Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The aim of this article is to study in depth the changes taking place in the habits of adolescents using online communication, particularly due to the dramatic arrival of social networks in their daily lives, and the sociocultural implications of these processes. The research methodology focuses on a selfadministered questionnaire applied nationally. Based on the results of a survey of a representative national sample of 2,077 adolescents (12 to 17yearolds), this study has sought to update the information about online practices among Spanish adolescents, specifically with regard to the remarkable development of social networks. Similarly, the behavior of both regular users of social networks and of nonregular users has been compared, with the aim of detecting the influence of social network use on general online life, and we have considered the following variables: gender, age, funding type of the educational establishment and social class. Among the main conclusions of the study, we emphasize a more intensive use of the Internet as regards time and activities by those who are more frequent users of social networks, and especially the activities they carry out to keep in touch and share content with their equals.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Since 2008, social networks have experienced exponential growth in Spain, with regular users jumping from 22.6% to 72.3% between 2008 and the last quarter of 2010 according to the Spanish National Institute of Communication Technologies (INTECO, 2011). According to data from the Spanish National Institute of Statistics (INE, 2012), 88.5% of young Internet users aged 16-24 participate in social networks and in 2009, Bringué and Sádaba (2009) found that 71% of Spanish adolescents (12 to18-year-olds) already used them, with this figure increasing with age. At the same time, there is no doubt that the emergence of social networks and the ensuing integration of many online applications (Garmendia, Garitaonandia & al., 2011; Patchin & Hinduja, 2010) has fostered a change in general online practices, displacing certain habits and favoring others.

The main aim of this article is to detect and analyze the most recent online uses and behavior of adolescents and the influence of social networks on that group in Spain. More specifically, we incorporate a comparison between the online habits of different social network user profiles, from more intensive users to non-users, with the aim of identifying the influence on general online practices of the arrival of social networks. The work being presented here is situated at the theoretical and methodological crossroads of similar studies, with special relevance in relation to Sonia Livingstone’s work focusing on the relationship of children and young people with the Internet, within the framework of EU Kids Online. This project has focused strongly on the online practices and experiences of young people in a European framework, on the risks that they can face, such as cyberbullying, pornography, or invasions of privacy, and aspects such as digital skill and literacy levels (www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/Home.aspx). This perspective has given rise to a broad bibliography (Livingstone, 2008; Livingstone & Helsper, 2010; Livingstone & Brake, 2010; Livingstone & al., 2011), to which other studies in this direction, the result of increasing research efforts in recent years, must be added (Valcke & al., 2011).

The hypotheses we are examining in this study are the following:

H1. It is anticipated that greater use of social networks also entails more time spent online.

H2. The use of social networks means a shift from other, earlier applications focusing on communication with peer groups. Therefore, it is expected that social network users have shifted from use of this type of applications, whereas non-users of social networks will maintain their use of those applications.

H3. It is also anticipated that users of social networks make more intensive use of those online tools that allow them to obtain content to share with their peers.

1.1. Background

As stated by Ahn (2011), the issue analyzed here is the subject of an ever-expanding bibliography. Some authors’ studies are concerned, among other aspects, with intensive use and how it is distributed (Lenhart & Madden, 2007; Lenhart, Purcell & al., 2010) or with the growing influence of cell phones (Purcell, 2011). Other works analyzed educational subjects and literacy (Pérez, 2005; Eynon & Malmberg, 2011), the multitasking abilities of the new generations (Levine, Waite & Bowman, 2007; Moreno & al., 2012), relationships and the influence of the family environment (Liu & al., 2012; Duerager & Livingstone, 2012), aspects relating to gender differences (Valkenburg, Sumter & Peter, 2011), the impact of offline differences (Ahn, 2011) or the creation of contents (Buckingham, 2010), etc.

Other authors tackled the underlying reasons for online uses (Agosto, Abbas & Naughton, 2012), whereas Subrahmanyam and Greenfield (2008) highlighted the increase from the age of ten in relationships between peers and, in parallel, children's use of the Internet. There are also studies that focus on the impact of the Internet on aspects such as friendships or online relationships with strangers (Nie, 2001; Mesch, 2001; Boyd, 2007; Gross, 2004; Livingstone & Brake, 2010; Mesch & Talmud, 2007; Valkenburg & Peter, 2007, 2009, 2011), or the positive connection between the online environment and offline relationships (Subrahmanyam, Reich & al., 2008; Ellison & al., 2007; Barkhuus & Tashiro, 2010).

Valkenburg & Peter (2009) defined connectivity as the relationship adolescents have with others in their environment and Walsh, White and Young (2009) analyzed the processes of building identity and the feeling of social connection and belonging (Pearson & al., 2010). Furthermore, Cheung and others (2011) detected that the implicit and explicit rules of groups influence Facebook practices and Patchin and Hinduja (2010) discovered the relevance of self-protection factors in online life.

Flanagin (2005) analyzed the popularity of instant messaging, Gabino (2004) did the same with chatrooms and their oral connection, Nyland (2007) studied gratification and use of social networks in comparison to emails and face-to-face communication, and Utz, Tanis & Vermeulen (2012) highlighted the need for popularity as a powerful predictor of behavior on social network sites.

In Europe, the data collected throughout 2005 and 2006 as part of the Mediappro project allowed it to be concluded that the most common online activities of European adolescents were doing homework, playing games, communicating and searching for differing types of information (Mediappro, 2006). According to Livingstone, Haddon & al. (2011), the most frequent online activity of European teenagers is using the Internet to do school work (85%), followed by games (83%), watching videos (76%), using social networks and messaging (62%), and emailing (61%).

Focusing on Spain, the Information Security Observatory (INTECO, 2009) published a report compiled on the basis of data relating to adolescents aged between 10 and 16 years old referring to late 2007 and early 2008. Noteworthy in the report was that the most common options were, in order, using email, downloading films and looking for information for school; using Messenger was ranked fifth, while only 7.2% participated in forums and 2.2% in blogs. The phenomenon of social networks had not yet been included. In data from the following year, the Interactive Generation Forum detected that email, which had previously been the favorite application of adolescents aged between 12 and 18, had been taken over by Messenger and social networks (Bringué & Sádaba, 2009). Based on that same survey, the authors also analyzed social network use and interactions between the user profile (advanced users, users and non-users) and the use of other screened devices (cell phones, TV, videogames) and online services (Bringué & Sádaba, 2011). In addition to those listed above, other institutions and researchers in Spain have also discussed these issues: Aranda & others (2010), the Pfizer Foundation (2009), Espinar and González (2009) and Sánchez and Fernández (2010).

2. Methodology

The data presented in this study come from a representative statistical survey of adolescents (12-17 years old) attending school at the level of «Educación Secundaria Obligatoria» (years 1 to 4 of compulsory secondary education, ESO) and «Bachillerato» (High School equivalent level) in the Spanish State, with the exception of Ceuta, Melilla and Balearic and Canary Islands, throughout the 2011/2012 academic year. According to data published by the Ministry of Education, the study universe comprises 2,227,191 students at «ESO» and «Bachillerato» level from a total of 6,053 state, private and state-funded private (privados-concertados) educational establishments for secondary education and «Bachillerato» (the listings concerning these data were recovered from the respective websites of the Departments of Education of each of the Autonomous Communities included in the study universe). The design of the sample was a multi-stage stratified cluster sampling. As the first step, stratified cluster sampling was conducted by Autonomous Community, stage of education and type of educational establishment (state-owned or private school). In total, 100 educational establishments were randomly selected.

The second step consisted of applying stratified sampling of students by Autonomous Community, stage of education and whether it was a state-owned or privately-owned educational establishment. Ultimately, 2,077 surveys were obtained, in line with the quotas set for the variables of gender, age, stage of education and whether the establishment was state or privately owned, thus ensuring the representativeness of each segment according to the established sample. The sampling error stood at ± 2.2 for the worst possible case of variability in which p and q = 50/50 and a 95% level of confidence, assuming simple random sampling. The final results of the sample showed a marginal deviation with regard to the characteristics of the universe in some of the aforementioned parameters, therefore, elevation indices were established for the purpose of making adjustments to the real sample and the theoretical sample.

The educational establishments selected were contacted by telephone to request their collaboration. Once their participation had been confirmed, they were provided with an information letter addressed to the parents containing the objectives and contents of the study and data protection information, a standard informed consent form for parents or guardians regarding the participation of their children in the research and a participation report for the establishment detailing its involvement. For the educational establishments belonging to the Valencia Autonomous Community, additional authorization from the Valencia Regional Government was required in order to be able to participate in the survey. These establishments were also sent the Resolution dated October 21, 2011, of the Director-General of Teaching Establishments and Management of the Regional Department of Education, Training and Employment, authorizing the schools to participate in the project.

