Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This paper contributes to the analysis of the role that social networks play in civic, social mobilization and solidarity of Spanish young people, considering whether social networks are responsible for active social commitment off-line or if they just intensify an existing or previous tendency towards social participation. This research was undertaken by on-line questionnaire –Likert scale and multiple choice questions– in collaboration with the Spanish social network Tuenti where more than 1,300 young people took part. The results show significant percentages of participation exclusively on-line although there were more than 80% of young people, in a way or another, involved in actions to which they were called by social networks. The study analyzes the forms of participation in solidarity actions and the influence of factors such as geographical, social or emotional proximity to causes on the degree of participation on-line and off-line. The article shows that social networks have changed the meaning of participation. They are encouraging young people not mobilized away from social networks, to take action, so it proposes in its conclusions the need to overcome the dichotomy that opposes on-line and off-line activism and passivity.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Social networks should not be considered merely as technological tools for exchanging messages –even if at one point in time they were– but rather as contemporary means for communication, interaction and global participation. It is currently undeniable that their consequences have resulted in a change that goes beyond them.

What occurred with the earthquake and the subsequent tsunami that devastated the Japanese coast in March 2011 marked a before and an after in terms of how social media are used. According to Tweet-o-meter (which measures Twitter activity), the number of Twitter messages originating in Tokyo those days surpassed 1,200 per minute, and they consisted primarily of messages sent by people who needed to know the location of others (Google has launched the Person Finder service, a social tool that allows disaster victims to publish and receive information about others whose condition is not known).

Initiatives based on solidarity and participation, such as the fight against cancer, for example, highlight the importance being achieved by social networks in this area. Top athletes, singers and celebrities in general have used this tool to show their solidarity with various causes. These globally famous individuals are joined by thousands of users who show their support anonymously using online networks.

However, there are those who go beyond simply stating their support in favour or against something, who go beyond exchanging messages in the various social networks, people who feel motivated to convey the values they defend –including solidarity– to the offline world through actions that take place beyond these networks, such as assisting efforts or carrying out actions that directly affect or have direct repercussions beyond these networks, such as economic contributions through networks to certain causes.

1.1. The value of social networks and cyber-activism

What are the aspects of social networks that allow them to influence users that other mass-communication media alternatives, such as television, have not had in the past? The effects on the audience and their mobilisation through this medium has been studied for decades. The response links two obvious aspects: immediacy and interactivity.

The creation of the World Wide Web in 1989 marked the start of a new era due to its impact on all social, economic and even political structures thanks to its extraordinary contributions in terms of communication. The expansion of this communication phenomenon was even more significant after the new millennium, when new tools that have favoured the exponential connection between audiences were developed, reinventing the classical paradigms for mass and non-mass communication. This has been possible thanks to the appearance and development of what are known as social networks.

Users no longer play only the role of recipients (a role that they had hardly left behind in the traditional mass-media communication process), and instead they alternatively assume the role of recipients and senders. This alternation is a core affordance of interpersonal communication, and it has now transferred to global communication which, applied to the mass media, has coined terms such as «prosumer», a user that consumes and also creates contents.

Digital technologies have made it possible for users throughout the world to interact with each other and share opinions and experiences. Internet users have their own virtual identity that is developed through the set of platforms that comprise social media. These new channels have changed the parameters of communication between individuals and groups, allowing dialogue to be democratised and multiplied exponentially.

With the Web 2.0, any individual can have a global impact with their dialogue, and this is exactly where the phenomenon of cyber-activism takes place (Tascón & Quintana, 2012), thanks to the array of possibilities that have opened popular channels such as Youtube, Facebook and Twitter. The term Web 2.0 (O’Reilly, 2005) was created to refer to the social phenomenon based on the interaction of various web applications centred on users that facilitate the exchange of information, multimedia collaboration and exchange in real time, which are essential for participation and social activism on the Internet.

Aside from growing in parallel with the number of Internet users (according to Internet World Stats 2012, more than 2.4 billion people, more than a third of the world population), this revolution that is defining the new digital era is also increasing the possibilities of broadcasting content that denounces situations of social injustice, abuse, etc. A good example is the witness.org website, a platform whose slogan is «See it; film it; change it» and its aim is to encourage people to provide witnesses with the mission of opening «the world’s eyes to human rights violations» (http://goo.gl/7wg5SM) with their testimony.

This is ultimately a form of social cyber-activism or cyber-social movement that involves active participation through social networks as well as individual/ social mobilisation in the real life of people (McCaughey & Ayers, 2003). Cyber-activists are «active» online and offline. This concept does not include a limited definition of cyber-activism that is referred to as «click-activism».

Establishing the concept of cyber-activism can be as complicated as defining activism before the Internet. Social movements, with the more or less active participation of many individuals, have always existed, but digital technologies and the opportunities they offer for interaction give users greater power with regard to these movements because they become content senders for mobilisation and the active collaborators that are necessary as individuals for attaining the overall objective.

This mobilisation and participation activity is manifested through social networks (Martínez, 2013). They are the link between organisations and users, and the way in which they are able to reach them and offer their content. The work of Valenzuela, Park and Kee (2009) showed the direct relation between the use of Facebook and the commitment to civic and/or political actions. An example of this is the Facebook event that filled Egypt’s Tahir Square during the Arab Spring (http://goo.gl/6NY9kO).

A further example is Barack Obama’s campaign for the United States presidency since it paradigmatically made apparent the power of social networks and the value of trust between individuals, beyond the traditional mass-communication structures. This is exactly how the contact networks in platforms such as Facebook, with more than 800 million users just in the United States (Vitak, Lampe, Gray & Ellison, 2012), Twitter, Linkedin or, Spain’s Tuenti, should be understood. Within the strategy of communication, they have all become extremely powerful tools that are growing continuously (Harfoush, 2009).

In this context, the studies presented by Hernández, Robles and Martínez (2013) are of interest. They analysed how young people experience democratic citizenship through both digital and traditional media. Here, a more informed digital citizenship is being created, and it extends its communication relations by connecting to a network, and it also transforms civic participation into one of the predominant aspects of social networks (Kahne, Lee & Timpany, 2011; Bescansa & Jerez, 2012).

This makes it possible to conclude that the foundation for active social participation online and offline can be found in digital literacy and in the increased level of competency. Thanks to social networks, young people have access to a multitude of possibilities to participate actively in creating social changes, and this participation in networks increases their knowledge of interaction methods that facilitate this activism (Ito, 2009).

These digital natives (Prensky, 2001), today’s youth, who comprise the sector that first discovered the networks and builds in them its relationship dynamics (Monge & Olabarri, 2011), have a long way to go in these new social digital communication methods. Experiences such as those of Leonard (2011) show that the education of young people, combined with the development of a critical ability in using online networks, will intensify the potential of these networks to help social mobilisation, participation, and the comprehensive training of this generation as well as future ones.

1.2. The role of networks in mobilising young people

Therefore, the following research question is worth considering: Are social networks responsible for people who are active online also displaying their social commitment beyond the network, or only when these individuals were already predisposed to mobilisation do the networks strengthen this active attitude that spreads to the offline response?

In order to understand what is occurring, it is important to take into consideration that the networks create paths towards active social participation, involving users in events for which in the past it would have been complicated to even be informed of, facilitating for organisers the dissemination and for recipients the information (Rubio-Gil, 2012). As a result, users, who become active recipients that alternate this role with the senders or producers of messages and contents, are also the information transmission channel.

