Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Currently, schools face the challenge of dealing with the phenomena of cyberbullying, which is increasingly present among teenagers. This study analyses teachers’ and students’ perception of the problem, as well as the strategies that both groups use to avoid it. Its findings will allow advances in prevention and intervention in the schools. The study was conducted on 1704 primary and secondary school students and 238 teachers who completed questionnaires about cyberbullying. We used a cross-sectional descriptive method. Findings show significant differences in the motives teachers attributed to cyberbullying. These depend on the educational stage they work in, whereas, among students, it depends on the role they have in the cyberbullying: victim or aggressor. We also find differences in the intervention strategies used by teachers, depending on the type of school, educational stage, and gender. Those used the most are communicating, mediating and seeking help. For students, the predominate strategies are avoidance, protection, and reporting. Schoolchildren, in general, show little confidence in their teachers' ability to solve the problem of cyberbullying. The study highlights the importance of training teachers and providing them with action models when faced with this issue, and it points out the necessity of coordinating the efforts of both teachers and students.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The widespread use of ICT (information and communication technologies) among young people reveals risks such as cyberbullying, access to inappropriate content and internet addiction (Nocentini, Zambuto, & Menesini, 2015). Different investigations show the close relationship between behaviours of dependency to social networks and certain antisocial behaviours, such as cyberbullying (Martínez & Moreno, 2017; Muñoz & al., 2016). The latter is understood to be a type of abuse exercised through electronic means of communication (Olweus & Limber, 2018) characterized by its intention to harm, endurance over time and imbalance of power between the parties due to the greater technological competence of the aggressors. In addition, it presents its characteristics such as access to a wider audience, greater durability of the aggressions, the ability to generate exclusion of the victims and anonymity of the aggressor (Martínez-Otero, 2017).

In schools, cyberbullying is an important educational and social concern due to the serious consequences it has on mental (Estévez, Jiménez, & Moreno, 2018) and psychosocial health (Smith & al., 2008), as well as on the academic performance of those involved (Egeberg, Thorvaldsen, & Ronning, 2016), especially in students who simultaneously adopt the role of aggressor and victim (Arnaiz, Cerezo, Giménez, & Maquilón, 2016, Giménez, 2015, Giumetti & Kowalski, 2016). In Spain, studies indicate an average prevalence of around 15.5% (Garaigordobil, 2015, Zych, Ortega-Ruiz, & Del Rey, 2015). The data is still lower than in the United States and other Spanish-speaking countries (Kowalski, Giumetti, Schroeder, & Lattanner, 2014), though no less alarming. To provide an appropriate response to the problem, we must start with the opinions that both teachers and students have about this form of bullying and their behaviour when faced with it.

1.1. The Perception of teachers and students concerning cyberbullying

Studies on cyberbullying allow for an increasingly accurate view of its characteristics and prevalence (Zych & al., 2015). According to the testimony and opinion of the victims themselves, the reasons why they are being harassed are due to variables related to a personal characteristic, such as physical appearance, which make them an easy target, or the economic situation of their family. On the other hand, those associated with the aggressors are jealousy, envy or feelings of superiority (Jacobs, Goossens, Dehue, Völlink, & Lechner, 2015).

Regarding intervention, on the part of the teachers, some studies highlight the most common strategies: “offer support to the victims”, “seek help from other colleagues”, “involve the parents” or “talk with the students” (Desmet & al., 2015). Stauffer (2011) found that teachers principally inform the school’s management team about the bullying and talk to the aggressors and victims themselves. Despite the strategies, which are implemented in some cases, the majority of the teachers point out the lack of specific intervention training (Cerezo & Rubio, 2017), and also training to detect cyberbullying even when it affects students in their classrooms (Montoro & Ballesteros, 2016). In this sense, what is required is greater involvement, specific training and intervention by teachers (Bevilacqua & al., 2017; Styron, Bonner, Styron, Bridgeforth, & Martin, 2016), as well as planned teacher training in order to be able to face cyberbullying (Nocentini & al., 2015).

However, it is important to recognize the efforts of teachers and institutions in preventing and intervening in bullying situations (Nocentini & al., 2015), even if the results are still limited. We should consider if we are applying programs that depart from the analysis of specific situations and do not take into account how schoolchildren confront bullying, as some studies suggest (Romera, Cano, García, & Ortega, 2016), since the way young people deal with these situations determines the extent of their seriousness (Jacobs, Dehue, Völlink, & Lechner, 2014). You can define coping strategies as the effort used to reduce or tolerate the demands that occur in a situation of stress. Among the strategies that influence the responses, the most frequently cited are age, the ability to express emotions and school policies (Jacobs & al., 2014).

Among the most effective responses which stand out are actions such as blocking the aggressor, confronting them or seeking help within the family, from teachers or other peers, were considered as being more effective than technical efforts (blocking contacts, increasing privacy in the network) (Orel, Campbell, Wozencroft, Leong, & Kimpton, 2017).

The coping strategies that are adopted emerge from the situation itself because inadequate responses are seen as determinants for the cyberbullying to increase its negative effects (Parris, Varjas, Meyers, & Cutts 2012). These reflections lead us to consider the importance of understanding how young people react to these situations.

It is therefore essential to investigate the perception that teachers and students have of the scope of the problem and of the intervention and coping strategies that are needed in schools in the fight against cyberbullying.

1.2. Purpose and objectives

This research, intending to cover this gap in understanding, analyses the perspective that teachers and primary and secondary students have on the causes that they attribute to cyberbullying and the strategies of intervention and coping that they employ. To achieve this general purpose, the following specific objectives are proposed:

• Analyse the perception teachers have about the causal attributions of cyberbullying, globally and by educational stage and the type of school.

• Analyse the causal attributions of the students involved in cyberbullying.

• Identify the intervention strategies used by teachers, and if there exist differences according to the educational stage, type of school, and gender.

• Identify the coping strategies of students facing cyberbullying.

2. Material and method

2.1. Participants

Taking into account that the at-risk age of cyberbullying is between 12 and 16 years old (Giumetti & Kowalski, 2016; Martínez-Otero, 2017), which coincides with the sixth grade of primary school and the whole of secondary education, a population of 96.524 students was evaluated distributed among the 6th grade of Primary (n=16.811, 17.4%), key stage 3 and 4 (n=65158, 67.5%), with an average age of 13.8 years (SD=2.03), of which 50.7% were boys. In the present study, 1.704 students from 38 state and private schools within the Region of Murcia (Spain) participated, consisting of the 6th year of primary education (29.3%) and compulsory secondary education (61.1%). Similarly, 238 educators (59.7% women) between the ages of 26 and 61 years old participated (M=43.58, SD=9.12), 35.7% being teachers in primary education and 64.3% in secondary education.

It was based on a multistage sampling. First, a selection of schools was made according to the population criteria and willingness to participate and according to the type of the school, state school and state-aided / private school. Secondly, the selection of the groups was made based on the judgment of the teaching staff at the school, trying to include all the educational stages under study.

2.2. Instruments

Studies on cyber-aggression among schoolchildren usually use self-report (Zych & al., 2015). This paper follows this practice. To identify the teachers’ perception about cyberbullying, a self-report questionnaire validated by five university experts was designed. The reliability of the complete instrument was a=.84. From this questionnaire, data were extracted from subscales referring to causes attributed to cyberbullying (11 items, a=.65), the perception of intervention strategies at the school level (12 items, a=.69), and intervention strategies developed by teachers (16 items, a=.88). The causes attributed to cyberbullying were assessed with a Likert-type scale with five response categories from the lowest to the highest level of agreement (1=in total disagreement, 5=totally agree). Some of the items included were: the aggressor is to blame; because the aggressor feels provoked; and because the aggressor enjoys it. The interventions of the school were assessed with the same Likert scale. The subscale on teacher intervention strategies was evaluated with a Likert scale of four categories (1=never and 4=always).

To identify the students’ perception and their coping characteristics, the “Cyberbull” Questionnaire for students was used (Giménez, 2015) based on the Daphne de Calmaestra questionnaire (2011). Its elaboration required two Delphi rounds of expert judgment. The questionnaire consists of five aspects/measurements: the relationship of the students with TIC; experiences of school bullying; experiences of cyberbullying; student coping strategies and bullying and cyberbullying bystanders. In this study, the questions used only referred to the causes of cyberbullying according to those involved as victims and aggressors and to coping strategies. To understand the causal attributions in cyber-victimization and cyber-aggression, those involved were asked about the reasons which led them to carry out the bullying (6 items, a=.64) or to receive it (6 items, a=.43), with answers evaluated with a Likert scale with five frequency categories (1=never and 5=always). Examples of questions for the aggressor: because it amuses me; because I like it; because I feel important; and for the victim: because they enjoy it; because I am weaker; and because they feel superior. Coping strategies were evaluated by the open question: What would you do to confront cyberbullying? The students were urged to specify all kinds of responses whether negative, positive, seeking help, etc. Finally, socio-demographic data (age, gender, and educational stage) were included.

