Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The goal of the present work is to analyze the use of social networks as a tool for social empowerment by Spanish university students, and their perception of the university as an institution that contributes to the formation of a critical and active citizenship, that provides them with the relevant digital competences. The literature review shows possible discrepancies regarding the effect of new forms of digital communication in empowering young people, specially university students, as well as the existence of issues related to clarify this digital stage. Following, a typological analysis of the perception of university students regarding social information networks, social empowerment and the role of the university is presented. Using the data collected through a structured questionnaire of a sample of 236 students of social science degrees, an analysis of typologies is performed with the algorithm K Medias. Three clusters significantly different –labeled as «total sceptics», «dual moderates» and «pro-digitals»– are identified. Its prevalence and its characterization are explained: belief and behaviour profiles related to these beliefs. The paper concludes with several recommendations for future research regarding the perception of the students about the use of social networks as a tool for social transformation and the role of the university in this area.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the art

The new forms of digital communication have helped democratize the process of communication. Social networks facilitate citizens’ access to a wealth of information and enable them to organize themselves to participate in the formation of public opinion through the exchange of information and opinions (Saorín & Gómez-Hernández, 2014; Viché, 2015). This state of affairs increases communicating subjects’ autonomy from communication companies (Castells, 2009), as citizens not only observe, but also become part of the process of constructing the news (Orihuela, 2011). Today, individuals can inform one another on a large scale, and thus play a leading role in the society of information and knowledge, and even overflow the boundaries of public institutions (Islands & Arribas, 2010).

Participation in social networks thus contributes to citizen empowerment and enhances social solidarity by raising awareness of certain subjects and allowing people to transcend local reality and accede to a more global sphere (Espiritusanto & Gonzalo, 2011). As against official news organizations that have traditionally decided how events should be presented, we are witnessing the emergence of news produced by ordinary people who have something to say or show (Gillmor, 2006). In this way, the knowledge of reality that we get from the media and that comes from the thematic selection made by these media (agenda setting) is giving way to citizens’ agenda focused on issues that interest them (Rivera-Rogel & Rodriguez-Hidalgo, 2016).

In the case of young people, these new capabilities to access, provide and disseminate information have given rise to a number of critical reflections. Many of such analyses highlight the opportunities social networks provide for social participation and mobilization (De-Moraes, 2004). However, social networks’ influence may be more complex than it would initially appear, as it may be minimizing the role of critical thinking. The speed at which information is generated and the criteria used to select it to raise questions as to whether different points of view are being excluded, thus choking off the potential for debate. Hence, the capacity for critical thinking and training in the use of media become crucial, especially in higher education.

Studies of young people reveal that the most common use they make of networks is contact and the creation of relationships, entertainment and finding out about the lives of others (Bringué & Sádaba, 2011). Therefore, there is an open discussion on whether these new forms of communication contribute to the empowerment of young people or if, on the contrary, they have not (yet) fostered debate and the exercise of youthful, active citizenship (Díez, Fernández-Rodríguez, & Anguita, 2011).

The foregoing reveals a possible discrepancy between the opportunities that social networks offer university students to express themselves, share, stay informed, debate, organize and mobilize (Yuste, 2015), as against their training in the use of such networks, their competences and the development of critical thinking.

A review of the literature leaves open a number of issues for analysis: Does virtual socialization of university students make them active and critical citizens? Do informational social networks facilitate participation and debate? Are they an instrument of social empowerment or merely of individual socialization for university students? Do students take on and exercise their capacity to influence, or are they merely part of a mass that is easily influenced, that multiply the positions of specific users that are highly influential (influencers)? How do they see the role of the university in the acquisition of digital competences and the development of critical thinking in tackling this huge amount of information?

The aim of this paper is to offer a current analysis of the role of social networks as a tool for social empowerment among Spanish university students, and of students’ perception of the university as an enabler of education in the use of media to become active and critical citizens.

There is a wide disparity in public participation in social networks between those who do no more than indicating that they like a piece of news, those who forward such news, those who comment on it, and those who contribute new materials (Fundación Telefónica, 2016). This diversity in the issues posed should, presumably, be found among university students as well. We believe that a typological analysis would be an appropriate research technique to study this. This technique of multivariate, descriptive and non-inferential analysis can extract information from a data set with no prior restrictions and is quite useful as a tool without imposing preconceived patterns (Gordon, 1999). In this way, we will identify and describe the different profiles of students with regard to the research questions posed.

The paper is organized as follows: first, an introduction outlines the state of the question by addressing the importance of education in informative social networks and media as tools facilitating empowerment; next, the materials and methods used in the empirical work are described; then, the analysis and results are presented and, lastly, the discussion, conclusions, and limitations of the research are set forth.

1.1. The importance of education in media for the new digital environment

The opportunity for empowerment offered by digital society must be grounded in the sound education of its members in order to be effective. Accordingly, the challenge is to integrate the media within educational processes by critically thinking about them and their powerful weapons for recreating and constructing reality (Aguaded, 2005). This amounts to an educational project whose purpose is to cultivate e-citizens who are aware, critical and responsible with the information they deal with.

We live in an environment where news can be distorted in a way that affects rights such as freedom of speech, information, and participation. The flow of information we receive on a daily basis is overwhelming, and it arrives unfiltered and with no critical analysis. Given these facts, it is important to increase the dose of citizen education by fostering critical and plural thinking (Delgado, 2003). However, now that users have an obviously active role as constructors of social reality (Saorín & Gómez-Hernández, 2014), it is also essential for such new competences to be strengthened by educational institutions. This challenge is acute in universities, which must also use research to analyze and comprehend the social changes brought about by this transformation (Lara, 2009).

The necessity and importance of educating in the use of the media are long-standing in recent history, having begun in the 1980s with UNESCO’s Grunwald Declaration of 1982. However, media education takes on a new dimension in today’s digital society. Media education enables the development of strategies for fostering dialogue between sectors, social groups, and generations (Frau-Meigs & Torrent, 2009). This education should address issues such as the influence of different media, their socializing function, the control they exercise and are subjected to, and the different information they convey (González-Sanchez & Muñoz-Rodríguez, 2002). The aim is to train aware University professionals and e-citizens capable of accessing a large volume of information, so that they are able to freely decide what contents are relevant and adequate for them, and to enable them to make a responsible choice when faced with the multiple options they encounter (Ballesta & Guardiola, 2001; Valerio-Urena & Valenzuela-González, 2011). This means designing study programs that include cross-disciplinary subjects related to media literacy that strengthen citizen’s competences (Ferrés, Aguaded, & García-Matilla, 2012). This task should involve communication professionals, university professors and teachers of compulsory education (Area, 2010; Marta-Lazo & Grandio, 2013).

However, hardly any work has been done on the role of the university in the process of creating critical citizens in this new technological context of information access. Hence, a number of issues arise: Are universities effectively fostering literacy in the use of the media? Are universities favoring the citizen empowerment offered by media? An answer to these questions would require an analysis of the activities carried out in the university world. However, beyond what is happening at universities, a perception prevails that university students are playing the key role, and are the main product of university processes.

In order to offer a specialized vision, we opted to focus our research on the use of social networks. Hence, we deemed it useful to contextualize Twitter within the phenomenon of social empowerment.

1.2. Informative social networks as a tool of citizen empowerment

Twitter, with 317 million active accounts at present (statista.com, 2016), has become the social network most widely used by the public to stay informed, express opinions, comment on the news, reporting on what is going on nearby and even to mobilize society in matters of public interest. Some authors have called it one of the most powerful communication mechanisms in history (Piscitelli, 2011). The public nature of tweets, unlike the privacy of messages in other social networks, propagates information in real time (Congosto, Fernandez, & Moro, 2011).

However, there is a certain debate in the literature about its international scope. Some authors contend that Twitter is something more than a social network (Romero, Meeder, & Kleinberg, 2011), as an indispensable platform for the transmission of information and news; for others, it is a hybrid network, halfway between a social network and an information stream, because it combines the essential practices of social networks such as “following”, “friending”, with the essence of “broadcasting” or the dissemination of content. This convergence would make it important for journalism (Bruns & Burgess, 2012). Assuming this hybrid nature, authors like Kwak, Lee, Park and Moon (2010) have emphasized its informational nature, as users turn to it mainly to exchange information and not so much to engage in social relations, as is the case with Facebook. We have even encountered arguments that accept Twitter’s informational nature, although limiting this to flashes or alerts related to coverage of tragedies or breaking news. Noteworthy is the study by the Pew Research Center (2015) that correlates news and information reading habits with the use of Twitter and Facebook in North America. The study argues that Twitter is not a social network as such, but rather a platform to receive and share information ( informational social network), with a special focus on breaking news and constant updates.