The school passed on the informed consent information to the students and these returned the authorization slips signed by their parents as a prerequisite for participating in the survey. They were also informed about the goals of the study, the relevance of their involvement and sincerity, and the necessity of data confidentiality.

The information was gathered from a classroom-based self-assessment questionnaire given only to those students who had obtained the consent of their parents. The questionnaire consisted of 54 questions and the average time required to complete it ranged from 20 to 30 minutes. In order to protect the children's rights, the questionnaire was supervised, reviewed and approved by the Office of the Ombudsperson for Children of the Autonomous Community of Madrid. The fieldwork was performed between the months of September and November 2011.

The calculation of social class needs to be clarified due to the complexity of this variable and, in particular, since those providing the information are minors. Given the difficulties involved in gathering information about the family's earnings in each household from the adolescents’ replies, and in anticipation that in the majority of cases this question would remain unanswered, social status was calculated on the basis of the father’s educational attainment level and profession, assuming that this is the person contributing the most earnings (which tends to be the most common situation in most households), except in those cases where the father was unemployed, or retired, etc., in which case the mother was taken into account. Despite these precautions, 492 subjects were unable to be classified because they had not given answers about one or more of the aforementioned variables, which obliges us to interpret the data with a degree of caution. The attached table explains the apportionment of the subjects among the classifications of upper class, middle class and lower class, based on the subjects' answers.


Draft Content 658830671-26804-en078.jpg

The data in this article was analyzed using the SPSS statistical program. The analysis was performed through the «custom tables» command, which allows contingency tables to be generated including two or more entries of variables and therefore allows the impact of third variables that show their relationship with the dependent variable, such as gender, whether the educational establishment that the minors attend is state or privately owned, and social class. This multivariable analysis will allow an assessment of whether the relationship is spurious or genuine and will permit us to observe how this third control variable alters the relationship between the intensity of social network use and other online practices. Finally, the statistical significance level that indicates to us if the differences detected are due to chance has been set for ?2< 0.05.

3. Results

Firstly, a description of general usage of the Internet by Spanish adolescents is given. Next, we examine the social networks that the children access, to then continue covering the type of activities they carry out in them. The following two subsections will focus on the study of adolescents' behavior depending on the profile of social network use, taking into account their age group, gender, whether the school they attend is state-owned or privately owned, and social class. After describing the characteristics of each profile, this study will explore the impact of social network user profiles on the time spent online and the general online practices of the adolescents.

3.1. Internet practices

The first factor studied is frequency of access depending on the type of activity. Social networks are the pages most frequented by adolescents, with 75.3% connecting very often, the figure reaching 90% if we include those who use them occasionally. This is followed by visiting the different sites which enable video-sharing (48.6% very often, and 31.6% occasionally), browsing different web pages (45.7% and 38.6%, respectively) and downloading music, film or TV series files (37.1% very often, and 33.9%, occasionally). Instant messaging occupies 31.6% of adolescents very often and 26.5% occasionally, whereas email occupies 24.5% of them very often, and 36.9% of them occasionally, and online games represent 16.3% and 25.2%, respectively.

At the other end of the spectrum are accessing chatrooms and forums (31.7% very often and occasionally), blogs (20%), photo-sharing sites (14.2%) and virtual worlds (9.1%), which is in the minority.

By age, it is observed that older adolescents access social networks very often to a greater extent than younger adolescents do: 84.1% of 15-17 year olds compared to 68% of 12-14 year olds. In addition, girls (78.5%) access social networks more than boys (71.8%). Differences by type of teaching are very limited, barely 0.8%. Looking at social class, those subjects classified as upper class connect very often more than other subjects: 78.3% compared to 75.1% (middle class) and 75.3% (lower class).

3.2. Behavior in social networks

An interesting initial fact refers to adolescents' preferences for certain social networks: 86.9% have one or more profiles in Tuenti and 73.4% have them on Facebook. Ranked third, 39% of registered adolescents choose Twitter. The greatest difference in the availability of profiles on social networks is observed in relation to age: the percentage of students aged 15-17 with a profile in all the social networks is greater than that of younger adolescents for the same item. Girls, however, have a profile on Facebook, Twitter and Fotolog to a greater extent than boys do.

Combining the two variables and taking into account the statistically significant differences for ?2< 0.05, younger boys have a profile on Facebook or MySpace to a greater extent than girls, but with age the trend reverses and the percentage of girls on Facebook exceeds that for boys. Between the ages of 15 and 17, the percentage of girls who have opened a profile on Fotolog is higher than that of boys. The differences in preferences for one social network or another by social class is only significant in the case of Tuenti, which is the option most used by the lower class. No statistically significant differences have been observed due to whether the establishment is state or privately owned.


Draft Content 658830671-26804-en079.jpg

Looking at social network practices, chatting stands out, with three-quarters of the adolescents admitting that they use the chat function very often. Around half use social networks to watch videos or look at their friends' photos (50.1%), while 48.3% send messages and 42.6% use them to update their profiles. Taking into consideration aspects more related to content creation, it is noted that the most frequent activity of this type on social networks among the adolescents is uploading personal photos or videos (55.2%), an activity done very often by 25.4% of them. Some 41% state that they upload interesting videos or photos that they have found online and 4.8% say that they participate in forums that create contents.

Considering social network practices by gender and age, we see that girls of all ages send messages (55.6%), update their profiles (48.9%), upload videos they themselves have made (32.6%), watch their friends' videos or photos (9.3%) more often than boys do. Boys, however, upload videos they have found on the Internet (17.9%), shop and sell (2.2%), participate in forums (4.8%) and play (24.4%) to a greater extent than the girls do. To end, the students at state schools use social networks more than students from private schools to play network games (17.1% compared to 12.7%) and boys classified as lower class watch strangers' videos or photos (11.6%,) more than those classified as upper and middle class do (7.8%).

3.3. Profiles of social network use

This section analyzes the basic characteristics of the different user profiles for social networks. To do this, the variable relating to the use of social networks has been recoded into intensive users (very often), occasional users (occasionally) and non-users (rarely or never), while «don't know/no answer» responses have been taken as lost cases. The most common profile of an intensive social network user is that of a female user aged between 15 and 17. Some 89.5% of them are intensive users compared to 79.3% of boys aged 15-17. The difference in the level of social network use is not significant by social class for ?2< 0.05.


Draft Content 658830671-26804-en080.jpg

3.4. Use of social networks and access time

Exploring the relationship between use of social networks and online connection times, the starting hypothesis is that greater use of social networks also entails more time spent online. In the first place, the types of social network users have been cross-referenced with the days on which they go online and, as was anticipated, the intensity of use of social networks is associated with going online daily, with slight variations depending on gender (more intensive use by female users) but with very noticeable differences for the 12-14 age group. These trends are not seen so clearly among the lower class, in which non-users of social networks are five percentage points above occasional users as regards daily Internet use.

Daily use of the Internet is more common among intensive users of social networks, while less frequent weekly use is more common among occasional users and even more so among non-users, who go online to a greater extent either two days per week or one day per week (see table 3).

Cross-referencing the types of users of social networks with the time they usually spend, it is not surprising to see that once again it is intensive social network users who go online the longest on weekdays and also, to a lesser extent, on weekends (more than two hours a day). The percentages of advanced users of social networks who spend over two hours a day online on weekdays (in the three related sections, which comprise between two and three hours, between three and five hours, and more than five hours) double those of the other two groups of users. The situation is somewhat similar at weekends but only as of three hours online per day.

Considering the variables of gender, age, type of education and social class, in general terms the pattern of increased time spent online according to the intensity of use of social networks is upheld in relation to both weekdays and weekends, but once again, among subjects classified as lower class and also among students of private schools, although to a lesser extent, non-users exceed occasional users.

3.5. Internet practices among users and non-users of social networks

With the exception of network games, intensive users always show a tendency to make more frequent use of the different applications provided by the Internet. This greater intensity of use is particularly important in the case of downloads of music files, films/series, instant messaging systems, chats and forums, videos and shared photos. These are activities that allow content to be put online to share in social networks (videos, photos, or even music archives), whereas chats and forums and instant messaging refer to activities concerning social relationships that can be carried on through the networks.

Some of the tools which do not have a lineal relationship with social network use are email, instant messaging systems, blogs, and chats and forums, which non-users of social networks take advantage of more frequently than occasional users do but not more frequently than intensive users, perhaps because occasional users satisfy this need through using the tools provided by social networks. However, it can be observed that the percentage of non-users who do not use these services is never higher than that of conventional users.

Considering age, gender, state or privately-owned educational establishments and social class, this does not mean substantial changes in the relationship between types of users of social networks and online uses since, for those values that maintain statistical significance, there are higher percentages of very frequent use for advanced users of social networks. Finally, the relationship between the type of user of social networks and the creation of websites or blogs has been explored. Intensive users of social networks are also those who have, to a greater extent than other users, created these spaces (39.9%, 28% and 27.2% respectively for advanced users, occasional users and non-users of social networks). These differences remain if we take into consideration the variables of gender, age, state or private ownership of the educational establishment and social class.


