Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Howard Gardner revolutionized the concept of intelligence with his Multiple Intelligences Theory. His vision was widely supported by the educational community, which considers different forms of learning and accessing knowledge. Despite its impact, there is still a lack of development of tools that can easily, practically and reliably evaluate multiple intelligences. This work describes the design, development, and piloting of TOI (Tree of Intelligences) software, a digital tool to evaluate multiple intelligences and perform interventions through video games. The aim of the study is to present the design of the TOI software and test its operation, analysing the distribution of the results game by game and checking whether there are differences according to gender or school year. A total of 372 primary school students participated, aged 5 to 9 years old (M=7.04, SD=.871), from three schools in Asturias and Madrid. The results show that 9 out of 10 games had a normal distribution and that there were no gender differences in most games, but there were differences in relation to the school year. We concluded that due to its operation and design TOI software has the potential be a suitable instrument for the evaluation and intervention of multiple intelligences.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

In the eighties, Howard Gardner revolutionized the world of psychology and education with his Theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI). His vision of intelligence, not as something unique but rather a set of skills, talents and abilities, called intelligences, which are independent from each other and potentially present in all people (Gardner, 2013), breaks with the traditional conception of human intellect and opens up a world of possibilities for education professionals, who see the opportunity for more personalized education that respects the many differences between students and their different ways of learning and accessing knowledge. It is becoming more and more common to find schools including aspects related to the development of multiple intelligences in their curriculum planning. There are some successful cases which are well known in the educational community, such as the Montserrat School in Barcelona, which implements a methodology based on multiple intelligences that respect emotional aspects and turns students into protagonists of their own learning (Del-Pozo, 2005).

Despite the impact of this theory on the world of education, thirty years later there is still no mechanism to evaluate multiple intelligences in a simple, practical and reliable way. The most significant experience is Project Spectrum (Gardner, Feldman, & Krechevsky, 2008), developed with the objective of evaluating the intelligence profile and working style of children, observing their behavior when solving problems related to each of the eight intelligences. The activities used in the project have proven to be valid and reliable for evaluating multiple intelligences (Ballester, 2001; Ferrándiz, Prieto, Ballester, & Bermejo, 2004), but despite Gardner suggesting that the model was ideal, it is a very laborious and slow process, which means that it is not widely used in schools or research on MI (Gardner, 2013). The most commonly used assessment practice for the classroom is the assessment scales for parents, teachers, and students that Thomas Armstrong compiled in his book “Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom” (Armstrong, 2006). These lists make it possible to organize faculty observations of a student’s multiple intelligences, but according to Armstrong himself (2006), the lists cannot be considered a standardized test since they have not been subjected to the necessary protocols to determine their reliability and validity, and should therefore only be used informally.

Designing an instrument that teachers can use to easily, validly and reliably assess different intelligences would have significant educational implications. It would encourage a concept of education that is far removed from the traditional school, and it would allow for more individual-centred teaching, taking into account that everyone is different in the degree to which they possess different intelligences and different combinations of intelligences.

For this reason, in this study, we look at the design, development, and testing of software to evaluate MI and perform interventions. The software is attractive and motivating for both students and families (Gardner, 2012), and complies with the evaluation characteristics proposed by the Theory of MI: continuous, systematic, varied, dynamic, contextualized, meaningful, motivating, etc. (Ballester, 2001; Ferrándiz, 2000; Gardner, Feldman, & Krechevsky, 2008; Gomis, 2007). At the same time, it is practical for use in both schools and research. Our aim is to produce an instrument “that in addition to evaluating constitutes a learning experience” (Gardner, 2013: 237).

Video games may constitute an appropriate evaluation procedure. They allow for the introduction of evaluation and educational objectives without sacrificing entertainment (Starks, 2014) and they can provide a dynamic MI evaluation process if activities are designed that work on basic skills defining each learning area and if these activities are planned within a meaningful and motivating learning context (Escamilla, 2014; Marin & García, 2005).

In addition, the dynamic and playful nature of video-games makes them motivating and influential at a cultural and social level, taking up a large part of children’s, young people’s and adults’ leisure time (Dorado & Gewerzc, 2017; Sedeño, 2010; Spanish Association of Video Games, 2015). Due to their potential, it is increasingly common to find video-games in the classroom, with specific methodologies that allow them to be incorporated into the educational process, such as gamification (applying the principles of the game to a different context than that of the game, for example, a classroom) or game-based learning which is based on in introducing video-games into the learning process in order to improve it (Díaz & Troyano, 2013; Zichermann & Cunningham, 2011).

The literature on the use of video games as a training and cognitive assessment tool is growing (Buckley & Doyle, 2017). In recent years, studies have emerged that analyse the measurement of intelligence through video games (Quiroga, Román, De-La-Fuente, Privado, & Colom, 2016), prove their effectiveness as a tool for the prevention of cognitive diseases such as Alzheimer’s (Hsu & Marshall, 2017) and evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive training in aspects such as work memory and attention (Ballesteros & al., 2017; Oh, Seo, Lee, Song, & Shin, 2017).

In the area of MI and video games, the studies by Del-Moral, Fernández & Guzmán (2015: 244) are prominent. They state that “the introduction of appropriate educational video games in the classroom and their systematic exploitation promote the development of MI”. The same authors point out that so-called “serious games” can stimulate the development of MI since they have multisensory components that provide learning contexts that are capable of holding the player’s attention and involving them in the game.

In this work, we describe the design, development, and testing of TOI software, which is an instrument composed of a variety of pedagogically designed video games. According to the ideals of MI assessment (Armstrong, 2006; Gardner, 2012; 2013; Gardner, Feldman, & Krechevsky, 2008), it should be able to assess multiple intelligences and be used in interventions in an attractive and motivating way. Plus, it should not only provide useful information about individuals’ abilities and potential, but it should also be capable of doing so in real time, facilitating its application in both school and research environments. We begin with a description of the software (Tree of Intelligences) in order to then examine more deeply its use in teaching and its application in intervention and evaluation. The aim of the study is to describe the educational design of the TOI software and to analyse its operation. That analysis will be done by analysing the distribution of the sample, any differences in terms of gender and any differences in terms of a school year. These aspects will allow us to check whether the difficulty of the games is sufficient to deal with the whole sample, whether it is valid for use in both boys and girls and whether the difficulty and content are suitable for the target age range.

1.1. Description of the TOI software

TOI, Tree of Intelligences, is software designed and developed to evaluate multiple intelligences and assist in interventions in a playful and interactive way. It began with the objective of providing information about people’s abilities and potentials, offering a useful response that helps reinforce strong areas and/or develop and compensate for weak areas. It uses video games as an instrument and is built on two fundamental pillars: instructional design understood as the planning and design of educational materials, and the understanding of intelligence as the ability to solve problems or create valuable products (Gardner, 2013).

TOI was developed following an innovative and detailed process of the same name, the TOI Method (Figure 1). Our starting point was Gardner’s conception of human intellect (2013), bearing in mind that intelligences always work in concert (Armstrong, 2006; Gardner, 2013), that they are triggered by information presented internally or externally (Gardner, 2013) and that there are different ways of being intelligent within the same intelligence (Armstrong, 2006). Game mechanics were designed to that they pose logical, visual, naturalistic, linguistic, bodily, emotional and musical challenges. People’s performance in solving different challenges determines their intelligence profile.


Garmen et al 2019a-69579-en028.png

Figure 1. Graphic description of the TOI Method.

