the percentage of young people who reported discomfort when not having Internet access increases among those who socialize with friends every day or nearly every day. There is a 5.8 percentage point difference compared with those who report not socializing or hardly socializing with friends.

The close family circle was addressed in the quantitative questionnaire through a variety of questions about the relationships of the young people with their parents. In order to qualify them, the interviewees should select one of the following options from a multiple choice question:

• Total confidence. My parents trust me and I tell them everything that happens to me.

• Enough confidence. We often talk about issues that concern us.

• My parents are very authoritarian with me and we have a lack of communication.

• My parents are very authoritarian with me, but they listen to me.

• My parents have no idea about what happens to me and I think they really don’t care.

• Others.

When cross-checking the data, it is observed that 21% of the young who report their parents as being very authoritarian and with lack of communication also express a feeling of stress and/or discomfort from an inability to connect to the Internet. The same is true of 19.6% of the young who claim that their parents have no idea about what happens to them, or even do not care about them.

The survey also asked young people about the frequency with which they interact or speak with the people at home. The perception among the ones who would feel discomfort when not having access to the Internet for several days doubles when we include the ones who reported never talking or hardly ever talking or relating to their relatives at home (15.3%).

The young who talk to their parents about Internet use are in the 12-to-14-years-old range. In general, the adults tend to establish clear and concise rules regarding access to the Internet by pre-adolescents, who also say they listen to their parents and respect these rules.

Four in ten young people consider their relationship with their parents to be one of total confidence, which allows more personal exchanges of ideas and the possibility for the youngsters to ask adults about things which concern them. Interviewees aged between 12 to 14 years old, more often qualify their relationships with parents as of total confidence, while the adolescents between 15 and 17 years old qualify them as of enough confidence.

Nevertheless, when asked about their contacts with strangers over the Internet and whether these contacts turn into a real meeting up, the percentage of youngsters who report these encounters to their parents is much lower (20.9%) than the percentage of young people who prefer their group of friends for such confidences (66.7%). A far smaller percentage of focus group participants report telling their siblings (18.6%), their friends by using a social networking platform or Internet forum (15.4%), and 12.7% prefer not to tell to anyone.

From the qualitative phase of the research it is important to note that no difference has been found between traditional and single-parent families when we focus on the control of Internet use or the digital behavior in the case of 12-to-14-year-olds. According to the interviewees, early access to the Internet (between 10 and 11 years old) is always done under the authorization and consent of their father and/or their mother. Overall, adolescents convey a sense of responsibility when they make a decision about visiting or not an inappropriate website, assuming that a lack of responsibility will, sooner or later, be discovered by their parents or other adults.

The parent-child relationship described by the group of the 15 to 17 year-olds is characterized by the typical defiance attitude of this age. Therefore, they try to solve their problems without any support from their parents.

4. Conclusion and discussion

The association between perception of discomfort because of lack of access and frequency, together with the use of online communication tools has been demonstrated to be pertinent. Young people recognize the inconvenience caused by the inability to access the Internet for several days, but in principle they do not think this could be a problematic experience. However, the perception of discomfort increases whenever additional variables are included in the research. The perception of stress is generally less evident if we consider the number of devices youngsters use to log on the Internet, and, conversely, it increases if there is a higher frequency of connection. The discomfort is even more evident if being offline means not to be able to access their social networking sites. Thus, the hypothesis H1 seem to be proved, from which elements could be highlighted that could influence the perception of the young people as regards a problematic Internet use.

In terms of the second hypothesis (H2), it has been noted that the young people who do not have good communication with their parents, or when the behavior of the latter is perceived as authoritarian by the interviewees, are the ones who tend to spend more hours online. In this way, youngsters try to compensate for the lack of communication at home. This problem is growing among adolescents in the 15 to 17 years old range, who prefer to have the support of their reference groups instead of talking to their parents in order to solve problems whose origin lie in the use of Internet.

Some of the trends identified in this paper, such as the increasingly early age of connection together with the gradual rise in the number of hours spent online, may become cyber pathological, which suggests new lines of investigation into methods of early detection of disorders aggravated by the daily practices in the digital environment. The first-person accounts, such as those which have been recorded during the focus groups, might help to contextualize the quantitative data. This information may also help to establish a necessary link between the social and cultural dimensions and the Internet uses attributed by adolescents themselves.

An additional finding of this research is that young people show an increasing preference for accessing television content through the Internet. They value the possibility of watching their favorite programs whenever they want, especially the opportunity to comment about them on social media of their choice. This behavior, increasingly prevalent among the young, opens a window of opportunity for audiovisual media in their transmedia expansion to achieve greater audiences.

The methodological triangulation performed in this study has not only helped to reach the objectives set and to prove both hypotheses, but it had also led to the confirmation of some of the trends reported by the research on which this paper is based. Nevertheless, it was found that to go further into the issue and improve the overall understanding of how young people go online and use the Internet, it is necessary to stimulate interdisciplinary synergies, especially regarding the correct use of terms and concepts like addiction or pathological/problematic Internet use.

References

Acier, D. & Kern, L. (2011). Problematic Internet Use: Perceptions of Addiction Counselors. Computer & Education, 56, 983-989. (DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2010.11.016).

Armstrong, L., Phillips, J.G. & Saling, L.L. (2000). Potential Determinants of Heavier Internet Usage. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 53, 537–550. (DOI: 10.1006/ijhc.2000.0400).

Bergmark, K.H., Bergmark, A. & Findahl, O. (2011). Extensive Internet Involvement -Addiction or Emerging Lifestyle? International Journal Environmental Research and Public Health, 8, 4488-4501. (DOI: 10.3390/ijerph8124488).

Carbonell, X., Fústerl, H., Chamarro, A. & Oberstl, U. (2012). Adicción a Internet y móvil: Una revisión de estudios empíricos españoles. Papeles del Psicólogo, 33, 82-89 (http://goo.gl/UYRxm9) (02-05-2013).

Douglas, A.C., Mills, J.E. & al. (2008). Internet Addiction: Meta-synthesis of Qualitative Research for the Decade1996-2006. Computers in Human Behavior, 24, 3027-3044. (DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2008.05.009).