Draft Content 658830671-26804-en081.jpg

4. Conclusions and discussion

Several conclusions that can be observed that are in accordance with the hypotheses initially put forward. Together with the high participation of minors in social networks, we can see the predominance for adolescents of social networks, followed by sites for sharing videos, general web pages and pages for downloading music files and movie or series files. As in the case of sites for sharing videos, social networks have superseded email and instant messaging as the main focuses of online activity. It has been detected that Tuenti and Facebook predominate at these ages and, in addition, that students aged between 15 and 17 years old get more involved, and that their favorite activities are chatting, watching videos or friends' photos, sending messages, or updating their profiles.

If we take into account social network user profiles, we can see a positive correlation between time spent online and use of social networks. Those who make more intensive use of social networks are those who most commonly take part in online activities, with the exception of online games. These advanced users are particularly active in activities related to obtaining content that can be shared with other «friends» in social networks, such as downloading music files, videos and sharing photos. In contrast to the initial assumption, more intensive users of social networks are also those who have more conversations and share, to a greater extent, content through chats, forums and instant messaging. The first and third hypotheses would therefore be deemed to be verified, that is, that more time is spent online by users who make more frequent use of social networks as well as applications that allow them to obtain content to share with their peers. In effect, it is apparent that users of social networks do make more intensive use of online tools that allow them to obtain content to share with their peers.

However, the data disprove the second hypothesis relating to the displacement of traditional online channels of communication due to involvement in social networks, at least as far as intensive users of these sites are concerned. This means that users who make most use of social networks are also those who make most versatile use of the Internet, using more services, who are more differentiated and who combine more the different applications focusing on communication, possibly because they make specialized use of these communication tools depending on online content and on other characteristics of the recipients. This suggests, in line with other studies, that the differentiation of consumption and behavior is more connected to factors such as access time or the individual's profile than to the application or channel.

In addition, the relevance of the variables of gender, age, type of education and social class, on time, frequency, behavior and consumption online. However, it does not imply substantial changes in the relationship between the type of social network user and cyberspace practices. The implications of this discovery are coupled with other concerns.

Some of the questions pending clarification relate to the senses that the adolescents themselves apply to their practices and relationships. Although tackling how the use of social networks can modify other online practices, which is the objective of this article, has not been common in qualitative studies, in turn, establishing relationships between patterns of use and the probability, or manner, of facing the potential risks of cyberspace has opened up as an interesting line of research.

Support

This study presents the results obtained from a Spanish state-wide survey as part of a research project with public and national funding: «Analysis of the use and consumption of media and social networks on the Internet among Spanish adolescents. Characteristics and high-risk practices» (CSO2009-09577), Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation. Secretary of State for Research. Directorate-General for Research and National R&D Plan Management, directed by Antonio García Jiménez. The research team comprised the following members (in alphabetical order): Mª Carmen Arellano-Pardo, Pilar Beltrán-Orenes, Beatriz Catalina-García, Carmen Gaona-Pisionero, Flavia Gómes-Franco-e-Silva, María Cruz López-de-Ayala-López, Esther Martínez-Pastor, Edisa Mondelo-González, Manuel Montes-Vozmediano, Carmen Pérez-Pais, Rosa Sansegundo-Manuel, José-Carlos Sendín-Gutiérrez. This framework program was preceded by the project entitled «Study of uses of Internet among children in the Madrid Autonomous Community. Risks and characteristics», which was also publicly funded (by the Madrid Autonomous Community) and the field work for which was performed throughout the month of October 2009.

References

Agosto, D.E., Abbas, J. & Naughton, R. (2012). Relationships and Social Rules: Teens’social Network and other ICT Selection Practices. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 63(6), 1108-1124. (DOI: 12.1002/asi.22612).

Ahn, J. (2011). The Effect of Social Network Sites on Adolescents’ Academic and Social Development: Current Theories and Controversies. Journal of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, 62(8), 1435-1445. (DOI: 10.1002/asi.21540).

Aranda, D. y otros (2010). Los jóvenes del siglo XXI: prácticas comunicativas y con-sumo cultural, II Congreso Internacional AE-IC Comunicación y desarrollo en la era digital. (www.aeic2010malaga.org/upload/ok/204.pdf) (10-09-2011).

Barkhuus, L. & Tashiro, J. (2010). Student Socialization in the Age of Facebook. Proceedings of the 28th Annual ACM Special Interest Group on Computer on Computer Human Interaction Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (SIGCHI ‘10). New York: ACM Press, 133-142.

Boyd, D. (2007). Why Youth Heart Social Network sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life. In D. Buckingham (Ed.), Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 119-142.

Bringué, X. & Sádaba C. (2011). Menores y redes sociales. Madrid: Fundación Tele-fónica. (www.generacionesinteractivas.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Libro-Menores-y-Redes-sociales_Fin.pdf) (08-04-2012).

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C. (2009), La generación interactiva en España. Niños y jóve-nes ante las pantallas. Madrid: Fundación Telefónica. (www.fundación.telefonica.com/.../generacionesinteractivas.pdf) (12-04-2012).

Buckingham, D. (2010). Do We Really Need Media Education 2.0? In K. Drotner & K. Schroder (Eds.), Digital Content Creation: Perceptions, Practices, & Perspectives, New York: Peter Lang.

Cheung, C., Chiu, P.W. & Lee, M. (2011). Online Social Networks: Why do Students Use Facebook? Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 1337–1343. (DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.-2010.07.028)

Duerager, A. & Livingstone, S. (2012). How Can Parents Support Children’s Internet Safety? EU Kids Online.London,UK.(www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOn-line/EU%20Kids%20III/Reports/ParentalMediation.pdf) (12-04-2012).

Ellison, N., Steinfield, C. & Lampe, C. (2007). The Benefits of Facebook Friends: Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer Mediated Communication, 12, 1143–1168, (DOI:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00367.x).

Espinar, E. y González, M.J. (2009). Jóvenes en las redes sociales virtuales: un aná-lisis exploratorio de las diferencias de géneros. Feminimo/s, 14, 87-105.

Eynon, R. & Malmberg, L. (2011). A Typology of Young People’s Internet Use: Implica-tions for Education. Computers & Education, 56, 585-595, (DOI: 10.1016/j.compe-du.2010.09.020).

Flanagin, A.J. (2005). IM Online: Instant Messaging Use among College Students. Communication Research Reports, 22 (3), 175-187. (www.comm.ucsb.edu/faculty/flanagin/CV/Flanagin2005(CRR).pdf) (1-06-2012).

Fundación Pfizer (2009). La juventud y las redes sociales en Internet. Informe de resultados de la encuestas (www.fundacionpfizer.org/docs/pdf/Foro_Debate/IN-FORME_FINAL_Encuesta_Juventud_y_Redes_Sociales.pdf) (20-09-2011).

Gabino, M.A. (2004). Niños y jóvenes como usuarios-receptores virtuales e interactivos. Comunicar, 22, 120-125. (www.revistacomunicar.com/index.php?contenido=detalles&numero=22&articulo=22-2004-18) (02-07-2012).

García, A. (Coord.) (2010). Comunicación y comportamiento en el ciberespacio. Actitudes y riesgos de los adolescentes. Barcelona: Icaria.

Garmendia, M., Garitaonandia, C. & al. (2011). Riesgos y seguridad en Internet: los menores españoles en el contexto europeo. (www.ehu.es/eukidsonline) (10-04-2012).

Gross, E.F. (2004). Adolescent Internet use: What We Expect, What Teens Report. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 25(6), 633–649.

INTECO (2011). Estudio sobre la seguridad de la información y la e-confianza de los hogares españoles. 2º cuatrimestre de 2011 (16ª oleada). Observatorio de la Seguridad de la Información, INTECO. (www.inteco.es/Seguridad/Observatorio/Es-tudios/Estudio_hogares_2C2011) (10-04-2012).

Lenhardt, A. & Madden, M. (2005). Teen Content Creators and Consumers. Wash-ington, DC: Pew Internet & American Life Project, November 2. (www.pewInternet.org/PPF/r/166/report_display.asp) (12-04-2012).

Lenhart, A. & Madden, M. (2007). Social Networking Websites and Teens: An Overview. (www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_SNS_data_Memo_Jan_2007.pdf) (12-04-2012).

Lenhart, A., Purcell, K. & al. (2010). Social Media and Mobile Internet Use amongs Teens and Young Adults. (pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults.aspx) (13-04-2012).

