Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

There is today a great deal of controversy over digital and social media. Even leaders in the tech industry are beginning to decry the time young people spend on smartphones and social networks. Recently, the World Health Organization proposed adding “gaming disorder” to its official list of diseases, defining it as a pattern of gaming behavior so severe that it takes “precedence over other life interests”. At the same time, many others have celebrated the positive properties of video games, social media, and social networks. This paper argues that a deeper understanding of human beings is needed to design for deep learning. For the purposes of this study “design for deep learning” means helping people matter and find meaning in ways that make them and others healthy in mind and body, while improving the state of the world for all living things, with due respect for truth, sensation, happiness, imagination, individuality, diversity, and the future. In particular, fifteen features related to human nature are suggested based on recent scientific developments to answer the question: What is a human being? Consequently, proposals that are linked to learning and transformation, as well as social improvement, should fit with the ways in which humans, as specific sorts of biological and social creatures, learn best (or can learn at all) and can change for the better.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Today, our world faces many serious problems. We tend to approach these problems in terms of narrow silos of expertise. These problems are only amenable to deep understanding and possible solutions based on the intersection of a wide variety of areas of expertise. Over the last couple of decades, research in various disciplines has made significant discoveries about the nature of human beings, the human mind and body. When we put these areas together, we get a new picture of humans, one that is quite different from both our traditional academic views and our everyday ideas about ourselves.

In summary, this paper presents some findings about humans leading to a new answer to the old question “What is a human being?” based on contemporary research. In turn, this answer may well fuel a deeper understanding of digital and social media in society while enabling its effective use for deep learning. For the purposes of this study, “deep learning design” is defined as design that helps people matter and find meaning in ways that make them and others healthy in mind and body, while improving the state of the world for all living things, with due respect for truth, sensation (pleasure and pain), happiness, imagination, individuality, diversity, and the future. Much of the design in our world serves no such goal. Sometimes this is so because designers intended to design for “misguided purposes”. In other cases, designers’ intentions are good, but their design is aimed at a mistaken idea of what humans are, thus missing the mark.

2. What is a human being?

Based on contemporary research, some features of human nature are suggested. This is not an exhaustive literature review on this complex topic. Rather, it is a general picture that describes some human traits according to certain scientific developments.

1) Mattering: Humans have a deep biological and psychological need for mattering or counting, to feel that what they do and think matters to others. When they feel they do not count, mental and physical illness often arises, as well as violence to self or others in some cases (Gee, 2000; Marmot, 2004; Wilkinson & Pickett, 2006).

2) Tropic to meaning (not truth): Humans have a deep biological and psychological need to feel that things are meaningful, make sense, and happen for a reason. This need for mental comfort regularly trumps truth for humans (Bruner, 1990; Gee, 2017a; Lázaro & Esteban-Guitart, 2014).

3) Humans as complex systems: Humans have a brain in their head and another one in their gut (and wherever else the vagus nerve navigates, such as the heart and lungs). In fact, more signals go from the gut-brain to the head brain than vice-versa. The human body, and especially the gut, contains trillions of microorganisms that affect how we think and feel, but they are not “our” cells, though they make up 90% of “us”. Human thinking, feeling, and physical/mental well-being are products of very complex interactions between our head and gut brains, our bodies, chemistry, microorganisms, and the myriad features present in the physical and social environments through which we move (Harris, 2018; Woolfson, 2016; Yong, 2016). In that regard, see the work on epigenetics (Sapolsky, 2017).

4) Lost without feeling: Humans attach affect to facts and choices. If they do not do so, then they do not retain or care about facts and cannot decide or choose. Therefore, thinking and feeling are integrally related; they function as a team and are often inert or dangerous when separated (Gray, Braver, & Raichle, 2002; Immordino-Yang & Damasio, 2007; LeDoux, 1998; Richards & Gross, 2000).

5) Limited insight: Humans are consciously aware of only a very small part of their motivations and reasons for acting and feeling. A great many modules in the brain process information and send decisions about actions and feelings (but not the reasons for them) to an interpreter module (the conscious part of the brain). In turn, the interpreter makes up a good story about our actions and feelings on the basis of quite limited overt information. Humans are good at confabulating reasons to explain their actions and feelings in the absence of any real evidence, a fact of which they are mostly unaware (Gantman, Adriaanse, Gollwitzer, & Oettingen, 2017; Gazzaniga, 2010; Pinto, de-Haan, & Lamme, 2017).

6) Brain bugs: Humans are prone to a number of “brain bugs”, one of the most significant of which is “confirmation bias”. Confirmation bias means that humans have a strong tendency to look for and only consider evidence that reaffirms what they already believe and discount evidence that disproves their beliefs. This effect is not lessened for educated people; education does not eradicate it and may even make it worse (Delgado, 2012; Legare, Schult, Impola, & Souza, 2016).

7) Poor memory: Human memory is more future-oriented than focused on the past. It is primarily used to plan for future actions. Every time we use memory, we change it. As an accurate record of the past, human memory is quite unreliable, though we humans are often unaware of this fact, and its implications for society at large and the legal system in particular. Human memory resembles a simulation device to pre-plan and imagine rather than a recording device (Glenberg, 1997; Klein, Robertson, & Delton, 2010; Seligman, Railton, Baumeister, & Sripada, 2016).

8) Self-defeating optimization: Humans will usually try to optimize any situation to their short-term desires and benefit, right up to ruining the situation for others and even themselves. Examples: if a game is designed to teach reading, many young people will do all they can to play and win the game without actually reading. Cheating in a multiple-player game up to the point where no one plays it anymore; getting into college and then seeking the easiest courses, graders, and doing the least amount of work possible while avoiding any hard learning (Cosmides, 1989; Rhode, 2017).

9) Us vs. them: Humans are inherently prone to think and act in terms of “us” versus “them”. This effect, which stems from human evolution, is very often exacerbated by culture and society, and it is intensified when people feel threatened or disdained (Gee, 2017b; Sapolsky, 2017; Taylor & Lobel, 1989).

10) Pattern recognizers gone wild: Humans are pattern-recognizers par excellence. They can find patterns and act on them where none exist (think astrology; signs of the “end times”; gambling; stock pickers; stereotypes; and all the people who mistake correlation for causation). Without guidance, human pattern recognition can be dangerous to all concerned, no matter how creative it may seem. Teaching can, if not done well and morally, dampen innovation and “colonize” the learner (Lara-Dammer, Hofstadter, & Goldstone, 2017).

11) The difficulty with “Hard problems”: The world today faces deep and hard problems stemming from dangerous interactions between different complex systems affected by human behaviors. These problems are not amenable to solutions based on anyone silo of expertise, though that is often how we try to approach them. Narrow experts over-trust what they know and discount what they ignore (Jenkins, 2006; Nielsen 2012).

12) Limitations of individual intelligence: A great deal of human thinking and deciding works best when it is off-loaded to good tools, collaborations with others, and human-engineered environmental structures and designs. Humans are “plug-and-play” devices that only work well when plugged into diverse people, smart tools, and well-designed environments. Left to their own devices, humans can be dangerous to themselves and others (Levy, 1999; Navarro, 2009; Ricaurte-Quijano & Álvarez, 2016; Perkins & Salomon, 1989).

13) School ineffectiveness: School is largely ineffective in terms of long-term retention by students. Skills learned in school are mostly forgotten once it ends, unless students practice them repeatedly. Humanities do not necessarily enhance life, considering that most people fail to engage them significantly after schooling. Moreover, there is seemingly no reason to believe that the humanities humanize human beings (Steiner, 1975). School largely serves to give people credentials that poorly correlate with their later success at work and in life, but get them in the door for a job or status (Arum & Roksa, 2011; Caplan, 2018; Pritchett & Beatty, 2015).

14) Corruption of powerful technologies: Technologies with great promise for learning, interaction, and activism tend to be corrupted by the marketplace –and human desires– to work in sub-optimal and even counterproductive ways. The setting into which technology is inserted (i.e., the capabilities and desires of people in situ) is more powerful in determining effects than the technology itself (Doyle, 2017; Hoffmann, 2017; Yudes-Gómez, Baridon-Chauvie, & González-Cabrera, 2018).

15) Diversity misunderstood: The ways in which humans think of diversity are largely factually wrong; however, they may be socially motivated and enforced. Groups like “black people”, “white people”, “African-Americans”, “Jews”, and many others, share fewer genes with each other than they do with people outside their group (Rutherford, 2016). While humans think of diversity in binary terms (black/white; male/female; normal/abnormal; conservative/liberal), it is rarely truly binary. Real diversity exists at the level of people’s everyday life experiences. People in socially constructed groups (like “races” or “genders”) are different in several ways (Gee, 2017b; Jenkins, 2009; Marhiri, 2017; Sapolsky, 2017).

3. Relationships among human features

There are inherent connections among some of the fifteen features listed above. These connections point the way to how designers can use these features for either misguided design purposes or effective deep learning design. The most important connection exists among the first five features: mattering, tropic to meaning, humans as complex systems, thinking and feeling, and pattern recognition gone wild.