TOI is currently made up of ten tests in a video game format. The instructional design means that the tests cover all eight intelligences proposed by Gardner (2012), as shown in Table 1. TOI is a mobile touchscreen application compatible with both iOS and Android operating systems. It is also optimized for use on computers with Windows 10 operating systems with the classroom in mind.

1.1.1. From instructional design to intelligence assessment

Unlike the vast majority of video games on the market, the TOI software is based on an instructional design that defines game mechanics, content, game-playing and evaluation criteria. Each game is designed to challenge the player. Depending on the skills or abilities required to solve the challenge, one intelligence will primarily be activated, and one or more will be activated in a secondary manner. One challenge may require the speed of reaction activating the visual and motor intelligences, while another may require knowledge about the different species in the animal world, activating naturalistic intelligence. We used three criteria for judging whether a game triggers an intelligence: the mechanics, or gameplay, and the content. The mechanics of the game demands skills or abilities to solve the problem, while the content requires more knowledge that may be related to intelligence. For example, a game that poses the challenge of classifying tools according to their geometric shape will work by content on logical and visual intelligences, and by mechanics on visual and bodily intelligences. In this case, we established that due to its weight in solving the challenge, the principal intelligence worked on is logical-mathematical intelligence and the visual and body-kinesthetic intelligences are triggered in a secondary way.

Once we had defined the mechanics and content of the game, the evaluation criteria were established defining the dependent variables: successes (hits, or correct responses), errors, level of difficulty, time and score. In this process, elements and interactions were also taken into account, determining both the speed at which objects exist and the possible number of interactions needed to change the difficulty level.

Following the instructional design phase, the pedagogical design was placed in the hands of creatives and programmers, who gave the games and software the aesthetic and technical resources that encourage engagement and guarantee playability. These aspects, along with emotional design, play a key role in introducing assessment objectives without sacrificing entertainment.

1.1.2. The games, the TOI software engine

All games are designed to work primarily on one intelligence, and one or more on a secondary basis, taking into account the key competencies and skills associated with each intelligence, as indicated in Table 1. The eight intelligences defined by Gardner are not all represented to the same extent in the games. Visual-Spatial intelligence is covered in many of the games, while interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligences are only addressed in one game. It is worth mentioning that this social intelligence (inter- and intra-personal) is one of the most difficult to evaluate in this software.


Garmen et al 2019a-69579-en029.png

The initial duration of each game is 60 seconds, but the time increases with correct answers and decreases with wrong answers; so the player’s performance determines how long the game lasts. It ends when the timer reaches zero, at which point the TOI algorithm analyses the number of successes and errors, the total playing time, the player’s accuracy and the gamma elements.

Most of the data is collected internally, but in order to enhance the gamification, users are shown the total number of hits, the accuracy of their responses and the number of trophies and virtual coins they managed to collect. The latter allows for a gamma tool design.

1.1.3. Profile of Intelligences

The main mission of the TOI software is to provide users with information about their intelligence profile, showing a graph of their more and less developed intelligences (Figure 2), which allows them to discover their potential and to be able to take action depending on the results to enhance or improve their intelligences. To this end, the ability and performance of the player is analyzed in each of the pedagogically designed games, establishing a weighted score based on whether the game works an intelligence in a primary or secondary manner.


Garmen et al 2019a-69579-en030.png

Figure 2. Profile of Intelligences.

The score obtained is compared in real time with the recorded performance of other users in each of the games, showing the percentile for each intelligence and a bar graph that allows users to see at a glance their most and least developed intelligences.

The TOI software also offers feedback on the intelligence profile, providing relevant information on what the percentage in each intelligence means. This analysis allows us to offer advice and make recommendations to enhance or develop intelligence through complementary analog and digital activities.

2. Method

2.1. Participants

A total of 372 students participated in the study. They were aged between 5 and 9 years old (M=7.04, SD=.871), in the first three years of primary education, and from three private Spanish schools in Asturias and Madrid. The group consisted of 199 boys (53.5%), with an average age of 7.07 (SD=.91) and 173 girls (46.5%), with an average age of 7.01 (SD=.82), with no significant differences between the age groups (p=.511). There were also no differences in the gender distribution in the sample [?2(1)=1,817, p=.178].

2.2. Procedure

The schools were selected according to accessibility criteria. Once the consent of the families had been obtained, the participants carried out the test by playing all the video games in the TOI software individually, during teaching hours and in periods of 90 minutes. Each of the tests was supervised and guided by a specialist from the research group.

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Distribution of the sample

We performed a game by game analysis to check the distribution of the sample in the variables successes, total time and accuracy. The game variables are normally distributed according to the criteria laid down by Finney and Di-Stefano (2006), in which asymmetry scores between 2 and –2 and kurtosis scores between 7 and –7 of kurtosis mean sufficiently normal distributions. The exception is the game “Electric colours”, which works with visual-spatial and logical-mathematical intelligence. The distribution in this game is asymmetrically negative in the successes variables (asymmetry=2.21) and time (2.64). For the analysis of results, non-parametric tests were used, as the distribution of the sample did not meet the parameters of normality in all the games. Thus, the Mann-Whitney U was applied for the analysis of gender differences, and the Kruskal Wallis tests for the analysis of differences according to the school year.

3.2. Gender differences

In order to find out whether there were significant differences according to gender, we performed a comparative analysis of the matching game on the means and standard deviations of the variables successes, time of play and accuracy index.

In the results, there were significant differences (p=.000) in the successes variable in the mathematical-logical intelligence game “Mathlon” (U de Mann-Whitney=11132,00; (p=.000) between boys (M=40.92, SD=18.51) and girls (M=32.95, SD=15.10). Significant differences were also found in the successes variable of the body and visual intelligence game “Lunch Time” (U de Mann-Whitney=7,233.00; p=.033) in boys (M=39.72, SD=13.39) compared to girls (M=42.95, SD=13.87). We also found significant differences in the accuracy variable of the emotional game “Say Cheese” (U de Mann-Whitney=11,611.00; p=.039) between boys (M=72.12, SD=15.50) and girls (M=75.58, SD=14.08). No significant gender differences were found for the remaining variables and games.

3.3. Differences by school year

We looked at the variables successes, time and accuracy for each game in terms of the children’s school year (Table 2). We found significant differences in all the games analysed. Both the mean and the standard deviation of all three variables were higher in the second year when compared to the first year, and they were higher in the third year than in the second year.


Garmen et al 2019a-69579-en031.png

4. Discussion and conclusions

In addition to the description of the TOI educational software, the other aim of our study was to test its operation through a game-by-game analysis of the distribution of the sample, differences by gender and the differences by school year in the variables successes, time and accuracy. The results show that the variables in all games, with the exception of “Electric colours”, were normally distributed; therefore, their design in terms of difficulty is appropriate. In the case of “Electric colours”, which was designed to work on and analyse visual-spatial and logical-mathematical intelligence, it will be necessary to make a design adjustment for the successes and game time.

The results also indicate that there were no significant gender differences in most of the variables. The exceptions were the successes variable in the “Mathlon” game for logical-mathematical intelligence, successes in the body and visual intelligence game “Lunch Time”, and the accuracy variable in the emotional game “Say cheese”, which will all need some revision in design. It is important not to have gender differences to ensure that neither evaluations nor interventions are affected by gender issues and that the tool is applicable to both boys and girls. Our results differ from those in the study by Del-Moral, Guzmán, and Fernández (2018), who observed gender differences in all intelligences.