Levine, L.E., Waite B.M. & Bowman, L.L. (2007). Electronic Media Use, Reading, and Academic Distractibility in College Youth. Cyberpsychology Behavior, 10(4), 560-566.

Liu, Q.X., Fang, XY. & al. (2012). Parent-adolescent Communication, Parental Internet Use and Internet-Specific Norms and Pathological Internet Use among Chinese Adolescents. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1269-1275.

Livingstone, S. & Brake, D.R. (2010). On the Rapid Rise of Social Networking Sites: New Findings and Policy Implications. Children & Society, 24, 75-83.

Livingstone, S. & Helsper, E. (2010). Balancing Opportunities and Risks in Teenegers’ Use of the Internet: the Role of Online Skills and Internet self-efficacy. New Media & Society, 12, 2, 309-329.

Livingstone, S. (2008). Taking Risky Opportunities in Youthful Content Creation: Teenagers’ Use of Social Networking Sites for Intimacy, Privacy and Self-expression. New Media & Society, 10, 393-411.

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L. & al. (2011). Risks and Safety on the Internet: The Perspective of European Children. Full Findings. LSE, London: EU Kids Online. (www.e-prints.lse.ac.uk/33731/1/Risks_and_safety_on_the_internet_the_perspective_of_European_children.pdf) (15-06-2012).

Mediappro (2006). Mediappro. A European Research Project for the Appropriation of New Media by Youth (online) Brussels, European Commission. (www.mediappro.org/publications/finalreport.pdf) (10-04-2012).

Mesch, G. (2001). Social Relationships and Internet Use among Adolescents in Israel. Social Science Quarterly, 82, 329-340.

Mesch, G.S. & Talmud, I. (2007). Similarity and the Quality of Online and Offline Social Relationships among Adolescents in Israel. Journal of Research on Adolescents, 17, 455-466.

Moreno, M.A. & al. (2012). Internet Use and Multitasking among Older Adolescents: An Experience Sampling approach. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1097-1102

Nie, N. (2001). Stability, Interpersonal Relationships and the Internet: Reconciling Conflicting Findings. American Behavioral Scientist, 45, 420-435.

Nyland, R. (2007). The Gratification Niche of Internet Social Networking, E-mail, and Face-to-face Communication. Master´s Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Brigham Young University. (www.comm.ucsb.edu/faculty/flanagin/CV/Flanagin2005(CRR).pdf) (10-04-2012).

Patchin, J.W. & Hinduja, S. (2010). Trends in Online Social Networking: Adolescent Use of MySpace over Time. New Media & Society, 12(2) 197–216, (DOI: 10.1177/1461444809341857).

Pearson, J.C., Carmon, A. & et al. (2010). Motives for Communication: Why the Mille-nnial Generation Uses Electronic devices. Journal of the Communication, Speech & Theatre Association of North Dakota, 22, 45–55.

Pérez, R. (2005). Alfabetización en la comunicación mediática: la narrativa digital. Comunicar, 25, 165-175. (www.revistacomunicar.com/index.php?contenido=-detalles&numero=25&articulo=25-2005-023) (02-07-2012).

Purcell, K. (2011). Trends in Teen Communication and Social Media Use (Pew Internet & American Life Project). Presentation given at Joint Girl Scout Research Institute/Pew Internet Webinar. (www.pewinternet.org/Presentations/2011/Feb/PIP-Girl-Scout-Webinar.aspx) (13-04-2012).

Sánchez, A. & Fernández, M.P. (2010). Informe Generación 2.0, 2010. Hábitos de los adolescentes en el uso de las redes sociales. (http://escacc.cat/docroot/escacc/includes/elements/fitxers/1111/generacin2-0.pdf)

Subrahmanyam, K. & Greenfield, P. (2008). Online Communication and Adolescent Relationships. Children and Electronic Media. 18 (1), 119-146. The Future of Children. (www.futureofchildren.org/futureofchildren/publications/docs/18_01_06.pdf) (05-05-2012).

Subrahmanyam, K., Reich, S. & al. (2008). Online and Offline Social Networks: Use of Social Networking sites by Emerging Adults. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 29, 420-433.

Utz, S., Tanis, M. & Vermeulen, I. (2012). It Is All About Being Popular: The Effects of Need for Popularity on Social Network Site Use. Cyberpsychology Behavior and Social Networking, 15 (1), 37-42, (DOI:10.1089/cyber.2010.0651).

Valcke, M., De-Weber, B. & al. (2011). Long-term Study of Safe Internet Use of Young Children. Computers & Education, 57, 1292-1305.

Valkenburg, P. M. & Peter, J. (2011). Online Communication among Adolescents: An integrated model of its attraction, opportunities, and risks. Journal of Adolescent Health, 48(2), 121-127.

Valkenburg, P.M. & Peter, J. (2007). Preadolescents’ and Adolescents’ Online Commu-nication and their Closeness to Friends. Developmental Psychology, 43(2), 267-277.

Valkenburg, P.M. & Peter, J. (2009). Social Consequences of the Internet for Adolescents: A Decade of Research. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 18(1), 1-5.

Walsh, S., White, K. & Young. R. (2009). The Phone Connection: A Qualitative Explo-ration of How Belongingness and Social Identification Relate to Mobile Phone Use amongst Australian Youth. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 19, 225-240.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Profundizar en los cambios que se están perfilando en los hábitos online de los adolescentes, en particular debido a la fuerte irrupción de las redes sociales en su vida cotidiana, así como en las implicaciones socioculturales de estos procesos, es el objeto de este trabajo. La metodología de investigación se centró en un cuestionario autoadministrado aplicado a escala nacional. Sobre una muestra representativa nacional de 2.077 adolescentes (de 12 a 17 años), se ha buscado actualizar la información relativa a las prácticas online entre los menores y adolescentes españoles, con atención específica a la extensión del fenómeno de las redes sociales e identificando su influencia sobre las prácticas de los adolescentes en la Red. De igual modo, se comparan los usos entre los usuarios habituales de las redes sociales y los que no las tienen entre sus prácticas cotidianas, con la idea de detectar la influencia del uso de las redes sociales en los usos generales en Internet y controlando esa relación en función de cuatro variables: sexo, edad, titularidad del centro al que asisten los adolescentes y clase social. Entre las principales conclusiones destacamos el uso más intensivo en tiempo y en actividades de los usuarios que utilizan muy frecuentemente las redes sociales, con especial incidencia en aquellas actividades que les permiten mantener el contacto y compartir contenidos con sus pares.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Desde el año 2008, las redes sociales han experimentado un crecimiento exponencial en España, aumentando del 22.6% al 72.3% los usuarios habituales entre el año 2008 y el último trimestre de 2010 (INTECO, 2011). Según datos del Instituto Nacional de Estadística en 2012, el 88,5% de los jóvenes usuarios de Internet con edades comprendidas entre los 16 y 24 años participa en redes sociales y, ya en 2009, Bringué y Sádaba (2009) encontraron que el 71% de los adolescentes españoles (12-18 años) las utilizaban, elevándose esta cifra con la edad. Al mismo tiempo, no cabe duda de que la emergencia de las redes sociales y la consiguiente integración de muchas de las aplicaciones on-line (Garmendia, Garitaonandia & al., 2011; Patchin & Hinduja, 2010) promueve un cambio de las prácticas generales en la Red, desplazando ciertos hábitos y propiciando otros.

Este artículo tiene como principal objetivo detectar y analizar los usos y comportamientos más recientes de los adolescentes en Internet y en las redes sociales en España. Más concretamente, incorporamos una comparación de los hábitos on-line entre diferentes perfiles de usuarios de las redes sociales, desde los más intensivos hasta los no usuarios, con el objetivo de identificar la influencia de la incorporación de las redes sociales en los usos generales de Internet. El trabajo que aquí se presenta se sitúa en el cruce teórico y metodológico de estudios similares, con especial vinculación a los trabajos de Sonia Livingstone enfocados a la relación entre menores y jóvenes con Internet, en el marco de EU Kids Online. Un proyecto que se ha centrado tanto en los usos y experiencias de los menores en Internet en el marco europeo, en los riesgos a los que se pueden enfrentar, como son el «cyberbulling», la pornografía, o la invasión de la privacidad, así como en aspectos como los niveles de alfabetización y competencia digital (www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/Home.aspx). Esta perspectiva ha dado lugar a una bibliografía ingente (Livingstone, 2008; Livingstone & Helsper, 2010; Livingstone & Brake, 2010; Livingstone & al. 2011), a la que hay que añadir otros estudios en esta línea (Valcke & al., 2011), producto del creciente esfuerzo investigador de los últimos años.

Las hipótesis que barajamos en esta investigación son las siguientes:

• H1. Se espera encontrar que un mayor uso de las redes sociales también conlleva un mayor tiempo de conexión a la Red.