People need to matter to others. Let’s use “X” for any group or cause that makes a person feel they matter. X, in making the person matter, also enables the person to make sense and give meaning to things, thereby fulfilling feature 2. When humans lose their sense of mattering, they still seek meaning, but that search can become idiosyncratic, isolating, and even dangerous. When humans feel like they do not matter and cannot find meaning, their mind and body well-being suffers (feature 3), often due to stress and anxiety (Harris, 2018; Marmot, 2004; Wilkinson & Pickett, 2006).

Humans prefer mattering and meaning to truth in and of itself. Furthermore, they will value truth only when they can attach affection to it. What makes mattering and meaning-finding so crucial for humans is that it melds affect and information (whether it be true or false). Humans’ super-power is pattern-recognition, and they actively seek out (however spurious) patterns that make them feel good (regarding mattering, meaning, and self-interest).

Feature 3 is crucial here. When we pay attention separately to the (head) brain, and treat the body (as “brainless”), and consider environments as out there, separate from us, we miss all the real action with humans. Each human is a “multiple-brained-genetic-cognitive-emotional-chemical-epigenetic-social-interactional-environmental complex systems” (Harris, 2018; Sapolsky, 2017). Everything interacts with and co-creates everything else. When humans feel they do not matter and are isolated from shared meaning, the complex system, as a whole, goes away, not just one piece of it. Chronic stress/anxiety is one of the outcomes, and its effects spread throughout the whole system with deeply negative results (Harris, 2018). It is barely helpful to design good schools, good learning, or good media for people who are highly stressed in this way. Such people pay little attention to anything other than the threats to their integrity as a worthwhile person.

The following three features are also profoundly connected: limited insight, brain bugs, and poor memory. Humans are complex systems (partially) run by a driver (consciousness, the interpreter) with minimal insight (too much else is going on under the hood of the system beyond a person’s conscious awareness) and very poor memory in the sense of “a veridical record of the past”. Brain bugs, like confirmation bias, work well for relatively stable environments, like the ones in which we evolved as creatures. In these environments, it is smart to trust what one already knows. Moreover, brain bugs do not work for the rapidly changing and complex environments of the modern world. The solutions to these problems are to be found in dealing with feature 12, which we will discuss below.

It is essential to see, regarding the feature set 5-7, that humans are built to be more future-oriented than past-oriented. If an inaccurate memory facilitates good future choices, then it is more valuable than an accurate one that does not. People store edited versions of their experiences in their long-term memories and use these memories (in bits, pieces, and various transformations) to think, plan, and choose (Gee, 2017a; Seligman, Railton, Baumeister, & Sripada, 2016). People cannot think, plan, or choose well without a large amount of good, rich experiences to use as fodder for imagination and simulations in their minds. However, as they gain experiences and learn to use them fruitfully for imagination and simulations, they need help, in the form of good tools, good practices, and good teaching, to make up for their limited insight and brain bugs.

The following features are also integrally connected to each other: Self-defeating optimization and Us vs. Them. These are both features that are connected to human beings favoring short-term advantage over long-term advantage and favoring self-advantage over advantaging others, as well. Humans are selfish, though this selfishness often displays itself as favoring “kin” or “people like us” over others, and not just the self alone. They are also built to favor short-term gain over long-term gain. Both of these properties evolved in us because, under the conditions in which we evolved (as hunter-gatherers), they were good for survival (Tomasello, 2014). People do not engage in delayed gratification when food is scarce. Also, “us” is all important when there are not many “them” around, and we have no real idea whether “they” are “safe” or not. Neither of these features is particularly good in a world replete with short-term pleasures that will kill in the long run, which is much longer for modern humans, and replete with a massive array of “strangers” in “your” very own society.

Now, we arrive at a set of features that capture the problem with humans at the larger levels of society and institutions. Human intelligence is quite limited at the individual level, as we have seen. However, humans can accomplish mighty deeds (like bridges and wars) when they act collectively with proper tools. However, problems arise here as well. Since technology effects are largely due to the contexts (concerning human capacities, desires, and cultures) in which they are placed, technologies tend to become “corrupted” by the short-term desires of human beings (Coker, 2018). When we use technology to speak to a problematic situation, that situation itself often undoes the technology or recruits it to serve the problem and not serve as a solution to the problem.

Collective intelligence, in its modern sense, requires pooling diversity and using good tools to recruit as much knowledge, experience, and creativity as we can. Although human society and institutions are most often organized around silos of expertise protecting their boundaries and “rights”. Furthermore, diversity in society and academic world, it is most often defined (and defended) in terms of big groups and binaries that do not represent the level of difference and diversity that fuels collective intelligence. That diversity level is achieved when a person has lived the interaction of all their social groups and identities, filtered through their unique personhood, in a myriad of diverse lived experiences that have given them their own quite situated and specific insights, knowledge, perspectives, and vital contributions to make (Gee, 2017b; Marhiri, 2017).

We often believe that it is the job of schools and schooling to speak to the issues we have been discussing. However, abundant work in economics has shown that the effects of school are quite transitory for the most part (Caplan, 2018). Students soon forget most of what they learn in school, unless they continue to practice it as part of their daily lives or on the job. Work leads to skills, not school, for the most part. Moreover, the humanities do not seem to humanize, given how few people make much use of them later in life, and how much damage well-educated people do in the world.

Economists have argued that a large percentage of the school system (though not all of it) functions only to signal to employers who will be intelligent, conforming, and conscientious workers, based on the amount of drudgery they could endure while in school, especially in the process of getting credentials and degrees. In reality, school speaks very little to the human problems we have surveyed. After all, the vast majority of people whose digital and social media habits we bemoan are or have been in school.

The final set of connected features, below, are those that point to the beginnings of a solution: difficulty dealing with hard problems, limitations of individual intelligence, school ineffectiveness, corruption of powerful technologies, and diversity misunderstood.

If we want to use technology to design for deep learning –and therefore design for humans as they are rather than as we imagine them– we have to reverse features 11-15. We must stop new technologies from being corrupted in situ. We have to recruit the full range of actual diversity. We need to engage in transdisciplinary perspectives to deal with hard and complex problems, not just isolated narrow areas of specialization alone. We are required to supplement and expand –not contract– human intelligence via adequate tools, effective forms of collaboration and collective intelligence, and life-enhancing social networks. In addition, we have to realize that the solution is not at school –or only at school– at least, not remotely in the schools we have, have had, and probably, for the most part, will always have.

4. Design for deep learning: Our challenge

Having said all that, we would like to consider a tentative suggestion about how to think about designing (whether it is a blog, a game, an app, a video, a website) effectively for humans as they are.

Perhaps the most profound urge for humans is to affiliate themselves with an idea, a cause, or an endeavor that can give their lives meaning and make them matter to others and to themselves. Humans have a choice when faced with misguided, flawed design or effective, deep learning design. Designing for deep learning means enticing people to affiliate with something that enhances their lives and those of others, as well as our shared world. When people join a cause, idea, or endeavor, they usually do so in a social context as part of a group of people with whom they share this interest. Most people gain their sense of mattering socially, concerning others who also matter to them.

Indeed, learning and development are consequences of social participation in affinity spaces. By “affinity space” we mean a site/space that may be virtual, physical or both, where people interact with each other and have access to resources that enable their engagement in a shared activity in which participants have a common interest. Each of these spaces, for example, a social activism webpage, is part of a larger affinity space comprised by smaller ones (just like a state is made up of towns and cities). The linked spaces, or space of spaces through which people move to learn deeply and to become someone new, are a real ecosystem that changes over time and expands knowledge and identity. Not everything that happens in these linked spaces –and not every journey through them– is positive. The balance between good and evil is always shifting. Design for deep learning must be for the long haul, must be continuous and must eventually become a joint endeavor with a social push for good that can be self-correcting in the face of change and crisis.

People, for example, visit a blog or website to have an experience; essentially, they want to see if there is anything they can learn (and become) in the site that will add value to their lives. Humans do not learn well from “anything goes” experiences, especially when they are newbies. Therefore, the designer should create an experience that will lead to deep learning. This, of course, is not easy because good or deep learning involves effort and risk, so it is harder than trivial learning or learning that plays to our weaknesses and prejudices. According to Gee (2017a), humans dislike doing hard things, except under certain special conditions. In any case, the experience is good for deep learning for humans when:

a) They have a clear, but perhaps, changeable goal.

b) The goal requires an action (or set of actions) that the learner emotionally cares about (for humans, the most effective form of caring –for learning and thinking– is when something is “at stake” for them).

c) Something (i.e., stuff you design) helps them, especially if they are “newbies”, to manage their attention in fruitful ways so that they are aware of what is important and useful amidst the myriad of elements that compose any human experience.

d) They are encouraged to try different things and to see failure as an important form of learning.

e) It helps them discover the appropriate values and judgments they can use to assess their progress through various tries, retries, and failures. This often means internalizing the norms of a group of people, some of whom have become adepts or experts at a given endeavor. This internalization process is necessary (though it can also be a type of “colonizing” or “policing”). However, the ultimate goal is to go beyond the internalization of norms to produce people who eventually learn how to improve and transform the norms.