The results show that there were significant differences in terms of the school year, and therefore age, in the variables successes, time and accuracy in each game. This is a positive finding as it shows that the content is appropriate for the age group that was analysed (5-9 years), adjusting the results to each educational stage. When analysing the intelligence profile, it should be noted that the results show the profiles compared to each students’ peer group. Differences between school years are only analysed to determine the suitability of the content and the difficulty.

TOI is an appropriate tool for assessing MI because its design and development encompass features of the ideas proposed by Gardner and his collaborators for assessing multiple intelligences (Armstrong, 2006; Gardner, 2012; 2013; Gardner, Feldman, & Krechevsky, 2008): intrinsically interesting and motivating materials due to the use of gamification and new technologies, neutrality, a natural learning environment and feedback (Buckley & Doyle, 2017).

Marín, López and Maldonado (2015) highlight video games as a positive resource for learning, stating that young people consider them attractive, and Del-Moral and al. (2018) point out that in addition to improving skills and abilities, video games are a powerful strategy facilitating learning. The fact that it is the children themselves who discover knowledge through cognitive efforts and in turn relate that knowledge to things they already know and are familiar with makes video games especially interesting (Gramigna & González-Faraco, 2009). As for neutrality, both in the test instructions and in test development, we tried to avoid the influence of verbal and logical intelligences, instead directly analyzing the intelligence that is operating in response to the challenge posed.

Using video games as an instrument makes it more likely for the evaluation to be “part of the natural interest of the individual in a learning situation” (Gardner, 2013: 233), because children perceive it as a game due to its potential to motivate and its attractiveness, and they are not aware of being evaluated, engaging in the activity because they want to. This motivating factor of video games is one of the aspects which has been most widely analysed by the educational community and can be found in both recent (Ferrer, 2018; Prena & Sherry, 2018) and past studies (Alfageme & Sánchez, 2002).

The software also offers feedback with analysis and advice to help interventions in the intelligence profile. For Gardner (2013), it is very important that the evaluation is helpful because psychologists often spend too much time classifying people and too little time helping them (Escamilla, 2014).

In conclusion, due to its design and performance results, TOI has the potential to be a suitable instrument for assessing MI and associated interventions; and its inclusion in the classroom could have significant educational implications and provide value to the educational community as long as it is treated carefully to avoid stigma or classification of students. While many teachers accept individual differences, few address them or attempt to improve children’s intelligences (Bartolomé-Pina, 2017). This is why a tool such as TOI, which allows teachers to discover students’ intelligence profiles or strong and weak areas, opens up the possibility of knowing which learning style best suits students’ profiles or discoveries which activities they feel most comfortable with in order to work towards more personalised, inclusive education, taking into account the fact that everyone is different and therefore should not learn in the same way.

It is necessary to point out some limitations to be addressed in future work. First, a psychometric analysis is needed to determine whether the TOI software is valid as a measurement tool. In this regard, and bearing in mind that for an assessment to be legitimate, it must cover a wide range of measuring instruments and methods (Armstrong, 2006). It would be useful to compare and contrast the profile results obtained by this method with those of other MI assessment instruments such as the MI self-perception scales aimed at families and teachers (Prieto & Ballester, 2003; Prieto & Ferrándiz, 2001). In addition, a test-retest assessment would allow us to analyze other important aspects such as the learning or training effect. It would also be interesting to gather feedback from teachers and the educational community on the use of TOI software in the classroom.

Secondly, it is worth noting possible sample bias as the tests were only carried out on students in private schools. Tests should also be carried out in public schools so that the results can be generalized to the rest of the population.

In addition, in order to avoid the use of video games as part of the model and thus provide greater reliability, we are planning the development of an educational program of multiple intelligences to accompany the use of the tool in a more analog sense, with activities that complement the development of skills in real contexts, inside and outside the classroom. Furthermore, due to the difficulty in evaluating inter- and intrapersonal intelligence, any evaluation of this type will need further development in order for it to be represented appropriately.

As for the design of the tool, in addition to the previously mentioned adjustment of the “Electric Colours” set due to its negative asymmetry, it would also be useful to make an adjustment to the “Letter Soup” set. Although the sample is distributed within the normal range, the current version does not take into account the error variable, and this means less difficulty, with most of the subjects scoring values above the average.

With a view to future lines of work, we hope to apply the methodology for the design of games to cover different age groups, as well as to verify the validity and reliability of TOI for intervention with groups with specific educational needs, such as high capacity or ADHD.

References

Alfageme, B., & Sánchez, P. (2002). Learning skills with videogames. [Aprendiendo habilidades con videojuegos]. Comunicar, 19, 114-119. https://bit.ly/2P27D77

Armstrong, T. (2006). Inteligencias múltiples en el aula. Barcelona: Paidós.

Asociación Española de Videojuegos (Ed.) (2015). Anuario de la industria del videojuego. https://bit.ly/2bRFQq9

Ballester, P. (2001). Las inteligencias múltiples: Un nuevo enfoque para evaluar y favorecer el desarrollo cognitivo (Tesis de Licenciatura). Murcia: Universidad de Murcia.

Ballesteros, S., Mayas, J., Ruiz-Marquez, E., Prieto, A., Toril, P., De-Leon, L.P., & Avilés, J.M.R. (2017). Effects of video game training on behavioral and electrophysiological measures of attention and memory: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Bartolomé-Pina, M. (2017). Diversidad educativa. ¿Un potencial desconocido? Revista de Investigación Educativa, 35(1), 15-33. https://doi.org/10.6018/rie.35.1.275031

Buckley, P., & Doyle, E. (2017). Individualising gamification: An investigation of the impact of learning styles and personality traits on the efficacy of gamification using a prediction market. Computers and Education, 106, 43-55. https://doi.org/10.101

Del-Moral Pérez, M.E., Fernández-García, L.C., & Guzmán-Duque, A.P. (2015). Videojuegos: Incentivos multisensoriales potenciadores de las inteligencias múltiples en Educación Primaria. Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology, 13(2), 243-2

Del-Moral-Pérez, M., Guzmán-Duque, A., & Fernández-García, L. (2018). Game-based learning: Increasing the logical-mathematical, naturalistic, and linguistic learning levels of primary school students. Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research, 7(1

Del-Pozo, M. (2005). Una experiencia a compartir: las inteligencias múltiples en el Colegio Montserrat. Barcelona: Fundación M. Pilar Mas. https://bit.ly/2LoEMrc

Díaz, J., & Troyano, Y. (2013). El potencial de la gamificación aplicado al ámbito educativo. III Jornadas de Innovación Docente. Innovación Educativa: respuesta en tiempos de incertidumbre. https://bit.ly/2Pvzpdb

Dorado, S., & Gewerc, A. (2017). El profesorado español en la creación de materiales didácticos: Los videojuegos educativos. Digital Education Review, 31, 176-195. https://bit.ly/2BF9soC

Escamilla, A., (2014). Inteligencias múltiples. Claves y propuestas para su desarrollo. Barcelona: Graó. https://bit.ly/2LlZ8RQ

Ferrándiz, C. (2000). Inteligencias múltiples y currículum escolar (Tesis de Licenciatura). Murcia: Universidad de Murcia.