If we turn our attention to the use of Twitter by millennials, 2016 reports position the network as a communication platform that is mainly oriented to the management of news, and that is predominantly news-related (40% of users use it as a source of information). For millennials, it is a place to communicate with others, establish relationships and access information at any time and in any place (The Cocktail Analysis & Arena, 2016). It is a network that has consolidated itself in this generation, with a high degree of penetration, although it has a leisure or socially oriented use: it enables them to stay in touch with friends, family and classmates (90%), share opinions and seek out the opinions of others (60%), seek out information (70%) and freely express opinions (45%) (Ruiz-Blanco, Ruiz-San-Miguel, & Galindo, 2016). Its use has grown significantly, and it now reaches 24% of connected youth, surpassing penetration in adults (12%) according to Pew Research.

These data confirm the profound changes that the social platforms are giving rise to and unquestionably encompass millennials, which include university students. The degree of the impact of technology on university students and their digital competences has radically altered the way they interact and stay informed (Romero-Rodríguez & Aguaded, 2016). However, the absence of a filter does not allow us to consider the content to be a valid source of information, as all information must be checked (Said, Serrano, García de Torres, Yezers’ka, & Calderín, 2013); also, the lack of context for this immense quantity of information (Rivera-Rogel & al., 2016), are significant factors that give rise to the need to research how students process all the information they receive, who are the opinion leaders they follow, how they choose them and how such leaders influence other users of informational social networks. In short, the point is to clarify if the alleged social empowerment attributed to these information platforms is effective among students.

2. Material and methods

Typological analysis –that is, cluster analysis– is a technique of interdependence that can identify different profiles of subjects on the basis of quantitative variables that define their characteristics and provides the prevalence of the typology in the studied sample, in addition to the profiles. Widely used in scientific research, this method is clearly exploratory and descriptive in nature, as it classifies individuals into uniform groups whose a priori composition is unknown, based on a similarity measure (Hair, Anderson, Tatham & Black, 1999).

In this way, we carried out an exploratory study using as material for the empirical part of this work the information collected from a sample of 236 university students in degree programs of Commerce, Journalism, Advertising and Business Administration at public universities. These degree paths were chosen because they all include courses on communication, which familiarizes participants with the potential of social networks. The sampling method used was by clusters, with classes used as sampling units. The field work was conducted between 15th and 25th October 2016.

To collect the data, we designed a structured direct answer questionnaire initially comprising 120 variables, mainly with Likert seven-position scales in which the participant indicates the degree of agreement with the content of the item (1=strongly disagree and 7=strongly agree). This satisfies one of the requirements of cluster analysis, namely that information from subjects should be numerical in nature.

The content of the questionnaire addresses the following areas:

Behaviour area: objective information on students’ participation in informational social networks (Twitter) with a specification of the social networks in which they have an account and are active, what type of activity they engage in, the intensity of the participation, their capacity to influence (followers vs. followed) criteria for selection of sources, preferences and content of interest, motivation for use of informational social networks (expression, relationship, influence in their surroundings, social awareness, citizen collaboration, involvement in political affairs or mobilization of citizen action).

Belief area: related to information produced and consumed in social networks by students. Perception of the information that circulates in networks, the credibility of their content, the importance of the immediacy of the information, the mediation of the content, the importance and meaning of checking information. Awareness of the capacity to influence, self-perceptions of their degree of knowledge, skill and ability in the use of the new communication tools and the training they receive in the university that enables them to participate as truly empowered citizens.

The following were also included as classification data: degree area, gender, age, and the average of academic transcript to date.

A double questionnaire pre-test was performed prior to the field work. Items’ suitability was analysed by a group of experts consisting of university professors with extensive experience in quantitative research (Churchill, 1979). Subsequently, and after due modifications were made as recommended by the experts (elimination of two variables and modification of a third) a second pre-test was performed with a sample of 15 users from the universe in which the field work was to be applied. The aim was to verify the comprehensibility of the sentences and time required to complete the test. This pre-test led to the removal of three items. After the two pre-tests, the final questionnaire consisted of 115 items organized into 13 questions.


Gavilan et al 2017a-62668-en020.jpg

For the cluster analysis, we used the K Average algorithm, the only requirement of which is to have numerical variables to set up groups, a condition that was met owing to the response scales used. The data were exploited with the statistical analysis package SPSS, version 18.0 for Windows.

3. Analysis and results

We have a sample of 236 university students (Table 2: see next page) in which the 95.6% state that they use an informational social network to keep up with the news: Twitter (46.9%), Facebook (42.1%) and Instagram (6.6%).


Gavilan et al 2017a-62668-en021.jpg

The aggregates yielded by the cleaning up of the items were used as the active variables for the identification of groups of homogeneous subjects. The K means algorithm, after a process of seven iterations, issued a final solution of three clusters with significantly different average scores in the main characterization factors (Table 3: see next page).

These groups may be characterized by taking as a reference the core values in each factor and the differences observed in the behaviour of each (Sparrowhawk, Martinez-Navarro, & Fernández-Lords, 2017).

The first cluster, labeled as “total sceptic” students, makes up 10.18% of the sample. Its members have the most critical profile, as disenchanted with both social networks and the role played by the university in their education as digital citizens. They give low credibility to the information that circulates online (23%) and assume that immediacy prevails over the quality, volume, and diversity of information. They see themselves with low, almost zero, ability to influence their environment through the use of social networks (2.7). And they do not believe that social networks offer an opportunity for empowerment, and do not understand them as a tool that enables them to create opinion, or as a vehicle for mobilization in society. They are also sceptical regarding the university’s role in fostering literacy, as an institution for creating critical citizens. This doubly sceptical attitude leads us to call them “total sceptics”.


Gavilan et al 2017a-62668-en022.jpg

Members of this group are older, with an average age of 24, and an average grade level of 7.2, which is slightly higher than the other groups (p<.05). This group also has more men (54.5%) than women (45.5%) (Table 4).

Analysis of the behavior of these “total sceptics” shows that although their basic activity as reflected in variables such as number of followers, number of tweets or number of likes does not differ from other groups, their behavior is passive and limited to a reading of other people’s comments and opinions without engaging, proposing topics of debate (p<.05) or initiating conversations (p<.1).


Gavilan et al 2017a-62668-en023.jpg

With respect to their criteria when choosing who to follow, the “total sceptics” stand out as being those who pay significantly less attention to social criteria (2.3) –recommendations of other users or friends– (Mtotal=3.1 p<.05).

Their low level of participation is likely due to the fact that they do not value or perceive the opportunity for expression offered by social networks. They show the lowest level (3.3, which is significantly lower than the average) in motivations of expression offered by networks –expressing oneself freely, creating opinion and taking part in debates– (Mtotal=3.9 p<.05).

We have called the second cluster “dual moderates”, and they are the most numerous (58.8% of the sample). They present a more intermediate profile that is somewhat more positive. “Dual moderates” are defined by their intermediate scores in both variables relating to social networks and towards the role of the university. Hence, they grant more credibility to the information found online (52%) than “total sceptics”; they assign greater value to both the volume and diversity and, in particular, to the immediacy of information (5.9). However, they are similar in their low confidence in social networks as a way to influence their surroundings (2.9). They are optimistic about the role of the university and certain that their education will prepare them and give them a way to think critically about their surroundings. They believe in the university’s role in training them to be active and responsible, and non-manipulable, e-citizens who are committed to society. Nevertheless, their perception of the role of universities in the development of new digital competences is quite low, only slightly higher than the “total sceptics”.

Unlike the former group, “dual moderates” are younger, and their grade average is slightly lower. Compared to the other groups, they have a higher percentage of female members (65.4% vs. 34.60% men).

They have a moderate level of activity in social networks. Their average number of followers followed and tweets are slight, yet not significantly lower. Notable, however, is their low level of participation in likes, where they are the least active group (p<.05). Their main activity is to read friends’ opinions, where they are significantly more exhaustive (p<.05). This fact marks them as spectators of network activity, mere transmitters who do not lead the content or set the agenda.

They have different tastes with respect to the themes and content of interest. They are more likely to follow artists, brands and friends (p<.05), and it is also significant that their criteria for the selection of sources are mainly social, as they allow themselves to be led by friends, acquaintances and other participants they already follow, which situates them in a stage of individual socialization.

The last group, consisting of 31.02% of the sample, has been labeled the “pro-digitals”, as they score the highest in all matters related to social networks and the opportunities these provide for participating in and influencing their surroundings. In spite of this, “pro-digital” students again show clear wariness about the educational role of the university, with scores that place them in close proximity to “total sceptics”.