Echeburúa, E. & Corral, P. (2010). Adicción a las nuevas tecnologías y a las redes sociales en jóvenes: un nuevo reto. Adicciones, 22, 91-96 (http://goo.gl/jZe0x3) (15-12-2011).

Echeburúa, E. (1999). ¿Adicciones sin droga? Las nuevas adicciones: juego, sexo, comida, compras, trabajo, Internet. Bilbao: Desclée de Brouwer.

Espinar, E. & López, C. (2009). Jóvenes y adolescentes ante las nuevas tecnologías: percepción de riesgos. Athenea Digital, 16, 1-20 (http://goo.gl/wRETSZ) (22-01-2011).

Fundación Kaiser (Ed.) (2005). Generation M. Media in the Lifes of 8-18 Years-old (http://goo.gl/K373Fe) (20-07-2012).

Fundación Kaiser (Ed.) (2010). Generación M2: Media in the Lives of 8 to 18 Years old (http://goo.gl/8tRJej) (20-07-2012).

García, A. (Coord.) (2010). Comunicación y comportamiento en el ciberespacio. Actitudes y riesgos de los adolescentes. Barcelona: Icaria.

García, A., López-de-Ayala, M.C. & Catalina, B. (2013). Hábitos de uso en Internet y en las redes sociales de los adolescentes españoles. Comunicar, 41, 195-204. (DOI: 10.3916/C41-2013-19).

Griffiths, M.D. (2000). Does Internet and Computer «Addiction» Exist? Some Case Study Evidence. CyberPsychology and Behavior, 3, 211-218. (DOI: 10.1089/109493100316067).

Gross, E.F. (2004). Adolescent Internet Use: What we Expect, What Teens Report. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 25, 633-649. (DOI: 10.1016/j.appdev.2004.09.005).

Holmes, J. (2011). Cyberkids or Divided Generations? Characterising Young People’s Internet Use in the UK with Generic, Continuum or Typological Models. New Media & Society, 13, 1104-1122. (DOI: 10.1177/1461444810397649).

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (INE) (2013). Encuesta sobre equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de información y comunicación en los hogares (http://ine.es) (15-09-2013).

Internet World Sats (2013). Internet and Facebook Usage in Europe (http://goo.gl/xAXM8O) (15-09-2013).

Kim, H-K. & Davis, K.E. (2009). Toward a Comprehensive Theory of Problematic Internet Use: Evaluating the Role of Self-esteem, Anxiety, Flow, and the Self-rated Importance of Internet Activities. Computers in Human Behavior, 25, 490-500. (DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2008.11.001).

Kim, J. & Haridakis, P. M. (2009). The Role of Internet User Characteristics and Motives in Explaining Three Dimensions of Internet Addiction. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14, 988-1015. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1083-6101.2009.01478.x).

Kuss, D.J. & Griffiths, M.D. (2011). Online Social Networking and Addiction. A Review of the Psychological Literature. International Journal of Environment and Public Health, 8, 3528-3552. (DOI: 10.3390/ijerph8093528).

Kuss, D.J., Griffiths, M.D. & Binder, J.F. (2013). Internet Addiction in Students: Prevalence and Risk Factors. Computers in Human Behavior, 29, 959-966. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2012.12.024).

Labrador, F.J. & Villadongos, S.M. (2010). Menores y nuevas tecnologías: conductas indicadoras de posible problema de adicción. Psicothema, 22, 180-188 (http://goo.gl/Lqb6OY).

Lam, L.T., Peng, Z.W., Mai, J.C. & Jing, J. (2009). Factors Associated with Internet Addiction among Adolescents. CyberPsychology and Behavior, 12, 551-555. (DOI: 10.1089/cpb.2009.0036).

Lee, B.W. & Stapinski, L.A. (2012). Seeking Safety on the Internet: Relationship between Social Anxiety and Problematic Internet Use Related. Journal of anxiety disorders, 26, 197-205. (DOI: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2011.11.001).

Leung, L. (2004). Net-generations Attributes and Seductive Properties of the Internet as Predictors of Online Activities and Internet Addiction. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 7, 333-347. (DOI: 10.1089/1094931041291303).

Liu, Q-X., Fang, X-Y. & al. (2012). Parent-adolescent Communication, Parental Internet Use and Internet-Specific Norms and Pathological Internet Use among Chinese Adolescents. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1269-1275. (DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2012.02.010)

Livingstone, S. & Haddon, L. (2008). Risky Experiences for Children Online: Charting European Research on Children and the Internet. Children & Society, 22, 314-323. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1099-0860.2008.00157.x).

Muñoz-Rivas, M.J., Fernández, L. & Gámez-Guadix, M. (2010). Analysis of the Indicators of Pathological Internet Use in Spanish University Students. The Spanish Journal of Psychology, 13, 697-707 (http://goo.gl/zOTeSv) (24-09-2012).

Park, S.K., Kim, J.Y. & Cho, C.B. (2008). Prevalence of Internet Addiction and Correlations with Family Factors among South Korean Adolescents. Adolescence, 43, 895-909.

Schaedel, U. & Clement, M. (2010). Managing the Online Crowd: Motivations for Engagement in User-generated Content. Journal of Media Business Studies, 7, 17-36.

Shapira, N.A., Lessig, M.C. & al. (2003). Problematic Internet Use: Proposed Classification and Diagnostic Criteria. Depression and Anxiety, 17, 207-216. (DOI: 10.1002/da.10094).

Taraszow, T., Aristodemou, E. & al. (2010). Disclosure of Personal and Contact Information by Young People in Social Networking Sites: An Analysis Using Facebook Profiles as an Example. International Journal of Media & Cultural Politics, 6, 81-101. (DOI: 10.1386/macp.6.1.81/1).

Valkenburg, P.M. & Peter, J. (2007). Preadolescents' and Adolescents' Online Communication and their Closeness to Friends. Developmental Psychology, 43, 267-277. (DOI: 10.1037/0012-1649.43.2.267).

Valkenburg, P.M. & Peter, J. (2011). Online Communication among Adolescents: An Integrated Model of its Attraction, Opportunities and Risks. Journal of Adolescent Health, 48, 121–127. (DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.08.020).