• H2. La incorporación de las redes sociales supone un desplazamiento de otras aplicaciones anteriores orientadas a la comunicación con el grupo de pares. Por tanto, se espera que los usuarios de las redes sociales hayan desplazado en sus usos este tipo de aplicaciones que se mantendrían entre los no usuarios.

• H3. También se espera que los usuarios de las redes sociales hagan un uso más intensivo de aquellas herramientas on-line que les permitan obtener contenidos para compartir con sus pares.

1.1. Antecedentes

Tal y como señala Ahn (2011), la cuestión aquí analizada es objeto de una cada vez más amplia bibliografía. Algunos autores se preocupan, entre otros aspectos, del uso intensivo, de cómo se distribuye (Lenhart & Madden, 2007; Lenhart, Purcell & al., 2010) o de la creciente influencia de los móviles (Purcell, 2011). Otros trabajos analizan los temas educativos y la alfabetización (Pérez, 2005; Eynon & Malmberg, 2011), la capacidad multitarea de las nuevas generaciones (Levine, Waite & Bowman, 2007; Moreno & al., 2012), las relaciones e influencia del contexto familiar (Liu & al., 2012; Duerager & Livingstone, 2012), los aspectos referidos a las diferencias de género (Valkenburg & Peter, 2011), el impacto de las diferencias offline (Ahn, 2011) o la creación de contenidos (Buckingham, 2010), etc.

Otros autores abordan las razones últimas de los usos on-line (Agosto, Abbas & Naughton, 2012), mientras que Subrahmanyam y Greenfield (2008) subrayan el incremento, desde los diez años, de las relaciones entre iguales y, paralelamente, la conexión con Internet por parte de los menores. También hay estudios que se detienen en el impacto de Internet en aspectos como la amistad o las relaciones on-line con extraños (Nie, 2001; Mesch, 2001; Boyd, 2007; Gross, 2004; Livingstone & Brake, 2010; Mesch & Talmud, 2007; Valkenburg & Peter, 2007, 2009, 2011), o la vinculación positiva entre el ámbito on-line y las relaciones offline (Subrahmanyam, Reich & al., 2008; Ellison, Steinfield & Lampe, 2007; Barkhuus & Tashiro, 2010).

A su vez, Valkenburg y Peter (2009) definen la conectividad como la relación de los adolescentes con otros en su ambiente y Walsh, White y Young (2009) analizan los procesos de construcción de la identidad o el sentimiento de conexión social y pertenencia (Pearson & al., 2010). También Cheung y otros (2011) detectan que las normas, implícitas y explícitas, de los grupos tienen influencia en el uso de Facebook y Patchin e Hinduja (2010) descubren la relevancia de los factores de auto-protección en la vida on-line.

Por su parte, Flanagin (2005) analiza la popularidad de la mensajería instantánea, Gabino (2004) hace lo mismo con el chat y su conexión con lo oral, Nyland (2007) las satisfacciones en el uso de las redes sociales en contraposición con el correo electrónico y la comunicación cara a cara y Utz, Tanis y Vermeulen (2012) destacan la necesidad de popularidad como un predictor fuerte del comportamiento en los sitios de redes sociales.

En Europa, los datos recogidos en el marco del proyecto de Mediappro a lo largo de 2005 y 2006 permiten concluir que las actividades más comunes de los adolescentes europeos en la Red se orientan a realizar deberes, juegos, comunicación y búsqueda de información de diverso tipo (Mediappro, 2006). Siguiendo a Livingstone, Haddon y otros (2011), la actividad más realizada por los adolescentes europeos en la Red se refiere al uso de Internet para realizar tareas escolares (85%), seguida por juegos (83%), ver video-clips (76%), redes sociales y mensajería (62%) y correo electrónico (61%).

Centrando la atención en España, el Observatorio de la Seguridad de la Información (INTECO, 2009) publica un informe elaborado con datos correspondientes a los adolescentes de entre diez y dieciséis años y referidos a finales de 2007 y principios de 2008, en el que se destaca que las opciones mayoritarias, por este orden, son el uso del correo electrónico, descarga de películas e información para el colegio; el Messenger ocuparía un quinto puesto y únicamente el 7,2% participa en foros y el 2,2% en blogs; el fenómeno de las redes sociales todavía no se recoge. Con datos de un año después, el Foro de las Generaciones Interactivas detecta que el correo electrónico, como aplicación favorita de los adolescentes de 12 a 18 años, ha sido superado por el Messenger y las redes sociales (Bringué y Sádaba, 2009). Sobre la base de esa misma encuesta, estos autores analizan el uso de las redes sociales y las interacciones entre el perfil de usuario (usuarios avanzados, usuarios y no usuarios) y la utilización de otras pantallas (móviles, televisión, videojuegos) y de otros servicios en Internet (Bringué & Sádaba, 2011). Además de los citados, en el contexto español, otros centros e investigadores también se han preocupado por estas cuestiones: Aranda y otros (2010), Fundación Pfizer (2009), Espinar y González (2009) y Sánchez y Fernández (2010).

2. Metodología

Los datos que se presentan proceden de una encuesta estadística representativa de los adolescentes (de 12 a 17 años) escolarizados en Educación Secundaria Obligatoria (1º-4º de ESO) y Bachillerato del Estado español, a excepción de Ceuta, Melilla y las Islas Baleares y Canarias, a lo largo del curso académico 2011/12. Según datos publicados por el Ministerio de Educación, el universo de estudio estaría conformado por 2.227.191 alumnos de ESO y Bachillerato de un total de 6.053 centros públicos, privados y privados-concertados de Educación Secundaria y Bachillerato (los listados referentes a estos datos fueron recuperados de las respectivas páginas web de las consejerías de educación de cada una de las Comunidades Autónomas que se incluyen en el universo de estudio). El diseño de la muestra siguió un muestreo polietápico estratificado por conglomerados. En una primera etapa se realizó un muestreo de conglomerados estratificado por Comunidades Autónomas, niveles de enseñanza y tipología de centro educativo (titularidad pública o privada). En total se seleccionaron de forma aleaoria 100 centros educativos.

En una segunda etapa se efectuó un muestreo estratificado de alumnos por Comunidad Autónoma, nivel de enseñanza y titularidad del centro al que asiste. Finalmente se obtuvieron 2.077 encuestas, siguiendo las cuotas marcadas de género, edad, nivel de estudios del encuestado y titularidad del centro educativo, garantizando la representatividad de cada segmento en función de la muestra establecida. El error muestral se situó en el ± 2.2 para un supuesto de máxima indeterminación en el que p y q= 50/50 y un nivel de confianza del 95%, bajo el supuesto de un muestreo aleatorio simple. Los resultados finales de la muestra mostraban una ligerísima desviación respecto a las características del universo en algunos de los parámetros señalados, por lo que se establecieron unos índices de elevación con el objetivo de ajustar la muestra teórica y la real.

Los centros educativos seleccionados fueron contactados telefónicamente para solicitar su colaboración. Una vez ratificada su participación, se les facilitaba: una carta informativa dirigida a los padres con los objetivos, contenidos del estudio y protección de datos; un modelo de consentimiento informado de los padres o tutores sobre la participación de sus hijos en la investigación; y un informe de participación donde se detallaba al centro su intervención. En los centros educativos pertenecientes a la Comunidad Valenciana se requería un permiso adicional de la Generalitat Valenciana para poder participar en la encuesta, a estos centros también se les remitió la Resolución de 21 de octubre de 2011 del Director General de Ordenación y Centros Docentes de la Consellería de Educación, Formación y Empleo por la que se autorizaba a los mismos a participar en el proyecto.

El centro trasladaba a los alumnos el consentimiento informado y estos remitían de vuelta la autorización firmada por sus padres como requisito previo para su participación en la encuesta. Igualmente, se les informaba sobre los objetivos del estudio, la relevancia de su participación y sinceridad y la necesaria confidencialidad de los datos.

La información fue recogida a partir de un cuestionario auto-administrado en el aula que se aplicó únicamente a aquellos alumnos que contaban con permiso paterno. El cuestionario constaba de 54 preguntas y el tiempo medio exigido para su cumplimentación oscilaba entre 20 y 30 minutos. Con el objetivo de preservar los derechos de los menores, el cuestionario ha sido supervisado, revisado y aprobado por la Oficina del Defensor del Menor de la Comunidad de Madrid. El trabajo de campo se llevó a cabo entre los meses de septiembre y noviembre de 2011.

