Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The research supporting this paper addresses the problem of educational communication efficacy using a dual methodology strategy. Over 1.200 questionnaires were given out to professionals in four institutions dedicated to persuasive communication; two traditional ?the church and schools? and two more recently created ? journalism and advertising. Probably they are the four groups with more socialising force in the last centuries; For this paper the educators’ responses were specifically analysed to determine their conception of the communication process and the requirements for effective communication, and these were compared with those from the other groups, especially from advertising professionals. Lastly, all the responses were compared to contributions from neuroscience that have been made in recent decades about how the human mind functions, particularly with regards to decision-making, to determine which communication proposals provide a greater guarantee of efficacy. The results indicate the need for educators to break away from a strictly cognitive polarized communication that focuses on transmission. They are more related with guaranteeing the supply than creating a demand, and open up to the communicative potential of emotions, interaction and storytelling.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The neurobiologist Giovanni Frazzetto (2014) stated that for the first time in the history of humanity we have the opportunity to know ourselves through science. This opportunity is especially useful for those communication professionals whose effectiveness depends on their ability to influence the minds of others.

However, it seems that, until now, education has not been aware of the need to take advantage of this opportunity, unlike other groups of communication professionals. When we talk about the decade of the brain, we refer to the 1990s, because it is considered that we learned more about the functioning of the human brain during this decade than in the entire previous history of humanity. Well, Neuromarketing emerged in the late 1980s before neuroscience had made its appearance. The contributions of Daniel Kahneman (2012), Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, shattered the classical economic paradigm and led the way to Neuroeconomics and Neuromarketing (Braidot, 2005; Van-Praet, 2012). Soon new disciplines appeared that benefitted from this ground-breaking scientific knowledge about the human mind: Neuropolitics, Neuroethics, Neuropsychology, Neurosociology, etc. However, education has been slow to jump on the bandwagon. Only recently have research into and publications about Neuroeducation, Neuropedagogy and Neurodidactica began to appear (Ansari, De-Smedt, & Grabner, 2012; Bueno, 2015; Bueno, 2017; Mora, 2013; Pincham & al., 2014). Pat Wolfe (2001), however, has already affirmed that the most innovative discovery in education is neuroscience. And Leslie Hart warned that educating without knowing how the brain works is like designing a glove without ever having seen a hand (Ibarrola, 2013).

It is in this context that we must place the present research, which looks at the conceptions of communication of a group, the advertisers, that permitted to be questioned by neuroscience, and compares them with those of another group, the educators, who have lived on the outskirts of these scientific findings. Of course there are very significant differences between the communication aims and contexts of advertising and education, but they do share some concerns: they both need to overcome the indifference and reluctance of the receptors who are initially uninterested in their messages; they both aim to modify the receptors' knowledge, attitudes, values, and behaviour patterns; they both adapt their message to a defined target audience and tune it to their concerns and interests; and the effectiveness of their work is conditioned by their ability to know and manage their interlocutors’ minds.

The most surprising discoveries of neuroscience have to do with the key role played by emotions and the unconscious in mental processes, including rational processes. “Emotions are the basis of everything we do, including thinking” (Maturana & Bloch, 1998: 137). “Emotions create a whirlwind of activity dedicated to one single purpose. Thoughts, unless they activate the emotional mechanisms, do not do this” (LeDoux, 1999: 337). Damasio (1996: 282): “Feeling is an integral componengt of the machinery of reasoning”. And in another work (2000: 57): “Well directed and well deployed emotions seem to choose a support system without which the building of reason cannot operate properly”.

The unconscious is also part of the great discoveries of neuroscience. Cordelia Fine (2006) calls it the secret command. “Most of the decisions we take have one responsible element: the unconscious” (Barchrach, 2013: 31), to the point that “unconscious judgments not only occur before the conscious ones, they also guide them” (Zaltman, 2003: 95).