Productive learning spaces allow participants to continuously co-design (customize, change, improve) the site or activity, what is in it, and the experience the site-activity affords (Esteban-Guitart, Coll, & Penuel, 2018; Jovés, Siqués, & Esteban-Guitart, 2015). The goal is for participants to become residents and co-owners (as well as “self-directed teachers” and “designers” in their own right). An experience for humans, when it is well designed, is placed into long-term memory in a way that is well-integrated with other memories. This memory and its elements are used as materials for simulating the future so that people can plan, dream, and make better choices to improve their future. This means that assessment of the site-activity success should not be based on how much people retain (or recall), but rather on how much better they get as choosers for better futures (Cutumisu, Blair, Chin, & Schwartz, 2015). In other words, space and/or activity fosters the construction of imagination, not (just) memories, by getting people to feel they matter (to others) and to find meaning (for things to make sense) through affiliation to a shared cause, idea, or endeavour connected to something good. In that context, the role of the “teacher” is to guide learners through a fruitful learning experience rather than to teach something. In other words, teachers become a resource for people’s self-teaching and self-directed learning. Following early Vygotsky (1997: 47): “Ultimately, the child teaches himself”, and the teacher’s role becomes to direct and guide the environment as a way to promote certain behaviors and reactions. According to the principles described above, it can be said that the space-site-activity should be full of resources with tools, technologies, and interactional social practices that supplement and transform the limits of human intelligence. This essentially involves designing for collective intelligence, a phenomenon that, of course, requires groups of people to take charge of their fruitful collaborations. There is now a large literature on different forms of collective intelligence and “wisdom of the crowd” (Levy, 1999; Navarro, 2009; Ricaurte-Quijano & Álvarez, 2016; Perkins & Salomon, 1989).

5. Conclusion

Deep learning and change are hard, and people will avoid them unless they are highly motivated to take on the challenge. The very basis of effective deep learning design is to attract and hold (some) people in space/site/activity through an emotionally-charged socially-shared “affinity” for a cause, idea, or endeavor and with the sorts of people who pursue that idea, endeavor, or cause. However, to truly motivate humans, that affinity needs “legs”, it must offer to take them to better places, to transport them on a journey with others with whom they feel valued and vice-versa. To achieve this, it is necessary to connect the space/site/activity to other spaces/sites/activities, maybe many others that share, supplement, or enhance the affinity you are seeking to engender (Esteban-Guitart, Coll, & Penuel, 2018).

As people journey back and forth from the space/ site/activity to others, they become fellow travelers on a path through life with others, a path they can share for a while or for a long time, a path from which they can branch off to new paths or a path they can take to the end. In the act, such design work can:

a) Make people matter to each other.

b) Direct their “us vs. them” urges as humans in wider and more meaningful directions -context is critical in how people think about who is “us” and who is “them” (Sapolsky 2017).

c) Get them to attach feeling (affect) to the truth by storying it as a cause, a journey, a direction, a shared mission for good.

d) Make people healthier in mind and body due to the connections between mattering, meaning, and health for people and society.

In the end, designs for deep learning are travel agents sending people on life-enhancing, world-enhancing journeys.

Although designing for deep learning is hard because humans often dislike effort, there is some hope here. Decades ago, Harry Harlow, the scientist who did the (in)famous wire monkey studies, was testing the intelligence of primates. This was done by giving a monkey a mechanical puzzle and seeing how well the monkey could solve the puzzle. Since psychologists at the time were good behaviorists, they placed an edible reward under each part of the puzzle, assuming that the reward for solving each part of the puzzle would encourage the monkey to keep working on the puzzle (i.e., they used continuous rewards to deal with the effort problem). However, one day, Harlow wondered what would happen if there were no food rewards (Harlow, Harlow, & Meyer, 1950). The assumption was the monkey would stop trying to solve the puzzle, and that working on it would not be worth the effort to the monkey yet. Harlow tried it anyway. He found that without rewards, the primates solved the puzzles quicker than they did with rewards. For primates, learning is a reward all on its own; primates, and particularly humans, have a biological urge to share, ask, learn and solve problems (Bruner, 2012; Tomasello, 2014).

Humans are primates. Schools and inequity in society have killed the psycho-biological love of learning, epistemological sensitivity (Bruner, 2012) and problem-solving for many people. We humans have lots and lots of hard problems to solve. Maybe the “designing for deep learning” problem is not really that humans do not like effort, but rather, that they need to discover who they are: beings that thrive on effort and learning when they sense rays of light and hope.

Funding Agency

This work was supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry, and Competitiveness (MINECO), the Spanish State Research Agency (AEI) and The European Regional Development Fund (European Union) [grant number EDU2017-83363-R].

References

Arum, R., & Roksa, J. (2011). Limited learning on college campus. Society, 48, 198-203. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12115-011-9417-8

Bruner, J. (1990). Acts of meaning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bruner, J. (2012). What psychology should study. International Journal of Educational Psychology, 1(1), 5-13. https://doi.org/10.4471/ijep.2012.01

Caplan, B. (2018). The case against education: Why the education system is a waste of time and money. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. https://doi.org/10.23943/9781400889327

Coker, C. (2018). Still the human thing? Technology, human agency and the future of war. International Relations, 32(1), 23-38. https://doi.org/10.1177/0047117818754640

Cosmides, L. (1989). The logic of social exchange: Has natural selection shaped how humans reason? Studies with the Wasson Selection task. Cognition, 31(3), 187-276. https://doi.org/10.1016/0010-0277(89)90023-1

Cutumisu, M., Blair, K.P., Chin, D.B., & Schwartz, D.L. (2015). Posterlet: A game-based assessment of children’s choices to seek feedback and to revise. Journal of Learning Analytics, 2(1), 49-71. https://doi.org/10.18608/jla.2015.21.4

Delgado, M.R. (2012). A brain bug’s life. Trends in Neurosciences, 35(4), 209-210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tins.2012.02.002

Doyle, T. (2017). Weapons of math estruction: How big data increases inequality and threatens democracy by Cathy O’Neil. The Information Society. An International Journal, 33(5), 301-302. https://doi.org/10.1080/01972243.2017.1354593

Esteban-Guitart, M., Coll, C., & Penuel, W. (2018). Learning across settings and time in the digital age. Digital Education Review, 33, 1-16.

Gantman, A.P., Adriaanse, M.A., Gollwitzer, P.M., & Oettingen, G. (2017). Why did I do that? Explaining actions activated outside of awareness. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 24(5), 1563-1572. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13423-017-1260-5

Gazzaniga, M. (2010). Cerebral specialization and interhemispheric communication: Does the corpus callosum enable the human condition? Brain, 123(7), 1293-1326. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/123.7.1293

Gee, J.P. (2000). Identity as an analytic lens for research in education. Review of Research in Education, 25, 99-125. https://doi.org/10.2307/1167322

Gee, J.P. (2017a). Teaching, learning, literacy in our high-risk high-tech world: A framework for becoming human. New York: Teachers College Press.

Gee, J.P. (2017b). Identity and diversity in today’s world. Multicultural Education Review, 9(2), 83-92. https://doi.org/10.1080/2005615X.2017.131221

Glenberg, A.M. (1997). What memory is for? Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 20(1), 1-19. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X97000010

Gray, J.R., Braver, T.S., & Raichle, M.E. (2002). Integration of emotion and cognition in the lateral prefrontal cortex prefrontal cortex. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 99(6), 4115-4120. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.062381899

Harlow, H.F., Harlow, M.K., & Meyer, D.R. (1950). Learning motivated by a manipulation drive. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 50(2), 228-234. https://doi.org/10.1037/h0056906

Harris, N.B. (2018). The deepest well: Healing the long-term effects of childhood adversity. New York: Houghton-Mifflin.

Hoffmann, A.L. (2017). Breaking bad algorithms. Science, 358, 310-311. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aao4414

Immordino-Yang, M.H., & Damasio, A. (2007). We feel, therefore we learn: The relevance of affective and social neuroscience to education. Mind, Brain and Education, 1(1), 3-10. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-228X.2007.00004.x

Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence culture: Where old and new media collide. New York: NYU Press.

Jenkins, H. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media education for the 21st century. Chicago: MacArthur Foundation.

Jovés, P., Siqués, C., & Esteban-Guitart, M. (2015). The incorporation of funds of knowledge and funds of identity of students and their families into educational practice. Teaching and Teacher Education, 49, 68-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2015.03

Klein S.B., Robertson T.E., & Delton A.W. (2010). Facing the future: Memory as an evolved system for planning future acts. Memory and Cognition 38, 1, 13-22. https://doi.org/10.3758/MC.38.1.13

Lara-Dammer, F., Hofstadter, D.R., & Goldstone, R.L. (2017). A computer model of context-dependent perception in a very simple world. Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artifical Intelligence, 29(6), 1247-1282. https://doi.org/10.1080/0952813X.2017.13

Lázaro, L., & Esteban-Guitart, M. (2014). Acts of shared intentionality. In search of uniquely human thinking. Ethos, 42(2), 10-13. https://doi.org/10.1111/etho.12066

LeDoux, J.E. (2000). Emotion circuits in the brain. Annual Review of Neuroscience, 23, 155-184. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.neuro.21.1.155

Legare, C.H., Schult, C.A., Impola, M., & Souza, A. (2016). Young children revise explanations in response to new evidence. Cognitive Development, 39, 45-56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2016.03.003

Levy, P. (1999). Collective intelligence: Mankind’s emerging world in cyberspace. New York: Basic Books. https://doi.org/10.1162/leon.1999.32.1.70b

Marhiri, J. (2017). Deconstructing race: Multicultural education beyond the color-bind. New York: Teachers College Press.