El cálculo de la clase social requiere una aclaración por la complejidad de esta variable y en particular cuando los informadores son menores de edad. Dada las dificultades para recopilar información acerca de los ingresos familiares en el hogar a partir de las respuestas de los adolescentes y en previsión de que en la mayoría de los casos esta pregunta apareciera sin responder, el estatus social se calculó a partir del nivel educativo y la ocupación del padre, asumiendo que es éste la persona que más ingresos aporta, que suele ser la situación más frecuente en la mayor parte de los hogares, salvo en aquellos casos en los que el padre esté en paro, sea pensionista, etc., que se ha considerado a la madre. A pesar de estas precauciones, 492 encuestados no pudieron clasificarse porque habían dejado sin contestar alguna de las variables referidas, lo que nos obliga a interpretar los datos con cierta precaución. En el cuadro adjunto se explica la distribución entre clase alta, media y baja en función de las respuestas de los entrevistados.


Draft Content 658830671-26804 ov-es078.jpg

En este artículo se han sometido los datos a un análisis estadístico con el programa SPSS. El análisis se ha realizado mediante el comando «tablas personalizadas» que permite generar tablas de contingencia incluyendo más de dos entradas de variables y controlar así los efectos de terceras variables que muestran su relación con la variable dependiente como son el género, la edad, la titularidad del centro al que asisten los menores o la clase social. Este análisis multivariable permitirá valorar si estamos ante una relación espuria o genuina y observar cómo altera esa tercera variable de control la relación entre la intensidad de uso de las redes sociales y otros usos de la Red. Por último, el nivel de validez estadística que nos indica si las diferencias detectadas se deben o no al azar se ha establecido para ?2<0.05.

3. Resultados

En primer lugar se describen los usos generales de las redes entre los adolescentes españoles. A continuación, nos detendremos en las redes sociales a las que acceden los menores para después continuar abordando el tipo de actividades que realizan en ellas. Los siguientes dos subapartados se dedicarán al estudio de los comportamientos de los adolescentes en función de su perfil de uso de las redes sociales teniendo en cuenta el grupo de edad, el género, la titularidad del centro al que asisten y la clase social. Después de describir las características de cada perfil, se explorará cómo incide el perfil de usuario en el tiempo de uso y en los usos generales que se hacen de la Red.

3.1. Usos de la Red

El primer factor estudiado es la frecuencia de acceso en función del tipo de actividad. Las redes sociales son los sitios que más frecuentan los adolescentes, conectándose el 75,3% con mucha frecuencia y alcanzando el 90% si incluimos a los que las utilizan en ocasiones. En segundo término le sigue la visita de diferentes sitios de vídeos compartidos (48,6% con mucha frecuencia, y 31,6% en ocasiones), navegar por distintas páginas web (45,7% y 38,6%, respectivamente) y la descarga de archivos de música o de películas o series (con mucha frecuencia, el 37,1%, y el 33,9% en ocasiones). La mensajería instantánea ocupa al 31,6% de los adolescentes con mucha frecuencia y al 26,5% ocasionalmente; el correo electrónico, al 24,5% y al 36,9%, y los juegos en red al 16,3% y 25,2%, respectivamente.

En el extremo opuesto se encuentra el acceso a chats y foros (31,7% con mucha frecuencia y en ocasiones), a blogs (20%), a los sitios de fotos compartidas (14,2%) y a los mundos virtuales (9,1%), que resulta minoritario.

Por edades, se observa que los de mayor edad acceden con mucha frecuencia, en mayor medida que los más pequeños, a las redes sociales: el 84,1% entre los 15 y 17 años, frente al 68% de los que tienen entre 12 y 14 años. También las chicas acceden en mayor medida que los varones, el 78,5% frente al 71,8%, respectivamente. Las diferencias por tipo de enseñanza resultan muy limitadas, apenas un 0.8%, y por clase social, son los de clase alta los que en mayor media conectan con mucha frecuencia, 78,3% frente al 75,1% de la clase media y el 75,3% de la clase baja.

3.2. Comportamiento en las redes sociales

Un primer dato interesante se refiere a las preferencias de los adolescentes por determinadas redes sociales: el 86,9% cuenta con algún perfil (uno o más) en Tuenti y el 73,4% en Facebook. En tercer lugar, el 39% de adolescentes registrados opta por Twitter. La mayor diferencia en la disposición de un perfil en las redes sociales se observa en función de la edad de los adolescentes: los alumnos de 15 a 17 años cuentan en mayor medida con un perfil en todas las redes sociales que los adolescentes de menor edad. Las chicas, sin embargo, cuentan con un perfil en mayor medida que los hombres en Facebook, Twitter y Fotolog.

Combinando ambas variables y teniendo en cuenta únicamente las diferencias estadísticamente significativas para ?2<0,05, los chicos más jóvenes mantienen en mayor medida que las chicas algún perfil en Facebook o MySpace, pero con la edad la tendencia se invierte y las chicas superan a los chicos en Facebook. Entre los 15 y 17 años las chicas tienen abierto algún perfil en mayor medida que los chicos en Fotolog. Las diferencias en las preferencias por unas u otras redes por clase social solo resultan significativas para Tuenti, que es la opción más utilizada por la clase baja. Por titularidad de centro no se observan diferencias estadísticamente significativas.


Draft Content 658830671-26804 ov-es079.jpg

En cuanto al uso de las redes sociales, destaca el chateo: tres cuartas partes de los adolescentes reconocen que lo usan con mucha frecuencia. Alrededor de la mitad se sirve de ellas para ver vídeos o fotos de amigos (50,1%), un 48,3% se dedica a enviar mensajes y el 42,6% a actualizar su perfil. Atendiendo a aspectos más vinculados con la creación de contenidos, se observa que la actividad de este tipo que más frecuentemente realizan los adolescentes en las redes sociales es subir vídeos o fotos personales (55,2%), haciéndolo con mucha frecuencia el 25,4%. El 41% afirma subir vídeos o fotos interesantes que ha encontrado por Internet y el 4,8% dice participar en foros, creando contenidos.

Controlando los usos de las redes sociales por sexo y edad, vemos que las chicas de todas las edades envían mensajes (55,6%), actualizan su perfil (48,9%), suben vídeos que ellas mismas han realizado (32,6%), ven vídeos o fotos de amigos (9,3%) con mayor frecuencia que los chicos. Los chicos, sin embargo, suben vídeos que han encontrado por Internet (17,9%), compran y venden (2,2%), participan en foros (4,8%) y juegan más que las chicas (24,4%). Para finalizar, los alumnos de los centros públicos utilizan más que los de centros privados sus redes sociales para jugar en red (17,1% frente a 12,7%) y los chicos de clase baja ven vídeos o fotos de desconocidos (11,6%) en mayor medida que clase media y alta (7,8%).

3.3. Perfiles de uso de las redes sociales

En este apartado se analizan las características básicas de los diferentes perfiles de usuarios de las redes sociales. Para ello se ha recodificado la variable relativa al uso de las mismas en: usuarios intensivos (con mucha frecuencia), usuarios ocasionales (en ocasiones) y no usuarios (rara vez y nunca) y se han tomado como casos perdidos los no sabe/no contesta. El perfil mayoritario de los usuarios intensivos de las redes sociales es mujer, de 15 a 17 años. El 89,5% de ellos son usuarios intensivos frente al 79,3% de los chicos de 15 a 17 años. La diferencia en el grado de uso de las redes sociales no resulta significativa por clase social para ?2 < 0.05.


Draft Content 658830671-26804 ov-es080.jpg

3.4. Uso de redes sociales y tiempo de acceso

Indagando en la relación entre el uso de redes sociales con el tiempo de conexión a Internet, se parte de la hipótesis de que un mayor uso de las redes sociales también conlleva un mayor tiempo de exposición a la Red. En primer lugar, se han cruzado los tipos de usuarios de las redes sociales con los días que se conectan a lo largo de la semana y, como se esperaba, la intensidad de uso de las redes sociales se asocia con la conexión diaria a la Red, con ligeras variaciones por género (más fuertes entre las mujeres) pero con diferencias muy notables para el grupo de edad de 12 a 14 años. Estas tendencias no se ven tan claras entre la clase baja, en la que los no usuarios superan en cinco puntos porcentuales a los usuarios ocasionales en el uso diario de Internet.

El uso diario de Internet es más frecuente entre los usuarios intensivos de las redes sociales, en tanto que el uso semanal menos frecuente es más común entre los usuarios ocasionales y aún más entre los no usuarios, que acceden en mayor medida dos días a la semana y un día a la semana respectivamente (ver tabla 3).

Cruzando los tipos de usuarios de las redes sociales con el tiempo que dedican habitualmente, no sorprende observar que, nuevamente, son los usuarios intensivos de las redes sociales los que más tiempo están conectados los días de diario y también, en menor medida, los fines de semana (más de dos horas diarias). Los porcentajes de usuarios avanzados de redes sociales que superan las dos horas diarias de conexión los días de diario (en los tres tramos que incluye: entre dos y tres horas, entre tres y cinco horas y más de cinco horas) duplican a los de los otros dos grupos de usuarios. Los fines de semana sucede algo similar pero a partir solo de las tres horas de conexión diaria.