Participation within the networks activates a movement that frequently spreads because the aim is for it to be extended (Dalhgren, 2011). For participating users, each initiative requires a different degree of involvement and a different complexity in the response from the moment when the organiser or the creator of a certain movement in the network may ask the recipient to simply press a button (a donation to a campaign against hunger) or to go out to the street and physically surround the Congress building, passing through intermediate initiatives such as collaborating to find a missing person.

What all situations have in common is that the dissemination process has changed from the traditional «mouth to mouth» to «computer to computer» and more recently «mobile phone to mobile phone» and what is now known as «Face to Face», as the shortened version of «Facebook to Facebook» that is an unexpectedly symbolic substitute by recalling the traditional and increasingly less essential «face to face». From Guatemala (Harlow, 2012) to South Korea (Choi & Park, 2014), experiences are being gathered in how young people use social networks, national or global, to participate and mobilise for social and/or civic purposes, online and offline. This is additional proof that «users have gained control of the tool and they are transforming it into a lever for changing the world» (Orihuela, 2008: 62). As Lim (2012) states, social networks have supported the change from online activism to offline protests and engagements.

2. Methodology

The initial hypothesis is based on the idea that the familiarity of young people with social networks makes them an ideal instrument for involving them in social participation. As a result, the general objective of research must be none other than to analyse how the participation of young people in social networks leads to an active social mobilisation online and offline (in other words, through a virtual world and also through the real world); to see to what degree it is cyber-activism in which young people have new tools that facilitate their involvement in situations of social injustice, solidarity or humanitarian needs.

The research instrument used to perform the study was a survey, so an online questionnaire adapted to the conditions of social networks was created. Internet surveys have intrinsic characteristics ?such as the speed in collecting information, the low cost and/or the improved responses? and these characteristics adapted perfectly to the study that was performed in this case (Díaz-de-Rada, 2012). The process of collecting this information relied on the collaboration of Tuenti, the Spanish social network par excellence, which has 10 million active users, that launched an advertising campaign in its platform to disseminate the questionnaire among users and encourage their participation (80% of the activity in Tuenti is by users between the ages of 14 and 25 years). This Tuenti campaign included a link to the research questionnaire –with dichotomous, Likert scale and multiple choice questions– regarding their overall participation in social networks, not just Tuenti. The questionnaire, with 30 questions, followed a logical sequence, starting with short questions about socio-demographics (age, gender, education) and then continued with introductory or ice-breaker and basic questions regarding privacy and participation in networks. The campaign used what is known as the «standard ad» format, and Tuenti offered an incentive (a prize draw amongst participants) in order to encourage user participation. Afterwards, the SPSS statistics application was used for the data analysis. The sample used for the study was comprised of 1,330 young people, male (59%) and female(41%) with the ages of 16 (44%), 17 (34%) and 18 (22%), selected through a random simple probabilistic sample, with a confidence interval of 95.5% and p=q=50%, and a margin of error of approximately 2.7%. The results obtained were then presented and reviewed.

3. Analysis and results

When analysing the role that social networks play in the lives of young people, it is important to highlight that the networks, beyond allowing them to expand their social relations, represent a medium that allows young people to not only be informed of civic, political and cultural events, etc., but also to participate in them actively (García & del-Hoyo, 2013).

As a result, with the aim of verifying this participation method, the research performed confirmed some of the descriptive data listed below. Regarding the first research question related to the influence of social networks in online/offline participation, the data seem to show that the participation of young people tends to start and end in the virtual world since 38% state that aside from participating in an online event, they tend to also join the offline version, and 44% admit that although they participate in online events, they do not join them in real life. However, interpreting this data in dichotomous terms of mobilisation and indifference would be incorrect.

In order to understand correctly the scope of these percentages, certain clarifications should be made, without veering from the data provided by the study. The mobilisation capabilities of young people through social networks should not be underestimated since they produce content and urge others to participate, as shown by 24% of the young people surveyed who state that they always or almost always use social networks «to encourage others to participate in certain events, demonstrations, meetings, etc. » or the 26% who agree with the following statement: «Social networks lave led me to develop/participate in an action of social protest».

The very similar percentages show the dual role that young people can play through the networks, or the dual role they play (the percentage of young people who feel encouraged by social networks to participate in social collective actions is very close to those who use social networks to encourage others to participate). Taking into consideration the Spearman rho coefficient (García-Ferrando, 1994: 253), a moderate relationship (0.63) can be established between the variables of «I use social networks to encourage others in the area of social mobilisation» and «social networks have led me to participate in an action of social protest».

Therefore, the figures invite us to deduce that young people are active in the networks, and that they are active in two ways: as producers of content that encourages others in the area of social mobilisation and as active recipients who transfer their empathy to situations of social need towards action.

An especially significant aspect is the percentage of young people surveyed who say they use social networks to support solidarity campaigns (34.3%), those who say they use social networks to denounce unfair situations (27.2%), and those who state that social networks have led them to develop or participate in an action of social protest (27%).

At this point, the data shed light on the participation possibilities that the networks offer young people in order to show, online or offline, their solidarity and involvement with situations of social injustice that are more or less close to them. In summary, the possibilities of promoting and channelling the social mobilisation of young people, especially as drivers of solidarity in this population group, which leads to our aim of knowing to what degree these possibilities are taken advantage of as tools for channelling solidarity in light of certain situations, and if so, how this solidarity is expressed.

Specifically, the study posed various situations to the young people selected that would require them to respond with solidarity...or not. This response could be reflected with a «click», an «economic donation» or «going to a social engagement». In the first case, and depending on the situation or the circumstances, the «click» could represent active online participation on behalf of the young person who would remain in that virtual behaviour.

However, it can be misleading to think that this would not move to the offline social life since there are associations such as Greenpeace whose webpage recognises the importance of cyber-activism. The organisation defines it in this manner: «Being a cyber-activist involves active mobilisation to defend the Earth from your computer. Your signature is a valuable tool in the fight for the environment, and with thousands of them we have been able to reduce some of the most serious assaults on our planet». Therefore, a «click» should not be considered simply as idle or passive behaviour by young people, nor should it be underestimated. Instead, the corresponding context should be taken into consideration (http://goo.gl/ttQx5i).

According to the study results, the majority of young people continue to participate through clicks from their computers, but as we have just seen, the effects of these actions are far from negligible. This is combined with the significant percentage of young people who seem to be involved in social and civic actions, and who take their solidarity actions beyond a click. In addition, only 17% of the young people surveyed can be considered as passive since only that 17% states that they «would not participate» through the virtual world or the real world in any of the events included in the questionnaire. As a result, it can be deduced that this reflects the other side of the coin: the confirmation that more than 80% of young people participate in some way or another in the actions they are invited to through social networks. Therefore, social networks cannot be considered simply a passing trend. They are a fundamental change in how we communicate and interact in a global manner. The added value they have contributed to certain social movements cannot be ignored.

3.1. Ways of participating in actions of solidarity

The behavioural differences shown by young people in situations that require their active social participation primarily respond to matters of proximity, including geographic proximity as well as what can be referred to as social proximity.

When expressing an active attitude that goes beyond social networks, young people tend to show more solidarity with situations that are geographically closer. Therefore, in the case of participating in an ecology campaign to protect Spain’s coast, 27.5% stated that they would participate in an offline engagement, while only 22% would participate in an ecology campaign to save the Arctic.