Marmot, M. (2005). Social determinants of health inequalities. Lancet, 365, 1099-1104. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(05)71146-6

Navarro, M.G. (2009). Los nuevos entornos educativos: Desafíos cognitivos para una inteligencia colectiva. [New educational settings. Cognitive challenges for the realization of a collective intelligence]. Comunicar, 33, 141-148. https://doi.org/10.3916/

Nielsen, M. (2012). Reinventing discovery: The new era of networked science. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. https://doi.org/10.1515/9781400839452

Perkins, D., & Salomon, G. (1989). Are cognitive skills context-bound? Educational Researcher, 18(1), 16-25. https://doi.org/10.3102/0013189X018001016

Pinto, Y., de Haan, E.H.F., & Lamme, V.A.F. (2017). The split-brain phenomenon revisited: A signle conscious agent with split perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 21(11), 835-851. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2017.09.003

Pritchett, L., & Beatty, A. (2015). Slown down, you’re going too fast: Matching curricula to student skill levels. International Journal of Educational Development, 40, 276-288. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijedudev.2014.11.013

Rhode, D. (2017). Cheating: Ethics in everyday life. New York: Oxford University Press.

Ricaurte-Quijano, P., & Álvarez, A.C. (2016). The wiki learning project: Wikipedia as an open learning environment. [El proyecto Wiki Learning: Wikipedia como entorno de aprendizaje abierto]. Comunicar, 49, 61-69. https://doi.org/10.3916/C49-2016-06

Richards, J.M., & Gross, J.J. (2000). Emotion regulation and memory: The cognitive costs of keeping one’s cool. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79(3), 410-424. https://doi.org/10.1037/00223514.79.3.410

Sapolsky, R.M. (2017). Behave: The biology of humans at our best and worst. New York: Penguin.

Seligman, E.P.M., Railton, P., Baumeister, R.F., & Sripada, C. (2016). Homo prospectus. New York: Oxford University Press.

Steiner, G. (1975). After Babel: Aspects of language and translation. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Taylor, S.E., & Lobel, M. (1989). Social comparison activity under threat: Downward evaluation and upward contacts. Psychological Review, 96(4), 569-575. https://doi.org/10.1037/0033.295C.96.4.569

Tomasello, M. (2014). The ultra-social animal. European Journal of Social Psychology, 44(3), 187-194. https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2015

Vygotsky, L.S. (1997). Educational psychology. Boca Raton, FL: St. Lucie Press.

Wilkinson, R.G., & Pickett, K.E. (2006). Income inequality and population health: A review and explanation of the evidence. Social Science & Medicine, 62(7), 1768-1784. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2005.08.036

Woolfson, A. (2016). Mob rule. Nature, 536, 146-147. https://doi.org/10.1038/536146a

Yong, E. (2016). I contain multitudes: The microbes within us and a grander view of life. New York: HarperCollins.

Yudes-Gómez, C., Baridon-Chauvie, D. & González-Cabrera, J.M. (2018). Cyberbylling and problematic Internet use in Colombia, Uruguay and Spain: Cross-cultural study. [Ciberacoso y uso problemático de Internet en Colombia, Uruguay y España: Un estudio transcultural]. Comunicar, 56, 49-58. https://doi.org/10.3916/C56-2018-05



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En la actualidad existe una nutrida controversia en relación a los medios de comunicación sociales y digitales que ha llevado, incluso, a censurar la utilización de las redes sociales y los móviles por parte de líderes en la industria tecnológica. En este sentido, la Organización Mundial para la Salud ha propuesto añadir el «desorden del juego» a su listado de enfermedades, definiéndolo como un modelo de comportamiento de juego tan severo que se impone como «preferencia sobre otros intereses». Al mismo tiempo, distintos académicos han enfatizado los aspectos positivos derivados de las redes sociales y los videojuegos. En este artículo se argumenta que es necesaria una mejor comprensión del ser humano para poder implementar lo que aquí se define como diseño para el aprendizaje profundo. El «diseño para el aprendizaje profundo» está encaminado al reconocimiento de las personas y el desarrollo de sentidos saludables, individual y colectivamente, así como la mejora, en general, del estado del mundo para todos los seres vivos, según principios de verdad, felicidad, imaginación, individualidad, diversidad y futuro. En particular, se sugieren quince características basadas en desarrollos científicos que responden a la pregunta: ¿Qué es un ser humano? Consecuentemente, propuestas vinculadas al aprendizaje y la transformación y mejora social deben ser coherentes con dichas características que permiten definir cómo las personas, en tanto que organismos biológicos y sociales, aprenden o pueden aprender óptimamente, así como cambiar para mejorar.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Hoy en día nuestro mundo se enfrenta a graves problemas. Nuestra tendencia es abordarlos desde estrechos dominios de especialización académica. Sin embargo, solo es posible entenderlos en profundidad y encontrar posibles soluciones a partir de la interacción de muchas áreas diferentes de conocimiento. Durante los últimos veinte años, la investigación llevada a cabo en varias áreas de conocimiento ha conducido a importantes descubrimientos en torno a la naturaleza del ser humano, así como de la mente y el cuerpo humano. Cuando juntamos estas áreas, obtenemos una nueva imagen sobre nosotros mismos, una imagen que difiere en gran medida de nuestras visiones, tanto académicas como cotidianas y populares.

En este artículo presentamos algunos hallazgos, fruto de estudios contemporáneos, que nos permiten abordar, de una manera nueva, la vieja cuestión antropológica: «¿Qué es un ser humano?». A su vez, esta respuesta abre la puerta a una comprensión más profunda del papel de los medios de comunicación sociales y digitales en la sociedad, así como a la creación de iniciativas más efectivas para aprovechar dichos medios en pos del aprendizaje profundo. Por «diseño para el aprendizaje profundo» nos referimos aquí a aquel tipo de diseño que ayude a las personas a sentirse socialmente reconocidas, así como dar sentido a su quehacer y proyecto de vida; de manera que les permitan, tanto individual como colectivamente, disfrutar de una buena salud física y mental, y mejorar el estado del mundo para todos los seres vivos, con el debido respeto a la verdad, las sensaciones (placer y dolor), la felicidad, la imaginación, la individualidad, la diversidad y la responsabilidad hacia el futuro. Muchos de los diseños disponibles y realizados, ya sean de entornos web, aplicaciones o dispositivos, no están al servicio de este objetivo. A veces porque los diseñadores siguieron fines desacertados. Otras veces porque la intención era buena pero el proceso y resultado no es congruente con la naturaleza humana, tal y como aquí pasamos a describir y caracterizar.

2. ¿Qué es un ser humano?

Basándonos en las últimas investigaciones, en este apartado vamos a sugerir algunas características de la naturaleza humana. No se trata de un repaso exhaustivo a la bibliografía existente sobre este complejo tema, sino más bien pretendemos esbozar un croquis general de lo que podrían considerarse ciertos rasgos de los seres humanos a partir de distintas evidencias científicas.

1) Reconocimiento: las personas tienen una profunda necesidad biológica y psicológica de sentirse socialmente reconocidas, es decir, de sentir que lo que hacen o piensan importa a los demás. Cuando sienten que no cuentan, a menudo aparecen enfermedades mentales o físicas, e incluso se traducen en acciones violentas hacia uno mismo y los demás (Gee, 2000; Marmot, 2004; Wilkinson & Pickett, 2006).

2) Priorización del sentido por encima de la verdad: las personas tienen una profunda necesidad biológica y psicológica de sentir que las cosas tienen un sentido y ocurren por alguna razón. Esta búsqueda de coherencia y propósito a menudo se aleja de la verdad, al menos no tiene necesariamente que coincidir con ella (Bruner, 1990; Gee, 2017a; Lázaro & Esteban-Guitart, 2014).

3) Cada humano es un sistema complejo: la especie humana tiene un cerebro en la cabeza y otro en el intestino (y en todos los sitios por donde pasa el nervio vago, como el corazón y los pulmones). De hecho, se envían más señales del cerebro del intestino al cerebro de la cabeza que al revés. El cuerpo humano, y especialmente el intestino, contiene billones de microorganismos que afectan a nuestra forma de pensar y sentir y, aunque no son nuestras «células», constituyen el 90% de nuestra naturaleza biológica. De modo que el pensamiento, las sensaciones y el bienestar (la salud física y mental) son producto de complejas interacciones entre nuestros cerebros de la cabeza y del intestino, nuestros cuerpos, nuestra química, nuestros microorganismos y la infinidad de factores presentes en los entornos físicos y sociales que nos rodean (Harris, 2018; Woolfson, 2016; Yong, 2016). Véase, por ejemplo, el trabajo en el campo de la epigenética (Sapolsky, 2017).