Controlando las variables género, edad, tipo de enseñanza y clase social, se mantiene, en general, la pauta de mayor consumo de Internet según la intensidad de uso de las redes sociales tanto días de diario como fines de semana, pero de nuevo entre la clase baja y también entre los alumnos de centros privados, aunque en menor medida, los no usuarios superan a los usuarios ocasionales.

3.5. Usos de Internet entre usuarios y no usuarios de redes sociales

Con la excepción de los juegos en red, los usuarios intensivos siempre manifiestan una tendencia a realizar un uso más frecuente de las distintas aplicaciones que proporciona la Red y esta mayor intensidad en el uso es particularmente importante en el caso de las descargas de archivos de música, películas/series, los sistemas de mensajería instantánea, los chats y foros, los vídeos y las fotos compartidos. Se trata de actividades que permiten colgar contenidos para compartir en las redes sociales (vídeos, fotos o, incluso, archivos de música), mientras que los chats y foros y la mensajería instantánea hacen referencia a actividades de relación social que bien pueden ser realizadas a través de las redes.

Algunas herramientas que no mantienen una relación lineal con el uso de redes sociales son: el correo electrónico, los sistemas de mensajería instantánea, los blogs y los chats y foros, en las que los no usuarios mantienen una actividad más frecuente que los usuarios ocasionales, pero no que los usuarios intensivos, quizás porque los usuarios ocasionales satisfacen esa necesidad con el uso de las herramientas que les proveen las redes sociales. Sin embargo, sí que se observa que el porcentaje de los no usuarios que no utilizan esos servicios nunca es superior al de los usuarios convencionales.

El control de la edad, el sexo, la titularidad del centro y la clase social no implican cambios sustanciales en la relación entre tipo de usuario de las redes sociales y usos en la red ya que, para aquellos valores que mantienen la significación estadística, se mantienen porcentajes de uso muy frecuente más elevados para los usuarios avanzados de las redes. Por último, se ha explorado la relación entre el tipo de usuario de redes sociales y la creación de webs o blogs. Los usuarios intensivos de las redes sociales también son los que han creado estos espacios en mayor medida que el resto (39,9%, 28% y 27,2% respectivamente para usuarios avanzados, ocasionales y no usuarios de las redes). Estas diferencias se mantienen si controlamos las variables sexo, edad, titularidad del centro y clase social.


Draft Content 658830671-26804 ov-es081.jpg

4. Conclusiones y discusión

Son varias las conclusiones que se observan conforme a las hipótesis planteadas inicialmente. Junto a la alta participación de los menores en las redes sociales, se constata su preponderancia para los adolescentes, seguidos por los espacios de vídeos compartidos, las páginas web generales y las de descarga de archivos de música, de películas o series. Como en el caso de los sitios de vídeos compartidos, las redes sociales han desbancado al correo electrónico y a la mensajería instantánea como principales focos de acción. Además, se ha detectado que Tuenti y Facebook predominan en estas edades y, por otra parte, que los estudiantes entre 15 y 17 años se implican más y que las actividades favoritas son: chatear, ver vídeos o fotos de amigos, enviar mensajes o actualizar su perfil.

Si tenemos en cuenta el perfil de uso de las redes sociales, se constata una correlación positiva entre el tiempo on-line y el uso de las redes sociales. Son aquellos que hacen un uso más intensivo de las redes sociales quienes realizan con más frecuencia actividades en la Red, a excepción de los juegos en red. Estos usuarios avanzados son particularmente activos en las actividades vinculadas a la obtención de contenidos que pueden compartir con otros «amigos» en las redes sociales, como son las descargas de archivos de música, los vídeos y las fotos compartidos. A diferencia de lo supuesto inicialmente, son los usuarios más intensivos de las redes sociales los que también mantienen más conversaciones y comparten, en mayor medida, contenidos a través de los chats, los foros y la mensajería instantánea. Quedarían, por tanto, verificadas la primera y tercera hipótesis, es decir, la mayor dedicación en tiempo a Internet entre los usuarios que más frecuentemente usan las redes sociales, así como a aquellas aplicaciones que les permiten obtener contenidos para compartir con sus pares. En efecto, se comprueba que los usuarios de las redes sociales hacen un uso más intensivo de aquellas herramientas on-line que les permitan obtener contenidos para compartir con sus pares.

Sin embargo, los datos refutan la segunda hipótesis relativa a un desplazamiento de los cauces «tradicionales» de comunicación en la Red por la participación en las redes sociales, al menos en lo que se refiere a usuarios intensivos de estos sitios. Esto significa que los usuarios que más uso hacen de las redes sociales son también los que hacen un uso más versátil de la Red, utilizando más servicios, más diferenciados, y combinando más las diferentes aplicaciones orientadas a la comunicación, posiblemente porque hacen un uso especializado de esas herramientas de comunicación en función de los contenidos de ésta y de las características de los destinatarios. Esto sugiere, en línea con otros trabajos, que la diferenciación de consumo y comportamiento se conecta más a factores como el tiempo de acceso o el perfil de individuo que por aplicación o canal.

Por otra parte, se ha detectado la relevancia de las variables de género, edad, tipo de enseñanza y clase social, en el tiempo, frecuencia, comportamiento y consumo en la red. Si bien no implican cambios sustanciales en la relación entre tipo de usuario de las redes sociales y usos en el ciberespacio. Las implicaciones de este hallazgo se suman a otras inquietudes.

Algunas de las cuestiones pendientes de dilucidar tienen que ver con los sentidos que los propios adolescentes aplican a los usos y a las relaciones. Aunque no ha sido habitual en los trabajos de naturaleza cualitativa abordar cómo el uso de las redes sociales pueden modificar otros usos de Internet, que es el objetivo de este artículo. A su vez, el establecimiento de relaciones entre patrones de uso y probabilidad, o modo, de enfrentarse a los riesgos potenciales del ciberespacio, se abre como una línea de investigación de interés.

Apoyos

En este trabajo se presentan los resultados obtenidos de una encuesta a escala estatal en el marco de un proyecto de investigación con financiación pública y nacional «Análisis de uso y consumo de medios y redes sociales en Internet entre los adolescentes españoles. Características y prácticas de riesgo» (CSO2009-09577), Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación. Secretaría de Estado de Investigación. Dirección General de Investigación y Gestión del Plan Nacional de I+D+I, dirigido por Antonio García Jiménez. El equipo de investigación estaba compuesto por los siguientes miembros (por orden alfabético): Mª Carmen Arellano-Pardo, Pilar Beltrán-Orenes, Beatriz Catalina-García, Carmen Gaona-Pisionero, Flavia Gómes-Franco-e-Silva, María Cruz López-de-Ayala-López, Esther Martínez-Pastor, Edisa Mondelo-González, Manuel Montes-Vozmediano, Carmen Pérez-Pais, Rosa Sansegundo-Manuel, José-Carlos Sendín-Gutiérrez. Este proyecto marco tiene como precedente el proyecto «Estudio sobre los usos de Internet entre los menores de la Comunidad de Madrid. Riesgos y características», realizado también con financiación pública (de carácter autonómico) y cuyo trabajo de campo se extendió a lo largo del mes de octubre de 2009.

Referencias

Agosto, D.E., Abbas, J. & Naughton, R. (2012). Relationships and Social Rules: Teens’social Network and other ICT Selection Practices. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 63(6), 1108-1124. (DOI: 12.1002/asi.22612).

Ahn, J. (2011). The Effect of Social Network Sites on Adolescents’ Academic and Social Development: Current Theories and Controversies. Journal of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, 62(8), 1435-1445. (DOI: 10.1002/asi.21540).

Aranda, D. y otros (2010). Los jóvenes del siglo XXI: prácticas comunicativas y con-sumo cultural, II Congreso Internacional AE-IC Comunicación y desarrollo en la era digital. (www.aeic2010malaga.org/upload/ok/204.pdf) (10-09-2011).

Barkhuus, L. & Tashiro, J. (2010). Student Socialization in the Age of Facebook. Proceedings of the 28th Annual ACM Special Interest Group on Computer on Computer Human Interaction Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (SIGCHI ‘10). New York: ACM Press, 133-142.

Boyd, D. (2007). Why Youth Heart Social Network sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life. In D. Buckingham (Ed.), Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 119-142.

Bringué, X. & Sádaba C. (2011). Menores y redes sociales. Madrid: Fundación Tele-fónica. (www.generacionesinteractivas.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Libro-Menores-y-Redes-sociales_Fin.pdf) (08-04-2012).

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C. (2009), La generación interactiva en España. Niños y jóve-nes ante las pantallas. Madrid: Fundación Telefónica. (www.fundación.telefonica.com/.../generacionesinteractivas.pdf) (12-04-2012).