For this group, the information online is reasonably credible (74%); here they find plentiful and diverse information that offers different views of events (4.95) and very positively rate the fact that it is always current and immediate, thus allowing them to know what is happening at all times from anywhere. The “pro-digitals” are more keenly aware of the opportunity networks provide, and they see them as a platform for freely expressing themselves and addressing all manner of subjects of their interest, and for helping to set the current news agenda. Nevertheless, even though their perception of their ability to influence and take the lead in changes is higher than in other groups, it remains moderately low (3.5).

The average age and grade profile of this group is very similar to that of “digital moderates”, but the proportion of women (57.6%) to men (42.4%) is somewhat less pronounced.


Gavilan et al 2017a-62668-en024.jpg

The “pro-digitals” show the highest level of activity and participation in networks. They show significant differences versus other groups in the number of followers (p<.1), the number of tweets (p<.1) or likes (p<.05). They are the most active in raising issues (p<.1), which shows that they are the most aware of their capacity of influence. Their motivations for using social networks relate to expressing themselves (p<.05) and mobilizing (p<.1).

By means of a graphic representation of cluster centroids (Graph 1) –obtained through a discriminant analysis of the groups– we gained an overall view of the main differences between the types identified. “Total sceptic” students, with negative scores in both factors (social networks and University), “dual moderates”, with a more positive view of the university but who are less active in social networks, and “pro-digitals” who are confident in their ability to influence in social networks, but not because of the university’s contribution to their training.

4. Discussion and conclusions

The aim of this paper was to provide an analysis of the use of informative social networks as a vehicle for the social empowerment of Spanish students, and their perception of the university as an educator in the use of such media to contribute to the formation of active and critical citizens. Based on a review of the literature relating to these issues, field work was carried out on a sample of 236 university students social studies degree programs. Using a typology analysis (K means) different positions adopted by students in these issues were identified, as was the prevalence of each type.

Before setting forth the conclusions, it should be borne in mind that all the data used for analysis come from students’ behaviour and their perception of both networks and the University. This is not an analysis of the work of the university as such, or of the performance of social networks, but of the perceptions held by students and of their actual behaviour.

The following conclusions have been drawn from the analysis: In spite of their attributed status as digital users, university students are little active in informative social networks, as shown by recent research that reveals certain gaps in the use of new technologies by young adults (Livingstone, Haddon & Görzig, 2012). Only a small group (the pro-digitals) identify and capitalize on these opportunities. A majority looks upon current affairs merely as passive observers. Therefore, as previous researchers have noted, it is clear that even though social networks constitute a major social phenomenon that has transformed the lives of millions of people, it has become equally clear that their impact on the education and the empowerment of university falls short of its potential (Granados-Romero, López-Fernandez, Avello, Luna-Álvarez, & Luna-Álvarez, 2014). In line with this behaviour, the belief prevails that, even though they may participate, their capacity to influence their surroundings, set the agenda and mobilize society is quite limited. Except for the “pro-digitals”, both the “total sceptics” and the “dual moderates” had quite similar numbers of followers and followed, which shows their limited capacity of influence.

In a simplification of the data, we might say that only three in ten university students place value on the possibility of empowerment provided to them by social networks. However, those who do believe in such a possibility do not think their time at the university has contributed to their competences in the use of networks or provided them with skills or critical thinking to deal with the abundance of content, which they consider to be both credible and distorted at the same time.

Consideration should also be given to the nature of the “total sceptics”. They are a smaller, older and incredulous group that is about to join the labour market –if they do no already combine professional and academic work– and where a deeper analysis is called for as to the source of this negative perception.

We cannot overlook the fact that nearly 60% of the sample comprises university students who are confident in the ability of the university to make them critical citizens, more than in skilful digital citizens, but who focus their network presence more on socialization than on participation in the news agenda.

The foregoing, conceived within the exploratory framework of the study carried out, leads to a discussion of the following challenges in the university world. First, it would be useful to probe deeper into the scope and source of the low appraisal held by university students of the university as an institution that can train or educate in the use of the new media. This would require an analysis of the work of university teaching staff. Second, it would be useful to determine if a change occurs in students’ assessment of the university when they join the labour market, as a result of possible mismatches between the education received and the education in demand. Thirdly, the university itself should assign a higher value to its role in preparing students by developing appropriate strategies to ensure that students develop digital competence during their years of education (Gisbert & Esteve, 2011). It makes little sense for the group that appears to be most skilful in the use of social networks, the most participative and the most likely to enjoy the benefit associated with empowerment, to believe that the university educating them has no bearing on such a capacity.

Funding Agency

Article 83 project “Transfer of experiential model of emotional talent commitment” financed by contract 4155903, Ref. 86/2016 of the Complutense University of Madrid (Spain).

References

Aguaded, I. (2005). Estrategias de edu-comunicación en la sociedad audiovisual. [Edu-communication Strategies in the Audiovisual Society]. Comunicar, 24, 25-34. (http://goo.gl/7TbMld) (2016-10-05).

Area, M. (2010). ¿Por qué formar en competencias informacionales y digitales en la educación superior? RUSC, 7(2), 2-4. https://doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v7i2.976

Ballesta, J., & Guardiola, P. (2001). Escuela, familia y medios de comunicación. Madrid: CCS.

Bringué, X., & Sádaba, C. (2011). Menores y redes sociales. Madrid: Foro de Generaciones Interactivas, Fundación Telefónica. (http://goo.gl/ozazDV) (2016-10-02).

Bruns, A., & Burgess, J. (2012). Researching News Discussion on Twitter: New Methodologies. Journalism Studies, 13(5-6), 801-814. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2012.664428

Castells, M. (2009). Comunicación y poder. Madrid: Alianza. (http://goo.gl/ysCZ5s) (2016-10-02).

Churchill, G. (1979). A Paradigm for Developing Better Measures of Marketing Constructs. Journal of Marketing Research, 16(1), 64-73. https://doi.org/10.2307/3150876

Congosto, M.L., Fernández, M., & Moro, E. (2011). Twitter y Política: Información, Opinión y ¿Predicción? Cuadernos de Comunicación Evoca, 4, 10-15. (http://goo.gl/64Ql7x) (2016-10-02).

De-Moraes, D. (2004). El activismo en Internet: nuevos espacios de lucha social. (http://goo.gl/IAB2Ca) (2016-10-02).

Delgado, P. (2003). Repensar la edu-comunicación desde la globalización: alternativas educativas. [A New Way to Think Education in a Global Word]. Comunicar, 21, 90-94. (http://goo.gl/ngcKap) (2016-10-02).

Díez, E., Fernández-Rodríguez, E., & Anguita, R. (2011). Hacia una teoría política de la socialización cívica virtual de la adolescencia. Revista Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado, 71(25.2), 73-100. (http://goo.gl/g0naxU) (2016-10-02).

Espiritusanto, O., & Gonzalo, P. (2011). Periodismo ciudadano. Evolución positiva de la comunicación. Madrid: Ariel y Fundación Telefónica. (http://goo.gl/fRjgbE) (2016-10-10).

Ferrés, J., Aguaded, I., & García-Matilla, A. (2012). La competencia mediática de la ciudanía española: dificultades y retos. Icono 14, 10(3), 23-42. https://doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v10i3.201

Frau-Meigs, D., & Torrent, J. (2009). Políticas de educación en medios: hacia una propuesta global [Media Education Policy: Towards a Global Rationale]. Comunicar, 32, 10-14. https://doi.org/10.3916/c32-2009-01-001

Fundación Telefónica (2016). La sociedad de la información en España 2015. (http://goo.gl/jC8cDY) (2016-10-02).

Gavilan, D., Martinez-Navarro, G., & Fernández-Lores, S. (2017). Tabla descriptiva de clusters. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5027894

Gillmor, D. (2006). We the Media : Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People. Sebastopol: O’Reilly Media, Inc.

Gisbert, M., & Esteve, F. (2011). Digital Learners: la competencia digital de los estudiantes universitarios. La Cuestión Universitaria, 7, 48-59. (http://goo.gl/xDnDGq) (2017-05-12).

González-Sánchez, M., & Muñoz-Rodríguez, M. (2002). La formación de ciudadanos críticos. Una apuesta por los medios. Teoría de la Educación. Revista Interuniversitaria, 14, 207-233. (http://goo.gl/eMD7on) (2016-10-10).

Gordon, A.D. (1999). Classification (2nd Ed.). London: Chapman and Hall/CRC.

Granados-Romero, J., López-Fernández, R., Avello, R., Luna- Álvarez, D., Luna-Álvarez, E., & Luna-Álvarez, W. (2014). Las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones, las del aprendizaje y del conocimiento y las tecnologías para el empoderamiento y la participación como instrumentos de apoyo al docente de la universidad del siglo XXI. Medisur, 12(1), 289-294. (http://goo.gl/JKDnYd) (2017-05-12).