From among the contributions of neuroscience we need to highlight the discovery of mirror neurons (Rizzolatti & Sinigaglia, 2006; Keysers, 2011) and the importance that storytelling acquires for being an effective form of persuasive communication (Ramachandran, 2011; Salmon, 2008).

2. Material and method

2.1. Objectives

The objective of the research was to determine what various groups of communication professionals understand as communication. We aimed to learn how they handle the challenge of interacting with the minds of others, what difficulties and obstacles they encounter in their communication processes and how they face them, and finally, the perception they have of their own group and the other groups of communicators. Once the most significant differences were detected, we compared them with the neuroscience findings on the functioning of the human mind in order to determine which communication proposals offer more guarantees in terms of effectiveness.

2.2. Selection of the sample

The sample universe consisted of 1.272 professionals from four different fields of persuasive communication: 533 education professionals (pre-primary, primary and secondary), 295 journalists, 225 advertising professionals and 219 priests. We used a “strategic or convenience” sampling method (Cea-D’Ancona, 1996; Igartua, 2006). The “snowball” technique was used to access the research profiles and obtain the highest possible number of answers. A reliability test was applied, and an accuracy of 2.7% was obtained.

2.3. Method and analysis

A quantitative methodology based on descriptive surveys was used. The analysis tool was a questionnaire developed by experts in the fields of communication and education. Apart from the identification questions –profession, age and community– there were multiple-choice questions, self-applied five-point Likert scales based on degrees of agreement, ratings or frequency, and open-ended questions. The answers to the open questions were analysed by experts who categorised them so they could be treated quantitatively.

For the pilot test, 37 online and face-to-face questionnaires were given to professionals from the different communication areas mentioned above. The face-to-face questionnaires were used to observe whether the professionals found the surveys too long or whether any questions were too difficult to understand, etc. The data obtained from the pilot test were treated with the SPSS program. The researchers made the appropriate changes based on the observations and results obtained.

The questionnaire was employed between 2014 and 2015 on paper and online. An application was created for the online questionnaires that automatically determined the profile and source of each questionnaire received. Once the questionnaires were given out, a database was created in the SPSS software for statistical treatment. A descriptive univariate analysis was carried out1.

3. Results

3.1. The paradoxical relationship between educators and advertising professionals

One of the most surprising conclusions that emerged from the questionnaire responses is the paradoxical relationship between educators and advertising professionals. On the one hand, educators seem to hold them in great consideration. When the communicators were asked to rate from 1 to 5 the degree of influence they consider that educators, priests, journalists and advertisers have on what people do and the way they are and think, educators considered advertising professionals to be the most influential communicators. They gave them 4.01 points out of 5, while they gave their own group members 3.6.

In contrast, when asked to rate from 1 to 5 how much they believed they should learn from each of the groups, educators gave their own group 4.06 but gave advertisers 2.76, a score almost as low as the one they gave priests, 2.35 points.

It is surprising that they consider that advertisers are the communicators with the most influence, but they believe that we should not learn from them, or that, although they consider them more influential than their own group, they believe that we should learn more from educators than from advertisers.

There are data that help us understand this paradox. When communicators were asked “Who do you think could convince people most easily that a certain social value is good?”, almost half of the education professionals (49.1%; n=259) responded educators, and only 38% (n=200) responded advertisers (Figure 1) (see next page).


Draft Content 306442922-58985-en024.jpg

Similar paradoxes can be found in the responses made by priests. When they were asked to rate the level of influence of the various groups on the ways of being, doing and thinking of most people, they gave the highest score (3.75 out of 5) to advertisers, and only 2.73 to their own group. However, when asked who would be able to convince people most easily that a certain social value were good, almost a third (30.9%; n=67) considered it to be their group, two points higher than advertisers (28.6%; n=62) (Figure 2).


Draft Content 306442922-58985-en025.jpg

These paradoxes in the two groups reveal some shared misunderstandings: they both equate knowledge with the ability to communicate this knowledge. They naively believe that the one who knows about a content (a value in this case) will be the one who communicates it better, and that the one who is most interested in a value will be the one who spreads this interest to other people most easily.