Something similar occurred when they were asked how they would participate in a humanitarian campaign against poverty in Spain or in a humanitarian campaign against poverty in Africa. In both cases, 38% responded «with a click», but the difference was made apparent in terms of transferring their solidarity beyond social networks. In that case, only 13% would go to an offline engagement for a campaign to fight poverty in the African continent, while 23% said they would go to an engagement if the campaign was to fight poverty in Spain.

Paradoxically, when making an economic donation, young people showed more awareness of poverty in Africa (33% of those surveyed would donate money) than of poverty in Spain (27.3% would do so).


Draft Content 195776185-29643-en004.jpg

Of all the situations that appeared in the study, the case of the campaign against hunger in Africa is the one with the most responses for making an economic donation.

The fact that geographic proximity can be a determining factor is also made apparent by the instance of a «Campaign against the death sentence in Iran», although in this case it would be more appropriate to refer to geographic distance, since this is what determines that 31% of the young people surveyed marked that they would not participate in this campaign. None of the other situations proposed for measuring how geographic distance influences participation obtained a higher percentage (the average for non-participation in the situations was 17.4%).

The «social proximity» factor refers to events in which geographic proximity is not involved or does not appear to be decisive. Instead, it is the empathy with the situation itself that leads individuals to participate actively, guided by social networks (similar to what is occurring in the media with the proximity news value, a value with a dual dimension, both geographic as well as emotional and/or intellectual). As a result, in a campaign against cancer, 24.2% would participate in an engagement, 30% would make a donation and 36% would participate with a «click». The percentage of individuals who would go to an engagement nearly doubles in the case of a «campaign against bullying at school or cyber-bullying» (40%) as this is an issue that they seem to be more aware of and feel closer to in their lives (in terms of the geographic proximity or distance, emotional proximity is the factor in this case) since most of the individuals in the sample were still completing their education (88.2%), and the situation that was described is probably close to them, regardless of whether they have experienced it directly.

Although it may seem difficult to determine what type of proximity plays a stronger role in certain instances, as in the case of the «campaign to support a neighbour with a rare disease» or the «campaign to defend the neighbourhood school», the results confirm that physical proximity is a secondary factor compared to social proximity (which is perfectly in line with the fact that the networks connect people, overcoming physical barriers). In the first instance mentioned, participation in virtual support was 35% while for the second it was 40%. The difference is exacerbated in favour of situations to which they feel emotionally closer, and when the possibility of participating in engagements outside of the network is proposed, the percentage that would participate to support a neighbour with a rare disease drops to 24%, while remaining at 31% to support situations the individuals identify with more easily in accordance with their age. An example is the new campaign against bullying at school, for which the percentage of commitment outside of the network is nearly 40%.


Draft Content 195776185-29643-en005.jpg

4. Discussion and conclusions

The study results confirm that motivations in social networks are not only aimed at areas related to personal interests, but also at social relational or inclusion needs, as suggested by Notley (2009) and Colás, González and de-Pablos (2013). In fact, they go one step further and reflect that a significant percentage of young people participate in the networks with solidarity or civic purposes in mind. American studies, like the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project on civic commitment in the Digital Era, affirm this conclusion in a study performed on adults that found 48% of Americans participated in a civic activity that could range from helping to solve a problem in their community to participating in a protest action, always mobilised by social networks (Civic Engagement in the Digital Age) (http://goo.gl/y2q7AM).

In the first part of this article, we stated that social networks go beyond simply being a method or a medium for communicating, and that they are also a method or a medium for social participation and global activism. The study results presented here confirm this since more than 80% of the young people surveyed channel through networks their response to campaigns that support or reject certain events.

It was also believed that the networks have an advantage over other media in terms of immediacy and interactivity. In light of the data and taking into consideration that the information for mobilising now reaches young people who in the past did not have access to it, it can be said that social networks are providing incentives for commitment and making it possible for young people who in the past did not mobilise to now take action, precisely because of the consequences resulting from the aspects mentioned at the beginning of this paragraph. The networks eliminate the physical distances that sometimes limit mobilisation significantly, and young people become closer to those who are «near» them, regardless of their actual location, and they support them because the support or the mobilisation have also overcome the physical limitations, as proven by the higher mobilisation percentages obtained by causes that feel close, regardless of their geographic proximity or distance (40% of the sample supported these types of causes).

Interactivity entails an alternation in the roles of sender and recipient in the networks, but once again, the data collected goes further by stating that users do not simply receive messages passively but instead they are capable of responding to them. This shows that those users take the initiative in new messages which the spread action. In other words, young people generate responses, but they also generate questions, proposals and calls for action (nearly one quarter of those surveyed confirmed this).

The impossibility of maintaining a limited concept of activism in the networks should be understood within this framework, not just because of the evidence that a virtual action has real consequences, but because within the sample that has been collected, it is still necessary to address degrees of commitment and degrees of mobilisation as opposed to degrees of activism or passivity. In summary, this refers to the need to overcome the dichotomy that opposes online and offline within social participation.

The study confirms that young people do not use social networks merely to expand their offline social relations. Networks offer an infinite number of possibilities for active social participation. It is necessary to show young people the options provided by networks as a resource for channelling actions of solidarity. The networks have changed the meaning of participation: organisations request the collaboration of citizens through the networks as a way to apply pressure in light of situations of injustice or of social needs.

Amnesty International and Greenpeace are already aware of the importance of social networks in encouraging the active social participation of citizens. In fact, Facebook has become a key tool for organising and co-ordinating civic protests in many cities around the world (Lim, 2012). Experiences like Change.org, «the largest platform for petitions in the world» in which, as they have announced, more than 50 million people «have taken action» are situations that require an updated and detailed analysis of the variables that drive people to participate. In this regard, this study could contribute to the developments in this field by considering certain variables that have an impact on online participation and the corresponding offline channelling. As a result, the geographic, social or emotional proximity will determine the commitment of young people in events that require their solidarity or cooperation.

With social networks, the power of bringing people together has grown and the cost of carrying out social awareness campaigns has dropped considerably. Therefore, organisations or social movements should rely on this new method of social communication as a resource for achieving digital and real mobilisation for «Causes 2.0», which are situations that require the civic participation of citizens and use social networks to achieve this. The study confirms that circumstances exist that result in greater participation, and the door is open to discovering other variables that, aside from being collected, drive young people to be increasingly committed on a civic level, which will be addressed in future work.

References

Bescansa-Hernández, C. & Jerez-Novara, A. (2012). La red: ¿nueva herramienta o nuevo escenario para la participación política? XV Encuentro de Latinoamericanistas: América Latina: la autonomía de una región. Españoles. Madrid: Universidad Complutense.

Choi, S. & Park, H.W. (2014). An Exploratory Approach to a Twitter-based Community Centered on a Political Goal in South Korea: Who Organized it, What they Shared, and How They Acted. New Media & Society, 16, 1, 129-148. (DOI: 10.1177/1461444813487956).

Colás, P., González, T. & De-Pablos, J. (2013). Juventud y redes sociales. Motivaciones y usos preferentes. Comunicar, 40, 15-23. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-01).

Dahlgren, P. (2011). Jóvenes y participación política. Los medios en la Red y la cultura cívica. Telos, 89, 12-22.

Díaz-de-Rada, V. (2012). Ventajas e inconvenientes de la encuesta por Internet. Papers 2012, 97/1, 193-223.