Hair, J.F., Anderson, R.E., Tatham, R.L., & Black, W.C. (1999). Análisis multivariante. Madrid: Prentice-Hall.

Islas, O., & Arribas, A. (2010). Comprender las redes sociales como ambientes mediáticos. In A. Piscitelli, I. Adaime, & I. Binder (Coord.), El proyecto Facebook y la posuniversidad. Sistemas operativos sociales y entornos abiertos de aprendizaje (pp. 147-161). Madrid: Ariel / Fundación Telefónica. (http://goo.gl/RX0SeZ) (2016-10-10).

Kwak, H., Lee, Ch., Park, H., & Moon, S. (2010). What Is Twitter, a Social Network or a News Media? WWW’10 Proceedings of the 19th International World Wide Web Conference, 591-600. Raleigh NC (USA). https://doi.org/10.1145/1772690.1772751

Lara, T. (2009). El papel de la Universidad en la construcción de su identidad digital. RUSC, 6(1), 15-21. https://doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v6i1.25

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., & Görzig, A. (2012). Children, Risk and Safety on the Internet: Research and Policy Challenges in Comparative Perspective. Bristol: The Policy Press.

Marta-Lazo, C.M., & Grandío, M. (2013). Análisis de la competencia audiovisual de la ciudadanía española en la dimensión de recepción y audiencia. Comunicación y Sociedad, 26(2), 114-130. (http://goo.gl/bqxyxa) (2017-05-12).

Orihuela, J. L. (2011). 80 claves sobre el futuro periodismo. Madrid: Anaya.Pew Research Center (2015). Mobile Messaging and Social Media 2015. (http://goo.gl/h98sNL) (2016-10-10).

Piscitelli, A. (2011). Prólogo: Twitter, la revolución y los enfoques ni-ni. En Orihuela, J.L., Mundo Twitter: una guía para comprender y dominar la plataforma que cambió la red (pp. 15-20). Barcelona: Alienta.

Rivera-Rogel, D., & Rodríguez-Hidalgo, C. (2016). Periodismo ciudadano a través de Twitter. Caso de estudio terremoto de Ecuador del 16 de abril de 2016. Revista de Comunicación, 15, 198-215. (http://goo.gl/35K2tS) (2016-10-02).

Romero, D., Meeder, B., & Kleinberg, J. (2011). Differences in the Mechanics of Information Diffusion across

Romero-Rodríguez, L.M., & Aguaded, I. (2016). Consumo informativo y competencias digitales de estudiantes de periodismo de Colombia, Perú y Venezuela. Convergencia, 70, 35-57. (http://goo.gl/4XPptM) (2017-05-11).

Ruiz-Blanco, S., Ruiz-San-Miguel, F., & Galindo, F. (2016). Los millennials universitarios y su interacción con el social mobile. Fonseca, 12, 97-116. https://doi.org/10.14201/fjc20161297116

Said, E., Serrano, A., García-de-Torres, E., Yezers’ka, L., & Calderín, M. (2013). La gestión de los Social Media en los medios informativos iberoamericanos. Comunicación y Sociedad, 26(1), 67-92. (http://goo.gl/ByuOEc) (2016-10-02).

Saorín, T., & Gómez-Hernández, J.A. (2014). Alfabetizar en tecnologías sociales para la vida diaria y el empoderamiento. Anuario ThinkEPI, 8, 342-348. (http://goo.gl/Beubj7) (2016-10-10).Statista.com (2016). (http://goo.gl/KgFsLh) (2016-10-10). The Cocktail Analysis & Arena (2016). VIII Observatorio de Redes Sociales. (http://goo.gl/T0krXc) (2016-12-20).

Topics: Idioms, Political Hashtags, and Complex Contagion on Twitter. WWW’11 Proceedings of 20th ACM International World Wide Web Conference, 695-704. Hyderabad (India). https://doi.org/10.1145/1963405.1963503

Valerio-Ureña, G., & Valenzuela-González, R. (2011). Redes sociales y estudiantes universitarios: del nativo digital al informívoro saludable. El Profesional de la Información, 20(6), 667-670. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2011.nov.10

Viché, M. (2015). El empoderamiento de los ciudadanos Internet. Congreso sobre movimientos sociales y TIC, 353-370. Sevilla. (http://goo.gl/AORr8E) (2017-05-12).

Yuste, B. (2015). Las nuevas formas de consumir información de los jóvenes. Revista de Estudios de Juventud, 15(108), 179-191. (http://goo.gl/eqg9UF) (2016-10-02).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El objetivo del presente trabajo es analizar el uso de las redes sociales informativas como herramienta de empoderamiento social por los universitarios españoles, y su percepción de la universidad como institución que contribuye a la formación de una ciudadanía crítica y activa, al tiempo que les proporciona las pertinentes competencias digitales. La revisión bibliográfica evidencia posibles discrepancias respecto al efecto que tienen las nuevas formas de comunicación digital en el empoderamiento de los jóvenes y en particular de los universitarios, así como la existencia de numerosas cuestiones por aclarar en este escenario digital. A continuación se presenta un análisis tipológico de la percepción de los estudiantes universitarios respecto a las redes sociales informativas, empoderamiento social y el papel de la universidad. A partir de los datos recogidos mediante un cuestionario estructurado de una muestra de 236 estudiantes de Grados de Ciencias Sociales, se realiza un análisis de tipologías con el algoritmo K Medias. Se identifican tres tipos –etiquetados como «escépticos totales», «moderados duales» y «pro-digitales»– significativamente diferentes. Se explica su prevalencia, y su caracterización: perfiles de creencias y conducta relacionadas con dichas creencias. El trabajo concluye con diversas recomendaciones para futuras investigaciones en cuanto a la percepción del universitario sobre el uso de las redes sociales como herramienta de transformación social y el papel de la universidad.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

Las nuevas formas de comunicación digital han contribuido a democratizar el proceso de comunicación. Las redes sociales facilitan el acceso de los ciudadanos a gran cantidad de información y les permiten organizarse para participar en la formación de la opinión pública, a través del intercambio de información y opiniones (Saorín & Gómez-Hernández, 2014; Viché, 2015). Esta situación incrementa la autonomía de los sujetos comunicantes respecto a las empresas de comunicación (Castells, 2009), puesto que los ciudadanos no solo observan, sino que se integran en el proceso de construcción de las noticias (Orihuela, 2011). Hoy los individuos pueden informarse unos a otros a gran escala, asumiendo un rol protagonista en la sociedad de la información y el conocimiento, desbordando incluso a las instituciones (Islas & Arribas, 2010).

La participación en las redes sociales contribuye por tanto al empoderamiento ciudadano, favorece la solidaridad social, concienciando sobre determinados temas, y facultando a las personas para que hagan trascender su realidad local a un ámbito más global (Espiritusanto & Gonzalo, 2011). Frente a las organizaciones de noticias oficiales que han decidido tradicionalmente cómo deberían mostrarse los acontecimientos, emergen las noticias producidas por gente ordinaria que tiene algo que decir o mostrar (Gillmor, 2006). De este modo, el conocimiento sobre la realidad que obtenemos de los medios y que proviene de la selección temática realizada por estos (agenda setting) cambia para dar paso a una agenda propia del ciudadano enfocada sobre los temas que le interesan (Rivera-Rogel & Rodríguez-Hidalgo, 2016).

En el caso de los jóvenes, estas nuevas capacidades para acceder, proveer y difundir información han suscitado diversas reflexiones. Son frecuentes los análisis que destacan la oportunidad que las redes otorgan para participar y movilizarse socialmente (De-Moraes, 2004). Sin embargo, su influencia puede ser más compleja de lo que parece a priori ya que puede estar reduciendo el pensamiento crítico. La velocidad con la que se genera la información y los criterios aplicados para seleccionarla plantean dudas sobre si se pudieran estar bloqueando puntos de vista diferentes sofocando así posibilidades de debate. Por ello, la capacidad de pensar críticamente y la formación en el uso de los medios se convierten en una piedra angular, principalmente en la educación superior.

Estudios realizados entre jóvenes revelan que el uso más habitual que dan a las redes es el contacto y la creación de relaciones, el entretenimiento y el conocimiento de vidas ajenas (Bringué & Sádaba, 2011). Existe por tanto un debate abierto sobre si estas nuevas formas de comunicación contribuyen al empoderamiento de los jóvenes, o si por el contrario, no han conseguido (todavía) fomentar el debate y el ejercicio de una ciudadanía joven activa (Díez, Fernández-Rodríguez, & Anguita, 2011).