Ferrándiz, C., Prieto, M.D., Ballester, P., & Bermejo, M.R. (2004). Validez y fiabilidad de los instrumentos de evaluación de las Inteligencias Múltiples en los primeros niveles instruccionales. Psicothema, 16(1), 7-13. https://bit.ly/2whZio7

Ferrer, J.R. (2018). Juegos, videojuegos y juegos serios: Análisis de los factores que favorecen la diversión del jugador. Miguel Hernández Communication Journal, 9, 191-226. https://doi.org/10.21134/mhcj.v0i9.232

Finney, S.J., & DiStefano, C. (2006). Non-normal and categorical data in structural equation modeling. In G.R. Hancock, & R.O. Muller (Eds.), Structural equation modeling: A second course (pp. 269-314). Greenwich, CT: Information Age.

Gardner, H. (2012). La inteligencia reformulada. Las inteligencias múltiples en el siglo XXI. Barcelona: Paidós. https://bit.ly/2OWZf8Y

Gardner, H. (2013). Inteligencias múltiples. La teoría en la práctica. Barcelona: Paidós. https://bit.ly/2o4edi0

Gardner, H., Feldman, D., & Krechevsky, M. (Comps.) (2008). El proyecto Spectrum: Manual de evaluación para la educación infantil (Tomo III). Madrid: Morata. https://bit.ly/2MqXbsW

Gomis, N. (2007). Evaluación de las inteligencias múltiples en el contexto educativo a través de expertos, maestros y padres (Tesis doctoral). Alicante; Universidad de Alicante.

Gramigna, A., & González-Faraco, J.C. (2009). Learning with videogames: Ideas for a renewal of the theory of knowledge and education. [Videojugando se aprende: renovar la teoría del conocimiento y la educación]. Comunicar, 33(17), 157-164. https://doi.or

Hsu, D., & Marshall, G.A. (2017). Primary and secondary prevention trials in Alzheimer disease: looking back, moving forward. Current Alzheimer Research, 14(4), 426-440. https://doi.org/10.2174/1567205013666160930112125

Marín-Díaz, V., & García-Fernández, M.A. (2005). Los videojuegos y su capacidad didáctico-formativa. Pixel-Bit, 26, 113-119. https://bit.ly/2P27D77

Marín-Díaz, V., López, M., & Maldonado, G.A. (2015). Can gamification be introduced within primary classes? Digital Education Review, 27, 55-68. https://bit.ly/2xLZcqq

Oh, S.J., Seo, S., Lee, J.H., Song, M.J., & Shin, M.S. (2018). Effects of smartphone-based memory training for older adults with subjective memory complaints: a randomized controlled trial. Aging & Mental Health, 22, 4, 526-534. https://doi.org/10.1080/1

Prena, K., & Sherry, J.L. (2018). Parental perspectives on video game genre preferences and motivations of children with Down syndrome. Journal of Enabling Technologies, 12(1), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1108/JET-08-2017-0034

Prieto, M.D. & Ballester, P. (2003). Las inteligencias múltiples. Diferentes formas de enseñar y aprender. Madrid: Pirámide. https://bit.ly/2NbyLQx

Prieto, M.D., & Ferrándiz, C. (2001). Inteligencias múltiples y currículum escolar. Málaga: Aljibe. https://bit.ly/2woWupk

Quiroga, M.A., Román, F.J., De-La-Fuente, J., Privado, J., & Colom, R. (2016). The measurement of intelligence in the XXI Century using video games. The Spanish Journal of Psychology, 19(89), 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1017/sjp.2016.84.

Sedeño, A. (2010). Videogames as cultural devices: Development of spatial skills and application in learning [Videojuegos como dispositivos culturales: las competencias espaciales en educación]. Comunicar, 17(34), 183-189. https://doi.org/10.3916/C34-201

Starks, K. (2014). Cognitive behavioral game design: A unified model for designing serious games. Frontiers in Psychology, 5(28). https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00028

Zichermann, G., & Cunningham, C. (2011). Gamification by design: Implementing game mechanics in web and mobile apps. O’Reilly Media, Inc. https://bit.ly/2w6oEWF



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Howard Gardner revolucionó el concepto de inteligencia con su Teoría de las Inteligencias Múltiples. Su visión fue acogida por la comunidad educativa como la oportunidad para una educación más personalizada y que atienda las diferentes formas de aprender y acceder al conocimiento. A pesar de su impacto, todavía hoy hay una carencia en cuanto al desarrollo de herramientas capaces de evaluar de forma sencilla, práctica y fiable las inteligencias múltiples. Por ello, este trabajo plantea el diseño, desarrollo y pilotaje del software TOI, del inglés ‘Tree of Intelligences’, una herramienta digital para evaluar e intervenir las inteligencias múltiples a través de los videojuegos. El objetivo del estudio es presentar el diseño de TOI y testar su funcionamiento, analizando la distribución de los resultados juego a juego y comprobando si existen diferencias en función del género y el curso. Participaron un total de 372 estudiantes de primero a tercer curso de educación primaria de tres centros de Asturias y Madrid, con edades comprendidas entre 5 y 9 años (M=7.04, DT=.871). Los resultados muestran que 9 de 10 juegos presentan una distribución normal y que no existen diferencias en función del género en la mayoría de los juegos, pero sí en relación al curso. Se concluye que por su funcionamiento y diseño el software TOI puede ser un adecuado instrumento de evaluación e intervención de las inteligencias múltiples.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

En la década de los ochenta, Howard Gardner revolucionó el mundo de la psicología y la educación con su Teoría de las Inteligencias Múltiples (IM). Su visión de la inteligencia no como algo único, sino como un conjunto de habilidades, talentos o capacidades, independientes entre sí, denominadas inteligencias y presentes en potencia en todas las personas (Gardner, 2013). Rompe con la concepción tradicional del intelecto humano y abre un mundo de posibilidades a los profesionales de la educación, que ven la oportunidad de una educación más personalizada, que respete las múltiples diferencias entre los estudiantes y sus distintas formas de aprender y acceder al conocimiento. Cada vez es más habitual encontrarse con centros educativos que entre sus planes curriculares incluyen aspectos relacionados con el desarrollo de las inteligencias múltiples, y son populares entre la comunidad educativa algunos casos de éxito como el del Colegio Monsterrat de Barcelona, que implementa una metodología basada en las inteligencias múltiples que respeta aspectos emocionales y convierte al alumnado en protagonista de su aprendizaje (Del-Pozo, 2005).

A pesar del impacto de la teoría en el mundo de la educación, treinta años después no se encuentran pruebas que permitan evaluar de forma sencilla, práctica y fiable las inteligencias múltiples. La experiencia más significativa es el denominado Proyecto Spectrum (Gardner, Feldman, & Krechevsky, 2008), desarrollado con el objetivo de evaluar el perfil de inteligencias y el estilo de trabajar de los niños y niñas, observando su comportamiento a la hora de resolver problemas relacionados con cada una de las ocho inteligencias. Las actividades empleadas en el proyecto han demostrado ser válidas y fiables para evaluar las inteligencias múltiples (Ballester, 2001; Ferrándiz, Prieto, Ballester, & Bermejo, 2004), pero a pesar de ser el modelo propuesto como ideal por Gardner, es un proceso muy laborioso y lento, lo que hace que no esté muy extendido su uso en centros educativos o investigaciones sobre las IM (Gardner, 2013). La práctica de evaluación más utilizada para el aula son las escalas de evaluación para familias, profesorado y alumnado que recoge Thomas Armstrong en su libro «Las inteligencias múltiples en el aula» (Armstrong, 2006). Estas listas permiten organizar las observaciones del profesorado sobre las inteligencias múltiples de un estudiante, pero según el propio Armstrong (2006), las listas no se pueden considerar una prueba estandarizada, ya que no han sido sometidas a los protocolos necesarios para determinar su fiabilidad y validez, por lo que únicamente deben utilizarse de manera informal.