García-Ferrando, M. (1994). Socioestadística. Introducción a la estadística en Sociología. Madrid: Alianza

García-Galera, M.C. & del-Hoyo-Hurtado, M. (2013). Redes sociales, un medio para la movilización juvenil. Zer, 18, 34, 111-125

Harfoush, R. (2009). Yes We did! An Inside Look at How Social Media Built the Obama Brand. Berkeley: New readers.

Harlow, S. (2012). Social Media and Social Movements: Facebook and an Online Guatemalan Justice Movement that Moved Off-line. New Media & Society, 14 2, 225-243.

Hernández, E., Robles, M.C. & Martínez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos y culturas cívicas: sentido educativo, mediático y político del 15M. Comunicar, 40, 59?67. (DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-06).

Ito, M. (2009). Hanging Out, Messing Around, Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New Media. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

Kahne, J., Lee, N. & Timpany, J. (2011). The Civic and Political Significance of Online Partipatory Cultures and Youth Transitioning to Adulthood. San Francisco: DML Central Working Papers

Leonard, L.G. (2011). Youth Participation in Civic Engagement through Social Media : A Case Study. Association of Internet Researchers. (http://goo.gl/1v0dw9).

Lim, M. (2012). Clicks, Cabs, and Coffee Houses: Social Media and Oppositional Movements in Egypt, 2004-2011. Journal of Communication, 62, 231-248. (DOI:10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01628.x).

Martínez-Martínez, H. (2013). Ciberactivismo y movimientos sociales urbanos contemporáneos. Un mapa de la investigación en España. II Congreso Nacional sobre Metodología de la Investigación en Comunicación. Segovia: AEIC.

Mccaughey, M. & Ayers, D. (2003). Cyberactivism: Online Activism in Theory and Practice. Nueva York: Routledge.

Monge-Benito, S. & Olabarri-Fernández, M.E. (2011). Los alumnos de la UPV/EHU frente a Tuenti y Facebook: usos y percepciones. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 66, 79-100.

Notley, T. (2009). Young People, Online Networks, and Social Inclusion. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14, 4, 1.208-1.227. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1083-6101.2009.01487.x).

Orihuela, J.L. (2008). Internet: la hora de las redes sociales. Nueva Revista, 119, 57-62.

O´Reilly, T. (2005). What Is Web 2.0. O'Reilly Media Inc. (http://goo.gl/HzTN3N) (18-10-2013).

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. NCB University Press, 9 (5).

Rubio-Gil, A. (2012). Participación política de la juventud, redes sociales y democracia digital. El caso Spanish Revolution. Telos, 93.

Tascón, M. & Quintana, Y. (2012). Ciberactivismo. Las nuevas revoluciones de las multitudes conectadas. Madrid: Catarata.

Valenzuela, S., Park, N. & Kee, F. (2009). Is There Social Capital in a Social Network Site?: Facebook Use and College Students' Life Satisfaction, Trust, and Participation. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14, 4, 875-901. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1083-6101.2009.01474.x).

Vitak, J., Lampe, C., Gray, R. & Ellison, N. (2012). Why Won’t you be my Facebook Friend? Strategies for Managing Context Collapse in the Workplace. Procedings of the 7th Annual iConference, 555-557. New York: ACM.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Este trabajo analiza el papel que las redes sociales juegan en la movilización ciudadana, social y solidaria de los jóvenes españoles. El objetivo es observar si son responsables de que los jóvenes activos online demuestren también su compromiso en la vida fuera de la Red, y si su predisposición existente o no hacia la participación, se intensifica a través de estas redes sociales y en su respuesta offline. Para ello se desarrolló una investigación online a través de cuestionario –con preguntas en Escala de Likert y de elección múltiple– en colaboración con la red social Tuenti en la que participaron más de 1.300 jóvenes. Los resultados ponen de manifiesto porcentajes significativos de participación solidaria exclusivamente online, si bien se observa que más del 80% de los jóvenes, de una u otra forma, participan en las acciones a las que se les convoca a través de redes sociales. El estudio examina también las formas de participación en acciones solidarias y la influencia de factores como la proximidad geográfica, social o emocional sobre la participación online y offline. Las redes sociales han cambiado el significado de la participación, están incentivando el compromiso y consiguiendo que jóvenes que no se movilizaban fuera de ellas, pasen a la acción. Por ello propone entre sus conclusiones, la necesidad de superar la dicotomía que opone online y offline en el ámbito de la participación social.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Las redes sociales no deben entenderse como simples herramientas tecnológicas para el intercambio de mensajes, si en algún momento de su corta historia lo fueron, sino como auténticos medios para la comunicación, la interacción y la participación global. Hoy resulta innegable que sus consecuencias comportan un cambio que las trasciende.

Lo ocurrido con el terremoto y posterior tsunami que arrasó la costa japonesa en marzo de 2011 marcó un antes y un después en términos de uso de los denominados medios sociales (social media). Según Tweet-o-meter –medidor de la actividad en Twitter– el número de mensajes provenientes de Tokio aquellos días superó los 1.200 por minuto en Twitter, fundamentalmente mensajes de personas que necesitaban saber el paradero de otras (Google ha puesto en marcha el servicio «Person Finder», una herramienta de carácter social que permite a las víctimas de catástrofes publicar y recibir información sobre otras cuyo paradero se desconoce) (http://goo.gl/KxwdKk).

Iniciativas con un componente de solidaridad y participación, como la lucha contra el cáncer por ejemplo, ponen de relieve el protagonismo que están adquiriendo las redes sociales en este ámbito. Deportistas de élite, cantantes y famosos en general han utilizado esta herramienta para mostrar su solidaridad con distintas causas. A estas personas mundialmente conocidas, se suman miles de usuarios que, desde el anonimato y a través de las redes on-line, dejan constancia de su empatía.

Pero hay quien va más allá de esa manifestación expresa a favor o en contra de algo, quien va más allá de ese intercambio de mensajes en la red social de turno, alguien que se siente motivado para trasladar la defensa de sus valores –la solidaridad entre ellos– al mundo off-line, con acciones que se desarrollan fuera de estas redes, como la asistencia a movilizaciones, o el desarrollo de acciones que repercuten directamente o que tienen consecuencias directas fuera de esas redes, como la contribución económica, vía redes, a determinadas causas.

1.1. El valor de las redes sociales y el ciberactivismo

¿Qué tienen las redes sociales para influir en sus usuarios que no hayan tenido con anterioridad otros medios de comunicación, como la televisión, cuyos efectos en las audiencias –y movilización de las mismas a través del medio– se han estudiado durante décadas? La respuesta enlaza dos rasgos obvios: la inmediatez y la interactividad.

El nacimiento en 1989 de la World Wide Web marcó el inicio de una nueva era por su impacto en todos los órdenes sociales, económicos e incluso políticos, por sus extraordinarias aportaciones en materia de comunicación. La expansión de este fenómeno comunicativo fue aún más significativa a partir del nuevo milenio, cuando se desarrollaron nuevas utilidades que han favorecido la conexión multiplicada entre los públicos haciendo saltar por los aires paradigmas clásicos de la comunicación masiva y no masiva. Esto ha sido posible con la aparición y desarrollo de las denominadas redes sociales.

Los usuarios ya no desempeñan un único papel de receptores –papel que apenas habían abandonado en el proceso de comunicación de los mass-media tradicionales–, sino que asumen alternativamente el papel de receptores y el de emisores, alternancia casi innata a la comunicación interpersonal que ahora se traslada a la comunicación global, lo que aplicado a los medios de comunicación, ha hecho acuñar términos como «prosumidor», usuario que no es solo consumidor sino también creador de contenidos.