4) La importancia de las emociones: La conducta humana, los hechos y elecciones, está afectiva y emocionalmente condicionada. Sin ello no existiría preocupación por los hechos, así como procesos de decisión y elección. De modo que el pensamiento (cognición) y la emoción, lejos de ser realidades separadas, están profundamente conectados. Son un equipo y a menudo son vacuos o peligrosos si van por separado (Gray, Braver & Raichle, 2002; Immordino-Yang & Damasio, 2007; LeDoux, 1998; Richards & Gross, 2000).

5) Información limitada: los seres humanos son conscientes de una pequeñísima parte de sus propias motivaciones y de las razones por las que actúan o sienten de una determinada manera. Una enorme cantidad de módulos de nuestro cerebro procesa la información y envía las decisiones sobre acciones y sensaciones (pero no las razones que las han motivado) a un módulo de interpretación (la parte consciente del cerebro). A su vez, este módulo crea una buena historia sobre sus acciones y sensaciones a partir de la limitada información disponible. En realidad, las personas son buenas ingeniando razones para explicar sus acciones y sensaciones en ausencia de cualquier tipo de evidencia real (Gantman, Adriaanse, Gollwitzer, & Oettingen, 2017; Gazzaniga, 2010; Pinto, de-Haan, & Lamme, 2017).

6) Sesgos del cerebro: los seres humanos son proclives a sufrir una serie de «errores del cerebro» y, entre los más habituales, se cuenta el «sesgo de confirmación». El sesgo de confirmación significa que las personas tienen una fuerte tendencia a ver y tener en cuenta solo las evidencias que avalan sus creencias y a subestimar lo que no encaja con sus creencias. Este efecto no se atenúa entre las personas con educación y, de hecho, puede incluso contribuir a su manifestación (Delgado, 2012; Legare, Schult, Impola, & Souza, 2016).

7) Memoria limitada: la memoria humana está mucho más orientada al futuro que al pasado. Su principal función es planificar acciones futuras. Cada vez que usamos un recuerdo, lo modificamos. Como registro preciso del pasado, la memoria humana es poco fiable, aunque a menudo no seamos conscientes de ello y tampoco de las implicaciones que tiene para la sociedad en general y el sistema jurídico en particular. La memoria humana es más una herramienta de simulación para preplanificar e imaginar que una grabadora o registro fiel del pasado (Glenberg, 1997; Klein, Robertson, & Delton, 2010; Seligman, Railton, Baumeister, & Sripada, 2016).

8) Optimización contraproducente: Las personas normalmente tratan de optimizar cualquier situación para satisfacer sus deseos y sus objetivos a corto plazo, aunque ello signifique un perjuicio para otras personas e incluso para ellas mismas. Ejemplos: si diseñas un juego para enseñar a leer, muchos niños harán todo lo posible para jugar y ganar sin pararse a leer; hacer trampas en un juego multijugador hasta el punto de que todo el mundo pierda las ganas de jugar; ir a la universidad y elegir las asignaturas más fáciles y los profesores menos exigentes, y hacer el mínimo trabajo posible para evitar cualquier tipo de aprendizaje que requiera de un cierto esfuerzo (Cosmides, 1989; Rhode, 2017).

9) Nosotros frente a ellos: las personas tenemos una inclinación inherente a pensar y actuar en términos de «nosotros» frente a «ellos» (endogrupo/exogrupo; «personas que son como nosotras frente a personas que no son como nosotras»). Este efecto, resultado de la evolución humana, muchas veces es magnificado por la cultura y la sociedad, y se amplifica sobre todo cuando alguien se siente amenazado o menospreciado (Gee, 2017b; Sapolsky, 2017; Taylor & Lobel, 1989).

10) Identificadores de patrones fuera de control: los seres humanos son identificadores de patrones por excelencia. Buscan patrones y actúan según los patrones identificados, aunque no existan realmente (basta con pensar en la astrología; las señales del «fin del mundo»; el juego; la bolsa y especulación económica; los estereotipos; y toda la gente que confunde la correlación con la causalidad). Sin una guía (enseñanza), la identificación de patrones humanos puede ser peligrosa para todos los afectados, por muy creativa que pueda parecer. Sin embargo, la enseñanza puede empañar la innovación y «colonizar» al que aprende si no se realiza bien y de forma escrupulosa moralmente (Lara-Dammer, Hofstadter, & Goldstone, 2017).

11) Dificultad para gestionar «problemas complejos». El mundo se enfrenta hoy a problemas difíciles y profundos que tienen su origen en interacciones peligrosas de diferentes sistemas complejos, sistemas afectados por comportamientos humanos. Estos problemas no pueden encauzarse con soluciones basadas en un solo campo de especialización, aunque así es como solemos encararlos. Los expertos en un único ámbito de conocimiento muy especializado confían excesivamente en lo que saben y subestiman lo que no saben (Jenkins, 2006; Nielsen, 2012).

12) Límites de la inteligencia individual: gran parte de la actividad humana relacionada con el pensamiento y la toma de decisiones funciona mejor cuando se apoya en buenas herramientas, colaboraciones con otros y diseños ambientales concebidos óptimamente. Los seres humanos son dispositivos «plug-and-play» que solo funcionan bien cuando se conectan a personas de diverso perfil, herramientas inteligentes y entornos bien diseñados. Cuando actuamos solamente a merced de recursos propios, las personas podemos ser peligrosas para sí mismas y para los demás (Levy, 1999; Navarro, 2009; Ricaurte-Quijano & Álvarez, 2016; Perkins & Salomon, 1989).

13) Ineficacia de la escuela: la escuela es, en gran medida, ineficaz en términos de retención a largo plazo de lo que se enseña. Las habilidades aprendidas en contextos formales de enseñanza y aprendizaje a menudo no se retienen mucho tiempo después de la etapa escolar, a menos que se practiquen repetidamente. Las humanidades no necesariamente mejoran la vida, ya que la mayoría de la gente deja de tener contacto con ellas una vez terminada su etapa escolar. De hecho, no parece haber motivo para creer que las humanidades humanicen a los seres humanos (Steiner, 1975). La escuela sirve para dar a la gente títulos que tienen una correlación –aunque discreta– con su éxito posterior en el trabajo y en la vida, pero que les sirven para abrirles la puerta a un eventual trabajo, así como obtener un determinado status social (Arum & Roksa, 2011; Caplan, 2018; Pritchett & Beatty, 2015).

14) Corrupción de tecnologías potencialmente poderosas: tecnologías con grandes posibilidades para el aprendizaje, la interacción y el activismo tienden a ser pervertidas por el mercado –y los deseos humanos–, lo que da lugar a un funcionamiento poco óptimo e incluso contraproducente. El marco en el que se utiliza la tecnología (esto es, las capacidades y los deseos reales de las personas) tiene más peso a la hora de determinar sus efectos que la propia tecnología (Doyle, 2017; Hoffmann, 2017; Yudes-Gómez, Baridon-Chauvie, & González-Cabrera, 2018).

15) Diversidad mal entendida: la manera como habitualmente nos referimos a la diversidad es objetivamente errónea a pesar de que puedan subyacer nobles motivaciones sociales. Grupos, supuestamente homogéneos, como los «negros», los «blancos», los «afroamericanos», los «judíos» comparten menos genes entre sí que con personas fuera de su grupo (Rutherford, 2016). En cambio, concebimos la diversidad en términos binarios (negro/blanco; hombre/mujer; normal/anormal; conservador/liberal), a pesar de que la realidad no sea binaria. La diversidad real existe a nivel de las experiencias de la vida cotidiana de las personas. Las personas que forman parte de grupos construidos socialmente (como «razas» o «géneros») son diferentes en muchos aspectos (Gee, 2017b; Jenkins, 2009; Marhiri, 2017; Sapolsky, 2017).

3. La relación entre los rasgos humanos

Existen conexiones inherentes entre algunas de las quince características enumeradas en el apartado anterior. Estas conexiones pueden guiar a los diseñadores para que puedan usar estos rasgos, ya sea para propósitos desacertados o para promover procesos de aprendizaje profundo. La conexión más importante la encontramos entre las primeras cinco características: reconocimiento, priorización del sentido, complejidad del sistema humano, vínculo pensamiento-emoción, e identificación de patrones sin control.

Las personas necesitamos importar a los demás. Vamos a usar «X» para hacer referencia a cualquier grupo o causa que haga sentir a una persona que importa (que es un participante valorado). Este, al hacer sentir a una persona que importa, también le proporciona formas de dar sentido a las cosas, con lo que satisface la característica número dos. Cuando las personas no se sienten reconocidas, continúan buscando un sentido, pero esa búsqueda puede convertirse en un propósito idiosincrático, que fomente el aislamiento e incluso revista un peligro. En el momento en que las personas sienten que no importan y no encuentran sentido a las cosas, aparece la enfermedad mental y física, a menudo a causa del estrés y la ansiedad (Harris, 2018; Marmot, 2004; Wilkinson & Pickett, 2006).

Las personas priorizan claramente el reconocimiento y la búsqueda de sentido frente a la verdad empírica. Además, solo valoran profundamente la verdad cuando hay una vinculación afectivo-emocional con ella. De manera que sentirse reconocido y encontrar un sentido a las cosas son procesos muy relevantes en la especie humana dado que en ellos se fusiona el afecto y las asunciones (sean verdaderas o falsas). Nuestra especie muestra una tendencia poderosa a la identificación de patrones y, por ello, las personas buscan activamente patrones (por espurios que sean) que les hagan sentir bien, siendo a la vez fuentes de sentido y de reconocimiento personal.