However, when the communicators were asked to define each group with a single word, the highest percentage of educators (17.6%; n=94) used terms related to the semantic field of manipulation (manipulators, deceivers, liars, foxes, cheats, etc.) to describe advertising professionals, almost five points above those that used concepts belonging to the semantic field of creativity (12.9%; n=69) or effectiveness (12.8%; n=68).

In summary, although educators and priests consider that advertisers are the communicators who most influence the way of being, doing and thinking of most people, they believe that they are manipulative and that, therefore, they are the least effective in transmitting a positive value. They consider that communication effectiveness depends more on the content domain than on the procedure domain; that is, it depends more on the knowledge of what is to be communicated than on the knowledge about the mind of the person to whom it is to be communicated.

In the following pages we look at these paradoxes and analyse some features of the conception educators have of communication. We then contrast them with the conception held by advertising professionals. We determined three basic communication conceptions based on transmission, cognition and supply. These differences are then compared with some recent contributions from neuroscience.

3.2. Transmission-focussed communication

The communicators were asked what was the main objective they wanted to achieve with their work. Far more educators expressed a unidirectional conception of the communication process (40%; n=213) than a bidirectional conception of the process (3%; n=16): “Get across as much information as possible”, “Transmit information”, “That the contents get to the students”, “Instil contents and values”, etc. The rest of the educators gave ambiguous responses (54.2%; n=289) or responded that they didn't know (2.8%; n=15).

The trend was confirmed when they were asked to define in a maximum of two lines what they understood by communication. Among the educators who expressed themselves explicitly (84.1%; n=448), 56.1% (n=299) conceived educational communication as a unidirectional process and only 28% (n=149) as a bidirectional process. Most considered educational communication as a transmission process consisting in “instructing”, “giving information”, “sending messages”, “getting contents across”, etc.

The maximum expression of the transmission mentality of many educators is observed in definitions such as “Moving a message from an emitter to a receiver”, “Moving information to others”. Only a minority included concepts such as exchange, interaction or dialogue in their definitions.

The answers to other questions confirm that a one-way, transmission conception of communication predominates. The communication professionals were asked to order from 1 to 6 the most effective means of persuasive-seductive communication. The options were face-to-face interpersonal communication, cinema, television, printed media, radio and the Internet. Almost half of the communication professionals (43.3%; n=541) considered face-to-face interpersonal communication to be the most effective.

Interestingly, this percentage rose in the advertising group where more than half (55%; n=121) considered it to be the most effective. However, the percentage fell significantly among educators: below a third (29%; n=152) considered it the most effective. More significant is the fact that almost the same proportion of educators (27%; n=144) considered it to be the least effective (Figure 3).


Draft Content 306442922-58985-en026.jpg

The communication professionals were also asked what contribution did mobile phones and the Internet have on the efficacy of persuasive communication. More than a third of advertisers, 34.2% (n=77), highlighted the interaction possibilities offered by these technologies, but only 10.5% (n=56) of educators did so. It seems, therefore, that there is a more transmission, less interactive and dialogic, mentality among educators, even though they work in face-to-face interpersonal communication, than among advertising professionals, who mainly work in mediated communication. A new paradox.

The transmission conception of educational communication increased with the education level. Among pre-primary school teachers, 52.9% (n=36) consider educational communication to be a two-way process; among primary school teachers 29.5% (n=59) considered it two-way; and among high-school teachers 20.4% (n=54). We can also add that the lack of sensitivity regarding the need for interaction between subjects is accompanied by a lack of sensitivity regarding the need for interaction between codes. When asked what the Internet, social networks and mobile telephones contribute to the efficacy of persuasive communication, only 3.4% of educators (n=18) referred to multimedia and multimodality.