Las tecnologías digitales han facilitado que usuarios de todo el mundo puedan relacionarse y compartir opiniones y experiencias; los internautas tienen identidad virtual, que desarrollan a través del conjunto de plataformas que suponen los «social media». Estos nuevos canales han cambiado los parámetros de la comunicación entre individuos y colectivos, permitiendo que el diálogo se democratice y multiplique exponencialmente.

Con la Web 2.0, cualquier individuo puede tener un impacto global en su diálogo, donde se enmarca precisamente el fenómeno del ciberactivismo (Tascón & Quintana, 2012), gracias al abanico de posibilidades que han abierto canales hoy tan populares como Youtube, Facebook o Twitter. Recordemos que el término Web 2.0 (O’Reilly, 2005) surgió para designar el fenómeno social basado en la interacción de diferentes aplicaciones Web centradas en el usuario que facilitan el intercambio de información, la colaboración e interactividad multimedia en tiempo real, lo que es indispensable para poder hablar de participación y activismo social en Internet.

Esta revolución que está suponiendo la nueva era digital, además de crecer en paralelo con el número de internautas (supera los 2.400 millones de personas –Internet World Stats, 2012–, es decir más de la tercera parte de la población mundial), incrementa también las posibilidades de emitir contenidos en los que se denuncien situaciones de injusticia social, abusos… (http://goo.gl/rz2iSG). Tal es el caso de la página web witness.org, una plataforma cuyo lema es «see it; film it; change it» y cuyo objetivo es animar a las personas a cederles el testigo en la misión de abrir «los ojos al mundo ante las violaciones de los derechos humanos» (http://goo.gl/NrrO49) con su testimonio.

Se trata, en definitiva, de una forma de ciberactivismo social o movimientos ciber-sociales que implican no solamente una participación activa a través de las redes sociales, sino una movilización individual/social en la vida real de las personas (McCaughey & Ayers, 2003). El ciberactivista es «activo» on-line y off-line; en esta concepción, no cabe una definición reduccionista de ciberactivismo entendido como «clickactivismo».

Ahora bien, acotar el concepto de ciberactivismo puede resultar cuanto menos tan complicado como definir el activismo antes de Internet. Movimientos sociales, con la participación más o menos activa de muchos individuos, han existido siempre, pero las tecnologías digitales y la dimensión que con ellas alcanza el concepto de interacción, dan a sus usuarios mayor poder en relación con dichos movimientos, porque se convierten en emisores de contenido para la movilización, en colaboradores activos necesarios como individuos para conseguir el objetivo colectivo.

Esta actividad de movilización y participación se manifiesta a través de las redes sociales (Martínez, 2013). Ellas son el vínculo entre las organizaciones y los usuarios, la forma que aquellas tienen de llegar a estos y ofrecerles su contenido. El trabajo de Valenzuela, Park y Kee (2009) mostraba la relación directa entre el uso de Facebook y el compromiso con acciones cívicas y/o políticas, sirva como ejemplo el evento de Facebook que llenaría la plaza egipcia de Tahir durante la Primavera Árabe (http://goo.gl/DbLSbG).

Otro tanto puede decirse antes de la campaña de Barack Obama para la presidencia de los Estados Unidos, puesto que evidenció paradigmáticamente el poder de las redes sociales y el valor de la confianza de unos individuos sobre otros, más allá de los esquemas tradicionales de la comunicación de masas. Y precisamente así es como deben entenderse las redes de contactos en plataformas como Facebook, con más de 800 millones de usuarios solo en Estados Unidos (Vitak, Lampe, Gray & Ellison, 2012), Twitter, LinkedIn o, en España, Tuenti. Todas ellas convertidas, dentro de la estrategia de comunicación, en herramientas muy potentes y en continuo crecimiento (Harfoush, 2009).

Resultan interesantes en este contexto los estudios presentados por Hernández, Robles y Martínez (2013), quienes analizan cómo los jóvenes experimentan la ciudadanía democrática mediante los soportes digitales y mediáticos, donde se está formando una más informada ciudadanía digital, que ensancha sus relaciones comunicativas conectándose en red y convierte la participación cívica en una de las formas predominantes en las redes sociales (Kahne, Lee & Timpany, 2011; Bescansa & Jerez, 2012).

Lo anteriormente expuesto permite concluir que la base para la participación social activa on-line y off-line se encuentra en la alfabetización digital y en el aumento del nivel de competencia. Los jóvenes tienen a su alcance, a través de las redes sociales, multitud de posibilidades de participar activamente a la hora de provocar cambios sociales, pues la misma participación en redes aumenta su conocimiento sobre formas de interacción que lo facilitan (Ito, 2009).

Estos nativos digitales (Prensky, 2001), los jóvenes de hoy, que constituyen el sector que antes ha llegado a las redes y construye en ellas sus dinámicas de relación (Monge & Olabarri, 2011), tienen un largo camino por delante en estas nuevas formas de comunicación social digital. Experiencias como la de Leonard (2011) muestran que la preparación de estos jóvenes, junto con el desarrollo de una capacidad crítica en la utilización de las redes on-line, intensificará la potencialidad de estas redes para ayudar a la movilización social, a la participación y a la formación integral de esta generación y de las venideras.

1. 2. El papel de las redes en la movilización de los jóvenes

Por consiguiente, cabe plantear la siguiente pregunta de investigación: ¿Son las redes sociales responsables de que las personas activas on-line demuestren también su compromiso social fuera de la Red, o solo cuando esas personas ya estaban predispuestas a la movilización, las redes refuerzan esa actitud activa que las trasciende en la respuesta off-line?

Para poder comprender lo que está ocurriendo, hay que tener muy en cuenta que las redes nos abren caminos hacia la participación social activa, implicando a sus usuarios en eventos de los que antes difícilmente se podía ni siquiera tener noticia, facilitando a los organizadores la difusión y a los receptores, la información (Rubio-Gil, 2012). Así, los usuarios, convertidos en receptores activos que alternan este rol con el de emisores o productores de mensajes y contenidos, son también el canal trasmisor de información.

Con la participación dentro de las redes, se activa un movimiento que muchas veces las trasciende porque busca llegar más allá (Dalhgren, 2011). Ahora bien, cada iniciativa exige, para el usuario que participa, distinto grado de implicación, distinta complejidad de respuesta, desde el momento en que el organizador o el creador de un determinado movimiento en la Red puede pedir solo que su receptor pulse una tecla sin más (un donativo en una campaña contra el hambre), o que salga a la calle a rodear físicamente el Congreso, pasando por iniciativas intermedias como pueden ser la colaboración para encontrar a una persona desaparecida.

Lo que todas las situaciones tienen en común es que para su difusión se ha pasado del tradicional «boca a boca» al «ordenador a ordenador» y más recientemente «teléfono móvil a teléfono móvil», lo que se denomina ya «face to face», forma apocopada de «Facebook a Facebook» y un sustituto improvisadamente simbólico al evocar el tradicional, y cada vez menos imprescindible, «cara a cara». Desde Guatemala (Harlow, 2012) a Corea del Sur (Choi & Park, 2014) se están recogiendo las experiencias en las que los jóvenes utilizan las redes sociales, nacionales o globales, para participar y movilizar con fines sociales y/o cívicos, on-line y off-line: una manifestación más de que «los usuarios se han hecho con el control de la herramienta y la están convirtiendo en una palanca para cambiar el mundo» (Orihuela, 2008: 62). Como comenta Lim (2012), las redes sociales han sustentado el paso del activismo on-line, a las protestas o movilización off-line.