Van-Roij, A.J., Schoenmarkers, T.M., Vermulsti, A.A., Van der Eijden, R.J.J.M. & Van de Mheen, D. (2010). Online Video Game Addiction: Identification of Addicted Adolescent Gamers. Addiction, 106, 205-212. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03104.x).

Viñas, F., Juan, J. & al. (2002). Internet y psicopatología: las nuevas formas de comunicación y su relación con diferentes índices de psicopatología. Clínica y Salud, 13, 235-256 (http://goo.gl/t54z8n) (23-04-2012).

Wan, C-S. & Chiou, W-B. (2006). Why Are Adolescents Addicted to Online Gaming? An Interview Study in Taiwan. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 9, 762-766. (DOI: 10.1089/cpb.2006.9.762).

Yang, S.C. & Tung, C.J. (2007). Comparison of Internet Addicts and Non-addicts in Taiwanese High School. Computers in Human Behavior, 23, 79-96. (DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2004.03.037).

Yen, J-Y., Yen, C-F., Chen, C-C., Chen, S-H. & Ko, C-H. (2007). Family Factors of Internet Addiction and Substance Use Experience in Taiwanese Adolescents. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 10, 323-329. (DOI: 10.1089/cpb.2006.9948).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La universalización del acceso a Internet entre los jóvenes va acompañada de nuevas oportunidades asociadas a las prácticas y desarrollos on-line, pero también de amenazas derivadas de un uso problemático del entorno digital. En la literatura científica actual, no se observa un consenso en la definición de las conductas que podrían derivarse de un uso inadecuado de la Red, al que, de manera aún tentativa, se define como adicción. Este trabajo combina una aproximación cualitativa y cuantitativa, a partir de un proyecto competitivo nacional, con el objetivo de identificar las principales amenazas que presenta la inmersión digital de los jóvenes entre 12 y 17 años en España. Los resultados obtenidos confirman, en primer lugar, el estrés y/o malestar experimentado por los jóvenes ante la imposibilidad de conectarse a Internet durante un determinado período de tiempo, especialmente en aquellos usuarios intensivos de redes sociales. En segundo lugar, se ha comprobado cómo las relaciones familiares deterioradas o conflictivas influyen en que los adoles-centes a partir de 15 años pasen más tiempo conectados a la Red, en un intento de suplir sus interacciones familiares o protestar frente a ellas. El trabajo confirma tendencias apuntadas en la literatura especializada y presenta nuevos hallazgos que sugieren líneas adicionales de interés para futuras investigaciones interdisciplinarias en torno al reconocimiento y la detección precoz de las ciberpatologías.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

En los últimos años, el uso de Internet se ha extendido de forma significativa en España, especialmente entre los jóvenes. Los datos revelan que la universalización del acceso a la Red alcanza el 91,8% entre los niños de 10 a 15 años y el 97,4% entre los jóvenes de 16 a 24 años (INE, 2013). Es reseñable, asimismo, el incremento del número de perfiles en redes sociales. El 31 de diciembre de 2012, Facebook registraba una cifra superior a 17 millones de usuarios solamente en España (Internet World Sats, 2013), lo que representa un 37,6% de la población total del país. Además de por su uso intensivo de Internet, los jóvenes constituyen el grupo más propenso al desarrollo de un uso problemático de la Red al encontrarse en una etapa crítica –adolescencia– de definición de su identidad. La inestabilidad emocional e inseguridad pueden motivarles a buscar refugio en la web y en las herramientas sociales on-line sin que los adultos apenas lo adviertan. Esta circunstancia ha elevado el interés académico por el estudio de una posible adicción, pese a la ausencia de consenso respecto al empleo de este término.

1.1. Uso problemático de Internet o adicción: problemas de conceptualización y medición

La dificultad a la hora de precisar una definición apropiada del uso problemático de Internet o adicción y de reconocer cuándo una persona desarrolla estas conductas radica en la interpretación, a menudo ambigua, de los distintos matices derivados de dichas terminologías. Determinar si es realmente problemático el uso que se hace de Internet o de la variedad de contenidos, servicios y aplicaciones disponibles on-line (Bergmark & al., 2011; Kim & Haridakis, 2009; Echeburúa, 1999), especialmente aquellas actividades asociadas a una recompensa (Kim & Davis, 2009), es uno de los aspectos más controvertidos en este contexto. A este respecto, Shapira y otros (2003) encuentran una asociación positiva entre la adicción a Internet y otras enfermedades psiquiátricas, como la ludopatía, las desviaciones sexuales o la compra compulsiva. Sin embargo, la investigación empírica suele obviar esta cuestión debido a la problemática en torno a los límites conceptuales.

En la medida que el uso problemático es entendido como una ausencia de control de uso de la Red que genera malestar e impactos negativos en la vida cotidiana (Echeburúa & Corral, 2010; Shapira & al., 2003), diferentes autores han prestado atención al uso excesivo de Internet como un problema en sí mismo (Lee & Stapinski, 2012). En el ámbito de los jóvenes, estudios empíricos revelan que dedicar demasiado tiempo a la Red tiene influencias negativas sobre los hábitos y rutinas diarias, las notas y las relaciones personales en general (Armstrong & al., 2000; Douglas & al., 2008). Sin embargo, la diversidad de contenidos y servicios que se ofertan en Internet y el carácter multitárea de la actividad on-line, corroborada por distintas investigaciones (Kaiser Foundation, 2005; 2010; Gross, 2004), cuestiona que el uso excesivo pueda resultar un indicador adecuado de uso problemático de la Red.

Otro factor asociado al uso problemático es la percepción de estrés ante la imposibilidad de conectarse. Labrador y Villadongos (2010) sugieren que esta reacción es comparable a los síntomas de abstinencia provocados por los problemas de adicción. No obstante, Carbonell y colaboradores (2012) advierten de la necesidad de ser cautos en este punto debido a la posibilidad de que los cuestionarios midan «preocupación» o «percepción» en lugar de uso adictivo.