Buckingham, D. (2010). Do We Really Need Media Education 2.0? In K. Drotner & K. Schroder (Eds.), Digital Content Creation: Perceptions, Practices, & Perspectives, New York: Peter Lang.

Cheung, C., Chiu, P.W. & Lee, M. (2011). Online Social Networks: Why do Students Use Facebook? Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 1337–1343. (DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.-2010.07.028)

Duerager, A. & Livingstone, S. (2012). How Can Parents Support Children’s Internet Safety? EU Kids Online.London,UK.(www2.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOn-line/EU%20Kids%20III/Reports/ParentalMediation.pdf) (12-04-2012).

Ellison, N., Steinfield, C. & Lampe, C. (2007). The Benefits of Facebook Friends: Social Capital and College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer Mediated Communication, 12, 1143–1168, (DOI:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2007.00367.x).

Espinar, E. y González, M.J. (2009). Jóvenes en las redes sociales virtuales: un aná-lisis exploratorio de las diferencias de géneros. Feminimo/s, 14, 87-105.

Eynon, R. & Malmberg, L. (2011). A Typology of Young People’s Internet Use: Implica-tions for Education. Computers & Education, 56, 585-595, (DOI: 10.1016/j.compe-du.2010.09.020).

Flanagin, A.J. (2005). IM Online: Instant Messaging Use among College Students. Communication Research Reports, 22 (3), 175-187. (www.comm.ucsb.edu/faculty/flanagin/CV/Flanagin2005(CRR).pdf) (1-06-2012).

Fundación Pfizer (2009). La juventud y las redes sociales en Internet. Informe de resultados de la encuestas (www.fundacionpfizer.org/docs/pdf/Foro_Debate/IN-FORME_FINAL_Encuesta_Juventud_y_Redes_Sociales.pdf) (20-09-2011).

Gabino, M.A. (2004). Niños y jóvenes como usuarios-receptores virtuales e interactivos. Comunicar, 22, 120-125. (www.revistacomunicar.com/index.php?contenido=detalles&numero=22&articulo=22-2004-18) (02-07-2012).

García, A. (Coord.) (2010). Comunicación y comportamiento en el ciberespacio. Actitudes y riesgos de los adolescentes. Barcelona: Icaria.

Garmendia, M., Garitaonandia, C. & al. (2011). Riesgos y seguridad en Internet: los menores españoles en el contexto europeo. (www.ehu.es/eukidsonline) (10-04-2012).

Gross, E.F. (2004). Adolescent Internet use: What We Expect, What Teens Report. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 25(6), 633–649.

INTECO (2011). Estudio sobre la seguridad de la información y la e-confianza de los hogares españoles. 2º cuatrimestre de 2011 (16ª oleada). Observatorio de la Seguridad de la Información, INTECO. (www.inteco.es/Seguridad/Observatorio/Es-tudios/Estudio_hogares_2C2011) (10-04-2012).

Lenhardt, A. & Madden, M. (2005). Teen Content Creators and Consumers. Wash-ington, DC: Pew Internet & American Life Project, November 2. (www.pewInternet.org/PPF/r/166/report_display.asp) (12-04-2012).

Lenhart, A. & Madden, M. (2007). Social Networking Websites and Teens: An Overview. (www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_SNS_data_Memo_Jan_2007.pdf) (12-04-2012).

Lenhart, A., Purcell, K. & al. (2010). Social Media and Mobile Internet Use amongs Teens and Young Adults. (pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults.aspx) (13-04-2012).

Levine, L.E., Waite B.M. & Bowman, L.L. (2007). Electronic Media Use, Reading, and Academic Distractibility in College Youth. Cyberpsychology Behavior, 10(4), 560-566.

Liu, Q.X., Fang, XY. & al. (2012). Parent-adolescent Communication, Parental Internet Use and Internet-Specific Norms and Pathological Internet Use among Chinese Adolescents. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1269-1275.

Livingstone, S. & Brake, D.R. (2010). On the Rapid Rise of Social Networking Sites: New Findings and Policy Implications. Children & Society, 24, 75-83.

Livingstone, S. & Helsper, E. (2010). Balancing Opportunities and Risks in Teenegers’ Use of the Internet: the Role of Online Skills and Internet self-efficacy. New Media & Society, 12, 2, 309-329.

Livingstone, S. (2008). Taking Risky Opportunities in Youthful Content Creation: Teenagers’ Use of Social Networking Sites for Intimacy, Privacy and Self-expression. New Media & Society, 10, 393-411.

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L. & al. (2011). Risks and Safety on the Internet: The Perspective of European Children. Full Findings. LSE, London: EU Kids Online. (www.e-prints.lse.ac.uk/33731/1/Risks_and_safety_on_the_internet_the_perspective_of_European_children.pdf) (15-06-2012).

Mediappro (2006). Mediappro. A European Research Project for the Appropriation of New Media by Youth (online) Brussels, European Commission. (www.mediappro.org/publications/finalreport.pdf) (10-04-2012).

Mesch, G. (2001). Social Relationships and Internet Use among Adolescents in Israel. Social Science Quarterly, 82, 329-340.

Mesch, G.S. & Talmud, I. (2007). Similarity and the Quality of Online and Offline Social Relationships among Adolescents in Israel. Journal of Research on Adolescents, 17, 455-466.

Moreno, M.A. & al. (2012). Internet Use and Multitasking among Older Adolescents: An Experience Sampling approach. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1097-1102

Nie, N. (2001). Stability, Interpersonal Relationships and the Internet: Reconciling Conflicting Findings. American Behavioral Scientist, 45, 420-435.

Nyland, R. (2007). The Gratification Niche of Internet Social Networking, E-mail, and Face-to-face Communication. Master´s Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Brigham Young University. (www.comm.ucsb.edu/faculty/flanagin/CV/Flanagin2005(CRR).pdf) (10-04-2012).

Patchin, J.W. & Hinduja, S. (2010). Trends in Online Social Networking: Adolescent Use of MySpace over Time. New Media & Society, 12(2) 197–216, (DOI: 10.1177/1461444809341857).

Pearson, J.C., Carmon, A. & et al. (2010). Motives for Communication: Why the Mille-nnial Generation Uses Electronic devices. Journal of the Communication, Speech & Theatre Association of North Dakota, 22, 45–55.

Pérez, R. (2005). Alfabetización en la comunicación mediática: la narrativa digital. Comunicar, 25, 165-175. (www.revistacomunicar.com/index.php?contenido=-detalles&numero=25&articulo=25-2005-023) (02-07-2012).

Purcell, K. (2011). Trends in Teen Communication and Social Media Use (Pew Internet & American Life Project). Presentation given at Joint Girl Scout Research Institute/Pew Internet Webinar. (www.pewinternet.org/Presentations/2011/Feb/PIP-Girl-Scout-Webinar.aspx) (13-04-2012).

Sánchez, A. & Fernández, M.P. (2010). Informe Generación 2.0, 2010. Hábitos de los adolescentes en el uso de las redes sociales. (http://escacc.cat/docroot/escacc/includes/elements/fitxers/1111/generacin2-0.pdf)

Subrahmanyam, K. & Greenfield, P. (2008). Online Communication and Adolescent Relationships. Children and Electronic Media. 18 (1), 119-146. The Future of Children. (www.futureofchildren.org/futureofchildren/publications/docs/18_01_06.pdf) (05-05-2012).

Subrahmanyam, K., Reich, S. & al. (2008). Online and Offline Social Networks: Use of Social Networking sites by Emerging Adults. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 29, 420-433.

Utz, S., Tanis, M. & Vermeulen, I. (2012). It Is All About Being Popular: The Effects of Need for Popularity on Social Network Site Use. Cyberpsychology Behavior and Social Networking, 15 (1), 37-42, (DOI:10.1089/cyber.2010.0651).

Valcke, M., De-Weber, B. & al. (2011). Long-term Study of Safe Internet Use of Young Children. Computers & Education, 57, 1292-1305.

Valkenburg, P. M. & Peter, J. (2011). Online Communication among Adolescents: An integrated model of its attraction, opportunities, and risks. Journal of Adolescent Health, 48(2), 121-127.

Valkenburg, P.M. & Peter, J. (2007). Preadolescents’ and Adolescents’ Online Commu-nication and their Closeness to Friends. Developmental Psychology, 43(2), 267-277.

Valkenburg, P.M. & Peter, J. (2009). Social Consequences of the Internet for Adolescents: A Decade of Research. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 18(1), 1-5.

Walsh, S., White, K. & Young. R. (2009). The Phone Connection: A Qualitative Explo-ration of How Belongingness and Social Identification Relate to Mobile Phone Use amongst Australian Youth. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 19, 225-240.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/05/13
Accepted on 31/05/13
Submitted on 31/05/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C41-2013-19
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 47
Views 3
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?