2. Metodología

La hipótesis de partida se basa en que la familiaridad de los jóvenes con las redes sociales las convierte en un instrumento idóneo para involucrarles en la participación social. Así pues, el objetivo general de la investigación no puede ser otro que analizar cómo la participación de los jóvenes en las redes sociales conduce a una movilización social activa on-line y off-line, es decir, a través del mundo virtual y también a través del mundo real; ver hasta qué punto se trata de un ciberactivismo en el que los jóvenes cuentan con nuevas herramientas que facilitan su implicación en situaciones de injusticia social, solidaridad o necesidades humanitarias.

Para la realización del estudio, el instrumento de investigación utilizado es la encuesta, y para ello, se desarrolló un cuestionario on-line adaptado a las condiciones propias de las redes sociales. La encuesta a través de Internet tiene unas características intrínsecas, como son la rapidez en la recogida de información, el bajo coste y/o la mejora en las respuestas, características que se adaptaban perfectamente al estudio que aquí se realiza (Díaz-de-Rada, 2012). Para la recogida de estos datos, se contó con la colaboración de Tuenti, la red social española por excelencia que puso en marcha una campaña publicitaria en su plataforma –con 10 millones de usuarios activos– para divulgar y animar a la respuesta del cuestionario entre sus usuarios (el 80% de la actividad en esta red social corresponde a usuarios entre 14 y 25 años). Desde dicha campaña en Tuenti, se incluía un enlace al cuestionario de la investigación –con preguntas dicotómicas, escala de Likert y de elección múltiple–, referido a su participación en general en redes sociales, no exclusivamente en esta red. El cuestionario, con 30 preguntas, ha seguido una secuencia lógica, comenzando con breves preguntas sociodemográficas –edad, género, estudios– y continuando con preguntas introductorias o rompehielos y básicas, sobre privacidad y participación en las redes. La campaña utilizó el formato denominado «standard ad» y Tuenti ofreció un incentivo (sorteo de un regalo entre los participantes) para recabar la colaboración de los usuarios. Posteriormente, para el análisis de los datos, se utilizó el programa estadístico SPSS. La muestra utilizada para el estudio estaba formada por 1.330 jóvenes, hombres (59%) y mujeres (41%) en edades comprendidas entre los 16 (44%), 17 (34%) y los 18 (22%) años, seleccionados mediante muestreo probabilístico aleatorio simple, con un intervalo de confianza del 95,5% y p=q=50% y un margen de error de ±2,7%. A continuación, se exponen y revisan los resultados obtenidos.

3. Análisis y resultados

A la hora de analizar la función que las redes sociales desempeñan en la vida de los jóvenes, conviene señalar que las redes, más allá de permitir extender sus relaciones sociales, se constituyen como un medio que permite a los jóvenes, no solamente estar informados de acontecimientos cívicos, políticos, culturales, etc., sino también participar en ellos de manera activa (García & del-Hoyo, 2013).

Así, con intención de verificar esta forma de participación, la investigación realizada ha dejado constancia de algunos datos descriptivos que se recogen a continuación. Respecto a la primera pregunta de investigación relacionada con la influencia de las redes sociales en la participación on-line/off-line, los datos parecen poner en evidencia que siguen siendo más los jóvenes cuya participación comienza y termina en el mundo virtual, ya que frente al 38% que declara que, además de participar en algún evento on-line, se suele sumar a su versión off-line, más de un 44% reconoce que, aunque participe en eventos on-line, no se suma a ellos en la vida real; pero interpretar tales datos en términos dicotómicos de movilización y pasividad sería erróneo.

Para comprender correctamente el alcance de estos porcentajes deben hacerse algunas matizaciones, sin apartarnos de los datos que arroja el estudio. No debe despreciarse la capacidad de movilización de los jóvenes a través de las redes sociales al actuar como productores de contenido e inducir a otros a la participación, tal como lo ilustra el 24% de jóvenes encuestados cuando afirma que utiliza siempre o casi siempre las redes sociales «para animar a otros a la participación en algunas jornadas, manifestaciones, convocatorias, etc.», o el 26% que está de acuerdo con la afirmación: «Las redes sociales me han llevado a desarrollar/participar en alguna acción de protesta social».

Vemos pues con porcentajes muy igualados el doble papel que mediante las redes pueden desempeñar los jóvenes, o si se prefiere el doble papel que juegan ellas mismas (es un porcentaje similar el de jóvenes que se sienten animados desde las redes sociales a participar activamente en acciones sociales colectivas y aquellos que utilizan las redes sociales para animar a otros a la participación). Teniendo en cuenta el coeficiente rho de Spearman (García-Ferrando, 1994: 253) se puede establecer una correlación moderada (0,63) entre las variables «utilizo las redes sociales para animar a otros a la movilización social» y «las redes sociales me han llevado a participar en alguna acción de protesta social».

Por tanto, las cifras invitan a deducir que los jóvenes son activos en la Red, y lo son, en dos sentidos: como productores de contenido para invitar a otros a la movilización social y como receptores activos que trasladan a la realidad su empatía ante situaciones de necesidad social.

Especialmente significativo es el porcentaje de jóvenes encuestados que declaran utilizar las redes sociales para apoyar campañas de solidaridad (34,3%), los que afirman que hacen uso de las redes sociales para denunciar situaciones injustas (27,2%) o los que aseguran que las redes sociales les han llevado a desarrollar o participar en alguna acción de protesta social (27%).

En este punto, los datos arrojan luz sobre las posibilidades de participación que las redes ofrecen a los jóvenes para mostrar bien on-line bien off-line su solidaridad e implicación ante situaciones de desigualdad social, más o menos próximas a ellos, en definitiva posibilidades de promover y canalizar la movilización social activa de los jóvenes, especialmente como conductoras de la solidaridad en este grupo poblacional, de ahí que se pretenda saber hasta qué punto se aprovechan esas posibilidades, hasta qué punto las redes sociales se usan como una herramienta para canalizar la solidaridad ante situaciones que así la reclaman y, de hacerlo, cómo se expresa esa solidaridad.

Concretamente, el estudio planteaba a los jóvenes seleccionados diferentes situaciones que exigirían de ellos una respuesta solidaria. Esta respuesta podría quedar reflejada con un «click», con una «donación económica» o «acudiendo a una movilización social». En el primero de los casos, y según la situación o la circunstancia, el «click» podría significar una participación activa on-line por parte del joven que quedaría en esa conducta virtual.

Pero puede ser engañoso pensar que no transcendería a la vida social real, pues nos encontramos con asociaciones como Greenpeace, cuya página web reconoce la importancia del ciberactivismo. La organización lo define así: «Ser ciberactivista es movilizarse activamente en la defensa de la Tierra desde tu ordenador. Tu firma es una valiosa herramienta para la lucha por el medio ambiente, y con miles de ellas hemos conseguido paliar algunas de las agresiones más graves contra nuestro planeta». Por lo tanto, el «click» no debe juzgarse a priori como una conducta cómoda o pasiva por parte de los jóvenes ni tampoco infravalorarse sino que hay que tener en cuenta el contexto en el que se produce (http://goo.gl/7zOX8b).