En este sentido, Espinar y López (2009) consideran que los jóvenes reconocen haberse sentido excesivamente atraídos y hacer un uso excesivo de estas tecnologías muy vinculado al entretenimiento, y admiten que les molestaría no poder acceder a Internet porque esto les obligaría a buscar sustitutos para «matar el tiempo». Esto no significa, sin embargo, que el uso que hagan de la Red sea necesariamente problemático. Asimismo, estudios prácticos han demostrado que la percepción de problemas asociados al uso de Internet varía con la edad (Carbonell & al., 2012; Labrador & Villadongos, 2010) y con la propia experiencia de uso (Griffiths, 2000), además de verificar la transitoriedad de los casos de adicción a los juegos en línea (Van-Roij & al., 2010).

Existen todavía muchas lagunas respecto a la especificidad del uso problemático de la Red (Bergmark & al., 2011) y se sabe muy poco sobre la relación entre sus diferentes dimensiones y también de estas con los diferentes factores que lo predicen. Todo ello hace más complejo el análisis de la prevalencia y del significado del uso problemático entre muestras nacionales.

1.2. Factor asociado al uso problemático de Internet

Diversos estudiosos han examinado el tiempo de conexión como factor de predicción del uso patológico de la Red (Armstrong & al., 2000; Leung, 2004; Yang & Tung, 2007; Douglas & al., 2008; Labrador & Villadongos, 2010; Muñoz-Rivas & al., 2010). Se sospecha, asimismo, que el uso intensivo de Internet puede llegar a ser problemático dependiendo de los motivos por los que uno se conecta y de la existencia previa de otros problemas psicosociales.

Los resultados de diversos estudios sugieren que el uso problemático de la Red está asociado a ciertas aplicaciones orientadas a la comunicación (Carbonell & al., 2012), particularmente aquellas que facilitan la búsqueda de nuevos amigos on-line, tales como los chats y las redes sociales (Kuss & al., 2013; Viñas & al., 2002; Lee & Stapinski, 2012; Valkenburg & Peter, 2007; Acier & Kern, 2011). García y otros (2013) constatan, asimismo, que el uso de estas plataformas es directamente proporcional al tiempo on-line. Otros autores consideran que el uso problemático también tiende a estar vinculado a las comunicaciones alteradas de identidad (Carbonell & al., 2012), por ejemplo, mediante la adopción de un avatar (Wan & Chiou, 2006), el cual permite al usuario convertirse en otra persona (Carbonell & al., 2012; Douglas & al., 2008).

Sin embargo, desde la teoría de los usos y gratificaciones se insiste en que los efectos de los medios vienen dados por los motivos de uso, que varían de unas personas a otras, y Valkenburg y Peter (2011) concluyen que las mismas tecnologías pueden utilizarse de forma positiva o negativa. Kuss y Griffiths (2011) indican que los jóvenes introvertidos y extrovertidos son usuarios recurrentes de las redes interactivas digitales, de manera que los primeros las emplean para la compensación social, mientras que los segundos parecen utilizarlas simplemente para ampliar sus relaciones sociales. Los autores sugieren que ambas personalidades afrontan un mayor riesgo de adicción. Estos resultados apuntan a que el uso patológico no viene generado por la utilización de una herramienta concreta, sino por la relación problemática que se establece con ella y que podría tener su origen en un intento de evasión de los problemas de la vida diaria.

Por último, otros factores asociados al uso problemático de Internet entre los jóvenes están relacionados con el mundo offline, sobre todo con las dinámicas familiares, aunque todavía no se ha prestado demasiada atención a este aspecto. Las relaciones familiares insatisfactorias (Liu & al., 2012; Viñas & al., 2002; Lam & al., 2009), la comunicación con la familia (Liu & al., 2012; Park & al., 2008) y los altos niveles de conflicto entre padres e hijos (Yen & al., 2007) han sido asociados con el uso intensivo y problemático de la Red, actividad que permite a los menores distanciarse de los conflictos familiares (Douglas & al., 2008).

2. Método

En este trabajo se ha optado por triangular métodos con la finalidad de, en primer lugar, conocer los usos de Internet y de las herramientas sociales on-line por los jóvenes españoles de 12 a 17 años y, en segundo lugar, realizar un acercamiento a los hábitos de conexión del colectivo seleccionado a través de sus propios testimonios e identificar las actividades realizadas en el entorno virtual que podrían generar usos problemáticos de la Red.

Como hipótesis de partida (H1), se plantea que los jóvenes experimentan situaciones de estrés y/o malestar ante la ausencia de Internet cuanto mayor sea la frecuencia de conexión y el uso de herramientas digitales concretas, sobre todo las que poseen un carácter social. La segunda hipótesis (H2) afirma que la escasa relación comunicativa con los padres incrementa el estrés de los jóvenes cuando no pueden conectarse.

2.1. Etapa cualitativa

La fase cualitativa permitió testar el estado de opinión de los jóvenes y ayudó a confeccionar la encuesta nacional que se menciona más adelante. En esta etapa, por tanto, se realizaron ocho grupos de discusión durante los meses de junio y julio de 2011 a escala nacional, representando a los estudiantes matriculados en la enseñanza secundaria pública y privada ESO (12-16 años de edad) y Bachillerato (16-18 años).

Se trabajó con grupos mixtos separados por edad en los pre-adolescentes y adolescentes, considerados de forma operativa como individuos con edades comprendidas entre 12-14 años (niños) y de edad entre 15-17 años (jóvenes). Las seis escuelas secundarias estatales o Institutos Públicos seleccionados estuvieron ubicados en Andalucía (1), Cataluña (2), Madrid (2) y Murcia (1). También se realizaron dos grupos de discusión en centros concertados, concretamente en Galicia (1) y Aragón (1).

Una vez seleccionados los centros, miembros del grupo de investigación se pusieron en contacto con sus directores, que se ocuparon de la selección de los individuos y se solicitaron los correspondientes consentimientos paternos informados. Los grupos de discusión tuvieron una duración media aproximada de una hora y contaron con un promedio de seis menores. Fueron dirigidos por un moderador que se encargó de organizar cada sesión, con un conjunto de puntos previamente establecidos al hilo tanto de los usos como de los riesgos en Internet.