La tercera característica descrita anteriormente es crucial aquí. Cuando separamos el cerebro (cabeza) y tratamos el cuerpo (entendido como un componente «sin cerebro») y el entorno como «cosas que están allí fuera» ajenas a nosotros, reducimos la compleja conducta humana. Cada humano es un «sistema complejo multicerebral, genético, cognitivo, emocional, químico, epigenético, social, interaccional y ambiental» (Harris, 2018; Sapolsky, 2017). Todo interactúa con todo a partir de procesos de co-creación. Cuando las personas sienten que no importan y están aisladas del significado compartido, el sistema complejo desaparece por completo, no solo una parte del mismo. La ansiedad/estrés crónicos son una de las consecuencias y sus efectos se palpan en todo el sistema con unos resultados muy negativos (Harris, 2018). De poco sirve diseñar buenas escuelas, buenos métodos de aprendizaje o buenos medios de comunicación para personas con un alto nivel de estrés. Dichas personas prestan poca atención a cualquier cosa que no sea las amenazas a su integridad como persona.

Los tres rasgos siguientes están también profundamente conectados: información limitada, sesgos del cerebro y memoria limitada.

Los seres humanos son sistemas complejos guiados, parcialmente, por un conductor –la conciencia, el intérprete– provisto de una información muy limitada, siendo mucho más lo que acontece en un segundo plano dentro del sistema, fuera del alcance de la conciencia de una persona. Además, como ya se ha dicho anteriormente, la memoria humana no puede considerarse como «un registro verídico del pasado». Los errores del cerebro, como el sesgo de confirmación, funcionan bien en entornos relativamente estables (como aquellos en los que evolucionamos como criaturas) donde es inteligente confiar en lo que uno ya conoce, pero no en los entornos complejos y cambiantes del mundo moderno. La solución a estos problemas podemos hallarla al abordar el rasgo número doce.

Es importante ver, en relación con el conjunto de rasgos que van del número cinco al siete, que la especie humana parece provista para mirar más hacia el futuro que hacia el pasado. Si una memoria inexacta facilita elecciones acertadas en el futuro, entonces es más valiosa que una que sea exacta pero que no ofrezca el mismo resultado. Las personas guardan versiones editadas de sus experiencias en su memoria a largo plazo y utilizan estos recuerdos (parciales y con diferentes transformaciones) para pensar, planificar y elegir (Gee, 2017a; Seligman, Railton, Baumeister & Sripada, 2016). Las personas no pueden pensar, planificar o elegir bien sin disponer de muchas experiencias positivas y ricas que les sirvan como gasolina para la imaginación y las simulaciones que realizan en sus procesos mentales. Sin embargo, a medida que adquieren experiencias y aprenden a usarlas fructíferamente para imaginar y simular, necesitan ayuda (buenas herramientas, buenas prácticas y buenas enseñanzas) para compensar la información limitada y los sesgos del cerebro.

Los siguientes rasgos también están totalmente conectados entre sí: optimización contraproducente y contraposición «nosotros frente a ellos». Ambos rasgos tienen relación con la tendencia de los seres humanos a favorecer el beneficio a corto plazo frente al beneficio a largo plazo y también a favorecer el beneficio propio al de los demás. Las personas son egoístas, aunque este egoísmo a menudo se plasma en acciones para favorecer a nuestro «clan» o «las personas como nosotros» y no solo a uno mismo o una misma. Ello implica, también, cierta tendencia a favorecer la ganancia a corto plazo frente a la ganancia a largo plazo. Estas dos propiedades son el resultado de las condiciones en las que evolucionamos –como cazadores-recolectores–, porque en ese marco eran buenas para la supervivencia (Tomasello, 2014).

La gratificación retardada no tiene sentido cuando la comida es escasa. Y el «nosotros» es también muy importante cuando no hay muchos «ellos» y no tenemos ninguna certeza real de que estos «ellos» sean «fiables». Ninguno de estos rasgos es particularmente bueno en un mundo repleto de placeres a corto plazo que te matarán a largo plazo (un largo plazo que es mucho más largo para los seres humanos modernos) y lleno de infinidad de «extraños» en «tu» propia sociedad.

Ahora llegamos a un grupo de características que explican el problema que tienen los seres humanos en muchos niveles de la sociedad. Como hemos visto, nuestra inteligencia es bastante limitada en el plano individual. Sin embargo, podemos hacer grandes cosas (como puentes y guerras) cuando actuamos colectivamente y disponemos de las herramientas necesarias para ello. Ahora bien, también aquí aparecen problemas. Como el hecho que los efectos de la tecnología dependen en gran medida del contexto en el que se utilizan, de manera que las tecnologías tienden a quedar «pervertidas» por los deseos e intereses a corto plazo de las personas participantes (Coker, 2018). Cuando usamos la tecnología para abordar una situación problemática, a menudo la propia situación neutraliza la tecnología o se la apropia para servir al problema y no para servir como solución al mismo.

La inteligencia colectiva, en su sentido moderno, requiere de diversidad y del uso de buenas herramientas para reunir tantos conocimientos, experiencias y creatividad como sea posible. Eso contrasta con una sociedad y unas instituciones humanas que muchas veces están organizadas en torno a dominios de especialización que protegen sus fronteras y sus «derechos». Además, la diversidad en la sociedad y el mundo académico normalmente se define (y se defiende) en términos de grandes grupos binarios, un nivel de diferencia y diversidad que no estimula la inteligencia colectiva. La diversidad real, en cambio, se manifiesta en un nivel inferior en el que una persona individual es producto y resultado de su interacción con distintos grupos e identidades sociales. Es decir, una infinidad de experiencias vividas de todo tipo que dan a la persona sus conocimientos específicos, sus perspectivas concretas y sus aportaciones vitales (Gee, 2017b; Marhiri, 2017).

A menudo creemos que es el trabajo de las escuelas y de la escolarización abordar los temas objeto de nuestro análisis. Sin embargo, muchos estudios del ámbito de la economía demuestran que los efectos de la escuela son bastante efímeros en su mayor parte (Caplan, 2018). Los estudiantes olvidan pronto la mayoría de las cosas que han aprendido en la escuela, a menos que las continúen practicando en su día a día o en su entorno laboral. En términos generales, es en el trabajo donde se aprenden habilidades, no en la escuela o en cualquier otro contexto formal de enseñanza y aprendizaje. Y las humanidades no parecen humanizar, pocos las utilizan luego en su vida y son muchas las personas con una gran educación que provocan grandes desastres en el planeta.

En este sentido, varios economistas argumentan que gran parte de la escolarización (no toda) sirve para indicar a las personas qué candidato será un trabajador inteligente, dócil y concienzudo (tras haber demostrado su capacidad para aguantar un aburrimiento infinito en el colegio, sobre todo en su camino para obtener títulos y notas). En realidad, la escuela incide muy poco en los problemas humanos que hemos mencionado. Al fin y al cabo, la gran mayoría de las personas con unos hábitos de consumo de medios de comunicación sociales o digitales que no consideramos adecuados están escolarizados o lo han estado.

El último grupo de rasgos conectados entre sí son los que sugieren ciertas claves para empezar a encontrar una solución: dificultad para gestionar problemas complicados, límites de la inteligencia individual, ineficacia de la escuela, perversión de tecnologías con potencial y diversidad mal entendida.

Si queremos usar la tecnología para crear diseños para el aprendizaje profundo –y, por lo tanto, para diseñar para los seres humanos tal y como son–, tenemos que dar la vuelta a los rasgos que van del número once al quince. Tenemos que impedir que las nuevas tecnologías queden pervertidas en su aplicación real e incluir todo el espectro de diferencia y diversidad real. Tenemos que recurrir a perspectivas transdisciplinarias para lidiar con problemas difíciles y complejos, no solo a áreas de especialización pequeñas y aisladas; y que ampliar y complementar —no reducir— la inteligencia humana por medio de buenas herramientas, buenas formas de colaboración e inteligencia colectiva, y redes sociales capaces de mejorar la vida de las personas. Y tenemos que darnos cuenta de que la solución no está en la escuela –o solo en la escuela– o, al menos, no en las escuelas que tenemos, hemos tenido y que probablemente, en la mayoría de los sitios, seguiremos teniendo.

4. El diseño para el aprendizaje profundo: nuestro desafío

Dicho todo esto, nos gustaría sugerir una primera propuesta sobre cómo abordar el diseño de un blog, un juego, una app, un vídeo o un sitio web, según las características de la especie humana que hemos descrito anteriormente.

Quizás el deseo más profundo de los seres humanos sea implicarse en una idea, una causa o un proyecto que dé sentido a sus vidas y les ayude a sentir que importan a los demás y también a sí mismos. Evidentemente, las personas pueden implicarse tanto en diseños equivocados, defectuosos o efectivos en pro de aprendizajes profundos. En este sentido, diseñar para el aprendizaje profundo significa seducir a la gente para que se implique en cosas que mejoren sus vidas y las de los demás, además de nuestro mundo compartido en general. Cuando las personas se implican en una causa, idea o proyecto normalmente lo hacen de una forma social, es decir, como parte de un grupo que comparte este mismo interés. La mayoría de la gente encuentra en este entorno la sensación de importar socialmente, de reconocer y sentirse reconocida.