Diseñar un instrumento con el que el profesorado pueda evaluar de forma sencilla, válida y fiable las distintas inteligencias puede tener grandes implicaciones educativas, favorecer una concepción de la educación alejada de la escuela uniformadora y permitir una enseñanza más centrada en el individuo, que tenga en cuenta que todas las personas son distintas en el grado en que poseen distintas inteligencias y combinaciones de las mismas.

Por ello, el presente estudio propone el diseño, desarrollo y pilotaje de un software para evaluar e intervenir las IM, atractivo y motivador tanto para estudiantes como para familiares (Gardner, 2012), que se adapte a las características de la evaluación propuesta por la Teoría de las IM: continua, sistemática, variada, dinámica, contextualizada, significativa, motivadora, etc. (Ballester, 2001; Ferrándiz, 2000; Gardner, Feldman, & Krechevsky, 2008; Gomis, 2007), y que al mismo tiempo sea práctico para poder ser utilizado tanto en los colegios como en investigación. La finalidad es conseguir un instrumento «que además de evaluar constituya una experiencia de aprendizaje» (Gardner, 2013: 237).

Un adecuado procedimiento de evaluación pueden ser los videojuegos. Sus características permiten introducir objetivos evaluadores y educativos sin renunciar al entretenimiento (Starks, 2014) y puede ser un proceso dinámico de evaluación de las IM si se diseñan actividades que trabajen habilidades básicas que definen cada área de aprendizaje y estas actividades se plantean dentro de un contexto de aprendizaje significativo y motivador (Escamilla, 2014; Marín & García, 2005).

Además, su carácter dinámico y lúdico los convierte en instrumentos motivadores y de gran influencia a nivel cultural y social, ocupando gran parte del tiempo de ocio de menores, jóvenes y adultos (Dorado & Gewerzc, 2017; Asociación Española de Videojuegos, 2015; Sedeño, 2010), y por su potencial, cada vez es más habitual encontrar videojuegos en el aula, existiendo metodologías específicas que permiten incorporarlos al proceso educativo, como por ejemplo la gamificación (aplicar los principios del juego a un contexto diferente al del juego, por ejemplo, un aula) o el aprendizaje basado en juegos (game-based learning), que se cimenta en introducir videojuegos en el proceso aprendizaje con el propósito de mejorarlo (Díaz & Troyano, 2013; Zichermann & Cunningham, 2011).

La literatura en torno al uso de los videojuegos como herramienta de entrenamiento y evaluación cognitiva es cada vez más extensa (Buckley & Doyle, 2017). En los últimos años han surgido estudios que analizan la medición de la inteligencia a través de videojuegos (Quiroga, Román, De-La-Fuente, Privado, & Colom, 2016), comprueban su efectividad como herramienta de prevención de enfermedades de tipo cognitivo como el alzhéimer (Hsu & Marshall, 2017) o evalúan la eficacia del entrenamiento cognitivo en aspectos como la memoria de trabajo o la atención (Ballesteros & al., 2017; Oh, Seo, Lee, Song, & Shin, 2017).

En materia de IM y videojuegos destacan los estudios realizados por Del-Moral, Fernández y Guzmán (2015: 244), que concluyen que «la introducción de videojuegos educativos adecuados en las aulas y su explotación sistemática promueve el desarrollo de las IM». Los mismos autores señalan que los denominados «serious games» o juegos serios, pueden ser estímulos que favorezcan el desarrollo de las IM, ya que están dotados de componentes multisensoriales que propician contextos de aprendizaje capaces de atraer la atención del jugador y que se implique en el juego.

Con base en lo expuesto, se plantea el diseño, desarrollo y pilotaje del software TOI, un instrumento compuesto de diferentes videojuegos diseñados pedagógicamente, que, atendiendo a los ideales de evaluación de las IM (Armstrong, 2006; Gardner, 2012; 2013; Gardner, Feldman, & Krechevsky, 2008), sea capaz de evaluar e intervenir las inteligencias múltiples de una manera atractiva y motivadora, y que no sólo permita obtener información útil acerca de las habilidades y potencialidades de los individuos, sino que además sea capaz de hacerlo de forma inmediata, facilitando su aplicación tanto en el ámbito escolar como en investigación. Se incluye en un primer momento una descripción del software propuesto (Tree of intelligences) para después profundizar en el uso instruccional del software y sus aplicaciones de intervención y evaluación, utilizando como base dicho software. Por lo tanto, el objetivo del estudio es describir el diseño educativo del software TOI y analizar su funcionamiento. Para ello se analizará la distribución de la muestra, las diferencias en función del género y las diferencias en función del curso. Estos aspectos nos permitirán comprobar si la dificultad de los juegos es adecuada para atender a toda la muestra, si es válido para utilizar tanto en niños como en niñas y si la dificultad y contenido son adecuados para el rango de edad al que va dirigida.

1.1. Descripción del software TOI

TOI, del inglés «Tree of intelligences» (Árbol de las inteligencias), es un software diseñado y desarrollado para evaluar e intervenir las inteligencias múltiples de forma lúdica e interactiva. Nace con el objetivo de informar acerca de las habilidades y potencialidades de las personas, ofreciendo una respuesta útil que ayude a intervenir para potenciar las áreas fuertes y/o desarrollar y compensar los puntos débiles. Utiliza el videojuego como instrumento y se construye sobre dos pilares fundamentales: el diseño instruccional entendido como la planificación y diseño de materiales educativos, y la concepción de inteligencia como la habilidad para resolver problemas o crear productos valiosos (Gardner, 2013).

TOI se desarrolla a partir de un innovador y minucioso proceso del mismo nombre, el Método TOI (Figura 1). Partiendo de la concepción del intelecto humano de Gardner (2013), y teniendo en cuenta que las inteligencias trabajan siempre en concierto (Armstrong, 2006; Gardner, 2013), que se disparan a partir de información presentada de forma interna o externa (Gardner, 2013) y que existen diferentes maneras de ser inteligente dentro de una misma inteligencia (Armstrong, 2006), se diseñan mecánicas de juego que plantean retos lógicos, visuales, naturalistas, lingüísticos, corporales, emocionales y musicales. El rendimiento de la persona a la hora de resolver los diferentes retos determina su perfil de inteligencias.


Garmen et al 2019a-69579 ov-es028.png

Figura 1. Descripción gráfica del Método TOI.

Atendiendo a sus características técnicas, TOI se compone actualmente de diez pruebas en formato videojuego, que por su diseño instruccional abarcan el conjunto de las ocho inteligencias propuestas por Gardner (2012), tal y como se aprecia en la Tabla 1. Funciona de manera táctica e interactiva en formato de aplicación móvil, y es compatible tanto en sistemas operativos iOS como Android. Para un mayor acercamiento al aula, también se optimiza su uso en ordenadores con sistema operativo Windows 10.

1.1.1. Del diseño instruccional a la evaluación de inteligencias

A diferencia de la gran mayoría de videojuegos del mercado, el software TOI parte de un diseño instruccional en el que se definen las mecánicas del juego, los contenidos, la gamificación y los criterios de evaluación. Cada juego está diseñado para plantear un reto al jugador. Dependiendo de las habilidades o capacidades que el reto requiera para ser resuelto, se activará una inteligencia de manera principal y una o varias de manera secundaria. De esta forma, un reto puede requerir de la velocidad de reacción poniendo de manifiesto las inteligencias visual y motora, mientras que otro puede solicitar los conocimientos sobre las diferentes especies del mundo animal, activando la inteligencia naturalista.