Todos los grupos de discusión fueron grabados y transcritos en su totalidad. Tras repasar y corregir los textos de las transcripciones, se procedió a una primera segmentación a partir de toda la información recogida, siempre en función de la importancia semántica establecida por los objetivos de la investigación. En esta tarea se empleó el programa Atlas.Ti. Se codificó tomando en consideración quién hablaba, su género y edad. A continuación, se realizó el correspondiente procesamiento automático generándose 14 códigos semánticos: nueve vinculados a los usos (uso cotidiano, diversión, ligue, amistad, contenidos apropiados, uso activo apropiado, uso pasivo apropiado, educación familiar y relación familiar) y cinco a los riesgos y a las formas de control, tras ser testados por los miembros del grupo de investigación. En un porcentaje muy alto, se correspondían con las categorías extraídas a partir de cinco grupos de discusión realizados en un proyecto de investigación anterior limitado a los adolescentes en la Comunidad de Madrid (García, 2010). Por otro lado, estas categorías se adaptaban a los objetivos específicos establecidos en el proyecto y se compararon con dos grupos focales iniciales con el fin de establecer su validez.

Estas categorías fueron utilizadas para el análisis discursivo y la posterior discusión. Producto de estas tareas, se observaron diversas inconsistencias analíticas en algunas categorías, fundamentalmente en lo referido a la diferenciación entre usos activos y pasivos, a pesar de que en parte de la literatura relativa a los usuarios de Internet se dividió entre los sujetos activos, que generaban contenidos, y los pasivos, que utilizaban la creación de otros (Holmes, 2011; Schaedel & Clement, 2010; Taraszow & al., 2010; Livingstone & Haddon, 2008).

2.2. Etapa cuantitativa

La fase cuantitativa procede de una encuesta estadística representativa realizada de manera auto-administrada a los jóvenes de 12 a 17 años, escolarizados en Educación Secundaria Obligatoria (ESO), de 1º a 4º curso, y de Bachillerato en España, a excepción de Ceuta, Melilla e Islas Baleares, durante el curso académico 2011/12.

Para la elaboración del marco de muestreo y la selección de la muestra, se consultaron los datos estadísticos facilitados por el Ministerio de Educación (estudiantes) y las Comunidades Autónomas (centros educativos). El universo de estudio estaría compuesto por 2.227.191 alumnos de ESO y Bachillerato de un total de 6.053 centros públicos, privados y privados-concertados.

En una segunda etapa, se efectuó un muestreo estratificado de alumnos por Comunidad Autónoma, nivel de enseñanza y titularidad del centro al que asiste. En total se recogieron más de 5.000 cuestionarios. Para garantizar la representatividad de la muestra por género, edad, nivel de estudios y titularidad del centro, se seleccionaron 2.077 encuestas siguiendo las cuotas marcadas para estas variables. Debido a que la cumplimentación del cuestionario estaba supeditada a la obtención de los controles paternos, finalmente la muestra real mostró una ligera desviación con respecto a la muestra teórica de alumnos, por lo que se establecieron unos índices de elevación con el propósito de ajustarlas.

El error muestral se situó en aproximadamente ±2,2 para un supuesto de máxima indeterminación en los que p y q=50/50 y un nivel de confianza del 95%, bajo el supuesto de un muestreo aleatorio simple.

La información requerida se obtuvo a partir de un cuestionario de auto-evaluación administrado en el aula de septiembre a noviembre de 2011. El cuestionario consta de 54 preguntas relativas a los tipos de uso de Internet y las tácticas familiares habituales de control y supervisión. Para garantizar que se comprendieran las cuestiones propuestas y verificar su coherencia, se llevó a cabo un pre-test.

Los cuestionarios fueron filtrados sobre la base de la consistencia de la información reportada. Además, se realizaron análisis de frecuencias o «hole count», análisis del flujo de la encuesta, filtros de validación, controles de valores atípicos y análisis del ajuste de la media obtenida respecto a la planificada. Tras la obtención del consentimiento informado, firmado por sus padres, se administró el cuestionario previa explicación a los encuestados sobre los propósitos de la investigación, la importancia de su participación y sinceridad y la confidencialidad de la información.

Se ha empleado el programa estadístico SPSS, versión 18, para el análisis de los datos. Como es habitual, el nivel de validez estadística que indica si las diferencias detectadas se deben o no al azar se ha establecido para ?2< 0,05. Los datos también han sido sometidos a un análisis de correlaciones para establecer el grado de asociación entre el malestar por ausencia de acceso, la percepción de dificultad para dejar de conectarse o consultar ciertos contenidos y aplicaciones on-line, el tiempo de uso y las consecuencias sobre la vida diaria.


Draft Content 808500302-29644 ov-es006.jpg

3. Resultados

Los resultados aquí presentados se articulan en torno a las dos hipótesis de investigación expuestas y combinan los hallazgos de las fases cualitativa y cuantitativa. A continuación, se presentan los aspectos más significativos asociados a la percepción de malestar derivada de la desconexión durante un determinado período de tiempo, enlazándolos seguidamente con actividades concretas que podrían ocasionar una percepción de dependencia de la Red. En segundo lugar, se incorpora el enfoque a las relaciones personales, dentro y fuera del seno familiar, vinculándolas a los hábitos de conexión.

3.1. Sensación de estrés y/o malestar ante la ausencia de acceso a la Red

Entre los jóvenes que contestaron el cuestionario cuantitativo, aproximadamente siete de cada diez consideran que no tener acceso a Internet durante varios días seguidos no les supondría ningún problema o no representaría ningún problema grave pese a las molestias causadas por dicha situación (gráfico 1). El 70,2% de los menores se conecta todos o casi todos los días.

Si se tiene en cuenta el número de dispositivos utilizados para conectarse, lo que incrementa las posibilidades de exposición a la Red, se observa que cuantas más sean las vías de acceso a Internet de las que dispongan los jóvenes, mayor será la dificultad para mantenerse offline. Uno de cada diez jóvenes que utilizan tres o más dispositivos manifiesta sentirse muy mal ante la ausencia de Internet.


Draft Content 808500302-29644 ov-es007.jpg

Los datos revelan que esta tendencia se repite cuanto mayor sea la frecuencia de acceso a la Red. De la tabla 1 se deduce que la dificultad para mantenerse desconectado varios días aumenta de manera proporcional al tiempo que se dedique habitualmente a Internet.