Lo expuesto anteriormente evidencia una posible discrepancia entre las oportunidades que proporcionan las redes sociales a los jóvenes universitarios para expresarse, compartir, informarse, debatir, organizarse en red y movilizarse (Yuste, 2015), frente a su formación en el uso de las mismas, sus competencias y el desarrollo de pensamiento crítico.

La revisión de la literatura deja abierta diversas cuestiones para el análisis: ¿La socialización virtual de los universitarios los convierte en ciudadanos activos y críticos? ¿Facilitan las redes sociales informativas la participación y el debate? ¿Son para ellos un instrumento de empoderamiento social o simplemente de socialización individual? ¿Asumen y ejercitan su capacidad de influir, o forman parte de una masa altamente influenciable, que multiplica las posiciones de unos usuarios concretos con gran capacidad de influencia (influencers)? ¿Cómo perciben el papel de la universidad en la adquisición de competencias digitales y el desarrollo de pensamiento crítico para hacer frente a esta gran cantidad de información?

El objetivo del presente trabajo es ofrecer un análisis actual del papel de las redes sociales como herramienta de empoderamiento social entre los universitarios españoles, y su percepción de la universidad como facilitador en la educación en el uso de los medios para convertirse en ciudadanía activa y crítica.

Existe una amplia disparidad en la participación de los ciudadanos en las redes sociales entre quienes se limitan a indicar que una noticia les gusta, los que las reenvían, los que comentan, hasta los que se implican aportando nuevos materiales (Fundación Telefónica, 2016). Esta heterogeneidad respecto a las cuestiones planteadas previsiblemente también sucede entre los universitarios. Consideramos que el análisis de tipologías sería una técnica de investigación adecuada para abordar su estudio. Esta técnica de análisis multivariante, descriptiva y no inferencial, permite extraer información de un conjunto de datos sin restricciones previas y es muy útil como herramienta de análisis sin imponer patrones previos (Gordon, 1999). De este modo, procederemos a identificar y describir los diferentes perfiles de universitarios respecto a las preguntas de investigación planteadas.

El trabajo se organiza como sigue: primero presenta una introducción al estado de la cuestión donde se aborda la importancia de la educación en medios y las redes sociales informativas como herramientas facilitadoras de empoderamiento; seguidamente se exponen los materiales y métodos utilizados en el trabajo empírico; después se presentan el análisis y los resultados obtenidos y por último la discusión, conclusiones y limitaciones de la investigación.

1.1. La importancia de la educación en medios para el nuevo entorno digital

La oportunidad de empoderamiento que otorga la sociedad digital para ser efectiva debe tener como base la sólida formación de sus miembros. Así, el reto es integrar los medios de comunicación en los procesos educativos reflexionando sobre ellos y sus poderosas armas para recrear y construir la realidad (Aguaded, 2005). Un proyecto pedagógico cuya finalidad sea la de formar e-ciudadanos conscientes, críticos y responsables con la información que manejan.

Nos encontramos en un entorno donde la realidad informativa puede distorsionarse afectando a derechos como la libertad de expresión, de información y participación. El flujo de información que se recibe a diario es muy elevado, llega sin filtros ni análisis crítico. Ante estas circunstancias resulta importante incrementar la dosis de educación ciudadana fomentando un pensamiento crítico y plural (Delgado, 2003). Pero, ya que el usuario ahora tiene un notorio papel activo como constructor de la realidad social (Saorín & Gómez-Hernández, 2014), es también indispensable el fortalecimiento de nuevas competencias desde las instituciones educativas. Este desafío es máximo en las universidades que además, desde la investigación, deben ayudar a analizar y comprender los cambios sociales que comporta esta transformación (Lara, 2009).

La necesidad e importancia de educar en el uso de los medios tiene un largo recorrido en nuestra historia reciente que se inicia en los años ochenta con la declaración de Grunwald (1982), promulgada por la UNESCO. Sin embargo, es en la actual sociedad digital donde la educación en medios adquiere una nueva dimensión. A través de la formación en medios se facilita el desarrollo de estrategias para fomentar el diálogo entre sectores, grupos sociales y generaciones (Frau-Meigs & Torrent, 2009). Una formación que debe abordar cuestiones como la influencia que transmiten los distintos medios, su función socializadora, el control que ejercen y al que someten y la heterogénea información que transmiten (González-Sánchez & Muñoz-Rodríguez, 2002). El objetivo es formar universitarios profesionales y e-ciudadanos conscientes que sean capaces de acceder a gran volumen de información, sepan decidir libremente qué contenidos les son relevantes y adecuados, y capaces de adoptar una opción responsable entre las múltiples alternativas ofrecidas (Ballesta & Guardiola, 2001; Valerio-Ureña & Valenzuela-González, 2011). Esto implica diseñar programas de estudio que incorporen transversalmente asignaturas vinculadas a la alfabetización mediática que potencien las competencias de la ciudadanía (Ferrés, Aguaded, & García-Matilla, 2012). En esta tarea deben participar los profesionales de la comunicación, los profesores universitarios y de la enseñanza obligatoria (Area, 2010; Marta-Lazo & Grandío, 2013).

Sin embargo, apenas existen trabajos acerca del papel de la universidad en el proceso de creación de ciudadanos críticos en este nuevo contexto tecnológico de acceso a la información. Emergen así diversas cuestiones: ¿Está cumpliendo eficazmente la universidad con su papel de alfabetización en el uso de los medios? ¿Favorece la universidad el empoderamiento ciudadano que otorgan los medios? Para afrontar la respuesta a estas preguntas cabría un análisis de las actividades realizadas en el ámbito universitario, sin embargo, más allá de lo que suceda en la universidad, prevalece la percepción del estudiante universitario como protagonista y resultante del proceso realizado por esta.

Con objeto de ofrecer una visión especializada optamos por centrar la investigación en el uso informativo de las redes sociales. Por ello, consideramos conveniente contextualizar a Twitter dentro del fenómeno del empoderamiento social.

1.2. Redes sociales informativas como herramientas de empoderamiento ciudadano

Twitter, con 317 millones de cuentas activas en la actualidad (statista.com, 2016), se ha convertido en la red social más utilizada por los ciudadanos para informarse, expresar opiniones, comentar noticias, informar sobre lo que sucede a su alrededor e incluso movilizar a la sociedad en temas de interés público. Algunos autores la califican como uno de los mecanismos de comunicación más poderosos de la historia (Piscitelli, 2011). La dimensión pública que tienen sus «tweets», a diferencia de la privacidad de los mensajes de otras redes sociales, hace que la información se propague en tiempo real (Congosto, Fernández, & Moro, 2011).

Sin embargo, en la literatura existe cierto debate acerca de su naturaleza informacional. Así algunos autores consideran que Twitter es algo más que una red social (Romero, Meeder, & Kleinberg, 2011), al tratarse de una plataforma imprescindible en la transmisión de información y noticias; para otros es una red híbrida, a caballo entre una red social y una corriente de información porque combina las prácticas esenciales de las redes sociales, como el «following» (seguir a otros) o el «friending» (hacer amigos), con la esencia del «broadcasting» o difusión de contenidos. Esta convergencia sería la que le confiere importancia para el periodismo (Bruns & Burgess, 2012). Asumiendo esta naturaleza híbrida, autores como Kwak, Lee, Park y Moon (2010) destacan su carácter informacional dado que los usuarios la utilizan sobre todo para intercambiar información y no tanto para mantener relaciones sociales, como podría ser el caso de Facebook. Incluso, hallamos referencias de quienes asumiendo su naturaleza informativa, restringen este carácter informativo a la cobertura de noticias de calado trágico o de última hora, para conseguir pistas o alertas. En este sentido, destaca el estudio elaborado por Pew Research Center (2015) que relaciona los hábitos de lectura de noticias e información con el uso de Twitter y Facebook en Norteamérica. Este estudio considera que Twitter no es una red social en sí misma, sino una plataforma donde recibir y compartir información (red social informativa), con especial atención a la información de última hora y a la actualización constante.

Si dirigimos la atención al uso de Twitter por los Millennials, informes de 2016 posicionan esta red como una plataforma de comunicación principalmente orientada a la gestión de noticias y con marcado carácter informativo (un 40% de usuarios lo utilizan como fuente de información). Para los Millennials es un entorno donde comunicarse con los demás, establecer relaciones y acceder a la información, desde cualquier lugar y en cualquier momento (The Cocktail Analysis & Arena, 2016). Se trata de una red consolidada en el seno de esta generación, con una elevada tasa de penetración pero que tiene un uso lúdico-social: les permite estar en contacto con amigos, familiares y compañeros (90%), compartir opiniones y buscar opiniones de otros (60%), buscar información (70%) y expresar opiniones libremente (45%) (Ruiz-Blanco, Ruiz-San-Miguel, & Galindo, 2016). Su uso ha crecido notablemente alcanzando en la actualidad a un 24% de los jóvenes conectados, superando la penetración en adultos (12%) según Pew Research Center (2015).