Para considerar que un juego dispara una inteligencia se tienen en cuenta dos criterios: la mecánica o «gameplay» y los contenidos. La mecánica del juego demanda habilidades o capacidades para resolver el problema, mientras que los contenidos requieren más de conocimientos que pueden estar relacionados con la inteligencia. Por ejemplo, un juego que plantee el reto de clasificar herramientas según su forma geométrica trabajará por contenido las inteligencias lógica y visual, y por mecánica las inteligencias visual y corporal. En este caso, se establece que por el peso que tiene para poder resolver el reto se trabaja la inteligencia lógico-matemática de manera principal y las inteligencias visual y corporal de manera secundaria.

Una vez elegida la mecánica y contenido del juego se establecen los criterios de evaluación, definiendo las variables dependientes: aciertos, errores, nivel de dificultad, tiempo y puntuación. En este proceso también se toman en consideración los elementos y las interacciones, determinando tanto la velocidad a la que salen los objetos como el posible número de interacciones necesarias para cambiar de nivel de dificultad.

Terminada la fase de diseño instruccional, el diseño pedagógico pasa a manos de creativos y programadores, que dotan a los juegos y el software de los recursos estéticos y técnicos que favorecen el «engagement», y garantizan la jugabilidad. Estos aspectos, junto con el diseño emocional, juegan un papel clave para poder introducir objetivos evaluadores sin renunciar al entretenimiento.

1.1.2. Los juegos, el motor del software TOI

Todos los juegos están diseñados para trabajar una inteligencia de forma principal, y una o varias de manera secundaria, teniendo en cuenta las competencias y habilidades clave asociadas a cada inteligencia, como indica la Tabla 1. Es importante resaltar que las 8 inteligencias definidas por Gardner no están representadas con la misma intensidad en los juegos propuestos. La inteligencia visual-espacial se ve representada en mayor o menor medida, mientras la interpersonal e intrapersonal sólo en uno. Cabe mencionar que esta inteligencia social (inter e intrapersonal), es una de las inteligencias que resulta más difícil de evaluar en esta propuesta.


Garmen et al 2019a-69579 ov-es029.png

Los juegos parten de un tiempo de 60 segundos que se verá modificado en función de los aciertos y los errores. Los aciertos proporcionan tiempo extra y los errores lo restan, por lo que el rendimiento del jugador determina el tiempo total del juego. El juego finaliza cuando el marcador de tiempo llega a cero, momento en el que el algoritmo TOI analiza el número de aciertos y errores, el tiempo total de juego, la precisión del jugador y los elementos de gamificación.

La mayoría de los datos se recogen de forma interna, pero para favorecer la gamificación, al usuario se le muestran el número de aciertos totales, la precisión en la prueba y el número de trofeos y monedas virtuales obtenidas. Estos últimos permiten un diseño de la herramienta gamificado.

1.1.3. Perfil de inteligencias

La misión principal del software TOI es proporcionar información a las personas sobre su perfil de inteligencias, mostrando un gráfico de sus inteligencias más y menos desarrolladas (Figura 2), que les permita descubrir su potencial y poder intervenir en función de los resultados para potenciar o mejorar. Para ello, se analiza la habilidad y rendimiento del jugador en cada uno de los juegos diseñados pedagógicamente, estableciendo una puntación ponderada en función de si el juego trabaja la inteligencia de manera principal o secundaria.


Garmen et al 2019a-69579 ov-es030.png

Figura 2. Perfil de inteligencias.

La puntuación obtenida es comparada en tiempo real con el rendimiento del resto de usuarios en cada uno de los juegos, mostrando el percentil por cada inteligencia y un gráfico de barras que permite vislumbrar de un simple vistazo las inteligencias más y menos desarrolladas de la persona.

El software TOI ofrece además feedback sobre el perfil de inteligencias, aportando una información relevante sobre qué significa el porcentaje en cada inteligencia. Este análisis permite ofrecer consejos y recomendaciones para potenciar o desarrollar las inteligencias a través de actividades complementarias, tanto analógicas como digitales.

2. Método

2.1. Participantes

En el estudio participaron un total de 372 estudiantes de primero a tercer curso de educación primaria de dos colegios concertados de Asturias y uno privado de Madrid, con edades comprendidas entre 5 y 9 años (M=7.04, DT=.871). El grupo estuvo conformado por 199 niños (53,5%), con una media de edad de 7,07 años (DT=.91) y 173 niñas (46,5%), con una edad media de 7,01 años (DT=.82), sin existir diferencias significativas entre los grupos en edad (p=.511). Tampoco existieron diferencias en la distribución del género en la muestra [?2(1)=1,817, p=.178].

2.2. Procedimiento

Se seleccionaron los centros siguiendo criterios de accesibilidad. Una vez obtenido el consentimiento de las familias, el grupo de participantes realizaron la prueba jugando de forma individual a todos los videojuegos del software TOI, durante las horas lectivas y en periodos de 90 minutos. Cada una de las pruebas ha sido supervisada y guiada por una persona especialista del grupo de investigación.

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Distribución de la muestra

En primer lugar, se ha realizado un análisis de resultados juego a juego para comprobar la distribución de la muestra en las variables aciertos, tiempo total y precisión. Los juegos presentan una distribución normal en todas sus variables siguiendo el criterio de Finney y Di-Stefano (2006), según el cual puntuaciones entre 2 y –2 de asimetría y 7 y –7 de curtosis corresponden a distribuciones suficientemente normales, a excepción del juego «Colores eléctricos», que trabaja la inteligencia visual-espacial y lógico-matemática, cuya distribución es asimétricamente negativa en las variables aciertos (asimetría=2,21) y tiempo (2,64). En cuanto al análisis de resultados, se utilizaron pruebas no paramétricas, ya que la distribución de la muestra no cumplía los parámetros de normalidad en todos los juegos. De esta forma, se aplicaron la U de Mann-Whitney para el análisis de las diferencias en función del género, y las pruebas de Kruskal Wallis para analizar las diferencias en función del curso.

3.2. Diferencias en función del género

Con el objetivo de conocer si existen diferencias significativas en función del género, se ha realizado un análisis comparativo juego a juego en las medias y desviaciones típicas de las variables aciertos, tiempo de juego e índice de precisión.

Los resultados muestran que existen diferencias significativas en la variable aciertos del juego de inteligencia lógico-matemática «Mathlon» (U de Mann-Whitney=11132,00; (p=.000) entre chicos (M=40,92, DT=18,51) y chicas (M=32,95, DT=15,10). También se encontraron diferencias significativas en la variable aciertos del juego de inteligencia corporal y visual «Lunch time» (U de Mann-Whitney=7233,00; p=.033) en chicos (M=39,72, DT=13,39) respecto a chicas (M=42,95, DT=13,87). En la variable precisión del juego emocional «Fotomatón» (U de Mann-Whitney=11611,00; p=.039) también se han encontrado diferencias significativas en chicos (M=72,12, DT=15,50) frente a chicas (M=75,58, DT=14,08). No se han encontrado diferencias significativas en función del género para el resto de variables y juegos.