Por tanto, el estrés ante una situación que suponga no poder acceder a la web se agudiza al considerarse el tiempo de conexión. Dos de cada diez jóvenes que se conectan más de cinco horas a la semana afirman encontrarse muy mal si se ven obligados a alejarse de Internet durante varios días. Si a este contexto se añaden servicios concretos, la cifra de jóvenes a los que les costaría mucho dejar de conectarse se eleva. A cuatro de cada diez jóvenes les resultaría bastante difícil dejar de conectarse a su red social todos los días y a todas horas, mientras que a tres de cada diez les supondrían un reto no consultar YouTube.

3.1.1. Actividades on-line asociadas a una percepción de uso problemático

Se ha podido observar que las redes sociales son las que provocan un mayor apego a Internet y dan lugar a una percepción de dependencia por parte de los jóvenes. Plataformas como Tuenti y Facebook son sin duda las herramientas con mayor éxito de uso entre ellos, ya que nueve de cada diez jóvenes las utilizan y el 75% las visita con mucha frecuencia. Compartir vídeos (48,6%), navegar por diversas páginas web (45,7%) y descargar archivos y música (37,1%) son actividades on-line que también cuentan con una alta demanda.

En la codificación de los temas tratados en los grupos de discusión, las actividades referidas están insertas en un contexto de diversión. Compartir archivos de distintos formatos, subir fotos y etiquetarlas o chatear con los amigos son ejemplos de usos cotidianos de la Red cuya finalidad reportada por los informantes es el entretenimiento.

En este ámbito se incluyen otras actividades realizadas por los jóvenes de manera virtual: el 68,5% se conecta con mucha frecuencia para escuchar música y el 35,5% para ver la televisión. En torno al consumo mediático, los chicos se conectan con mayor frecuencia que las chicas para ver películas o series, para ver la televisión o para buscar información sobre series y/o artistas. Los «downloads» de programas televisivos son una actividad habitual entre el colectivo analizado, de modo que el 60,5% de los jóvenes de 12 a 14 años y el 71,2% de los que componen la siguiente franja de edad (de 15 a 17 años) descargan programas que no han podido ver por distintas razones, tales como la incompatibilidad de horarios o porque prefieren disponer de privacidad para visualizar los contenidos que más les gustan.

Durante la fase cualitativa, se constató que los participantes manifiestaron que uno de los principales usos atribuidos por ellos a la Red es ver la televisión, a la que acceden tanto desde un ordenador como desde una consola. Este hallazgo está asociado al uso de las redes sociales, plataformas que muchas veces albergan el debate en torno a las series más seguidas por ellos.

Los datos recogidos durante el trabajo de campo revelan que cada miembro del hogar puede llegar a tener un ordenador mientras que la familia dispone habitualmente de un solo televisor en la vivienda. Los participantes de los grupos de discusión confirman que se establecen límites en cuanto al consumo de contenidos televisivos inapropiados. Sin embargo, cuando están conectados a Internet a través del ordenador, este control disminuye.

3.2. Relaciones personales

Aunque exista una tendencia a asociar el malestar provocado por la ausencia de Internet a los problemas de relación y comunicación en el ámbito off-line, el porcentaje de los jóvenes que afirman sentirse mal al no poder conectarse es superior entre los que salen con los amigos todos o casi todos los días. La diferencia es de 5,8 puntos porcentuales respecto a los que indican que no quedan nunca o casi nunca con los amigos.

El entorno familiar ha sido contemplado en el cuestionario cuantitativo en una serie de preguntas acerca de las relaciones de los jóvenes con sus padres. Para calificarlas, los entrevistados deberían seleccionar, en una de las preguntas propuestas, alguna de las siguientes opciones:

• De total confianza, mis padres confían en mí y yo les cuento todo lo que me sucede.

• Bastante confianza, a menudo hablamos sobre cuestiones que nos preocupan.

• Mis padres se muestran muy autoritarios conmigo y apenas nos comunicamos.

• Mis padres se muestran muy autoritarios conmigo, pero me escuchan.

• Mis padres no tienen ni idea de lo que me sucede y creo que tampoco les importa.

• Otros.

Al cruzar los datos, se observa que el 21% de los jóvenes que consideran que sus padres se muestran autoritarios y que apenas se comunican con ellos manifiesta una sensación de estrés y/o malestar ante la imposibilidad de acceder a Internet. Lo mismo ocurre con el 19,6% que afirma que a sus padres ni saben lo que les sucede, ni les interesa saberlo.

La encuesta solicitaba, asimismo, que los jóvenes indicasen la frecuencia de interacción con las personas de su hogar. La percepción de que se sentirían mal en el caso de que no se pudieran conectar durante varios días a Internet se duplica entre los que dicen que nunca o casi nunca hablan o se relacionan con los familiares con los que comparten vivienda (15,3%).

Los jóvenes con quienes los padres dialogan más a menudo sobre Internet son los que pertenecen a la franja de edad de 12 a 14 años. De manera general, los padres tienden a establecer normas claras y concisas respecto al acceso a la Red por parte de los pre-adolescentes, los cuales, además, manifiestan respetarlas y cumplirlas.

Cuatro de cada diez jóvenes afirman disfrutar de una relación paterno-filial de total o de bastante confianza, lo que da lugar al intercambio de confidencias acerca de sus experiencias cotidianas y a consultas sobre temas que preocupan a los menores. Los entrevistados de 12 a 14 años son los que, en mayor medida, califican su relación con sus padres como de total confianza, mientras que la calificación mayoritaria entre los de 15 a 17 años suele ser de bastante confianza.

Sin embargo, cuando se les plantean preguntas acerca del contacto con desconocidos a través de Internet y de un posterior encuentro en persona, el porcentaje de los jóvenes que se lo cuentan a sus padres es bastante inferior (20,9%) al que opta por el grupo de amigos para este tipo de confidencias (66,7%). En menor porcentaje, se lo dicen a sus hermanos (18,6%), a los amigos en redes sociales o foros (15,4%) y un 12,7% prefiere no contárselo a nadie.