Estos datos corroboran los profundos cambios que las plataformas sociales están originando y que alcanzan indudablemente a la generación de los Millennials, en la que se incluye a los universitarios. El nivel de afectación de las tecnologías en estudiantes universitarios y sus competencias digitales ha cambiado radicalmente su manera de interrelacionarse e informarse (Romero-Rodríguez & Aguaded, 2016). Sin embargo, la falta de filtración impide que califiquemos sus contenidos como fuente de información válida, ya que cualquier información requiere ser contrastada (Said, Serrano, García-de-Torres, Yezers’ka, & Calderín, 2013); además la ausencia de contextualización frente a la gran cantidad de información (Rivera-Rogel & al., 2016) son factores relevantes que dan pie a la necesidad de investigar cómo gestionan los universitarios la abundante información que reciben, quiénes son los líderes de opinión a los que siguen, cómo los eligen y cómo estos influyen en otros usuarios de las redes sociales informativas. En definitiva, esclarecer si el presunto empoderamiento social atribuido a estas plataformas de información es efectivo entre los universitarios.

2. Material y métodos

El análisis tipológico (cluster analysis) es una técnica de interdependencia que permite identificar diferentes perfiles de sujetos, a partir de variables cuantitativas que definan sus características y proporciona además de los perfiles, la prevalencia de la tipología en la muestra estudiada. De extendida utilización en la investigación científica, tiene un claro carácter exploratorio y descriptivo, ya que clasifica a los individuos en grupos homogéneos cuya composición a priori es desconocida, a partir de una medida de similitud (Hair, Anderson, Tatham, & Black, 1999).

De este modo, procedemos a desarrollar un estudio exploratorio empleando como material para la parte empírica de este trabajo la información recogida de una muestra de 236 estudiantes universitarios de los Grados de Comercio, Periodismo, Publicidad y ADE de la universidad pública. La elección de los Grados se justifica en que todos ellos incorporan asignaturas de comunicación lo que familiariza a los participantes con la potencialidad de las redes sociales. El método de muestreo aplicado fue por conglomerados, utilizando las clases como unidades muestrales. El trabajo de campo tuvo lugar entre los días 15-25 de octubre de 2016.

Para la recogida de los datos diseñamos un cuestionario estructurado de respuesta directa formado inicialmente por 120 variables, principalmente con escalas tipo Likert de 7 posiciones en las que el participante indica su grado de conformidad con el contenido del ítem (1=total desacuerdo y 7=total conformidad). De este modo se satisface uno de los requisitos del análisis clúster: que la información de los sujetos sea de carácter numérico.

El contenido del cuestionario aborda las siguientes áreas temáticas:

Área de conducta: información objetiva relativa a la participación de los universitarios en las redes sociales con finalidad informativa (Twitter) con especificación de redes sociales en las que tiene cuenta y están activos, actividad realizada, intensidad en la participación, capacidad de influencia –seguidores vs. seguidos–, criterios de selección de las fuentes, preferencias y contenidos de interés, motivación para el uso de las redes sociales informativas –expresión, relación, influencia en su entorno, conciencia social, colaboración ciudadana, implicación en asuntos políticos, o movilización a la acción ciudadana–.

Área de creencias: relativas a la información producida y consumida en las redes sociales por los universitarios. Percepción de la información que circula en las redes, credibilidad de los contenidos, importancia de la inmediatez de la información, la mediación de los contenidos, importancia y significado de la contrastación de la información. Consciencia sobre la capacidad de influencia, autopercepción de su grado de conocimiento, destreza y habilidad en el manejo de las nuevas herramientas de comunicación y de la formación que reciben en el entorno universitario para habilitarles a participar como ciudadanos efectivamente empoderados.

Se recogen además como datos de clasificación: grado, sexo, edad y nota media de su expediente académico hasta la fecha.

Previo al trabajo de campo se realiza un doble pretest del cuestionario. A través de un grupo experto integrado por cuatro profesores universitarios con amplia experiencia en la investigación cuantitativa, se analiza la idoneidad de los ítems (Churchill, 1979). Posteriormente, y tras realizar las oportunas modificaciones recomendadas por los expertos –eliminación de 2 variables y modificación de una tercera– se realiza un segundo pretest con una muestra de 15 usuarios del universo en el que se realizará el trabajo de campo. El objetivo es verificar la comprensibilidad de las frases y la duración de la cumplimentación. Este pretest conduce a la eliminación de tres ítems. Tras ambos pretest, el cuestionario definitivo consta de 115 ítems organizados en 13 preguntas.


Gavilan et al 2017a-62668 ov-es020.jpg

Para la realización del análisis clúster empleamos el algoritmo K Medias, cuyo único requisito es disponer de variables numéricas para configurar los grupos, condición satisfecha gracias a las escalas de respuesta utilizadas. La explotación de los datos se ha realizado con el paquete de análisis estadístico SPSS versión 18.0 para Windows.

3. Análisis y resultados

Se contó con una muestra de 236 estudiantes universitarios (Tabla 2), en la que el 95,6% señala que emplea una red social informativa para mantenerse al día de la actualidad: Twitter (46,9%), Facebook (42,1%) e Instagram (6,6%).


Gavilan et al 2017a-62668 ov-es021.jpg

Para la identificación de los grupos de sujetos homogéneos se tomaron como variables activas las agregadas que resultan de la depuración de los ítems. El algoritmo K Medias, tras un proceso de siete iteraciones, emitió una solución final de tres conglomerados con unas puntuaciones medias en los principales factores de caracterización sensiblemente diferentes (Tabla 3).

Estos grupos se pueden caracterizar tomando como referencia los valores centrales en cada factor y las diferencias significativas observadas en la conducta de cada uno (Gavilan, Martinez-Navarro, & Fernández-Lores, 2017).

El primer clúster, etiquetado como universitarios «escépticos totales», abarca el 10,18% de la muestra. Sus integrantes poseen el perfil más crítico y desencantado tanto con las redes sociales como con el papel que juega la universidad en su formación como ciudadanos digitales. Otorgan baja credibilidad a la información que circula por la Red (23%) y asumen que prevalece la inmediatez sobre la calidad, el volumen y diversidad de la información. Se perciben a sí mismos con baja, casi nula, capacidad de influencia en su entorno a través del uso de las redes sociales (2,7). Tampoco perciben que estas supongan una oportunidad de empoderamiento, ni las entienden como una herramienta que les permita crear opinión, ni como instrumento de movilización dentro de la sociedad. Escépticos también respecto al papel de alfabetización que desempeña la universidad como institución formativa de ciudadanos críticos. Esta actitud doblemente escéptica nos conduce a denominarlos como «escépticos totales».


Gavilan et al 2017a-62668 ov-es022.jpg

Pertenecen a este grupo los estudiantes de más edad, con una media de 24 años, y una calificación media de 7,2, ligeramente superior a los otros grupos (p<,05). Así mismo, cuenta con una mayor presencia de hombres (54,5%) que de mujeres (45,5%) (Tabla 4).

Al analizar la conducta de estos «escépticos totales» observamos que si bien su actividad básica reflejada en variables como nº de seguidores, nº de «tweets» o nº de «likes», etc. no difiere de los otros grupos, su conducta es pasiva, limitándose a la lectura eventual de los comentarios y opiniones de otros sin implicarse, plantear temas de debate (p<,05) o iniciar conversaciones (p<,1).


Gavilan et al 2017a-62668 ov-es023.jpg

Respecto a sus criterios a la hora de elegir a quién siguen, los «escépticos totales» destacan por ser quienes significativamente prestan menos atención a los criterios sociales (2,3) –recomendaciones de otro usuarios o amigos– (Mtotal=3,1 p<,05).

Su baja participación probablemente está motivada porque no valoran o perciben la posibilidad de expresión que les ofrecen las redes. Presentan el valor más bajo (3,3), significativamente inferior a la media, en las motivaciones de expresión que ofrecen las redes –expresarse con libertad, crear opinión y participar en debates– (Mtotal=3,9, p<,05).

El segundo clúster, que hemos denominado «moderados duales», es el más numeroso –58,8% de la muestra–. Se caracterizan por presentar un perfil intermedio, algo más benévolo. Los «moderados duales» se definen por sus puntuaciones intermedias tanto en las variables referentes a las redes sociales como al papel de la universidad. Así, otorgan más credibilidad a la información que circula por la Red (52%) que los «escépticos totales»; valoran mejor tanto el volumen como la diversidad y especialmente la inmediatez de la información (5,9). Sin embargo, son parecidos en su baja confianza en la capacidad que les brindan las redes para influir en el entorno (2,9). Respecto al papel de la universidad se muestran optimistas y convencidos de que la formación recibida les prepara y confiere una forma de pensar crítica hacia su entorno. Creen en su faceta como formadora de e-ciudadanos activos y responsables, no manipulables y comprometidos con su entorno. No obstante, la percepción que tienen del papel de la universidad en el desarrollo de las nuevas competencias digitales de los estudiantes es muy baja, solo ligeramente superior a la de los «escépticos totales».