3.3. Cognition-focused communication

Most education professionals understand and manage communication from strictly cognitive parameters. They focus almost exclusively on and give priority to thinking and reasoning.

Although 86.5% (n=461) of educators gave a definition of communication in which the effects to be achieved were not explained, 90.3% (n=65) of those who referred to as effects, limited themselves to the cognitive field: “Be able to make myself understood”, “That the receiver grasps the meaning of what we try to transmit”, “Transmit knowledge in a way that others can understand”, “The extraordinary possibility of trying to explain reality to others and that they understand you”, “communication is effective when the recipient is able to understand the message”, etc.

When asked what is the main objective of their work, 40.5% (n=216) of educators also indicated cognitive objectives: “That the students go home understanding clearly the main message that I want to transmit” “Make myself understood”, “Train people who have the capacity to understand”, “Get the message across objectively and clearly”, “Get them to understand”, etc.

If we look only at the professionals who explain the effects that communication should produce and leave out the ambiguous or unanswered cases, we obtain that while 82.4% (n=216) of educators focused exclusively on cognition, forgetting the emotional, more than half of the advertising professionals (58.8%, n=50) included the emotional factor as a priority: “Creating a feeling of needing something”, “Making people feel desire”, “Fascinate, make passionate” “Moving society to achieve profound changes in it”, “Seduce”, “Fall in love”, “Modify behaviour, change lifestyles”, “Transmit a persuasive message that moves one to action”, “Make a product or service attractive”, etc.

Among the educators who explain the effects, only 17.6% (n=46) included emotional and attitudinal objectives: “Awaken enthusiasm, interest, curiosity”, “Encourage the students' desire to learn”, “Motivate” “Create interest”, “Awaken the need and enthusiasm to learn and to know”, “To inspire my students about the subject”, etc. These are suggestive responses, but they were in the minority.


Draft Content 306442922-58985-en027.jpg

3.4. Supply-focused communication

When asked what is the main obstacle to achieving their desired objective, educators gave the highest score to responses about the lack of interest and motivation of the students (26.8%; n=143), which almost doubled the score given to the communicator’s lack of abilities and training (13.9%, n=74) or the unfavourable social environment (13.5%, n=72), and far surpassed other obstacles related to the saturation of information (9.4%, n=50) and the political environment (7.1%, n=38).

On the other hand, among the advertising professionals, the responses that obtained the highest scores were related to information saturation (25.3%; n=57), followed by economic limitations (20.9%; n=47). Only 9.3% (n=21) referred to the interlocutors’ lack of motivation.

Something similar happened when we asked about the weak points of their profession. Almost a quarter of educators (22.7%; n=121) referred to factors related to the interlocutors' lack of interest and motivation. Among the advertising professionals this was only 1.8% (n=4).

Therefore, unlike advertising professionals, educators consider that the greatest difficulties are beyond their responsibility. They do not consider the difficulty of motivating their students, of overcoming their indifference and their unresponsiveness, to be due to a deficiency in their training. We could conclude that they approach communication as if they were salespeople, rather than considering themselves advertising professionals.

A salesperson is a person who offers goods for those who want to buy them. If we were to adapt this definition to advertising, we would have to say, “a person who offers goods so that they want to buy them”. The salesperson responds to a demand, while the advertising professional creates it. The salesperson can complain about the interlocutors' lack of interest. The advertising professional cannot because they are responsible for creating it.

The educators' complaints about their students' apathy demonstrate that consciously or not they act as salespeople. They do not hold themselves responsible for motivating their students («Motivation comes from the home”).

In pre-primary, 17.6% (n=12) referred to the students' lack of motivation as the main obstacle to achieving their goals as communicators, in primary school it was 27% (n=54) and in secondary schools it was 29.1% (n=77). Moreover, the percentage who considered the students' lack of motivation and interest as the weak point of their profession was 13.2% (n=9) in pre-primary, 20.5% (n=41) in primary and 26.8% (n=71) in secondary education.