2.3. Process

The participation of the schools was sought from the management teams by telephone. Those who gave their consent were sent the questionnaires by registered post for the teaching staff to complete anonymously. In the case of the students, authorization was obtained from their mother/father/guardian, and a session of between 20-30 minutes was established for its completion. During the sessions, a teacher and a member of the study’s research team were always present.

2.4. Design and data analysis

This research follows a descriptive and transversal design. For the analysis of the data, descriptive statistics (percentages, mean, typical deviation) and inferential statistics (parametric and non-parametric) were used. Given the categorical nature of the variables and the measurement values of the agreement level, the Pearson Chi square statistic was chosen for the contrast of proportions and the level of statistical significance, using Cramer’s V to assess the magnitude of the statistically significant associations.

With respect to the intervention strategies, the comparison of groups among teachers: type (state / private), educational level (primary /secondary) and gender (male/female), the Student’s t-statistic was used to check the normality and homoscedasticity criteria. As for the students involved (aggressors and victims), the non-parametric Mann Whitney U test was applied for the comparison of two groups. The data were analysed with the statistical package SPSS 21.0.

For the qualitative analysis of coping strategies, the students’ responses were codified and categorized, grouping them into positive (assertive and seeking help) and negative (confrontation with the aggressor and passivity) strategies. This categorical classification follows the proposal suggested by De-la-Caba and López (2013).

3. Results

3.1. Causes attributed by teachers to cyberbullying

Among the reasons that teachers attribute to the existence of cyberbullying (Table 1) stand out, with the highest level of agreement: the aggressor is to blame (44.1%); power imbalance between aggressors and victims (33.7%); and the enjoyment the aggressor gains in carrying out the harassment (22.6). Among the lesser considered causes (“in total disagreement”), we find the victim guilty (54.1%) and think that it happens because of the provocation of the victim (41.9%).


Gimenez-Gualdo et al 2018a-66327-en008.jpg

Analysis of the mean differences indicates that the teachers surveyed display a certain lack of awareness in their attribution of the causes of cyberbullying (M=3.17, SD=0.47) since the maximum value of the scale is 5.00 points.

Significant differences were found in favour of teachers in state schools (M=3.23, SD=0.43) compared to those in private schools (M=3.08, SD=0.51) (t (236)).=2.352, p=.019). By items, state school teachers are more likely to believe that cyberbullying is due to racist motives (36.7%), compared to private schools (18.2%) (X2 (2, n=238)=15.85, p=.003, V=.258); and to homophobia (34.7%), compared to private (17%) (X2 (2, n=238)=13.28, p=.010, V=.236).

The analyses also indicate differences by educational stage. Secondary school teachers show greater agreement that cyberbullying is due to the victim provoking the aggressor (85.7%) compared to 70.5% of primary school teachers (5.9%) (X2 (2, n=238)=11.95, p=.018, V=.224). On the other hand, primary school teachers more strongly agree (61.2%) that cyberbullying is due to the victim’s characteristics compared to their secondary school colleagues (49.6%) (X2 (2, n=238)=9.83, p=.043, V=.023).

3.2. Causes attributed by the students involved in cyberbullying

For the analysis of the causes attributed to cyberbullying, responses were selected from those students who were previously identified as aggressors (n=51, 2.7%) and as victims (n=132, 6.9%), opting for basic descriptive analysis (Table 2). From the perspective of the victims, the main reasons for which they are harassed are due to the aggressor enjoying doing it (M=2.79, SD=1.52) and because they feel superior (M=2.70, DT=1.63).


Gimenez-Gualdo et al 2018a-66327-en009.jpg

Analysing the responses of the student victims, we found that there are significant differences by educational stage. Victims in secondary education attribute cyberbullying to a greater extent than primary schools, to the superiority of the aggressor (X2 34.48, p=.000), envy (X2=6.99, p=.030) and enjoyment (X2=16.20, p=.000). Primary students attribute it to a greater extent to revenge (X2=38.23, p=.000). Only statistically significant differences were found between men (M=1.53, SD=0.78) and women (M=1.27, SD=0.61) in envy (U=1749.50, (72, 61), Z=–2,195, p=.028). Analysing the responses of the aggressor students, we found that the main reason for the harassment is the victim’s weakness (M=2.92, SD=1.60) followed by retaliating to aggressions previously suffered (M=2.72, DT=1.61). Significant differences were also found by gender, with boys indicating to a greater extent the weakness of the victim (U=165.00, (30, 19), Z=–2.767, p=.006), enjoyment (U=190.00, (29, 20), Z=–2.174, p=.030) and superiority (U=182.00, (29, 20), Z=–2.541, p=.011).

3.3. Intervention strategies of the teaching staff3.3.1. Intervention strategies in the school

The actions that offer the highest level of agreement among the entire teaching staff (Table 3) are: teachers and students working together on the subject (59.7%); establishing sanctions (59.3%) and implementing actions from the school coexistence plan (40.7%). Interesting data are those provided by the items “the teacher is trained” and “aware”, which show the lowest levels of agreement, mainly in ongoing training.


Gimenez-Gualdo et al 2018a-66327-en010.jpg

Differences are evident in the type of the school. Teachers in private schools consider themselves to be more capable of dealing with cyberbullying than those in state schools [X2 (2, n=236)=26.67, p<, 000, V=.336]. However, those from state schools have a higher level of agreement that this problem is dealt with in the classroom (X2 (2, n=237)=12.66, p=.002, V=.231). They also point out to a greater extent that the counselling department should take care of this issue (X2 (2, n=238)=6.59, p=.037, V=.166).

The analysis by gender shows that men have a greater level of agreement in establishing sanctions against aggressors (X2 (2, n=232)=8.15, p=.017, V=.187]. The women believe that the management of cyberbullying is the responsibility of the counselling department / Education Welfare Service (EWS) [X2 (2, n=233)=9.09, p=.011, V=.197], and that what is established in the School Coexistence Plan must be put in action (X2 (2, n=233)=10.67, p=.005, V=.214) By educational stage, the differences were not significant in any case.

3.3.2. Teacher intervention strategies

Among the strategies used by teachers (Table 4), communication strategies deserve special mention. With a frequency of “always”, cyberbullying is reported to the management team (73.9%), and to a lesser extent, to the Counselling Department (49.2%). With somewhat lower percentages, they communicate with the family (48.1%) and talk to those involved (aggressors, 39.5%, victims, 47.1%). Conversely, a considerable percentage of teachers “never” contact the police (66.1%), and in no, or few cases do they use existing specific resources, implement the School Coexistence Plan or seek external help.


Gimenez-Gualdo et al 2018a-66327-en011.jpg

Differences were found according to the type of the school, gender, and educational stage. Private schools employ strategies such as: dialogue with the family (p=.016), communication of the incident to the school counsellor or school coexistence team (p<, 000), self-education on the subject (p=.002), implementation of the school coexistence plan (p=.025), and the use of specific resources for the prevention of cyberbullying (p=.028). Teachers in state schools more frequently seek support and help from other colleagues (p=.018).

The analyses by gender indicate that males are more indifferent (p<, 000) compared to women who use other strategies, such as reorganizing the classroom (p<000), informing the management team of the incident (p=.043), educating themselves about the subject (p=.030), having discussions in class and during other activities (p=.046), and implementing the school coexistence plan (p=.031).

According to the educational stage, only significant differences appear in favour of secondary school teachers who, most frequently, report cyberbullying to the school counsellor t(236)=–5,023, p<.000). Primary teachers use mediation more as a resource than secondary teachers (t (236)=3.368, p<.001).

3.4. Student coping strategies

The responses to the question about how to deal with cyberbullying were coded by frequency and percentage. The most notable was avoiding strangers (13.48%), followed by reporting to the police (10.56%). On the other hand, blocking the aggressor or communicating the harassment to the responsible counselor at the school is hardly mentioned (0.03%). For ease of reference, following De-la-Caba and López (2013) coping strategies were grouped into positive categories (assertive and seeking help) and negative (confronting the aggressor and passive).

3.4.1. Positive strategies

As assertive strategies the students pointed out: reporting to the police (19.8%), helping / defending the victim (18.7%), talking to the aggressor (16.3%), preserving one’s privacy (15.7%), do not retaliate (10.9%), restrict access to ICT (10.1%), make good use of ICT (4.5%), report (the harassment) to the social network (3%) and save the conversations (0.9%).

Differences were found by educational stage, with primary school students choosing to report to the police (23.91%), restricting access to ICT (20.4%) and reporting (the harassment) to the social network (5.1%). On the other hand, secondary students chose to defend the victim (18.5%) and talk to the aggressor (17.8%).

Among the help-seeking strategies, most students report it to their parents (41.4%), other trusted adults (36.1%), teachers (11.5%), and friends (2.3%) and the responsible school counselor (0.2%). Again differences appear by educational stage. Primary school students report cyberbullying first to parents (49.5%), second to other adults (35.6%) and lastly to teachers (8.5%). Secondary students communicate to other adults (37.7%), parents (37.6%) and teachers (12.9%).