A diferencia del grupo anterior, los estudiantes «moderados duales» son más jóvenes y la nota media de su expediente es levemente inferior. En comparación con los otros grupos, destacan por tener el mayor porcentaje de presencia femenina (65,4% mujeres vs. 34,6% hombres).

Su actividad en las redes sociales es moderada. Su promedio en número de seguidores, seguidos y «tweets» es ligeramente más bajo pero no de forma significativa. Destaca sin embargo su baja participación expresando «likes», donde son el grupo menos activo (p<,05). Su actividad principal es la lectura de las opiniones de amigos, donde son significativamente más exhaustivos (p<,05). Este hecho les otorga cierto carácter de espectadores de la actividad de la red, meros transmisores, que ni lideran el contenido, ni crean la agenda.

En cuanto a las temáticas y contenidos de interés, presentan unos gustos diferenciados del resto. Son el grupo que más sigue a artistas, marcas y amigos (p<,05) y también es destacable que sus criterios de selección de fuentes son principalmente sociales, dejándose llevar por las sugerencias de amigos, conocidos y otros participantes a los que ya siguen, lo que les sitúa en un estadio de socialización individual.

El último grupo, integrado por el 31,02% de la muestra, ha sido etiquetado como «pro-digitales» puesto que sus puntuaciones son las más elevadas en todo lo relacionado con las redes sociales y la oportunidad que estas les ofrecen para participar e influir en su entorno. Pero a pesar de esto, los estudiantes «pro-digitales» plantean nuevamente una clara desconfianza respecto al rol capacitador de la universidad, con puntuaciones que les sitúan próximos a los «escépticos totales».

Para este grupo la información que circula en las redes es razonablemente creíble (74%); en ellas encuentran abundante y variada información que ofrece diferentes perspectivas de los acontecimientos (4,95) y valoran muy positivamente que es siempre actual e inmediata permitiendo saber lo que sucede a cada momento desde cualquier lugar. Los «pro-digitales» son más conscientes de la oportunidad que las redes les proporcionan, y las entienden como una plataforma en la que expresarse libremente y plantear todo tipo de temas de su interés, colaborando en la creación de la actualidad. No obstante, su percepción de la capacidad de influir y liderar cambios, siendo la más elevada de los tres grupos, sigue siendo moderadamente baja (3,5).

El perfil de edad y calificaciones medias de este grupo es muy similar al de los «moderados digitales», pero la proporción de mujeres (57,6%) frente a hombres (42,4%) es algo menos acusada.


Gavilan et al 2017a-62668 ov-es024.jpg

Los «pro-digitales» presentan el nivel más alto de actividad y participación en las redes. Existiendo diferencias significativas con los otros grupos tanto en número de seguidores (p<,1), como en número de «tweets» (p<,1) o «likes» (p<,05). Son el grupo que más participa planteando temas (p<,1) lo que les revela como los más concienciados de su capacidad de influencia. Sus motivaciones para utilizar las redes sociales son tanto la posibilidad de expresarse (p<,05) como la de movilizarse (p<,1).

A través de la representación gráfica de los centroides de los conglomerados (Gráfico 1) –obtenida mediante un análisis discriminante de los grupos– observamos de manera global las principales diferencias entre los tipos identificados. Universitarios «escépticos totales», con puntuaciones negativas en ambos factores (redes sociales y universidad), «moderados duales» más benévolos con la universidad aunque poco activos en redes sociales y «pro-digitales», confiados en su capacidad de influir en las redes sociales, pero no gracias a la contribución de la universidad en su formación.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

El objetivo de este trabajo era ofrecer un análisis del uso de las redes sociales informativas como herramienta de empoderamiento social entre los universitarios españoles, y su percepción de la universidad como facilitador en la educación en el uso de estos medios para contribuir a la formación de una ciudadanía activa y crítica. Para ello, tras la revisión bibliográfica respecto a ambas cuestiones, se ha realizado un trabajo de campo con una muestra de 236 universitarios estudiantes de Grados de Ciencias Sociales. Mediante un análisis tipológico (K Medias) se han identificado las diferentes posiciones adoptadas por los universitarios en ambas cuestiones, así como la prevalencia de cada tipología.

Antes de exponer las conclusiones conviene tener presente que todos los datos con los que se ha realizado el análisis proceden de la conducta realizada por los universitarios y su percepción acerca tanto de las redes como de la universidad. No se trata por tanto de un análisis sobre la labor de la universidad como tal, ni sobre el desempeño de las redes sociales, sino sobre la percepción que tienen los universitarios y la conducta efectiva que realizan.

Las conclusiones que se extraen del análisis realizado son las siguientes: A pesar de su atribuida naturaleza de usuarios digitales, los universitarios son poco activos en las redes sociales informativas como han reflejado recientes investigaciones que dejan constancia de determinadas carencias en el uso de las nuevas tecnologías por parte de jóvenes adultos (Livingstone, Haddon, & Görzig, 2012). Solo un reducido grupo (pro-digitales) identifica y aprovecha sus posibilidades. La mayoría contempla la actualidad informativa como mero observador pasivo. Por lo que, como investigaciones anteriores señalaban, se observa que si bien las redes sociales constituyen un fenómeno social de gran trascendencia que ha transformado la vida de millones de personas, también se ha reconocido que su impacto en la educación y en el empoderamiento de los universitarios dista de sus potencialidades (Granados-Romero, López-Fernández, Avello, Luna-Álvarez, Luna-Álvarez, & Luna-Álvarez, 2014). Consistente con esta conducta, existe la creencia de que si bien pueden participar, su capacidad para influir en el entorno, crear agenda y movilizar a la sociedad es muy reducida. Bien es cierto que a excepción de los «pro-digitales», tanto los «escépticos totales» como los «moderados duales», presentan un número muy similar de seguidores y seguidos lo que evidencia poca capacidad de influencia.

En una simplificación de los datos, podríamos afirmar que solo tres de cada diez universitarios aprecian la posibilidad de empoderamiento que les otorgan las redes sociales. Sin embargo, quienes así lo consideran, no creen que su paso por la universidad haya contribuido en sus competencias en el uso de las redes, ni les haya aportado habilidades o pensamiento crítico para afrontar la abundancia de contenidos, que consideran creíbles y distorsionados a la vez.

Merece también reflexión la naturaleza de los «escépticos totales». Un grupo reducido, mayor y descreído, que está a punto de incorporarse al mercado laboral, si no compagina ya la actividad profesional y académica, y donde habría que profundizar en el origen de esta percepción tan negativa.

No podemos obviar, sin embargo, que casi el 60% de la muestra está formado por universitarios que confían en la capacidad de la universidad para convertirles en ciudadanos críticos, más que en diestros ciudadanos digitales, pero que dirigen su presencia en la red principalmente a la socialización más que a la participación en la actualidad.

Lo expuesto, entendido en el marco exploratorio del estudio realizado, conduce a plantear los siguientes retos en el ámbito universitario. En primer lugar, sería deseable profundizar en el alcance y el origen de la baja percepción que parecen tener los universitarios de esta institución como formadora o capacitadora en el manejo de los nuevos medios. Esto implica un acercamiento al análisis de la actividad realizada por sus docentes. En segundo lugar, sería deseable analizar si se produce un cambio en la percepción del universitario respecto a la universidad, cuando se incorpora al mercado laboral, como consecuencia de posibles desajustes entre la formación recibida y la formación demandada. Y en tercer lugar, sería deseable que la propia institución universitaria pusiera en valor su contribución a la formación del estudiante desarrollando estrategias adecuadas que permitan asegurar que los estudiantes desarrollan la competencia digital durante su etapa formativa (Gisbert & Esteve, 2011). No es razonable que el grupo que parece más diestro en el manejo de las redes sociales, el más participativo y el que con más probabilidad disfrute del beneficio asociado al empoderamiento, aparentemente considere que la universidad en la que se está formando es ajena a esta capacidad.

Apoyos

Proyecto artículo 83 «Transferencia del modelo experiencial del compromiso afectivo del talento», financiado por el contrato 4155903, Ref. 86/2016 de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid (España).

Referencias

Aguaded, I. (2005). Estrategias de edu-comunicación en la sociedad audiovisual. [Edu-communication Strategies in the Audiovisual Society]. Comunicar, 24, 25-34. (http://goo.gl/7TbMld) (2016-10-05).