De la etapa cualitativa, es reseñable el hecho de que no se detecte ninguna diferencia entre las familias tradicionales y las monoparentales en el control o comportamiento digital de los niños de 12 a 14 años. De acuerdo con los informantes, el acceso temprano a la Red (entre los 10 y 11 años) siempre se realiza bajo la autorización y el consentimiento del padre y/o de la madre. En general, los jóvenes transmiten un sentimiento de responsabilidad ante la decisión de visitar o no una web inapropiada para su edad, porque suponen que las imprudencias, tarde o temprano, serán descubiertas.

La relación paterno-filial descrita por los grupos de 15 a 17 años se caracteriza por la rebeldía típica de esta franja de edad. Casi siempre procuran solucionar los problemas sin contar con la ayuda o el apoyo de los padres.

4. Conclusiones y discusión

La asociación entre el malestar ante la ausencia de Internet a la frecuencia de acceso a la Red y al uso de las herramientas sociales, propuesta por la hipótesis de partida, ha resultado pertinente. Los jóvenes reconocen las molestias causadas por la imposibilidad de conectarse durante varios días, pero en principio no la consideran problemática. Sin embargo, la sensación de malestar va en aumento cuantas más variables se tengan en cuenta. La percepción de estrés se manifiesta, en menor grado, si se considera el número de dispositivos empleados para acceder a Internet y se incrementa cuanto mayor sea la frecuencia de conexión. El malestar es aún más evidente si el hecho de estar offline les impide acceder a las redes sociales. Queda comprobada la hipótesis H1, de la que se pueden destacar elementos que podrían condicionar la percepción de los jóvenes respecto a un uso problemático de la Red.

En relación con la segunda hipótesis (H2), se ha podido observar que los jóvenes que no disfrutan de una comunicación fluida con los padres, o cuyo comportamiento se percibe como autoritario por parte de los hijos, son los que tienden a pasar más horas conectados, supliendo así la ausencia de comunicación en el hogar. Este problema se acentúa entre los jóvenes de 15 a 17 años, que incluso prefieren contar con el apoyo de sus grupos de referencia antes que acudir a los padres para solucionar problemas cuyo origen se encuentra en el uso de Internet.

Algunas de las prácticas señaladas en este artículo, tales como la conexión cada vez más temprana y el incremento paulatino del número de horas de navegación, pueden convertirse en ciberpatologías, lo que implica nuevas líneas de investigación en torno a los métodos de detección precoz de los trastornos agravados por las prácticas habituales en el entorno digital. Los relatos en primera persona, como los que se han podido captar en los grupos de discusión, al contextualizar los datos cuantitativos, pueden aportar elementos que contribuyan al necesario acercamiento entre las dimensiones social y cultural y el uso de la Red atribuido por los propios adolescentes.

Un hallazgo adicional de esta investigación es que los jóvenes muestran una preferencia creciente por el acceso on-line a los contenidos televisivos. Ellos valoran la posibilidad de acceder a sus programas favoritos cuando deseen y, sobre todo, comentarlos en sus redes sociales. Este comportamiento, cada vez más frecuente por parte de los jóvenes, abre una ventana de oportunidad a los medios audiovisuales en su expansión transmedia para conquistar nuevas audiencias.

La triangulación metodológica realizada en este estudio no solo ha permitido alcanzar los objetivos propuestos y demostrar la validez de ambas hipótesis, sino que ha propiciado la confirmación de algunas de las tendencias reportadas por las investigaciones en las que se basa el presente trabajo. No obstante, se ha constatado que para profundizar en este ámbito y mejorar la comprensión global de cómo los jóvenes acceden y hacen uso de Internet, es necesario buscar sinergias interdisciplinarias, especialmente en lo referente al manejo de términos como «adicción» o «uso patológico/problemático» de Internet.

Referencias

Acier, D. & Kern, L. (2011). Problematic Internet Use: Perceptions of Addiction Counselors. Computer & Education, 56, 983-989. (DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2010.11.016).

Armstrong, L., Phillips, J.G. & Saling, L.L. (2000). Potential Determinants of Heavier Internet Usage. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 53, 537–550. (DOI: 10.1006/ijhc.2000.0400).

Bergmark, K.H., Bergmark, A. & Findahl, O. (2011). Extensive Internet Involvement -Addiction or Emerging Lifestyle? International Journal Environmental Research and Public Health, 8, 4488-4501. (DOI: 10.3390/ijerph8124488).

Carbonell, X., Fústerl, H., Chamarro, A. & Oberstl, U. (2012). Adicción a Internet y móvil: Una revisión de estudios empíricos españoles. Papeles del Psicólogo, 33, 82-89 (http://goo.gl/UYRxm9) (02-05-2013).

Douglas, A.C., Mills, J.E. & al. (2008). Internet Addiction: Meta-synthesis of Qualitative Research for the Decade1996-2006. Computers in Human Behavior, 24, 3027-3044. (DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2008.05.009).

Echeburúa, E. & Corral, P. (2010). Adicción a las nuevas tecnologías y a las redes sociales en jóvenes: un nuevo reto. Adicciones, 22, 91-96 (http://goo.gl/jZe0x3) (15-12-2011).

Echeburúa, E. (1999). ¿Adicciones sin droga? Las nuevas adicciones: juego, sexo, comida, compras, trabajo, Internet. Bilbao: Desclée de Brouwer.

Espinar, E. & López, C. (2009). Jóvenes y adolescentes ante las nuevas tecnologías: percepción de riesgos. Athenea Digital, 16, 1-20 (http://goo.gl/wRETSZ) (22-01-2011).

Fundación Kaiser (Ed.) (2005). Generation M. Media in the Lifes of 8-18 Years-old (http://goo.gl/K373Fe) (20-07-2012).

Fundación Kaiser (Ed.) (2010). Generación M2: Media in the Lives of 8 to 18 Years old (http://goo.gl/8tRJej) (20-07-2012).

García, A. (Coord.) (2010). Comunicación y comportamiento en el ciberespacio. Actitudes y riesgos de los adolescentes. Barcelona: Icaria.

García, A., López-de-Ayala, M.C. & Catalina, B. (2013). Hábitos de uso en Internet y en las redes sociales de los adolescentes españoles. Comunicar, 41, 195-204. (DOI: 10.3916/C41-2013-19).