3.4.2. Negative strategies

Students differentiated between confrontation strategies and passive strategies. Among the first, the students mentioned: retaliate with cyber-bullying (69%); punishing the aggressors (33.8%); hitting the aggressor (30.4%) or excluding them (0.6%). Differences were observed by educational stage, with secondary students being the most likely to retaliate with cyber-bullying (64.1%), compared to primary school (56%).

Passive strategies include the following: avoiding strangers (46.4%); ignoring the aggressor (23.5%); restricting limit the use of TIC (28.8%); supporting anti-bullying rules protocols (13.5%); monitoring mobile phones and computers (10.3%) or doing nothing (11.4%). Again, differences appear by educational stage. Secondary students mention more the avoidance of strangers (53.7%) and doing nothing (8.7%), while those in primary school do not know what they would do, or if anything, eliminate their profile on the network (5.4%).

4. Discussion and conclusions

In the first place, it should be noted that the level of prevalence of cyberbullying found in the sample studied is similar to the averages found in other studies (Zynch & al., 2015).

As to the causes of cyberbullying, teachers consider the personal characteristics of the aggressor and the enjoyment of bullying as the main causes of this phenomenon (Martínez & Moreno, 2017; Monks, Mahdavi, & Rix, 2016). Likewise, the teaching staff as a whole highlight the importance of the imbalance of power between aggressors and victims (Romera & al., 2016). Differences were found according to the educational stage. Secondary teachers attribute, to a greater extent, the direct responsibility for harassment to the aggressors, while primary teachers point to the personal characteristics of the victim.

The results obtained show that most teachers attribute the causes to those involved, leaving out the classroom climate and relationship features. The differences by type of school are revealing: among teachers in state schools, racism and homophobia are identified as causes of cyberbullying, coinciding with the greater presence of foreign students. Previous research shows that students from minority groups (non-heterosexuals) and other ethnic groups are exposed to higher levels of cyberbullying when compared to those who are not involved and heterosexual students (Abreu & Kenny, 2017; Llorent, Ortega, & Zych, 2016).

Regarding the perception of the students, according to the aggressors and the victims, the main cause of cyberbullying is the enjoyment that the harassment arouses. To a lesser extent, attributing the blame to the aggressor and the victim, the results coincide with previous studies (Calmaestra, 2011; Giménez, 2015). Boys indicate envy more than girls. We find that when a student harasses another, they try to justify this act by also blaming the object of their bullying. On the other hand, from the perspective of the victim, the aggressors are responsible for the bullying (Jacobs & al., 2015). This data should be taken into account when initiating an intervention with those involved since it is necessary for the change of attitudes and cognitive attribution of the aggressors.

Relating to the strategies of intervention in the school, slightly more than half of the teachers emphasise teachers and students working together on the problem, and also point out the necessity of implementing the school coexistence plan. This reflects the concern and lack of effective measures available, which strengthen the option of establishing sanctions. The latter is a response mentioned frequently. It is certainly necessary to create a regulation that facilitates the school coexistence framework, which cannot be limited to a list of offenses and sanctions (Cerezo & Rubio, 2017), but rather effective solution strategies are needed. These strategies need to be adapted to the needs detected in the schools. It is important to mention the differences found between teachers in state and private schools, the former being the ones that most indicate their need for training and the benefits of carrying out prevention in the classroom. Regarding intervention strategies used by teachers, in the private schools, communication with the school’s management team, counsellors and the police is highlighted; and in state schools, the search for support from other colleagues stands out. Primary teachers intervene more than teachers in secondary schools, perhaps because of their closeness to the students. It has been found that women are more involved than men in finding solutions.

The victims usually communicate incidents to their families, and to a lesser extent to their teachers. This indicates distrust in their teachers’ ability to resolve the problem. It is essential to consider how the teachers’ attitudes, as well as specific actions in the organization of the classroom and improvements in school coexistence, can have a positive effect on the prevention and reduction of cyberbullying (Montoro & Ballesteros, 2016; Styron & al., 2016). However, the students do not see it that way. In this respect, Perren and others (2012) highlight parental mediation of Internet use, the support of peers, empowering the leadership skills of students and developing initiatives that embrace the entire educational community as more effective measures for preventing cyberbullying. Recent research confirms the need to unite the efforts of teachers and parents to ensure supervision and control of the Internet, which are key elements in reducing the risk of cyberbullying (Monks & al, 2016).

Regarding the strategies proposed by the students, those of avoidance / protection and reporting to the police stand out as the immediate steps taken. Intervention to defend the victim and the search for help are scarcely indicated, thus maintaining the victim’s defencelessness (Estévez & al., 2018), remain priorities to combat it (Jacobs & al., 2014). In addition, communication facilitates the instigation of immediate action measures, either by alerting the family or the school (Perren & al., 2012). Schoolchildren point out the importance of parental help (Monks & al., 2016) and scarcely that of teachers and friends, which is different from other studies that position friends in the first place (De-la-Caba & López, 2013). It should be noted that the School Counselling Service is hardly taken into account. In this way, the field of Educational Guidance remains largely unaware of this problem, despite the importance of school counsellors and psychologists in the evaluation, prevention, and intervention in cyberbullying.

Comparing intervention strategies of the teachers with those of students, we find that both groups agree on seeking help (DeSmet & Bourdeaudhuij, 2015), to communicate harassment (Perren & al., 2012) and to report it to the police; although to a very limited degree, which coincides with other studies which indicate that teachers are more inclined to refer cyberbullying to their management team, and to talk to the victim or the aggressor than to communicate with the family (Stauffer, 2011). Another point of coincidence is the option for sanctioning the aggressors; this can be caused by the lack of adequate resources for the improvement of school coexistence and the lack of specific attention to those affected. In the case of students, it is striking that teachers are an underused resource, which suggests the limited perception students have of the ability of their teachers to resolve conflicts, an essential element to be taken into account for the improvement of these situations (Abreu & Kenny, 2017).

Finally, we want to point out that although we are making progress in raising awareness of the consequences of cyberbullying (Egeberg & al., 2016; Giménez, 2015), it is necessary to provide teachers with action models to help with prevention and intervention in their classrooms (Bevilacqua & al., 2017). As Romera and others (2016) affirm, teachers and counsellors, require training and clear action models to manage groups of students, work on the improvement of the classroom atmosphere, the development of social activities, the analysis of classroom relations and in the establishment of interpersonal links. Only by understanding the teachers’ and students’ perception of the problem will it be possible to lay the foundations for its effective detection, prevention, and intervention. Acting on this problem and facilitating the students understanding of the risks of this phenomenon, so that they collaborate in its eradication, is the responsibility of the entire educational community. This study has highlighted the importance of this perspective.

This study presents some limitations. Thus, the number of participating teachers and the sample belonging to the same geographical area limits the generalization of results. Another limitation is related to the information collection instrument given that it is a self-report, it is difficult to control the social desirability bias. In future research, these aspects will be taken into account, and not only will the students’ coping strategies be analysed, but also their effectiveness in order to set out recommendations for intervention. In addition, we will look more deeply into the relationship between the measures adopted by the school and the teaching staff and the effective coping strategies of the students.

Funding Agency

This manuscript is the result of the I+D+i Project “Inclusive education and improvement project in nursery, primary and secondary schools” (EDU2011-26765), and Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport.

References

Abreu, R.L., & Kenny, M.C. (2017). Cyberbullying and LGBTQ youth: A systematic literature review and recommendations for prevention and intervention. Journal of Child & Adolescent Trauma, 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40653-017-0175-7

Arnaiz, P., Cerezo, F., Giménez, A.M., & Maquilón, J.J. (2016). Conductas de ciberadicción y experiencias de cyberbullying entre adolescentes. Anales de Psicología, 32(3), 761-769. https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.32.3.217461

Beer, P., Hallet, F., Hawkins, C., & Hewitson, D. (2017). Cyberbullying levels of impact in a special school setting. The International Journal of Emotional Education, 9(1), 121-124.