En realidad, el aprendizaje y el desarrollo psicológico son consecuencia de la participación social en espacios de afinidad. Por «espacio de afinidad» nos referimos a un sitio/espacio –virtual, físico o una combinación de ambos– donde las personas interactúan entre sí y con recursos para participar en una actividad compartida en la que todos tienen un interés o incluso una pasión común. Cada uno de estos espacios, como la página web de una causa de activismo social, forma parte de espacios de afinidad más grandes (al igual que un estado está formado por pueblos y ciudades). Los espacios conectados, o el espacio de espacios en el que las personas se mueven para realizar un aprendizaje profundo y evolucionar hasta convertirse en alguien nuevo, son una ecología real que cambia con el tiempo y que amplía los conocimientos y la identidad de las personas. No todo lo que ocurre en estos espacios conectados –y no todo el viaje que en ellos se realiza– es positivo. El equilibrio entre lo positivo y lo negativo siempre puede tambalearse. El diseño para el aprendizaje profundo debe tener como objetivo el largo plazo; debe ser continuo y debe terminar por convertirse en un proyecto conjunto con un deseo social de hacer el bien, capaz de autocorregirse cuando se producen cambios y crisis.

Las personas, por ejemplo, llegan a un blog o a un sitio web para tener una experiencia. Básicamente entran para ver si hay algo que pueden aprender (y llegar a ser) a ese sitio que les permita añadir valor a sus vidas. Los seres humanos no aprenden bien de experiencias del tipo «todo vale», sobre todo si son principiantes en el tema. Por este motivo, el responsable del diseño debe diseñar una experiencia orientada al aprendizaje profundo. Obviamente, esta meta no es fácil, porque el aprendizaje bueno o profundo implica esfuerzo y riesgo, por lo que es más duro que el aprendizaje superficial o el aprendizaje que juega con nuestras debilidades y prejuicios. A las personas no les gusta hacer cosas complicadas, salvo en determinadas condiciones especiales. Sea como fuere, una experiencia es buena para el aprendizaje profundo cuando (Gee, 2017a):

a) Tiene un objetivo (claro, pero quizás, modificable).

b) El objetivo requiere una acción (o varias) y la persona que aprende tiene una conexión emocional (afectiva) con ella(s). Para las personas la forma más eficaz de aprender es cuando sienten que hay algo «en juego», algún desafío que merece la pena afrontar.

c) Algo (es decir, el diseño) les ayuda, sobre todo si son «principiantes», a gestionar su atención de forma fructífera para que puedan centrarse en lo que es importante y útil en medio de la infinidad de elementos que integran cualquier experiencia humana.

d) Les anima a probar cosas diferentes y a entender el fracaso como una forma importante de aprendizaje.

e) Les ayuda a descubrir cuáles son los valores y los juicios adecuados para evaluar sus progresos a lo largo de los diferentes intentos, ensayos y fracasos. Ello implica a menudo internalizar las normas de un grupo de personas, algunas de las cuales son expertas en el tema. Este proceso de internalización es necesario, aunque puede ser también un tipo de «colonización». Sin embargo, el objetivo último es ir más allá de la internalización de las normas para crear personas que acaben aprendiendo a mejorar y transformar dichas normas. Los espacios de aprendizaje productivo permiten a los participantes codiseñar (personalizar, modificar y mejorar) continuamente el sitio o la actividad, lo que incluye la experiencia que aporta el sitio-actividad (Esteban-Guitart, Coll, & Penuel, 2018; Jovés, Siqués, & Esteban-Guitart, 2015). El objetivo es que los participantes se conviertan en residentes y copropietarios (y «profesores autodirigidos» y «diseñadores» por derecho propio). De manera que una experiencia bien diseñada entra a formar parte de la memoria a largo plazo de los participantes al integrarse plenamente con sus experiencias y recuerdos anteriores. Este recuerdo se utiliza básicamente como material para simular (imaginar) el futuro, de modo que las personas puedan planificar, soñar y elegir bien para construir futuros mejores. Eso significa que nos interesa evaluar el éxito de la actividad o el sitio no por la cantidad de información que los individuos retengan (puedan recordar) sino por si les ayuda a tomar decisiones más acertadas para construir futuros mejores (Cutumisu, Blair, Chin, & Schwartz, 2015). En otras palabras, el espacio y/o la actividad debe fomentar la imaginación, y no solamente los recuerdos, de modo que las personas sientan que importan a los demás y encuentren un sentido a las cosas mediante la implicación en una causa, idea o proyecto compartido que tenga relación con algo bueno. En este contexto, el papel del «profesor» es guiar a los que aprenden a través de una experiencia de aprendizaje fructífera más que tratar de enseñarles algo. En otras palabras, el profesor se convierte en un recurso para el autoaprendizaje. En la línea de lo que propugnaba Vygotsky (1997: 47) en sus primeros trabajos: «Al fin y al cabo, el niño se enseña a sí mismo». El papel del profesor es dirigir y guiar el entorno como una forma de producir algunos comportamientos y reacciones. Siguiendo los principios descritos arriba, podemos decir que el espacio-sitio-actividad debería estar lleno de recursos con herramientas, tecnologías y prácticas sociales de interacción capaces de complementar y transformar los límites de la inteligencia humana. Ello implica fundamentalmente diseñar para la inteligencia colectiva, un fenómeno que, evidentemente, requiere de grupos de personas que se responsabilicen de sus propias colaboraciones fructíferas. Actualmente, disponemos de un gran número de trabajos sobre la «sabiduría de la multitud» y las diferentes formas de inteligencia colectiva (Levy, 1999; Navarro, 2009; Ricaurte-Quijano & Álvarez, 2016; Perkins & Salomon, 1989).

5. Conclusión

El aprendizaje profundo y el cambio son difíciles, y la gente los evitará a menos que tenga una gran motivación para asumir el desafío. La base fundamental del diseño para el aprendizaje profundo es atraer y retener algunas personas en un espacio/sitio/actividad porque existe una «afinidad» compartida socialmente y con una vinculación emocional con una causa, idea o proyecto y también con las personas que trabajan por esa idea, proyecto o causa común. Ahora bien, para motivar de verdad a los seres humanos, esa afinidad debe tener «ramificaciones», debe ofrecerles la posibilidad de llevarlos a sitios mejores, de subirlos a un viaje con otras personas que valoren y que les valoren. Para conseguirlo, es necesario conectar o vincular el espacio/actividad/sitio a otros espacios/sitios/actividades que compartan, complementen o mejoren la afinidad que se está tratando de alumbrar (Esteban-Guitart, Coll, & Penuel, 2018).

En ese ir y venir del espacio/sitio/actividad a otros, las personas se convierten en compañeros de viaje en un camino por la vida con otros, un camino que pueden compartir durante un tramo o durante mucho tiempo, un camino que puede llevarles a tomar desvíos hacia otros caminos o un camino que pueden seguir hasta el final. Un trabajo de diseño de este tipo puede:

a) Hacer que la gente tenga la sensación de que importa.

b) Orientar la tendencia a contraponer el nosotros y el ellos en direcciones más amplias y útiles: el contexto es muy importante en la forma como la gente identifica el «nosotros» y el «ellos» (Sapolsky, 2017).

c) Conseguir suscitar en las personas un apego (afecto) por la verdad al presentarla como una causa, un viaje, una dirección, una misión compartida para hacer el bien.

d) Mejorar la salud mental y física de las personas mediante las conexiones entre el reconocimiento, el sentido y la salud para las personas y la sociedad en general.

En último término, los diseños para el aprendizaje profundo se convierten en agentes que envían a personas a viajes pensados para mejorar tanto su vida como la del mundo en general.

Aunque el diseño para el aprendizaje profundo es difícil porque a los seres humanos a menudo no les gusta esforzarse, hay cierta esperanza. Décadas atrás, Harry Harlow, el científico que realizó los famosos e infames estudios con monos y madres de alambre, estudió la inteligencia de los primates. En ese momento, se hacía dando a un mono un puzle mecánico y mirando si conseguía resolverlo. Como los psicólogos de la época eran buenos conductistas les ponían una recompensa en forma de comida debajo de cada parte del puzle, partiendo de la idea de que la recompensa para resolver cada parte del puzle les animaría a seguir trabajando en el puzle (en otras palabras, usaban recompensas continuas para lidiar con el problema del esfuerzo). Sin embargo, un día Harlow se preguntó qué pasaría si no hubiera comida como recompensa (Harlow, Harlow, & Meyer, 1950). La suposición era que el primate dejaría de intentar resolver el puzle dado que el esfuerzo no le merecería la pena. Sin embargo, Harlow lo probó de todos modos. Descubrió que los primates solucionaban el puzle sin recompensas más rápidamente que cuando sí las había. Para los primates, aprender es una recompensa en sí misma; los primates, y los humanos en particular, tienen la necesidad biológica de compartir, preguntar, aprender y resolver problemas (Bruner, 2012; Tomasello, 2014).