The journalists showed a similar tendency to conceive communication as supply: “Inform the public about events and opinions which could interest them”, “Notify the receptor of facts of interest to them”, “Transmit truthful information to interested readers”. The interest is taken for granted. Lorenzo Gomis does not think so. He believes journalism is the art of making what happens interesting to people. Only one journalist responded in this line: “Make readers feel inspired when they read the story in the same way that I do”.


Draft Content 306442922-58985-en028.jpg

4. Discussion and conclusions

4.1. The inadequacy of the cognitive focus

Advertising professionals know that knowing about a product and understanding the messages used to promote it are essential but insufficient factors to ensure adherence and acquisition. It does not matter if a potential customer knows about Pepsi Cola and understands their advertising if what they want is a Coca Cola.

Nor is the indifference to or rejection of certain political leaders solved by making their messages more understandable. Understanding must be accompanied by the activation of an emotional response. The understood message is not powerful, rather it is the message that moves you in the right direction that is effective.

A review of the scientific literature on the mechanisms that govern mental processes calls into question an educational communication focused strictly on cognition (Serrano-Puche, 2016).

Are we afraid because we tremble or tremble because we are afraid? William James (1884) asked this question more than a hundred years ago and it is still a controversy today. From the point of view of the Cartesian paradigm, there is no doubt that we tremble because we are afraid. The response of trembling (action) would be the result of a conscious evaluation (reflection) that the rational mind makes into a response to a stimulus (perception). The mind would be like a sandwich in which perception and action would be the bread and conscious cognition the filling, the substantial element that gives meaning and flavour to the whole. Emotion and the unconscious would both be irrelevant, not to mention the body.

Damasio (1996) spoke of Descartes' error to question the Cartesian paradigm. Reason and consciousness are not the pivotal axis of mental activity. Neuroscience has arrived at this certainty by discovering that although a person with lesions to their emotional brain is still able to reason, they are unable to make appropriate decisions in terms of efficacy and ethics (Damasio, 1996).

It has also been discovered that unconscious responses occur before the conscious ones and indeed condition them. Our brain processes 11 million bits every second, but only about 40 reach the conscious level (Wilson, 2004). For centuries of evolution, the human brain has learned to manage a multiplicity of stimuli by filtering them, selecting only those that represent an opportunity or a threat. The rest are relegated to indifference, to what-do-I-care.

The only stimuli that get past the what-do-I-care are those that are associated, by genetics or learning, with a somatic marker (Damasio, 1996); those that are emotionally important for the subject (Damasio, 2005). These stimuli automatically and unconsciously elicit a body response that leads to action. In short, I'm afraid because I tremble. The unconscious body reaction occurs before we know we are afraid. The rational brain can then assess this body reaction with reasoning, but conditioned by the previous emotional reaction.

Mental processes are therefore more complex than the Cartesian paradigm explains. They are integral experiences that includes the senses, the body, emotions and cognition. The emotional (often unconscious) brain is key in selecting the few unconscious stimuli that will arrive to consciousness and the few conscious ones that will trigger action.

Communication that only considers cognition is doomed to failure because the limbic system or emotional brain “is the brain's energy source” (Carter, 2002: 54). Communication efficacy requires the capacity to manage the energy source. Educational communication is ineffective when it is saturated with thoughts that do not activate emotions and, consequently, do not motivate. In the words of Kahneman (2012: 48), “the rational brain is a secondary character who thinks it is the star”. Educational communication therefore needs to rewrite its scripts to include new stars in the show.

4.2. The inadequacy of the transmission focus

Although the conventional culture invites us to think the opposite, the social and cultural hegemony of transmission technologies is a parenthesis in the history of communication. The printing press appeared in the middle of the fifteenth century, cinema in 1896, television in the 1930s. These technologies made it possible for a message to arrive simultaneously and unidirectional to a diverse and often dispersed multitude of receptors. The school emerged in this context and followed this communication model, which is far from the hegemonic parameters of the main part of human evolution.