Bevilacqua, L., Shackleton, N., Hale, D., Allen, E., Bond, L., Christie, D., & Viner, R.M. (2017). The role of family and school-level factors in bullying and cyberbullying: a cross-sectional study. BMC Pediatrics, 17. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-017-0907-8

Calmaestra, J.A. (2011). Cyberbullying: Prevalencia y características de un nuevo tipo de bullying indirecto. Universidad de Córdoba: Tesis doctoral. http://goo.gl/SjkL8k

Cerezo, F., & Rubio, F.J. (2017). Medidas relativas al acoso escolar y ciberacoso en la normativa autonómica española. Un estudio comparativo. Revista Electrónica Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado, 20(1), 113-126. http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/reifop/20.1.253391

De-la-Caba, M.A., & López, R. (2013). La agresión entre iguales en la era digital: estrategias de afrontamiento de los estudiantes del último ciclo de Primaria y del primero de Secundaria. Revista de Educación, 362, 247-272. https://doi.org/10.4438/1988-592X-RE-2011-362-160

DeSmet, A., & De-Bourdeaudhuij, I. (2015). Secondary school educators’ perceptions and practices in handling cyberbullying among adolescents: A cluster analysis. Computers & Education, 88, 192-201. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2015.05.006

Egeberg, G., Thorvaldsen, S., & Ronning, J.A. (2016). The impact of cyberbullying and cyber harassment on academic achievement. In E. Elstad (Ed.), Digital expectations and experiences in education (pp. 183-204). The Netherlands: Sense Publishers. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6300-648-4_11

Estévez, E., Jimenez, T., & Moreno, D. (2018). Aggressive behavior in adolescence as a predictor of personal, family, and school adjustment problems. Psicothema, 30(1) 66-73. https://doi.org/10.7334/psicothema2016.294

Garaigordobil, M. (2015). Cyberbullying in adolescents and youth in the Basque Country: prevalence of cybervictims, cyberaggressors, and cyberobservers. Journal of Youth Studies, 18, 569-582. https://doi.org/10.1080/13676261.2014.992324

Giménez, A.M. (2015). Cyberbullying. Análisis de su incidencia entre estudiantes y percepciones del profesorado (Tesis doctoral). Universidad de Murcia. http://goo.gl/5gQW4q

Giumetti, G. W., & Kowalski, R.M. (2016). Cyberbullying matters: Examining the incremental impact of cyberbullying on outcomes over and above traditional bullying in North America. In R. Navarro, S. Yubero, & E. Larrañaga (Eds.), Cyberbullying across the Globe. Gender, family, and mental health. Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.

Jacobs, N., Dehue, F. Völlink, T., & Lechner, L. (2014). Determinants of adolescents’ ineffective and improved coping with cyberbullying: A Delphi study. Journal of Adolescence, 37, 373-385. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2014.02.011

Jacobs, N., Goossens, L., Dehue, F. Völlink, T., & Lechner, L. (2015). Dutch cyberbullying victims’ experiences, perceptions, attitudes and motivations related to (coping with) cyberbullying: Focus group interviews. Societies, 5, 43-64. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5010043

Kowalski, R.M., Giumetti, G.W., Schroeder, A.N., & Lattanner, M.R. (2014). Bullying in the digital age: A critical review and meta-analysis of cyberbullying research among youth. Psychological Bulletin, 140, 1073-1137. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035618

Llorent, V.J., Ortega, R., & Zych, I. (2016). Bullying and cyberbullying in minorities: Are they more vulnerable than the majority group? Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 1507. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01507

Martínez, B., & Moreno, D. (2017). Dependencia de las redes sociales virtuales y violencia escolar en adolescentes. International Journal of Developmental and Educational Psychology, 1(1), 105-114. https://doi.org/10.17060/ijodaep.2017.n1.v2.923

Martínez-Otero, V. (2017). Acoso y ciberacoso en una muestra de alumnos de secundaria. Profesorado, 21(2), 277-298.

Monks, C.P., Mahdavi, J., & Risk, K. (2016). The emergence of cyberbullying in childhood: Parent and teacher perspectives. Piscología Educativa, 22, 39-48. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pse.2016.02.002

Montoro, E., & Ballesteros, M. (2016). Competencias docentes para la prevención del ciberacoso y delito de odio en Secundaria. Relatec, 15(1), 131-143. https://doi.org/10.17398/1695-288X.15.1.131

Muñoz, R., Ortega, R., López, M.R., Batalla, C., Manresa, J.M., Montellá, N., & Torán, P. (2016). The problematic use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), in adolescents by the cross sectional JOITIC study. BMC Pediatrics, 16(140). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-016-0674-y

Nocentini, A., Zambuto, V., & Menesini, E. (2015). Anti-bullying programs and information and Communication Technologies (ICT): A systematic review. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 23, 52-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2015.05.012

Olweus, D., & Limber, S.P. (2018). Some problems with cyberbullying research. Current Opinion in Psychology, 19, 139-143. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.copsyc.2017.04.012

Orel, A., Campbell, M.A., Wozencroft, K., Leong, E.W., & Kimpton, M. (2017). Exploring university students’ coping strategy intentions for cyberbullying. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 32(3), 446-462. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260515586363

Perren, S., Corcoran, L., Cowie, H., Dehue, F., Garcia, D., Mc Guckin, C.,… & Völlink, T. (2012). Tackling cyberbullying: Review of empirical evidence regarding successful responses by students, parents, and schools. International Journal of Conflict and Violence, 6(2), 283-293. https://doi.org/10.4119/UNIBI/ijcv.244

Romera, E.M., Cano, J.J., García, C.M., & Ortega, R. (2016). Cyberbullying: Social Competence, Motivation and Peer Relationships [Cyberbullying: Competencia social, motivación y relaciones entre iguales]. Comunicar, 48(24), 71-79. https://doi.org/10.3916/C48-2016-07

Smith, P.K., Mahdavi, J., Carvalho, C., Fisher, S., Russell, S., & Tippett, N. (2008). Cyberbullying: Its nature and impact in secondary school pupils. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49, 376-385.

Stauffer, S.V. (2011). High school teachers’ perceptions of cyber bullying prevention and intervention strategies [Thesis dissertation]. http://goo.gl/j51cFu

Styron, R.A., Bonner, J.L., Styron, J.L., Bridgeforth, J., & Martin, C. (2016). Are teacher and principal candidates prepared to address student cyberbullying. Journal of At-Risk Issues, 19(1), 19-28.

Zych, I., Ortega-Ruiz, R., & Del-Rey, R. (2015). Systematic review of theoretical studies on bullying and cyberbullying: Facts, knowledge, prevention, and intervention. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 23, 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2015.10.001



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Actualmente los centros educativos tienen el reto de enfrentarse al fenómeno del ciberacoso, cada vez más presente entre los adolescentes. El presente estudio analiza la percepción del profesorado y del alumnado y las estrategias que ambos colectivos utilizan para afrontarlo. Su conocimiento permitirá avanzar en su prevención e intervención en las aulas. El estudio se realizó con 1.704 estudiantes de educación primaria, secundaria y 238 profesores a los que se aplicaron sendos cuestionarios sobre ciberacoso. Se utilizó un método descriptivo y transversal. Los resultados muestran diferencias significativas en las causas que el profesorado atribuye al ciberacoso según la etapa educativa donde ejerza la docencia, apareciendo en el alumnado según el rol que adopta en la situación de acoso: víctima o acosador. También se encuentran diferencias en las estrategias de intervención utilizadas por el profesorado, según la titularidad del centro, la etapa educativa y el sexo, siendo las más empleadas comunicar, mediar y buscar ayuda; en el alumnado predominan las estrategias de evitación, protección y denuncia. Los escolares en general muestran escasa confianza en el profesorado para resolver el problema del ciberacoso. Se concluye exponiendo la importancia de dotar al profesorado de formación específica y de modelos de actuación ante este fenómeno, y señalando la necesidad de coordinar los esfuerzos de docentes y estudiantes.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

El uso generalizado de las TIC, entre los jóvenes, revela riesgos como el ciberacoso, el acceso a contenidos inapropiados y la ciberadicción (Nocentini, Zambuto, & Menesini, 2015). Diferentes investigaciones manifiestan la estrecha relación entre las conductas de dependencia a las redes sociales y determinadas conductas antisociales, como el ciberacoso (Martínez & Moreno, 2017; Muñoz, Ortega, López, Batalla, Manresa, Montellá, & Torán, 2016), entendido como un tipo de maltrato ejercido a través de medios electrónicos de comunicación (Olweus & Limber, 2018) caracterizado por su intencionalidad (hacer daño), perdurabilidad en el tiempo y desequilibrio de poder entre las partes, debido a la mayor competencia tecnológica de los agresores. Además presenta unas características propias como extensión a una audiencia más amplia, mayor perdurabilidad de las agresiones, capacidad para generar exclusión de las víctimas y anonimato del agresor (Martínez-Otero, 2017).

En los centros escolares el ciberacoso constituye una importante preocupación educativa y social por sus graves consecuencias en la salud mental (Estévez, Jiménez, & Moreno, 2018) y psicosocial (Smith, Mahdavi, Carvalho, Fisher, Russell, & Tippett, 2008), y en el rendimiento académico de los implicados (Egeberg, Thorvaldsen, & Ronning, 2016), especialmente en los estudiantes que adoptan roles de agresor y víctimas simultáneamente (Arnaiz, Cerezo, Giménez, & Maquilón, 2016; Giménez, 2015; Giumetti & Kowalski, 2016). En España, los estudios indican una prevalencia media en torno al 15,5% (Garaigordobil, 2015; Zych, Ortega-Ruiz, & Del-Rey, 2015), datos que, aun siendo inferiores a los de Estados Unidos y otros países de habla hispana (Kowalski, Giumetti, Schroeder, & Lattanner, 2014), no por ello son menos alarmantes. Para proporcionar una respuesta ajustada al problema, debemos partir de la opinión que tanto profesorado como alumnado tienen de las situaciones de acoso y su actuación ante las mismas.