Area, M. (2010). ¿Por qué formar en competencias informacionales y digitales en la educación superior? RUSC, 7(2), 2-4. https://doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v7i2.976

Ballesta, J., & Guardiola, P. (2001). Escuela, familia y medios de comunicación. Madrid: CCS.

Bringué, X., & Sádaba, C. (2011). Menores y redes sociales. Madrid: Foro de Generaciones Interactivas, Fundación Telefónica. (http://goo.gl/ozazDV) (2016-10-02).

Bruns, A., & Burgess, J. (2012). Researching News Discussion on Twitter: New Methodologies. Journalism Studies, 13(5-6), 801-814. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2012.664428

Castells, M. (2009). Comunicación y poder. Madrid: Alianza. (http://goo.gl/ysCZ5s) (2016-10-02).

Churchill, G. (1979). A Paradigm for Developing Better Measures of Marketing Constructs. Journal of Marketing Research, 16(1), 64-73. https://doi.org/10.2307/3150876

Congosto, M.L., Fernández, M., & Moro, E. (2011). Twitter y Política: Información, Opinión y ¿Predicción? Cuadernos de Comunicación Evoca, 4, 10-15. (http://goo.gl/64Ql7x) (2016-10-02).

De-Moraes, D. (2004). El activismo en Internet: nuevos espacios de lucha social. (http://goo.gl/IAB2Ca) (2016-10-02).

Delgado, P. (2003). Repensar la edu-comunicación desde la globalización: alternativas educativas. [A New Way to Think Education in a Global Word]. Comunicar, 21, 90-94. (http://goo.gl/ngcKap) (2016-10-02).

Díez, E., Fernández-Rodríguez, E., & Anguita, R. (2011). Hacia una teoría política de la socialización cívica virtual de la adolescencia. Revista Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado, 71(25.2), 73-100. (http://goo.gl/g0naxU) (2016-10-02).

Espiritusanto, O., & Gonzalo, P. (2011). Periodismo ciudadano. Evolución positiva de la comunicación. Madrid: Ariel y Fundación Telefónica. (http://goo.gl/fRjgbE) (2016-10-10).

Ferrés, J., Aguaded, I., & García-Matilla, A. (2012). La competencia mediática de la ciudanía española: dificultades y retos. Icono 14, 10(3), 23-42. https://doi.org/10.7195/ri14.v10i3.201

Frau-Meigs, D., & Torrent, J. (2009). Políticas de educación en medios: hacia una propuesta global [Media Education Policy: Towards a Global Rationale]. Comunicar, 32, 10-14. https://doi.org/10.3916/c32-2009-01-001

Fundación Telefónica (2016). La sociedad de la información en España 2015. (http://goo.gl/jC8cDY) (2016-10-02).

Gavilan, D., Martinez-Navarro, G., & Fernández-Lores, S. (2017). Tabla descriptiva de clusters. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5027894

Gillmor, D. (2006). We the Media : Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People. Sebastopol: O’Reilly Media, Inc.

Gisbert, M., & Esteve, F. (2011). Digital Learners: la competencia digital de los estudiantes universitarios. La Cuestión Universitaria, 7, 48-59. (http://goo.gl/xDnDGq) (2017-05-12).

González-Sánchez, M., & Muñoz-Rodríguez, M. (2002). La formación de ciudadanos críticos. Una apuesta por los medios. Teoría de la Educación. Revista Interuniversitaria, 14, 207-233. (http://goo.gl/eMD7on) (2016-10-10).

Gordon, A.D. (1999). Classification (2nd Ed.). London: Chapman and Hall/CRC.

Granados-Romero, J., López-Fernández, R., Avello, R., Luna- Álvarez, D., Luna-Álvarez, E., & Luna-Álvarez, W. (2014). Las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones, las del aprendizaje y del conocimiento y las tecnologías para el empoderamiento y la participación como instrumentos de apoyo al docente de la universidad del siglo XXI. Medisur, 12(1), 289-294. (http://goo.gl/JKDnYd) (2017-05-12).

Hair, J.F., Anderson, R.E., Tatham, R.L., & Black, W.C. (1999). Análisis multivariante. Madrid: Prentice-Hall.

Islas, O., & Arribas, A. (2010). Comprender las redes sociales como ambientes mediáticos. In A. Piscitelli, I. Adaime, & I. Binder (Coord.), El proyecto Facebook y la posuniversidad. Sistemas operativos sociales y entornos abiertos de aprendizaje (pp. 147-161). Madrid: Ariel / Fundación Telefónica. (http://goo.gl/RX0SeZ) (2016-10-10).

Kwak, H., Lee, Ch., Park, H., & Moon, S. (2010). What Is Twitter, a Social Network or a News Media? WWW’10 Proceedings of the 19th International World Wide Web Conference, 591-600. Raleigh NC (USA). https://doi.org/10.1145/1772690.1772751

Lara, T. (2009). El papel de la Universidad en la construcción de su identidad digital. RUSC, 6(1), 15-21. https://doi.org/10.7238/rusc.v6i1.25

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., & Görzig, A. (2012). Children, Risk and Safety on the Internet: Research and Policy Challenges in Comparative Perspective. Bristol: The Policy Press.

Marta-Lazo, C.M., & Grandío, M. (2013). Análisis de la competencia audiovisual de la ciudadanía española en la dimensión de recepción y audiencia. Comunicación y Sociedad, 26(2), 114-130. (http://goo.gl/bqxyxa) (2017-05-12).

Orihuela, J. L. (2011). 80 claves sobre el futuro periodismo. Madrid: Anaya.Pew Research Center (2015). Mobile Messaging and Social Media 2015. (http://goo.gl/h98sNL) (2016-10-10).

Piscitelli, A. (2011). Prólogo: Twitter, la revolución y los enfoques ni-ni. En Orihuela, J.L., Mundo Twitter: una guía para comprender y dominar la plataforma que cambió la red (pp. 15-20). Barcelona: Alienta.

Rivera-Rogel, D., & Rodríguez-Hidalgo, C. (2016). Periodismo ciudadano a través de Twitter. Caso de estudio terremoto de Ecuador del 16 de abril de 2016. Revista de Comunicación, 15, 198-215. (http://goo.gl/35K2tS) (2016-10-02).

Romero, D., Meeder, B., & Kleinberg, J. (2011). Differences in the Mechanics of Information Diffusion across

Romero-Rodríguez, L.M., & Aguaded, I. (2016). Consumo informativo y competencias digitales de estudiantes de periodismo de Colombia, Perú y Venezuela. Convergencia, 70, 35-57. (http://goo.gl/4XPptM) (2017-05-11).

Ruiz-Blanco, S., Ruiz-San-Miguel, F., & Galindo, F. (2016). Los millennials universitarios y su interacción con el social mobile. Fonseca, 12, 97-116. https://doi.org/10.14201/fjc20161297116

Said, E., Serrano, A., García-de-Torres, E., Yezers’ka, L., & Calderín, M. (2013). La gestión de los Social Media en los medios informativos iberoamericanos. Comunicación y Sociedad, 26(1), 67-92. (http://goo.gl/ByuOEc) (2016-10-02).

Saorín, T., & Gómez-Hernández, J.A. (2014). Alfabetizar en tecnologías sociales para la vida diaria y el empoderamiento. Anuario ThinkEPI, 8, 342-348. (http://goo.gl/Beubj7) (2016-10-10).Statista.com (2016). (http://goo.gl/KgFsLh) (2016-10-10). The Cocktail Analysis & Arena (2016). VIII Observatorio de Redes Sociales. (http://goo.gl/T0krXc) (2016-12-20).

Topics: Idioms, Political Hashtags, and Complex Contagion on Twitter. WWW’11 Proceedings of 20th ACM International World Wide Web Conference, 695-704. Hyderabad (India). https://doi.org/10.1145/1963405.1963503

Valerio-Ureña, G., & Valenzuela-González, R. (2011). Redes sociales y estudiantes universitarios: del nativo digital al informívoro saludable. El Profesional de la Información, 20(6), 667-670. https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2011.nov.10

Viché, M. (2015). El empoderamiento de los ciudadanos Internet. Congreso sobre movimientos sociales y TIC, 353-370. Sevilla. (http://goo.gl/AORr8E) (2017-05-12).

Yuste, B. (2015). Las nuevas formas de consumir información de los jóvenes. Revista de Estudios de Juventud, 15(108), 179-191. (http://goo.gl/eqg9UF) (2016-10-02).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/17
Accepted on 30/09/17
Submitted on 30/09/17

Volume 25, Issue 2, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C53-2017-06
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 1
Views 6
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?