Los seres humanos son primates. La escuela y la desigualdad en la sociedad han matado la pasión psicobiológica por aprender, por la sensibilidad epistemológica (Bruner, 2012) y por resolver problemas en mucha gente. Nos enfrentamos a un gran número de problemas difíciles de resolver. Quizás el problema del «diseño para el aprendizaje profundo» no es realmente que a los seres humanos no les guste el esfuerzo, sino que necesitan descubrir qué son realmente: seres que crecen esforzándose y aprendiendo cuando perciben que hay rayos de luz, reconocimiento y esperanza.

Apoyos

Este trabajo ha contado con el apoyo del Ministerio de Economía, Industria y Competitividad (MINECO) de España, la Agencia Estatal de Investigación (AEI) y el Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional (Unión Europea) [subvención número EDU2017-83363-R].

Referencias

Arum, R., & Roksa, J. (2011). Limited learning on college campus. Society, 48, 198-203. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12115-011-9417-8

Bruner, J. (1990). Acts of meaning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Bruner, J. (2012). What psychology should study. International Journal of Educational Psychology, 1(1), 5-13. https://doi.org/10.4471/ijep.2012.01

Caplan, B. (2018). The case against education: Why the education system is a waste of time and money. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. https://doi.org/10.23943/9781400889327

Coker, C. (2018). Still the human thing? Technology, human agency and the future of war. International Relations, 32(1), 23-38. https://doi.org/10.1177/0047117818754640

Cosmides, L. (1989). The logic of social exchange: Has natural selection shaped how humans reason? Studies with the Wasson Selection task. Cognition, 31(3), 187-276. https://doi.org/10.1016/0010-0277(89)90023-1

Cutumisu, M., Blair, K.P., Chin, D.B., & Schwartz, D.L. (2015). Posterlet: A game-based assessment of children’s choices to seek feedback and to revise. Journal of Learning Analytics, 2(1), 49-71. https://doi.org/10.18608/jla.2015.21.4

Delgado, M.R. (2012). A brain bug’s life. Trends in Neurosciences, 35(4), 209-210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tins.2012.02.002

Doyle, T. (2017). Weapons of math estruction: How big data increases inequality and threatens democracy by Cathy O’Neil. The Information Society. An International Journal, 33(5), 301-302. https://doi.org/10.1080/01972243.2017.1354593

Esteban-Guitart, M., Coll, C., & Penuel, W. (2018). Learning across settings and time in the digital age. Digital Education Review, 33, 1-16.

Gantman, A.P., Adriaanse, M.A., Gollwitzer, P.M., & Oettingen, G. (2017). Why did I do that? Explaining actions activated outside of awareness. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 24(5), 1563-1572. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13423-017-1260-5

Gazzaniga, M. (2010). Cerebral specialization and interhemispheric communication: Does the corpus callosum enable the human condition? Brain, 123(7), 1293-1326. https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/123.7.1293

Gee, J.P. (2000). Identity as an analytic lens for research in education. Review of Research in Education, 25, 99-125. https://doi.org/10.2307/1167322

Gee, J.P. (2017a). Teaching, learning, literacy in our high-risk high-tech world: A framework for becoming human. New York: Teachers College Press.

Gee, J.P. (2017b). Identity and diversity in today’s world. Multicultural Education Review, 9(2), 83-92. https://doi.org/10.1080/2005615X.2017.131221

Glenberg, A.M. (1997). What memory is for? Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 20(1), 1-19. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X97000010

Gray, J.R., Braver, T.S., & Raichle, M.E. (2002). Integration of emotion and cognition in the lateral prefrontal cortex prefrontal cortex. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 99(6), 4115-4120. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.062381899

Harlow, H.F., Harlow, M.K., & Meyer, D.R. (1950). Learning motivated by a manipulation drive. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 50(2), 228-234. https://doi.org/10.1037/h0056906

Harris, N.B. (2018). The deepest well: Healing the long-term effects of childhood adversity. New York: Houghton-Mifflin.

Hoffmann, A.L. (2017). Breaking bad algorithms. Science, 358, 310-311. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aao4414

Immordino-Yang, M.H., & Damasio, A. (2007). We feel, therefore we learn: The relevance of affective and social neuroscience to education. Mind, Brain and Education, 1(1), 3-10. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-228X.2007.00004.x

Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence culture: Where old and new media collide. New York: NYU Press.

Jenkins, H. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media education for the 21st century. Chicago: MacArthur Foundation.

Jovés, P., Siqués, C., & Esteban-Guitart, M. (2015). The incorporation of funds of knowledge and funds of identity of students and their families into educational practice. Teaching and Teacher Education, 49, 68-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2015.03

Klein S.B., Robertson T.E., & Delton A.W. (2010). Facing the future: Memory as an evolved system for planning future acts. Memory and Cognition 38, 1, 13-22. https://doi.org/10.3758/MC.38.1.13

Lara-Dammer, F., Hofstadter, D.R., & Goldstone, R.L. (2017). A computer model of context-dependent perception in a very simple world. Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artifical Intelligence, 29(6), 1247-1282. https://doi.org/10.1080/0952813X.2017.13

Lázaro, L., & Esteban-Guitart, M. (2014). Acts of shared intentionality. In search of uniquely human thinking. Ethos, 42(2), 10-13. https://doi.org/10.1111/etho.12066

LeDoux, J.E. (2000). Emotion circuits in the brain. Annual Review of Neuroscience, 23, 155-184. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev.neuro.21.1.155

Legare, C.H., Schult, C.A., Impola, M., & Souza, A. (2016). Young children revise explanations in response to new evidence. Cognitive Development, 39, 45-56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2016.03.003

Levy, P. (1999). Collective intelligence: Mankind’s emerging world in cyberspace. New York: Basic Books. https://doi.org/10.1162/leon.1999.32.1.70b

Marhiri, J. (2017). Deconstructing race: Multicultural education beyond the color-bind. New York: Teachers College Press.

Marmot, M. (2005). Social determinants of health inequalities. Lancet, 365, 1099-1104. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(05)71146-6

Navarro, M.G. (2009). Los nuevos entornos educativos: Desafíos cognitivos para una inteligencia colectiva. [New educational settings. Cognitive challenges for the realization of a collective intelligence]. Comunicar, 33, 141-148. https://doi.org/10.3916/

Nielsen, M. (2012). Reinventing discovery: The new era of networked science. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. https://doi.org/10.1515/9781400839452

Perkins, D., & Salomon, G. (1989). Are cognitive skills context-bound? Educational Researcher, 18(1), 16-25. https://doi.org/10.3102/0013189X018001016

Pinto, Y., de Haan, E.H.F., & Lamme, V.A.F. (2017). The split-brain phenomenon revisited: A signle conscious agent with split perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 21(11), 835-851. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2017.09.003

Pritchett, L., & Beatty, A. (2015). Slown down, you’re going too fast: Matching curricula to student skill levels. International Journal of Educational Development, 40, 276-288. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijedudev.2014.11.013

Rhode, D. (2017). Cheating: Ethics in everyday life. New York: Oxford University Press.

Ricaurte-Quijano, P., & Álvarez, A.C. (2016). The wiki learning project: Wikipedia as an open learning environment. [El proyecto Wiki Learning: Wikipedia como entorno de aprendizaje abierto]. Comunicar, 49, 61-69. https://doi.org/10.3916/C49-2016-06

Richards, J.M., & Gross, J.J. (2000). Emotion regulation and memory: The cognitive costs of keeping one’s cool. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79(3), 410-424. https://doi.org/10.1037/00223514.79.3.410

Sapolsky, R.M. (2017). Behave: The biology of humans at our best and worst. New York: Penguin.

Seligman, E.P.M., Railton, P., Baumeister, R.F., & Sripada, C. (2016). Homo prospectus. New York: Oxford University Press.

Steiner, G. (1975). After Babel: Aspects of language and translation. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Taylor, S.E., & Lobel, M. (1989). Social comparison activity under threat: Downward evaluation and upward contacts. Psychological Review, 96(4), 569-575. https://doi.org/10.1037/0033.295C.96.4.569

Tomasello, M. (2014). The ultra-social animal. European Journal of Social Psychology, 44(3), 187-194. https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2015

Vygotsky, L.S. (1997). Educational psychology. Boca Raton, FL: St. Lucie Press.

Wilkinson, R.G., & Pickett, K.E. (2006). Income inequality and population health: A review and explanation of the evidence. Social Science & Medicine, 62(7), 1768-1784. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2005.08.036

Woolfson, A. (2016). Mob rule. Nature, 536, 146-147. https://doi.org/10.1038/536146a

Yong, E. (2016). I contain multitudes: The microbes within us and a grander view of life. New York: HarperCollins.

Yudes-Gómez, C., Baridon-Chauvie, D. & González-Cabrera, J.M. (2018). Cyberbylling and problematic Internet use in Colombia, Uruguay and Spain: Cross-cultural study. [Ciberacoso y uso problemático de Internet en Colombia, Uruguay y España: Un estudio transcultural]. Comunicar, 56, 49-58. https://doi.org/10.3916/C56-2018-05

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/18
Accepted on 31/12/18
Submitted on 31/12/18

Volume 27, Issue 1, 2019
DOI: 10.3916/C58-2019-01
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 7
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?