1.1. Percepción de docentes y estudiantes sobre el ciberacoso

Los estudios sobre el ciberacoso permiten tener una visión cada vez más exacta de sus características y prevalencia (Zych & al., 2015). Según el testimonio y la opinión de las propias víctimas, las causas por las que son acosadas obedecen a variables relacionadas con una característica personal, como la apariencia física, que las hacen un blanco fácil, o la situación económica familiar; en cambio las asociadas a los agresores son los celos, la envidia o sentirse superiores (Jacobs, Goossens, Dehue, Völlink, & Lechner, 2015).

En cuanto a la intervención, por parte del profesorado, algunos estudios destacan como estrategias más comunes: «ofrecer apoyo a las víctimas», «buscar ayuda en otros compañeros», «implicar a los padres» o «hablar con los alumnos» (Desmet & al., 2015). Stauffer (2011) encontró que principalmente los docentes transmiten a la dirección del centro el acoso y hablan con agresores y víctimas. A pesar de las estrategias, que en algunos casos se ponen en marcha, la mayor parte del profesorado señala la falta de formación específica para intervenir (Cerezo & Rubio, 2017), e incluso para detectar el ciberacoso aun cuando afecta a alumnos de sus propias aulas (Montoro & Ba­llesteros, 2016). En este sentido, es necesaria una mayor implicación, formación específica e intervención del profesorado (Bevilacqua, Shackleton, Hale, Allen, Bond, Christie, & Viner, 2017; Styron, Bonner, Styron, Bridgeforth, & Martin, 2016), así como su entrenamiento consciente y planificado para poder intervenir ante el ciberacoso (Nocentini, Zambuto, & Menesini, 2015). Sin embargo, es importante reconocer los esfuerzos del profesorado y las instituciones por prevenir e intervenir en el acoso escolar (Nocentini & al., 2015), aunque los resultados son todavía limitados. Deberíamos plantearnos si se están aplicando programas que no parten del análisis de las situaciones concretas y no tienen en cuenta cómo se enfrentan los propios escolares al acoso, como sugieren algunos estudios (Romera, Cano, García, & Ortega, 2016), ya que la forma en que los jóvenes afrontan estas situaciones determinan el alcance de su gravedad (Jacobs, Dehue, Völlink, & Lechner, 2014). Se pueden definir las estrategias de afrontamiento como el esfuerzo empleado para reducir o tolerar las demandas que se producen ante una situación de estrés. Entre las estrategias que condicionan las respuestas, la edad, la capacidad de expresar las emociones y las políticas escolares son las que se citan con mayor frecuencia (Jacobs & al., 2014). Entre las respuestas más eficaces destacan acciones como bloquear al agresor, confrontarse con él o buscar ayuda en la familia, docentes u otros iguales, siendo consideradas como más efectivas las de tipo técnico (bloquear, aumentar la privacidad en la red) (Orel, Campbell, Wozencroft, Leong, & Kimpton, 2017).

Las estrategias de afrontamiento que se adopten transcienden la propia situación, ya que las respuestas inadecuadas se perfilan como determinantes para que el ciberacoso aumente sus efectos negativos (Parris, Varjas, Me­yers, & Cutts 2012). Estas reflexiones nos llevan a considerar la importancia de conocer cómo reaccionan los jóvenes ante esta situación.

Se hace, pues, imprescindible indagar en la percepción que tienen el profesorado y los estudiantes sobre el alcance del problema y sobre las estrategias de intervención y afrontamiento que se precisan en los centros educativos en la lucha contra el ciberacoso.

1.2. Finalidad y objetivos

Esta investigación, tratando de cubrir esta carencia, analiza la visión que profesores y estudiantes de primaria y secundaria tienen sobre las causas que atribuyen al ciberacoso y las estrategias de intervención y afrontamiento que emplean. Para alcanzar este propósito general se plantean los siguientes objetivos específicos:

• Analizar la percepción de los docentes sobre las atribuciones causales del ciberacoso de forma global y por etapa educativa y titularidad del centro.

• Analizar las atribuciones causales del alumnado implicado en ciberacoso.

• Conocer las estrategias de in­tervención que emplea el profesorado (centro y profesores) y si existen diferencias por etapa educativa, titularidad y sexo.

• Conocer las estrategias de afrontamiento del alumnado ante el ciberacoso.

2. Material y método

2.1. Participantes

Teniendo en cuenta que la edad de riesgo del ciberacoso se sitúa entre los 12 y 16 años (Giumetti & Kowalski, 2016; Martínez-Otero, 2017), que coincide con los cursos de sexto de primaria y los de secundaria, se consideró una población de 96.524 estudiantes distribuidos entre 6º de Primaria (n=16.811, 17,4%), de 1º a 4º ESO (n=65.158, 67,5%), con una media de edad de 13,8 años (DT=2,03), de los cuales 50,7% fueron chicos. En el presente estudio participaron 1.704 estudiantes de 38 centros de titularidad pública y privada de la Región de Murcia (España), siendo de 6º de educación primaria (29,3%) y de educación secundaria obligatoria (61,1%). Así mismo, participaron 238 profesores (59,7% mujeres) de edades comprendidas entre los 26 años y los 61 años (M=43,58, DT=9,12), perteneciendo el 35,7% docentes a educación primaria y el 64,3% a educación secundaria.

Se partió de un muestreo multietápico. Primero se realizó una selección de centros atendiendo a los criterios de población y disposición a participar, según titularidad pública y concertada/privada. Y en un segundo momento se hizo la selección de los grupos a criterio del profesorado del centro, tratando de incluir a todos los cursos objeto de estudio.

2.2. Instrumentos

Los estudios sobre ciberagresión entre escolares suelen utilizar el autoinforme (Zych & al., 2015). Este trabajo sigue esta propuesta. Para conocer la percepción del profesorado sobre el ciberacoso se diseñó un cuestionario de autoinforme validado por cinco expertos universitarios. La fiabilidad del instrumento completo fue de a=,84. De este cuestionario se extrajeron los datos de las subescalas referidas a las causas atribuidas al ciberacoso (11 ítems, a=,65), la percepción sobre estrategias de intervención a nivel de centro educativo (12 ítems, a=,69), y las estrategias de intervención desarrolladas por los docentes (16 ítems, a=,88). Las causas atribuidas al ciberacoso fueron valoradas con una escala tipo Likert con cinco categorías de respuesta de menor a mayor nivel de acuerdo (1=en total desacuerdo, 5=totalmente de acuerdo). Algunos de los ítems incluidos fueron: por culpa del agresor, porque el agresor se siente provocado, porque al agresor le divierte. Las intervenciones del centro educativo se valoraron con la misma escala Likert. La subescala sobre estrategias de intervención de los docentes se evaluó con una escala Likert de cuatro categorías (1=nunca y 4=siempre).

Para conocer la percepción del alumnado y sus características de afrontamiento, se utilizó el cuestionario «Cyberbull» para alumnado (Giménez, 2015) basado en el cuestionario Daphne de Calmaestra (2011). Su elaboración requirió dos rondas Delphi por juicio de expertos. El cuestionario consta de cinco dimensiones: relación de los menores con las TIC, experiencias de acoso escolar, experiencias de ciberacoso, estrategias de afrontamiento ante el ciberacoso y espectadores ante el acoso y ciberacoso. En este trabajo se utilizaron únicamente las preguntas referidas a las causas del ciberacoso según los implicados como víctimas y agresores y estrategias de afrontamiento. Para conocer las atribuciones causales en cibervictimización y ciberagresión se preguntó a los implicados sobre los motivos que les llevaban a acometer el acoso (6 ítems, a=,64) o a recibirlo (6 ítems, a=.43), con respuestas evaluadas con una escala tipo Likert con cinco categorías de frecuencia (1=nunca y 5=siempre). Ejemplo de preguntas para el agresor: porque me divierte, porque me gusta, porque me siento importante; y para la víctima: porque le divierte, porque soy más débil, porque se siente superior. Las estrategias de afrontamiento se evaluaron mediante la pregunta abierta: ¿Qué harías tú para afrontar el ciberacoso? Se instó a los estudiantes a que precisaran todo tipo de respuestas ya fueran negativas, positivas, de búsqueda de ayuda, etc. Finalmente, se incluyeron datos sociodemográficos (edad, sexo y etapa educativa).

2.3. Procedimiento

Se solicitó por vía telefónica a los equipos directivos la participación de los centros. A los que dieron su consentimiento se les envió por correo certificado los cuestionarios del profesorado para su cumplimentación anónima. En el caso de los alumnos se obtuvo la autorización de padres/madres/tutores y se estableció una sesión de entre 20-30´ para su cumplimentación. Durante la misma se contó siempre con la presencia de un profesor y de un miembro del equipo de investigación del estudio.

2.4. Diseño y análisis de datos

Esta investigación sigue un diseño descriptivo y transversal. Para el análisis de los datos se utilizó tanto la estadística descriptiva (porcentajes, Media, Desviación Típica) como inferencial (paramétrica y no paramétrica). Dada la naturaleza categórica de las variables y los valores de medición del nivel de acuerdo se optó por el estadístico Chi cuadrado de Pearson para al contraste de proporciones y el nivel de significación estadística, empleando la V de Cramer para valorar la magnitud de las asociaciones estadísticamente significativas.