Since the origin of the species, around 2.4 million years ago, our ancestors have lived some 84,000 generations as hunter-gatherers, only seven generations in an industrial era and only two in a digital era. Our minds are thus designed to solve the problems of hunter-gatherers (Van-Praet, 2012).

For millions of years the human brain evolved through processes of interaction with nature and with other human beings. Unlike unidirectional transmission, interaction allows us to adapt the message to the interlocutor’s receptivity, their degree of interest, their capacity to understand and their learning pace. This flexibility is lost in transmission communication, especially when it is going from one to many.

In dialogic interaction with the teacher or the machine that facilitates learning, the subjects benefit from the possibility to control at all times both the motivation and interest of the interlocutors as well as their understanding and assimilation levels. In collaborative work the subjects also benefit from the possibility of learning by doing, creating synergies, looking at points of views and turning diversity into opportunity. As stated by Jenkins et al (2006) and Jenkins, Ito, and Boyd (2015), we live in a participatory culture, but schools are slow in reacting to this new reality and have not known how to take advantage of these opportunities. Change is necessary. Participatory culture requires us to move from individual expression to participation in the community.

In educational communication, the absence of interaction between subjects is often accompanied by the absence of interaction between codes. If the educator were to use multimodal communication, they would have the opportunity to use each expression form for the most appropriate contents and for the teaching functions that they best fulfil. The word is most useful for describing, the image for showing, the graph for structuring, and audiovisual communication for audio-visual-kinetic contents. The word works best for the abstract, the image and audiovisual to show and motivate, and the graph to systematize.

4.3. The inadequacy of the supply focus: the limitations of salesperson strategies

If the educator feels uncomfortable with the invitation to behave like an advertising professional and not as a salesperson, they can consider taking on the functions of a mediator. Neuromarketing expert, Neil Rackham has devoted a large part of his professional work to investigating the strategies used by the great persuasive communicators. The main conclusion of his research is that the best negotiators and mediators devote 40% of their time to determining and managing the interests of the other party (Shell & Moussa, 2007). This strategy is a far cry from the usual practice in educational communication, fixated almost exclusively on understanding.

The educator should be closer to the mediator than the salesperson. Only this relationship can lead to communication in which motivation is assumed. If a customer comes into a shop, we can assume they want to buy the product. However, the advertising professional must start the communication process taking for granted the interlocutor's indifference. And the mediator must start by taking for granted the interlocutor's opposition. The advertising professional and the mediator will not be successful if they do not generate demand, and they will fail to generate it without the ability to manage the interlocutor's emotions.

Francisco Mora (2013) states that you only learn what you love. However, according to David Bueno (2015), neuroscience shows that the expression “spare the rod and spoil the child” is correct. These two statements are not contradictory. The opposite of love for certain contents is not fear, but indifference, apathy: the what-do-I-care attitude. Love and desire are engines of action and consequently stimuli for learning, but fear can also be a stimulus. The need to free yourself from pain is a spur to action. Only indifference impedes learning.

Lack of understanding is not the main reason why some messages provoke indifference, opposition or rejection. For the educator, a lack of motivation should be more worrisome than a lack of understanding.

The apparent increase in the lack of motivation as we progress through the educational stages can be explained in this context. Going from pre-primary education to primary, and even more so in secondary education, corresponds to moving from an environment in which students have the opportunity to constantly ask about issues that concern them to another environment where they are required to continuously respond to questions they are not interested in.

4.4. The inadequacy of the supply focus: the limitations of the discourse

It should not be surprising that storytelling has become a form of hegemonic communication in all areas of persuasive communication in which it is essential to create demand: from advertising to politics, as well as leadership, economics, law, management and business. There is also evidence of the effectiveness of storytelling in the education system (Bautista, 2009).