Según los resultados del estudio realizado, la participación mayoritaria de los jóvenes sigue traduciéndose con un click en su ordenador, acción cuyas consecuencias, como acabamos de ver, no son en absoluto desdeñables. A ello se suma un porcentaje nada despreciable que parece implicarse en acciones sociales, cívicas, y lleva sus actos de solidaridad más allá del click. Con todo esto, el porcentaje de jóvenes encuestados que podemos considerar pasivos se limita al 17%; solo ese 17% asegura que «no participaría», ni a través del mundo virtual ni en el mundo real, en ninguno de los eventos que se les incluye en el cuestionario. De aquí puede deducirse que refleja la otra cara de esta moneda: la constatación de que más del 80% de los jóvenes, de una u otra forma, participan en las acciones a las que se les convoca a través de las redes sociales. Por lo tanto, las redes sociales no pueden ser consideradas sin más una moda pasajera. Son un cambio fundamental en la forma de comunicarnos y relacionarnos de manera global. El valor añadido que han incorporado a determinados movimientos sociales no puede dejarse caer en el olvido.

3.1. Formas de participación en acciones solidarias

Las diferencias de comportamiento que muestran los jóvenes en situaciones que requieren su participación social activa obedecen, en buena medida, a razones de proximidad, tanto a lo que entendemos como proximidad geográfica como a lo que podemos denominar proximidad social.

Cuando se trata de mostrar una actitud activa más allá de las redes sociales, los jóvenes tienden a mostrarse más solidarios con las situaciones más próximas geográficamente. Así, en el supuesto de participar en una campaña ecologista para proteger la costa española, un 27,5% aseguraba que participaría en una movilización off-line, mientras se reducía casi cinco puntos, 22%, el porcentaje de jóvenes que participaría en una campaña ecologista para salvar el Ártico.

Algo similar ocurre cuando se les pregunta cómo participarían en una campaña humanitaria contra la pobreza en España o en una campaña humanitaria contra la pobreza en África. En ambos casos, un 38% responde que «con un click», pero la diferencia se pone de manifiesto en cuanto se habla de trasladar su solidaridad fuera de las redes sociales. Entonces, aunque solo un 13% acudiría a movilizarse off-line en el caso de que la campaña se desarrollara para superar la pobreza en el continente africano; un 23% asegura que acudiría a alguna movilización si la campaña pretendiera combatir la pobreza en España.

Paradójicamente, a la hora de hacer una donación económica, los jóvenes se muestran más sensibilizados con la pobreza en África (33% de los encuestados donaría dinero) que con la pobreza en España (27,3% lo haría). El caso de la campaña contra el hambre en África es la situación –de todas las que se presentan en el estudio– que aglutina un porcentaje mayor de respuestas que optan por hacer una donación económica.


Draft Content 195776185-29643 ov-es004.jpg

Que la proximidad geográfica puede ser determinante se demuestra también en el supuesto referido a una «Campaña contra la pena de muerte en Irán», aunque quizá fuera aquí más apropiado hablar de lejanía geográfica, ya que es ella la que determina que un 31% de los jóvenes encuestados marcara que no participaría en dicha campaña. Ninguna otra de las situaciones planteadas para medir de qué forma influye la distancia geográfica en la participación acaparó un porcentaje mayor (la media de no participación en los supuestos se sitúa en el 17,4%).

El factor «proximidad social» hace referencia a eventos en los que la proximidad geográfica no interviene o no resulta determinante, sino que es la empatía con la propia situación la que lleva al individuo a una participación activa, guiada desde las propias redes sociales (algo similar a lo que ha estado ocurriendo en prensa con el valor noticia de la proximidad, valor con una doble dimensión, tanto geográfica, como emocional y/o intelectual). Así, en una campaña contra el cáncer, el 24,2% acudiría a una movilización, el 30% haría una donación y el 36% participaría con un «click». El porcentaje de los que acudirían a una movilización casi se duplica cuando se trata de una «campaña contra el acoso escolar o ciberbullyng» (40%), tema hacia el que parecen estar más sensibilizados y que sienten más cercano en sus vidas (sobre la cercanía o lejanía geográfica, se impone aquí la proximidad emocional), ya que la mayoría de los individuos que forman parte de la muestra se encuentran aún realizando sus estudios (88,2%) y probablemente la situación descrita –la hayan sufrido o no– les resulta cercana.

Aunque parezca difícil determinar qué tipo de proximidad pesa más en algunos supuestos, como el caso de la «campaña para el apoyo de un vecino con una enfermedad rara» o en el de la «campaña en defensa de la escuela del barrio», las cifras permiten afirmar que la proximidad física se sitúa como un factor secundario, frente a la proximidad social (lo que es perfectamente coherente con el hecho de que las redes pongan en contacto a las personas superando barreras físicas). En el primer supuesto mencionado, la participación de apoyo virtual alcanza el 35%, mientras el segundo llega al 40%.

La diferencia se agudiza a favor de las situaciones a las que se sienten más próximos emocionalmente, cuando se tantea la posibilidad de participar en movilizaciones fuera de la Red: el porcentaje que se movilizaría así en apoyo de ese vecino con una enfermedad rara baja al 24%, mientras se mantiene en un 31% a la hora de apoyar situaciones supuestas con las que por edad se identifican más fácilmente. Como ejemplo sirve de nuevo la campaña contra el acoso escolar donde el porcentaje que llevaría su compromiso fuera de la Red casi roza el 40%.


Draft Content 195776185-29643 ov-es005.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Los resultados del estudio dejan patente que las motivaciones en las redes sociales no están orientadas únicamente a la esfera de intereses personales, así como a necesidades sociales de tipo relacional o de inclusión, como plantean Notley (2009) y Colás, González y de-Pablos (2013). De hecho, dan un paso más y reflejan que un importante porcentaje de jóvenes participan en las redes con propósitos solidarios o cívicos. Estudios americanos como el realizado por Pew Research Center Internet & American Life sobre el compromiso cívico en la Era Digital refrendan esta conclusión en un estudio entre individuos adultos, según el cual, el 48% de los americanos participó en alguna actividad de carácter cívico, que podía abarcar desde colaborar para solucionar algún problema en su comunidad a participar en alguna acción de protesta, siempre movilizados por las redes sociales (Civic Engagement in the Digital Age) (http://goo.gl/Ov2XEr).

En la primera parte de este artículo, recogíamos la afirmación de que las redes sociales van más allá de ser una forma o un medio por el que comunicarse, para ser también una forma o un medio de participación social y activismo global. Los resultados del estudio presentado aquí lo demuestran desde el momento en que más de un 80% de los jóvenes encuestados canaliza vía redes su respuesta a campañas de apoyo o rechazo a determinados hechos.

Se partía también de que las redes aventajan a cualquier medio en inmediatez e interactividad. A la vista de los datos y teniendo en cuenta que la información para movilizarse llega ahora a jóvenes a los que antes no llegaba, cabe afirmar que están incentivando el compromiso y consiguiendo que jóvenes que no se movilizaban fuera de ellas, pasen a la acción, precisamente por las consecuencias que acarrean los dos rasgos que hemos recordado al comienzo de este párrafo. Las redes rompen las distancias físicas, tan limitadoras a veces para la movilización, y los jóvenes se acercan a sus «próximos» estén donde estén, y les apoyan, porque la colaboración o la movilización también han superado las limitaciones físicas, como lo corrobora que los mayores porcentajes de movilización los acaparen causas que sienten próximas, lo estén geográficamente o no (la adhesión a causas de este carácter acapara un 40% de la muestra).