3.3. Diferencias en función del curso

En cuanto a la edad, después de realizar un análisis por curso en las variables aciertos, tiempo y precisión de cada juego, observamos (Tabla 2) que existen diferencias significativas en función del curso en todos los juegos analizados. Tanto la media como la desviación típica de las variables aciertos, tiempo y precisión se ve incrementada en el segundo curso con respecto al primero, y en el tercer curso con respecto al segundo.


Garmen et al 2019a-69579 ov-es031.png

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Además de la descripción del software educativo TOI, el estudio tiene el objetivo de comprobar su funcionamiento a través del análisis juego a juego de la distribución de la muestra, de las diferencias por género y de las diferencias por curso en las variables aciertos, tiempo y precisión. Los resultados muestran que todos los juegos a excepción de «Colores eléctricos» tienen una distribución normal, por lo que su diseño en cuanto a dificultad es adecuado. En el caso de este juego, diseñado para trabajar y analizar las inteligencias visual-espacial y lógico-matemática, será necesario hacer un ajuste de diseño en los aciertos y el tiempo de juego.

Los resultados también indican que no existen diferencias significativas en función del género en la mayoría de las variables, a excepción de la variable aciertos del juego «Mathlon» correspondiente a la inteligencia lógico-matemática, y aciertos del juego de inteligencia corporal y visual «Lunch time», así como precisión del juego emocional «Fotomatón»; en las cuales sería necesario revisar su diseño. Esta ausencia de diferencias es importante para que tanto la evaluación como la intervención no se vean condicionadas por cuestiones de género, siendo un instrumento válido para aplicar tanto en niños como en niñas. Los resultados difieren con los obtenidos en su estudio por Del-Moral, Guzmán y Fernández (2018), que observaron diferencias en función del género en todas las inteligencias.

En lo relativo a las diferencias por curso, los resultados determinan que existen diferencias significativas en las variables aciertos, tiempo y precisión de cada juego dependiendo del curso y por tanto de la edad. Esta circunstancia es positiva para el diseño de la herramienta, porque determina que el contenido es adecuado para la franja de edad que ha sido analizada (5-9 años), ajustándose los resultados a cada etapa educativa. A la hora de analizar el perfil de inteligencias, cabe señalar que los resultados muestran los perfiles comparativamente a su grupo de iguales, por lo que las diferencias únicamente se analizan para determinar la idoneidad de los contenidos y la dificultad.

TOI, además, puede ser un adecuado instrumento de evaluación de las IM porque su diseño y desarrollo abarca rasgos de los ideales propuestos por Gardner y colaboradores para la evaluación de las inteligencias múltiples (Armstrong, 2006; Gardner, 2012; 2013; Gardner, Feldman & Krechevsky, 2008): materiales intrínsecamente interesantes y motivadores debido a la propuesta de gamificación y las tecnologías, neutralidad, entorno natural de aprendizaje y retroalimentación (Buckley & Doyle, 2017).

Marín, López y Maldonado (2015) destacan los videojuegos como un recurso positivo para el aprendizaje y que los jóvenes consideran atractivo y Del-Moral y otros (2018) señalan que los videojuegos, además de mejorar las habilidades y capacidades, son una potente estrategia para facilitar el aprendizaje. El hecho de que sea el propio niño el que va descubriendo el conocimiento mediante esfuerzos cognitivos y a su vez relacionando ese conocimiento con cosas que ya conoce y que le resultan familiares, los hace especialmente interesantes (Gramigna & González-Faraco, 2009). En cuanto a la neutralidad, tanto en las instrucciones de las pruebas como en el desarrollo de la mismas, se intenta evitar la influencia de las inteligencias verbal y lógica, analizando directamente la inteligencia que está operando en la resolución del reto planteado.

Utilizar los videojuegos como instrumento favorece que la evaluación se lleve a cabo como «parte del interés natural del individuo en una situación de aprendizaje» (Gardner, 2013: 233), ya que, por su potencial motivador y atrayente, el individuo lo percibe como un juego y no es consciente de estar siendo evaluado, desarrolla la actividad porque se siente motivado para hacerlo. Este factor motivador de los videojuegos es uno de los aspectos más analizados por la comunidad educativa, y puede encontrarse referenciado tanto en estudios recientes (Ferrer, 2018; Prena & Sherry, 2018) como pasados (Alfageme & Sánchez, 2002).

El software ofrece además una retroalimentación con análisis y consejos que permiten ayudar a intervenir sobre el perfil de inteligencias. Para Gardner (2013), es muy importante que la evaluación suponga una ayuda, porque en muchas ocasiones los psicólogos emplean demasiado tiempo clasificando personas y muy poco ayudándolas (Escamilla, 2014).

En conclusión, por su diseño y resultados de funcionamiento, TOI puede ser un instrumento adecuado para evaluar e intervenir las IM, y su inclusión en el aula podría tener fuertes implicaciones educativas y generar un valor en la comunidad educativa si se lleva a cabo un tratamiento cuidadoso que evite estigmas o clasificaciones en el alumnado. Aunque muchos aceptan las diferencias individuales, pocos las cuidan y desarrollan (Bartolomé-Pina, 2017). Por ello, una herramienta como TOI, que permita conocer el perfil de inteligencias o los puntos fuertes y débiles del alumnado, abre a los docentes la posibilidad de saber qué estilo de aprendizaje se adapta mejor en función de su perfil, o descubrir en qué actividad se siente más cómodo para trabajar; en definitiva, alcanzar una educación más personalizada e inclusiva, que tenga en cuenta que todas las personas son diferentes y que por tanto no deben aprender del mismo modo.

No obstante, es necesario señalar algunas limitaciones a subsanar en trabajos futuros. En primer lugar, será necesario realizar un análisis psicométrico para determinar si el software TOI es válido como herramienta de medición. En este aspecto, y teniendo en cuenta que para que una evaluación sea auténtica, debe abarcar una gama amplia de instrumentos, medidas y métodos (Armstrong, 2006), sería conveniente comparar y contrastar los resultados de perfil obtenidos con los de otros instrumentos de evaluación de IM como las escalas de autopercepción de las IM dirigidas a familias y profesorado (Prieto & Ballester, 2003; Prieto & Ferrándiz, 2001), así como llevar a cabo una evaluación test-retest que nos permita analizar otros aspectos importantes como el efecto de aprendizaje o entrenamiento. También resultaría interesante recoger feedback del profesorado y la comunidad educativa sobre el uso del software TOI en el aula.

En segundo lugar, cabe señalar el posible sesgo de la muestra al tratarse de pruebas realizadas únicamente en alumnado de colegios privados y concertados. Por tanto, se propone la realización de pruebas también en centros públicos que permitan generalizar los resultados al resto de la población.

Además, para evitar el uso únicamente de videojuego como parte del modelo y dotar así de mayor fiabilidad, se propone el desarrollo de un programa educativo de inteligencias múltiples que acompañe el uso de la herramienta de una forma más analógica, con actividades que permitan complementar el desarrollo de las habilidades en contextos reales, dentro y fuera del aula.

En cuanto al diseño de la herramienta, además del ya mencionado ajuste en el juego «Colores eléctricos» debido a su asimetría negativa, sería idóneo hacer un ajuste en el juego «Sopa de Letras», aunque la muestra se distribuye dentro de los márgenes de normalidad, la versión actual no tiene contemplado el error y eso implica una menor dificultad, concentrando a la mayoría de los sujetos en valores por encima de la media. Además, las inteligencia inter e intrapersonal, debido a su dificultad para evaluarlas, necesitan de un desarrollo futuro y un nivel de representación en cualquiera de las propuestas de evaluación de este tipo.