Griffiths, M.D. (2000). Does Internet and Computer «Addiction» Exist? Some Case Study Evidence. CyberPsychology and Behavior, 3, 211-218. (DOI: 10.1089/109493100316067).

Gross, E.F. (2004). Adolescent Internet Use: What we Expect, What Teens Report. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 25, 633-649. (DOI: 10.1016/j.appdev.2004.09.005).

Holmes, J. (2011). Cyberkids or Divided Generations? Characterising Young People’s Internet Use in the UK with Generic, Continuum or Typological Models. New Media & Society, 13, 1104-1122. (DOI: 10.1177/1461444810397649).

Instituto Nacional de Estadística (INE) (2013). Encuesta sobre equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de información y comunicación en los hogares (http://ine.es) (15-09-2013).

Internet World Sats (2013). Internet and Facebook Usage in Europe (http://goo.gl/xAXM8O) (15-09-2013).

Kim, H-K. & Davis, K.E. (2009). Toward a Comprehensive Theory of Problematic Internet Use: Evaluating the Role of Self-esteem, Anxiety, Flow, and the Self-rated Importance of Internet Activities. Computers in Human Behavior, 25, 490-500. (DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2008.11.001).

Kim, J. & Haridakis, P. M. (2009). The Role of Internet User Characteristics and Motives in Explaining Three Dimensions of Internet Addiction. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14, 988-1015. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1083-6101.2009.01478.x).

Kuss, D.J. & Griffiths, M.D. (2011). Online Social Networking and Addiction. A Review of the Psychological Literature. International Journal of Environment and Public Health, 8, 3528-3552. (DOI: 10.3390/ijerph8093528).

Kuss, D.J., Griffiths, M.D. & Binder, J.F. (2013). Internet Addiction in Students: Prevalence and Risk Factors. Computers in Human Behavior, 29, 959-966. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2012.12.024).

Labrador, F.J. & Villadongos, S.M. (2010). Menores y nuevas tecnologías: conductas indicadoras de posible problema de adicción. Psicothema, 22, 180-188 (http://goo.gl/Lqb6OY).

Lam, L.T., Peng, Z.W., Mai, J.C. & Jing, J. (2009). Factors Associated with Internet Addiction among Adolescents. CyberPsychology and Behavior, 12, 551-555. (DOI: 10.1089/cpb.2009.0036).

Lee, B.W. & Stapinski, L.A. (2012). Seeking Safety on the Internet: Relationship between Social Anxiety and Problematic Internet Use Related. Journal of anxiety disorders, 26, 197-205. (DOI: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2011.11.001).

Leung, L. (2004). Net-generations Attributes and Seductive Properties of the Internet as Predictors of Online Activities and Internet Addiction. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 7, 333-347. (DOI: 10.1089/1094931041291303).

Liu, Q-X., Fang, X-Y. & al. (2012). Parent-adolescent Communication, Parental Internet Use and Internet-Specific Norms and Pathological Internet Use among Chinese Adolescents. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1269-1275. (DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2012.02.010)

Livingstone, S. & Haddon, L. (2008). Risky Experiences for Children Online: Charting European Research on Children and the Internet. Children & Society, 22, 314-323. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1099-0860.2008.00157.x).

Muñoz-Rivas, M.J., Fernández, L. & Gámez-Guadix, M. (2010). Analysis of the Indicators of Pathological Internet Use in Spanish University Students. The Spanish Journal of Psychology, 13, 697-707 (http://goo.gl/zOTeSv) (24-09-2012).

Park, S.K., Kim, J.Y. & Cho, C.B. (2008). Prevalence of Internet Addiction and Correlations with Family Factors among South Korean Adolescents. Adolescence, 43, 895-909.

Schaedel, U. & Clement, M. (2010). Managing the Online Crowd: Motivations for Engagement in User-generated Content. Journal of Media Business Studies, 7, 17-36.

Shapira, N.A., Lessig, M.C. & al. (2003). Problematic Internet Use: Proposed Classification and Diagnostic Criteria. Depression and Anxiety, 17, 207-216. (DOI: 10.1002/da.10094).

Taraszow, T., Aristodemou, E. & al. (2010). Disclosure of Personal and Contact Information by Young People in Social Networking Sites: An Analysis Using Facebook Profiles as an Example. International Journal of Media & Cultural Politics, 6, 81-101. (DOI: 10.1386/macp.6.1.81/1).

Valkenburg, P.M. & Peter, J. (2007). Preadolescents' and Adolescents' Online Communication and their Closeness to Friends. Developmental Psychology, 43, 267-277. (DOI: 10.1037/0012-1649.43.2.267).

Valkenburg, P.M. & Peter, J. (2011). Online Communication among Adolescents: An Integrated Model of its Attraction, Opportunities and Risks. Journal of Adolescent Health, 48, 121–127. (DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.08.020).

Van-Roij, A.J., Schoenmarkers, T.M., Vermulsti, A.A., Van der Eijden, R.J.J.M. & Van de Mheen, D. (2010). Online Video Game Addiction: Identification of Addicted Adolescent Gamers. Addiction, 106, 205-212. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03104.x).

Viñas, F., Juan, J. & al. (2002). Internet y psicopatología: las nuevas formas de comunicación y su relación con diferentes índices de psicopatología. Clínica y Salud, 13, 235-256 (http://goo.gl/t54z8n) (23-04-2012).

Wan, C-S. & Chiou, W-B. (2006). Why Are Adolescents Addicted to Online Gaming? An Interview Study in Taiwan. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 9, 762-766. (DOI: 10.1089/cpb.2006.9.762).

Yang, S.C. & Tung, C.J. (2007). Comparison of Internet Addicts and Non-addicts in Taiwanese High School. Computers in Human Behavior, 23, 79-96. (DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2004.03.037).

Yen, J-Y., Yen, C-F., Chen, C-C., Chen, S-H. & Ko, C-H. (2007). Family Factors of Internet Addiction and Substance Use Experience in Taiwanese Adolescents. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 10, 323-329. (DOI: 10.1089/cpb.2006.9948).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/14
Accepted on 30/06/14
Submitted on 30/06/14

Volume 22, Issue 2, 2014
DOI: 10.3916/C43-2014-04
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 15
Views 2
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?