En cuanto a las estrategias de intervención, la comparación de grupos entre docentes: titularidad (pública/privada), nivel educativo (primaria/secundaria) y sexo (hombre/mujer), se empleó el estadístico t de Student, comprobados los criterios de normalidad y homocedasticidad. En el caso del alumnado, dado que se seleccionaron los alumnos implicados (agresores y víctimas), se aplicó la prueba no paramétrica U de Mann Whitney para la comparación de dos grupos. Los datos se analizaron con el paquete estadístico SPSS 21.0.

Para el análisis cualitativo sobre estrategias de afrontamiento, las respuestas de los estudiantes se codificaron y categorizaron agrupándolas en estrategias positivas (asertivas y búsqueda de ayuda) y negativas (confrontación con el agresor y pasividad). Esta clasificación categórica sigue la propuesta sugerida por De-la-Caba y López (2013).

3. Resultados

3.1. Causas atribuidas por el profesorado al ciberacoso

Entre los motivos que los docentes atribuyen a la existencia del ciberacoso (Tabla 1) destacan, con mayor nivel de acuerdo, culpabilizar al agresor (44,1%), desequilibrio de poder entre agresores y víctimas (33,7%), y la diversión que le propicia al agresor ejercer el acoso (22,6). Entre las causas menos consideradas («en total desacuerdo») encontramos culpabilizar a la víctima (54,1%) y pensar que sucede por provocación de la víctima (41,9%).

El análisis de diferencias de medias indica que el profesorado encuestado muestra cierto desconocimiento en la atribución de causas al ciberacoso (M=3,17, DT=0,47), pues el valor máximo de la escala es de 5,00 puntos.

Se aprecian diferencias significativas a favor de los docentes de los centros públicos (M=3,23, DT=0,43) frente a los de centros privados (M=3,08, DT=0,51) (t(236)=2,352, p=,019). Por ítems, los docentes de centros públicos opinan en mayor medida que el ciberacoso se debe a motivos racistas (36,7%), ante los de centros privados (18,2%) (X2(2, n=238)=15,85, p=,003, V=,258); y a la homofobia (34,7%), frente a los privados (17,0%) (X2(2, n=238)=13,28, p=,010, V=,236).

Los análisis también indican diferencias por etapa educativa. Los docentes de educación secundaria muestran mayor acuerdo en que el ciberacoso se debe a que la víctima provoca al agresor (85,7%) ante el 70,5% de los docentes de primaria (5,9%) (X2(2, n= 238)=11,95, p=,018, V=,224). En cambio los docentes de primaria están más de acuerdo (61,2%) en que el ciberacoso se debe a las características personales de la víctima frente a sus compañeros de secundaria (49,6%) (X2(2, n=238)=9,83, p=,043, V=,023).

3.2. Causas atribuidas por el alumnado implicado en el ciberacoso

Para el análisis de las causas atribuidas al ciberacoso se seleccionaron las respuestas de aquellos estudiantes que se identificaron previamente como agresores (n=51, 2,7%) y como víctimas (n=132, 6,9%), optando por el análisis con descriptivos básicos (Tabla 2). Desde la perspectiva de las víctimas, los motivos principales por los que son acosadas se deben a que al agresor le divierte hacerlo (M=2,79, DT=1,52) y a que este se siente superior (M=2,70, DT=1,63).


Gimenez-Gualdo et al 2018a-66327 ov-es008.jpg

Analizando las respuestas de los estudiantes víctimas, encontramos que se encuentran diferencias significativas por etapa educativa. Las víctimas de educación secundaria atribuyen el ciberacoso, en mayor medida que las de primaria, a la superioridad del agresor (X2 34,48, p=,000), la envidia (X2=6,99, p=,030) y la diversión (X2=16,20, p=,000). Las de primaria las atribuyen en mayor medida a la revancha (X2=38,23, p=,000). Solamente se hallaron diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre hombres (M=1,53, DT=0,78) y mujeres (M=1,27, DT=0,61) en envidia (U=1749,50, (72, 61), Z=–2,195, p=,028). Analizando las respuestas de los estudiantes agresores, encontramos que el principal motivo para acosar es la debilidad de la víctima (M=2,92, DT=1,60) seguido de devolver la agresión previamente sufrida (M=2,72, DT=1,61). También se hallaron diferencias significativas por sexo, siendo los chicos los que señalan en mayor medida la debilidad de la víctima (U=165,00, (30, 19), Z=–2,767, p=,006), la diversión (U=190,00, (29, 20), Z=–2,174, p=,030) y la superioridad (U=182,00, (29, 20), Z=–2.541, p=,011).

3.3. Estrategias de intervención del profesorado3.3.1. Estrategias de intervención en el centro educativo

Las acciones que ofrecen mayor nivel de acuerdo en el conjunto del profesorado (Tabla 3) son: trabajar el tema conjuntamente entre docentes y alumnos (59,7%), establecer sanciones (59,3%) e implementar actuaciones del plan de convivencia (40,7%). Datos interesantes son los aportados por los ítems «el profesorado está capacitado» y «sensibilizado», que muestran los niveles de acuerdo más bajos, principalmente, en capacitación.


Gimenez-Gualdo et al 2018a-66327 ov-es009.jpg

Se evidencian diferencias por titularidad. Los docentes de centros privados se consideran más capacitados para hacer frente al ciberacoso que los de centros públicos [X2(2, n=236)=26,67, p<,000, V=,336]. Sin embargo, los de centros públicos, presentan mayor nivel de acuerdo en que esta problemática se trata en clase [X2(2, n=237)=12,66, p=,002, V=,231). También señalan en mayor medida que el Departamento de Orientación debería encargarse de esta cuestión (X2(2, n=238)=6,59, p=,037, V=,166).

El análisis por sexo muestra que los hombres tienen mayor grado de acuerdo en que se establezcan sanciones a los agresores (X2(2, n=232)=8,15, p=,017, V=,187]. Las mujeres consideran que la gestión del ciberacoso corresponde al Departamento de Orientación/EOEP [X2(2, n=233)=9,09, p=,011, V=,197], y que se debe poner en marcha lo establecido en el Plan de Convivencia (X2(2, n=233)=10,67, p=,005, V=,214). Por etapa educativa, las diferencias no fueron significativas en ningún caso.

3.3.2. Estrategias de intervención del profesorado

Entre las estrategias que utiliza el profesorado (Tabla 4), merecen destacarse las de comunicación. Con una frecuencia de «siempre», comunican el ciberacoso al equipo directivo (73,9%) y en menor medida al Departamento de Orientación (49,2%). Con porcentajes algo más bajos, lo comunican a la familia (48,1%) y dialogan con los implicados (agresores, 39,5%; víctimas, 47,1%). Contrariamente, los docentes «nunca» contactan con la policía en un porcentaje considerable (66,1%), y en ninguna o en pocas ocasiones usan materiales específicos existentes, o ponen en marcha el Plan de Convivencia o buscan ayuda externa.

Se encontraron diferencias por titularidad del centro, sexo y etapa educativa. Los centros privados emplean estrategias como el diálogo con la familia (p=,016), comunicación del incidente al orientador del centro o equipo específico de convivencia (p<,000), autoformación sobre el tema (p=,002), implementación del plan de convivencia del centro (p=,025), y utilización de materiales específicos para la prevención del ciberacoso (p=,028). Los profesores de los centros públicos utilizan más la búsqueda de apoyo y de ayuda en otros compañeros (p=,018).

Los análisis por sexo indican que los varones se muestran más indiferentes (p<,000), ante las mujeres que emplean otras estrategias como reestructurar el aula (p<,000), comunicar el incidente al equipo directivo (p=,043), formarse sobre el tema (p=,030), hacer debates en clase y otras actividades (p=,046), e implementar el plan de convivencia del centro (p=,031).

Según la etapa educativa, únicamente aparecen diferencias significativas a favor de los docentes de educación secundaria que, con más frecuencia, comunican el ciberacoso al orientador del centro t(236)=–5,023, p<,000). Los docentes de primaria utilizan más la mediación como recurso que los docentes de secundaria (t(236)=3,368, p<,001).


Gimenez-Gualdo et al 2018a-66327 ov-es010.jpg

3.4. Estrategias de afrontamiento del alumnado

Las respuestas a la pregunta sobre cómo afrontar el ciberacoso, se codificaron por frecuencia y porcentaje. La más notable fue evitar a los desconocidos (13,48%), seguida de denunciar ante la policía (10,56%). En cambio, excluir al agresor o comunicar el acoso al orientador del centro apenas son mencionadas (0,03%). Para facilitar la exposición, siguiendo a De-la-Caba y López (2013), se agruparon las estrategias de afrontamiento en categorías positivas (asertivas y búsqueda de ayuda) y negativas (confrontar con el agresor y pasivas).