De cara a líneas futuras de trabajo, se espera aplicar la metodología para el diseño de juegos que permitan abarcar grupos de edades diferentes, también comprobar la validez y fiabilidad de TOI para la intervención con colectivos de necesidades educativas específicas, como por ejemplo altas capacidades o TDAH.

Referencias

Alfageme, B., & Sánchez, P. (2002). Learning skills with videogames. [Aprendiendo habilidades con videojuegos]. Comunicar, 19, 114-119. https://bit.ly/2P27D77

Armstrong, T. (2006). Inteligencias múltiples en el aula. Barcelona: Paidós.

Asociación Española de Videojuegos (Ed.) (2015). Anuario de la industria del videojuego. https://bit.ly/2bRFQq9

Ballester, P. (2001). Las inteligencias múltiples: Un nuevo enfoque para evaluar y favorecer el desarrollo cognitivo (Tesis de Licenciatura). Murcia: Universidad de Murcia.

Ballesteros, S., Mayas, J., Ruiz-Marquez, E., Prieto, A., Toril, P., De-Leon, L.P., & Avilés, J.M.R. (2017). Effects of video game training on behavioral and electrophysiological measures of attention and memory: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Bartolomé-Pina, M. (2017). Diversidad educativa. ¿Un potencial desconocido? Revista de Investigación Educativa, 35(1), 15-33. https://doi.org/10.6018/rie.35.1.275031

Buckley, P., & Doyle, E. (2017). Individualising gamification: An investigation of the impact of learning styles and personality traits on the efficacy of gamification using a prediction market. Computers and Education, 106, 43-55. https://doi.org/10.101

Del-Moral Pérez, M.E., Fernández-García, L.C., & Guzmán-Duque, A.P. (2015). Videojuegos: Incentivos multisensoriales potenciadores de las inteligencias múltiples en Educación Primaria. Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology, 13(2), 243-2

Del-Moral-Pérez, M., Guzmán-Duque, A., & Fernández-García, L. (2018). Game-based learning: Increasing the logical-mathematical, naturalistic, and linguistic learning levels of primary school students. Journal of New Approaches in Educational Research, 7(1

Del-Pozo, M. (2005). Una experiencia a compartir: las inteligencias múltiples en el Colegio Montserrat. Barcelona: Fundación M. Pilar Mas. https://bit.ly/2LoEMrc

Díaz, J., & Troyano, Y. (2013). El potencial de la gamificación aplicado al ámbito educativo. III Jornadas de Innovación Docente. Innovación Educativa: respuesta en tiempos de incertidumbre. https://bit.ly/2Pvzpdb

Dorado, S., & Gewerc, A. (2017). El profesorado español en la creación de materiales didácticos: Los videojuegos educativos. Digital Education Review, 31, 176-195. https://bit.ly/2BF9soC

Escamilla, A., (2014). Inteligencias múltiples. Claves y propuestas para su desarrollo. Barcelona: Graó. https://bit.ly/2LlZ8RQ

Ferrándiz, C. (2000). Inteligencias múltiples y currículum escolar (Tesis de Licenciatura). Murcia: Universidad de Murcia.

Ferrándiz, C., Prieto, M.D., Ballester, P., & Bermejo, M.R. (2004). Validez y fiabilidad de los instrumentos de evaluación de las Inteligencias Múltiples en los primeros niveles instruccionales. Psicothema, 16(1), 7-13. https://bit.ly/2whZio7

Ferrer, J.R. (2018). Juegos, videojuegos y juegos serios: Análisis de los factores que favorecen la diversión del jugador. Miguel Hernández Communication Journal, 9, 191-226. https://doi.org/10.21134/mhcj.v0i9.232

Finney, S.J., & DiStefano, C. (2006). Non-normal and categorical data in structural equation modeling. In G.R. Hancock, & R.O. Muller (Eds.), Structural equation modeling: A second course (pp. 269-314). Greenwich, CT: Information Age.

Gardner, H. (2012). La inteligencia reformulada. Las inteligencias múltiples en el siglo XXI. Barcelona: Paidós. https://bit.ly/2OWZf8Y

Gardner, H. (2013). Inteligencias múltiples. La teoría en la práctica. Barcelona: Paidós. https://bit.ly/2o4edi0

Gardner, H., Feldman, D., & Krechevsky, M. (Comps.) (2008). El proyecto Spectrum: Manual de evaluación para la educación infantil (Tomo III). Madrid: Morata. https://bit.ly/2MqXbsW

Gomis, N. (2007). Evaluación de las inteligencias múltiples en el contexto educativo a través de expertos, maestros y padres (Tesis doctoral). Alicante; Universidad de Alicante.

Gramigna, A., & González-Faraco, J.C. (2009). Learning with videogames: Ideas for a renewal of the theory of knowledge and education. [Videojugando se aprende: renovar la teoría del conocimiento y la educación]. Comunicar, 33(17), 157-164. https://doi.or

Hsu, D., & Marshall, G.A. (2017). Primary and secondary prevention trials in Alzheimer disease: looking back, moving forward. Current Alzheimer Research, 14(4), 426-440. https://doi.org/10.2174/1567205013666160930112125

Marín-Díaz, V., & García-Fernández, M.A. (2005). Los videojuegos y su capacidad didáctico-formativa. Pixel-Bit, 26, 113-119. https://bit.ly/2P27D77

Marín-Díaz, V., López, M., & Maldonado, G.A. (2015). Can gamification be introduced within primary classes? Digital Education Review, 27, 55-68. https://bit.ly/2xLZcqq

Oh, S.J., Seo, S., Lee, J.H., Song, M.J., & Shin, M.S. (2018). Effects of smartphone-based memory training for older adults with subjective memory complaints: a randomized controlled trial. Aging & Mental Health, 22, 4, 526-534. https://doi.org/10.1080/1

Prena, K., & Sherry, J.L. (2018). Parental perspectives on video game genre preferences and motivations of children with Down syndrome. Journal of Enabling Technologies, 12(1), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1108/JET-08-2017-0034

Prieto, M.D. & Ballester, P. (2003). Las inteligencias múltiples. Diferentes formas de enseñar y aprender. Madrid: Pirámide. https://bit.ly/2NbyLQx

Prieto, M.D., & Ferrándiz, C. (2001). Inteligencias múltiples y currículum escolar. Málaga: Aljibe. https://bit.ly/2woWupk

Quiroga, M.A., Román, F.J., De-La-Fuente, J., Privado, J., & Colom, R. (2016). The measurement of intelligence in the XXI Century using video games. The Spanish Journal of Psychology, 19(89), 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1017/sjp.2016.84.

Sedeño, A. (2010). Videogames as cultural devices: Development of spatial skills and application in learning [Videojuegos como dispositivos culturales: las competencias espaciales en educación]. Comunicar, 17(34), 183-189. https://doi.org/10.3916/C34-201

Starks, K. (2014). Cognitive behavioral game design: A unified model for designing serious games. Frontiers in Psychology, 5(28). https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00028

Zichermann, G., & Cunningham, C. (2011). Gamification by design: Implementing game mechanics in web and mobile apps. O’Reilly Media, Inc. https://bit.ly/2w6oEWF

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/18
Accepted on 31/12/18
Submitted on 31/12/18

Volume 27, Issue 1, 2019
DOI: 10.3916/C58-2019-09
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 4
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?