La interactividad comporta una alternancia en los papeles de emisor y receptor en las redes, pero de nuevo, los datos recogidos van más allá de constatar que los usuarios no se limitan a recibir mensajes pasivamente sino que tienen capacidad de responder a ellos, para demostrar que además esos usuarios toman la iniciativa en nuevos mensajes que difunden la acción, es decir, los jóvenes no generan solo respuesta sino que generan pregunta, propuesta, llamada a la acción (casi una cuarta parte de los encuestados lo aseguraba).

En esta línea debe entenderse la imposibilidad de mantener un concepto reduccionista de su activismo en las redes, no solo por la evidencia de que una acción que podemos llamar virtual tiene consecuencias reales, sino porque de la muestra recogida se sigue la necesidad de hablar de grados de compromiso o de grados de movilización, más que de activismo o pasividad; se sigue, en definitiva, la necesidad de superar la dicotomía que opone on-line y off-line en el ámbito de la participación social.

El estudio corrobora que los jóvenes no utilizan exclusivamente las redes sociales para prolongar sus relaciones sociales off-line. Las redes ofrecen infinitas posibilidades de participación social activa. Es necesario mostrar a los jóvenes las opciones que las redes proporcionan como medio para canalizar las acciones solidarias. Las redes han cambiado el significado de la participación: las propias organizaciones piden la colaboración de sus ciudadanos a través de las redes como una forma de presión ante situaciones de injusticia o de necesidad social.

Amnistía Internacional o Greenpeace ya son conscientes de la importancia que tienen las redes sociales para animar a la participación social activa de los ciudadanos, y de hecho, Facebook se ha convertido en una herramienta clave para organizar y coordinar protestas de carácter cívico en muchísimas ciudades alrededor del mundo (Lim, 2012). Experiencias como las de Change.org, «la mayor plataforma de peticiones del mundo», en la que, como ellos mismos anuncian, más de 50 millones de personas «han pasado a la acción» son situaciones que requieren de un análisis actual y detallado sobre las variables que mueven a las personas a la participación. En este sentido, el presente estudio podría contribuir a las aportaciones en esta área con el planteamiento de algunas variables que inciden en esa participación on-line y su canalización off-line. Así, la proximidad geográfica, social o emocional determinará el compromiso de los jóvenes en eventos que requieran de su solidaridad o cooperación.

Con las redes sociales, el poder de convocatoria se ha visto ampliado y el coste de la realización de campañas de concienciación social ha mermado considerablemente. Por tanto, las organizaciones o movimientos sociales deben contar con esta nueva forma de comunicación social como medio para conseguir una movilización digital y real ante las «Causas 2.0», es decir, situaciones que requieren de la participación cívica de la ciudadanía y que utilizan las redes sociales para conseguirlo. Ahora bien, el estudio deja patente que hay circunstancias que llevan a una mayor participación y la puerta está abierta para conocer otras variables que, además de las recogidas, conduzcan a los jóvenes a un mayor compromiso cívico, lo que se abordará en próximos trabajos.

Referencias

Bescansa-Hernández, C. & Jerez-Novara, A. (2012). La red: ¿nueva herramienta o nuevo escenario para la participación política? XV Encuentro de Latinoamericanistas: América Latina: la autonomía de una región. Españoles. Madrid: Universidad Complutense.

Choi, S. & Park, H.W. (2014). An Exploratory Approach to a Twitter-based Community Centered on a Political Goal in South Korea: Who Organized it, What they Shared, and How They Acted. New Media & Society, 16, 1, 129-148. (DOI: 10.1177/1461444813487956).

Colás, P., González, T. & De-Pablos, J. (2013). Juventud y redes sociales. Motivaciones y usos preferentes. Comunicar, 40, 15-23. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-01).

Dahlgren, P. (2011). Jóvenes y participación política. Los medios en la Red y la cultura cívica. Telos, 89, 12-22.

Díaz-de-Rada, V. (2012). Ventajas e inconvenientes de la encuesta por Internet. Papers 2012, 97/1, 193-223.

García-Ferrando, M. (1994). Socioestadística. Introducción a la estadística en Sociología. Madrid: Alianza

García-Galera, M.C. & del-Hoyo-Hurtado, M. (2013). Redes sociales, un medio para la movilización juvenil. Zer, 18, 34, 111-125

Harfoush, R. (2009). Yes We did! An Inside Look at How Social Media Built the Obama Brand. Berkeley: New readers.

Harlow, S. (2012). Social Media and Social Movements: Facebook and an Online Guatemalan Justice Movement that Moved Off-line. New Media & Society, 14 2, 225-243.

Hernández, E., Robles, M.C. & Martínez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos y culturas cívicas: sentido educativo, mediático y político del 15M. Comunicar, 40, 59?67. (DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-06).

Ito, M. (2009). Hanging Out, Messing Around, Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New Media. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

Kahne, J., Lee, N. & Timpany, J. (2011). The Civic and Political Significance of Online Partipatory Cultures and Youth Transitioning to Adulthood. San Francisco: DML Central Working Papers

Leonard, L.G. (2011). Youth Participation in Civic Engagement through Social Media : A Case Study. Association of Internet Researchers. (http://goo.gl/1v0dw9).

Lim, M. (2012). Clicks, Cabs, and Coffee Houses: Social Media and Oppositional Movements in Egypt, 2004-2011. Journal of Communication, 62, 231-248. (DOI:10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01628.x).

Martínez-Martínez, H. (2013). Ciberactivismo y movimientos sociales urbanos contemporáneos. Un mapa de la investigación en España. II Congreso Nacional sobre Metodología de la Investigación en Comunicación. Segovia: AEIC.

Mccaughey, M. & Ayers, D. (2003). Cyberactivism: Online Activism in Theory and Practice. Nueva York: Routledge.

Monge-Benito, S. & Olabarri-Fernández, M.E. (2011). Los alumnos de la UPV/EHU frente a Tuenti y Facebook: usos y percepciones. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 66, 79-100.

Notley, T. (2009). Young People, Online Networks, and Social Inclusion. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14, 4, 1.208-1.227. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1083-6101.2009.01487.x).

Orihuela, J.L. (2008). Internet: la hora de las redes sociales. Nueva Revista, 119, 57-62.

O´Reilly, T. (2005). What Is Web 2.0. O'Reilly Media Inc. (http://goo.gl/HzTN3N) (18-10-2013).

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. NCB University Press, 9 (5).

Rubio-Gil, A. (2012). Participación política de la juventud, redes sociales y democracia digital. El caso Spanish Revolution. Telos, 93.

Tascón, M. & Quintana, Y. (2012). Ciberactivismo. Las nuevas revoluciones de las multitudes conectadas. Madrid: Catarata.

Valenzuela, S., Park, N. & Kee, F. (2009). Is There Social Capital in a Social Network Site?: Facebook Use and College Students' Life Satisfaction, Trust, and Participation. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14, 4, 875-901. (DOI: 10.1111/j.1083-6101.2009.01474.x).

Vitak, J., Lampe, C., Gray, R. & Ellison, N. (2012). Why Won’t you be my Facebook Friend? Strategies for Managing Context Collapse in the Workplace. Procedings of the 7th Annual iConference, 555-557. New York: ACM.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/14
Accepted on 30/06/14
Submitted on 30/06/14

Volume 22, Issue 2, 2014
DOI: 10.3916/C43-2014-03
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 34
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?