3.4.1. Estrategias positivas

Como estrategias asertivas los estudiantes señalaron: denunciar a la policía (19,8%), ayudar/defender a la víctima (18,7%), hablar con el agresor (16,3%), preservar mi privacidad (15,7%), no contraatacar (10,90%), restringir el acceso a las TIC (10,1%), hacer buen uso de las TIC (4,5%), denunciar en la red social (3,0%) y guardar las conversaciones (0,9%).

Se hallaron diferencias por etapa educativa, siendo los escolares de primaria los que eligieron denunciar a la policía (23,91%), restringir el acceso a las TIC (20,4%) y denunciar la red social (5.1%). En cambio, los estudiantes de ESO eligieron defender a la víctima (18,5%) y hablar con el agresor (17,8%).

Entre las estrategias de búsqueda de ayuda, la mayoría de los estudiantes dicen comunicarlo a los padres (41,4%), a otros adultos de confianza (36,1%), a los profesores (11,5%), a los amigos (2,3%) y al orientador del centro (0,2%). De nuevo aparecen diferencias por etapa educativa. Los estudiantes de primaria son los que comunican el ciberacoso a los padres en primer lugar (49,5%), en segundo a otros adultos (35,6%) y en último lugar a los profesores (8,5%). Los estudiantes de ESO comunican a otros adultos (37,7%), a los padres (37,6%) y a los profesores (12,9%).

3.4.2. Estrategias negativas

Se diferenciaron entre estrategias de confrontación y estrategias pasivas. Entre las primeras, los estudiantes mencionaron: devolver la ciberagresión (69%), castigar a los agresores (33,8%), pegar al agresor (30,4%) o excluirlo (0,6%). Por etapa educativa se apreciaron diferencias, siendo los estudiantes de la ESO los más proclives a devolver la agresión (64,1%), frente a los de primaria (56%).


Gimenez-Gualdo et al 2018a-66327 ov-es011.jpg

Entre las estrategias pasivas destacan las respuestas: evitar a los desconocidos (46,4%), ignorar al agresor (23,5%), restringir el uso a las TIC (28,8%), promover una ley antiacoso (13,5%), vigilar los móviles y ordenadores (10,3%) o no hacer nada (11,4%). De nuevo, aparecen diferencias por etapa educativa. Los estudiantes de secundaria mencionan más la evitación de los desconocidos (53,7%) y no hacer nada (8,7), mientras que los de primaria no saben qué harían o, en todo caso, eliminarían su perfil en la red (5,4%).

4. Discusión y conclusiones

En primer lugar, cabe indicar que el nivel de prevalencia de ciberacoso hallado en la muestra estudiada, se sitúa en porcentajes medios encontrados en otras investigaciones (Zynch & al., 2015).

Sobre las causas del ciberacoso, el profesorado considera las características personales del agresor y la diversión que le produce acosar como las causas principales de este fenómeno (Martínez & Moreno, 2017; Monks, Mahdavi, & Rix, 2016). Asimismo, el conjunto del profesorado destaca la importancia del desequilibrio de poder entre agresores y víctimas (Romera & al., 2016). Se observaron diferencias según la etapa educativa. Los profesores de secundaria otorgan, en mayor medida, la responsabilidad directa del acoso a los agresores, mientras que los docentes de primaria apuntan hacia las características personales de la víctima.

Los resultados obtenidos ponen en evidencia que la mayoría de los docentes atribuye las causas a los propios implicados, dejando fuera el clima del aula y las características de la relación educativa. Son reveladoras las diferencias por titularidad del centro: entre el profesorado de centros públicos, el racismo y la homofobia se señalan como causas del ciberacoso, coincidiendo esta realidad con la mayor presencia de alumnado extranjero. Investigaciones previas constatan que el alumnado de grupos minoritarios (no heterosexuales) y otras etnias están expuestos a mayores niveles de ciberacoso cuando se comparan con los no implicados y estudiantes heterosexuales (Abreu & Kenny, 2017; Llorent, Ortega, & Zych, 2016).

En cuanto a la percepción del alumnado, la principal causa del ciberacoso es la diversión que provoca acosar según agresores y víctimas. En menor medida, atribuir la culpa al agresor y la víctima, resultados coincidentes con estudios previos (Calmaestra, 2011; Giménez, 2015). Los chicos indican la envidia en mayor medida que las chicas. Encontramos que cuando un estudiante acosa a otro, intenta justificar este acto responsabilizando también al objeto de su acoso. En cambio, desde la perspectiva de la víctima, son los agresores los responsables del acoso (Jacobs & al., 2015). Este dato debería tenerse en cuenta para iniciar la intervención con los implicados, ya que se necesita un cambio de actitudes y de atribución cognitiva en los agresores.

Sobre las estrategias de intervención en el centro educativo, algo más de la mitad del profesorado, destaca trabajar el problema conjuntamente, profesorado y alumnado, e incluso señala la necesidad de implementar el plan de convivencia. Esto refleja la preocupación y la escasez de medios eficaces con los que cuenta, lo que afianza la opción de establecer sanciones, respuesta señalada con frecuencia. Ciertamente, es necesario establecer una normativa que facilite el marco de convivencia, la cual no puede limitarse a un listado de faltas y sanciones (Cerezo & Rubio, 2017), sino que se precisan estrategias de solución eficaces y adaptadas a las necesidades detectadas en los centros. Es importante mencionar las diferencias encontradas entre los docentes de centros públicos y privados, siendo los primeros los que señalan en mayor medida su necesidad de formación y la conveniencia de llevar a cabo la prevención desde las aulas.

Sobre las estrategias de intervención que emplea el profesorado, en los centros privados destaca la comunicación a la dirección del centro, a los orientadores y a la policía, y en centros públicos la búsqueda de apoyo en otros compañeros. El profesorado de primaria interviene en mayor medida que el de secundaria, quizás por la cercanía con el alumnado. Se ha encontrado que las mujeres se implican más que los hombres en la búsqueda de soluciones.

Las víctimas suelen comunicar los hechos a sus familias, y en menor medida al profesorado. Esto indica desconfianza en su capacidad de resolver el problema. Es imprescindible considerar que, tanto las actitudes del profesorado como las actuaciones específicas en la organización del aula y mejora de la convivencia, tienen un efecto positivo en la prevención y reducción del ciberacoso (Montoro & Ballesteros, 2016; Styron & al., 2016). Sin embargo, el alumnado no lo aprecia así. En este sentido, Perren y otros (2012) destacan como medidas más efectivas para la prevención del ciberacoso la mediación parental en Internet, el apoyo de los iguales, empoderar las habilidades de liderazgo de los alumnos y desarrollar iniciativas que acojan a toda la comunidad educativa. Investigaciones recientes confirman la necesidad de aunar esfuerzos de docentes y padres para asegurar la supervisión y control de Internet, claves para reducir el riesgo de ciberacoso (Monks & al, 2016).

En cuanto a las estrategias propuestas por el alumnado, destacan las de evitación/protección y denuncia a la policía como medidas inmediatas. La intervención para la defensa de la víctima y la búsqueda de ayuda son escasamente señaladas, lo que mantiene la indefensión de la víctima (Estévez & al., 2018), siendo primordiales para combatirlo (Jacobs & al., 2014). Además, la comunicación facilita plantear medidas de actuación inmediatas, ya sea para alertar a la familia o en el centro educativo (Perren & al., 2012). Los escolares señalan la importancia de la ayuda de los padres (Monks & al., 2016) y escasamente la del profesorado y de los amigos, lo que discrepa de otros estudios que señalan a los amigos en primer lugar (De-la-Caba & López, 2013). Cabe destacar que el Servicio de Orientación Escolar apenas se tiene en cuenta, de manera que el ámbito de la Orientación Educativa queda bastante ajeno a este problema, a pesar de la importancia de orientadores y psicólogos escolares en la evaluación, prevención e intervención sobre el ciberacoso.

Comparando las estrategias de intervención del profesorado con las del alumnado, encontramos que ambos colectivos coinciden en la búsqueda de ayuda (DeSmet & Bourdeaudhuij, 2015), en comunicar el acoso (Perren & al. 2012) y en la denuncia a la policía, aunque en proporciones muy limitadas, lo que coincide con otros estudios que señalan que los docentes se decantan más por comunicar el ciberacoso a los equipos directivos, hablar con la víctima o con el agresor que por comunicarlo a la familia (Stauffer, 2011). Otro punto de coincidencia es la opción de sancionar a los agresores, esto puede ser motivado por la falta de recursos eficaces para la mejora de la convivencia y la atención específica a los afectados. En el caso de los estudiantes llama la atención que los docentes sean un recurso poco recurrente, lo que deja entrever la percepción limitada que tienen de la capacidad del profesorado para resolver los conflictos, elemento básico a tener en cuenta para la mejora de estas situaciones (Abreu & Kenny, 2017).

Finalmente, queremos señalar que, aunque vamos avanzando en la concienciación de las consecuencias derivadas del ciberacoso (Egeberg & al., 2016; Giménez, 2015), es necesario dotar al profesorado de modelos de actuación para prevenir e intervenir en sus aulas (Bevilacqua & al., 2017). Como bien afirman Romera y otros (2016), los docentes y orientadores precisan conocimientos y modelos de actuación clarificadores para gestionar los agrupamientos, trabajar en la mejora del clima de aula, el desarrollo de actividades sociales, el análisis de las relaciones del aula y en el establecimiento de vínculos interpersonales. Solo desde el conocimiento de la percepción del problema por parte de docentes y del alumnado se podrán establecer las bases para su detección, prevención e intervención eficaces. Actuar sobre este problema y facilitar que el alumnado asuma los riesgos de este fenómeno, para que colabore en su erradicación, es responsabilidad de toda la comunidad educativa. Este estudio ha puesto de manifiesto la importancia de esta perspectiva.

Este trabajo presenta algunas limitaciones. Así, el número de profesores participantes y la pertenencia de la muestra a una misma zona geográfica, lo que limita la generalización de resultados. Otra está relacionada con el instrumento de recogida de información ya que, al tratarse de un autoinforme, es difícil de controlar el sesgo de deseabilidad social. En futuras investigaciones se tendrán en cuenta estos aspectos y se analizarán no solo las estrategias de afrontamiento del alumnado sino también la efectividad de las mismas en aras de plantear propuestas de intervención. Se ahondará, además, en la relación entre las medidas adoptadas por el centro y el profesorado, y las estrategias de afrontamiento eficaces del alumnado.

Apoyos

Este manuscrito es resultado del Proyecto I+D+i «Educación inclusiva y proyecto de mejora en centros de educación infantil, primaria y secundaria» (EDU2011-26765) del Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deportes.

Referencias

Abreu, R.L., & Kenny, M.C. (2017). Cyberbullying and LGBTQ youth: A systematic literature review and recommendations for prevention and intervention. Journal of Child & Adolescent Trauma, 1-17. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40653-017-0175-7

Arnaiz, P., Cerezo, F., Giménez, A.M., & Maquilón, J.J. (2016). Conductas de ciberadicción y experiencias de cyberbullying entre adolescentes. Anales de Psicología, 32(3), 761-769. https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.32.3.217461

Beer, P., Hallet, F., Hawkins, C., & Hewitson, D. (2017). Cyberbullying levels of impact in a special school setting. The International Journal of Emotional Education, 9(1), 121-124.

Bevilacqua, L., Shackleton, N., Hale, D., Allen, E., Bond, L., Christie, D., & Viner, R.M. (2017). The role of family and school-level factors in bullying and cyberbullying: a cross-sectional study. BMC Pediatrics, 17. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-017-0907-8

Calmaestra, J.A. (2011). Cyberbullying: Prevalencia y características de un nuevo tipo de bullying indirecto. Universidad de Córdoba: Tesis doctoral. http://goo.gl/SjkL8k

Cerezo, F., & Rubio, F.J. (2017). Medidas relativas al acoso escolar y ciberacoso en la normativa autonómica española. Un estudio comparativo. Revista Electrónica Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado, 20(1), 113-126. http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/reifop/20.1.253391

De-la-Caba, M.A., & López, R. (2013). La agresión entre iguales en la era digital: estrategias de afrontamiento de los estudiantes del último ciclo de Primaria y del primero de Secundaria. Revista de Educación, 362, 247-272. https://doi.org/10.4438/1988-592X-RE-2011-362-160

DeSmet, A., & De-Bourdeaudhuij, I. (2015). Secondary school educators’ perceptions and practices in handling cyberbullying among adolescents: A cluster analysis. Computers & Education, 88, 192-201. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2015.05.006

Egeberg, G., Thorvaldsen, S., & Ronning, J.A. (2016). The impact of cyberbullying and cyber harassment on academic achievement. In E. Elstad (Ed.), Digital expectations and experiences in education (pp. 183-204). The Netherlands: Sense Publishers. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6300-648-4_11

Estévez, E., Jimenez, T., & Moreno, D. (2018). Aggressive behavior in adolescence as a predictor of personal, family, and school adjustment problems. Psicothema, 30(1) 66-73. https://doi.org/10.7334/psicothema2016.294

Garaigordobil, M. (2015). Cyberbullying in adolescents and youth in the Basque Country: prevalence of cybervictims, cyberaggressors, and cyberobservers. Journal of Youth Studies, 18, 569-582. https://doi.org/10.1080/13676261.2014.992324

Giménez, A.M. (2015). Cyberbullying. Análisis de su incidencia entre estudiantes y percepciones del profesorado (Tesis doctoral). Universidad de Murcia. http://goo.gl/5gQW4q

Giumetti, G. W., & Kowalski, R.M. (2016). Cyberbullying matters: Examining the incremental impact of cyberbullying on outcomes over and above traditional bullying in North America. In R. Navarro, S. Yubero, & E. Larrañaga (Eds.), Cyberbullying across the Globe. Gender, family, and mental health. Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.

Jacobs, N., Dehue, F. Völlink, T., & Lechner, L. (2014). Determinants of adolescents’ ineffective and improved coping with cyberbullying: A Delphi study. Journal of Adolescence, 37, 373-385. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2014.02.011

Jacobs, N., Goossens, L., Dehue, F. Völlink, T., & Lechner, L. (2015). Dutch cyberbullying victims’ experiences, perceptions, attitudes and motivations related to (coping with) cyberbullying: Focus group interviews. Societies, 5, 43-64. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc5010043

Kowalski, R.M., Giumetti, G.W., Schroeder, A.N., & Lattanner, M.R. (2014). Bullying in the digital age: A critical review and meta-analysis of cyberbullying research among youth. Psychological Bulletin, 140, 1073-1137. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035618

Llorent, V.J., Ortega, R., & Zych, I. (2016). Bullying and cyberbullying in minorities: Are they more vulnerable than the majority group? Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 1507. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01507

Martínez, B., & Moreno, D. (2017). Dependencia de las redes sociales virtuales y violencia escolar en adolescentes. International Journal of Developmental and Educational Psychology, 1(1), 105-114. https://doi.org/10.17060/ijodaep.2017.n1.v2.923

Martínez-Otero, V. (2017). Acoso y ciberacoso en una muestra de alumnos de secundaria. Profesorado, 21(2), 277-298.

Monks, C.P., Mahdavi, J., & Risk, K. (2016). The emergence of cyberbullying in childhood: Parent and teacher perspectives. Piscología Educativa, 22, 39-48. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pse.2016.02.002

Montoro, E., & Ballesteros, M. (2016). Competencias docentes para la prevención del ciberacoso y delito de odio en Secundaria. Relatec, 15(1), 131-143. https://doi.org/10.17398/1695-288X.15.1.131

Muñoz, R., Ortega, R., López, M.R., Batalla, C., Manresa, J.M., Montellá, N., & Torán, P. (2016). The problematic use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), in adolescents by the cross sectional JOITIC study. BMC Pediatrics, 16(140). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-016-0674-y

Nocentini, A., Zambuto, V., & Menesini, E. (2015). Anti-bullying programs and information and Communication Technologies (ICT): A systematic review. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 23, 52-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2015.05.012

Olweus, D., & Limber, S.P. (2018). Some problems with cyberbullying research. Current Opinion in Psychology, 19, 139-143. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.copsyc.2017.04.012

Orel, A., Campbell, M.A., Wozencroft, K., Leong, E.W., & Kimpton, M. (2017). Exploring university students’ coping strategy intentions for cyberbullying. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 32(3), 446-462. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260515586363

Perren, S., Corcoran, L., Cowie, H., Dehue, F., Garcia, D., Mc Guckin, C.,… & Völlink, T. (2012). Tackling cyberbullying: Review of empirical evidence regarding successful responses by students, parents, and schools. International Journal of Conflict and Violence, 6(2), 283-293. https://doi.org/10.4119/UNIBI/ijcv.244

Romera, E.M., Cano, J.J., García, C.M., & Ortega, R. (2016). Cyberbullying: Social Competence, Motivation and Peer Relationships [Cyberbullying: Competencia social, motivación y relaciones entre iguales]. Comunicar, 48(24), 71-79. https://doi.org/10.3916/C48-2016-07

Smith, P.K., Mahdavi, J., Carvalho, C., Fisher, S., Russell, S., & Tippett, N. (2008). Cyberbullying: Its nature and impact in secondary school pupils. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49, 376-385.

Stauffer, S.V. (2011). High school teachers’ perceptions of cyber bullying prevention and intervention strategies [Thesis dissertation]. http://goo.gl/j51cFu

Styron, R.A., Bonner, J.L., Styron, J.L., Bridgeforth, J., & Martin, C. (2016). Are teacher and principal candidates prepared to address student cyberbullying. Journal of At-Risk Issues, 19(1), 19-28.

Zych, I., Ortega-Ruiz, R., & Del-Rey, R. (2015). Systematic review of theoretical studies on bullying and cyberbullying: Facts, knowledge, prevention, and intervention. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 23, 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avb.2015.10.001

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/18
Accepted on 30/06/18
Submitted on 30/06/18

Volume 26, Issue 2, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C56-2018-03
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 2
Views 6
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?