If discourse efficacy is based on the Cartesian paradigm, then storytelling is based on the mirror neurons paradigm: neurons that don’t carry out just one function, like the others, but rather several functions. It's not that they have a special configuration, but rather they have a powerful associative capacity. They connect the perceptual system with the motor system, the emotions and cognition (Keysers, 2011).

When I see (in reality or in fiction, or just when I read or hear a story) that two people kiss, in addition to activating the perceptual system, thanks to the mirror neurons, the motor system is also triggered (they activate my neurons that are activated when I kiss), as well as the emotions (I feel something similar to what I feel when I kiss) and cognition (I understand from having experienced a kiss).

It matters little that the story is fact or fiction. The mind simulates it, and consequently, makes it real, experiences it as real, involved in a unifying experience.

It is the system by which human beings have learned for 86,000 generations of hunter-gatherers. The learning experience of adolescents who accompanied adults to find food was similar to that of the child who listened to the stories of their adventures around the fire in the evening. In both cases the learning is achieved not through a discourse, which tends to activate only the rational system, but through storytelling: an integral and synergistic experience in which the perceptual, motor and emotional systems play an essential role in driving cognition.

4.5. Final thoughts

We know from science that the most appropriate metaphor for defining the mind is the network. Well, if educational communication aims to influence the mind it must adapt to the interactive demands of the network metaphor. The educator must be able to create networks of interaction in collaborative work, in the dialogical relationship between teacher and student, the synergistic relationships between students, the integration of technological tools, the interaction between codes to create an expressive synthesis (multimedia communication), and the combination of codes to get the most out of each expression form (multimodal communication). They also need to create interaction networks to enhance cerebral modularity. Descartes' error is the error of schools: divorcing the mind from the body, the rational from the emotional, the abstract from perception, the consciousness from the unconscious. It is logical that the renewal movements are based on increasing motivation and integration strategies, creating synergies between body and mind, abstraction and perception, reason and emotion. To influence others, it is more important to know about the minds of the people you want to influence than the contents through which you aim to influence them.

The brain’s energy centre is not the cognitive system but rather the emotional system. The greatest enemy of persuasive communication is not the difficulty of understanding but rather indifference, the “what do I care” attitude. Enhancing the emotional dimension in educational communication involves designing strategies that address the multitude of different interests that motivate students. Ultimately, the most valuable skill of an educational communicator is their ability to motivate, to get students involved through participation and interaction.

Funding Agency

This work was funded by the R+D+i projects “Competence in audiovisual communication in a digital environment. Diagnostic of needs in three social areas” (EDU 2010-21395-C03) and “Media literacy in the emerging digital media in university environments” (EDU2015-64015-C3-2-R) of the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Spain).

References

Ansari, D., De-Smedt, B., & Grabner, R.H. (2012). Neuroeducation. A Critical Overview of an Emerging Field. Neuroethics, 5, 105-117. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12152-011-9119-3

Bachrach, E. (2013). ÁgilMente: aprende cómo funciona tu cerebro para potenciar tu creatividad y vivir mejor. Barcelona: Conecta.

Bautista, A. (2009). Relaciones interculturales en educación mediadas por narraciones audiovisuales. [Audiovisual Narrations Based on Intercultural Relationships in Education]. Comunicar, 33(17), 149-156. https://doi.org/10.3916/c33-2009-03-006

Braidot, N.P. (2005). Neuromarketing. Neuroeconomía y Negocios. Madrid: Puerto Norte-Sur.

Bueno, D. (2015). La mirada de aprobación del maestro es más gratificante que un 10, El diario.es, 16/04/2015. (https://goo.gl/vcXT87) (2016-11-30).

Bueno, D. (2017). Neurociència per a educadors. Barcelona: Associació de Mestres Rosa Sensat.

Carter, R. (2002). El nuevo mapa del cerebro. Barcelona: RBA Libros.

Cea-D’Ancona, M.A. (1996). Metodología cuantitativa: estrategias y técnicas de investigación social. Madrid: Síntesis.

Damasio, A. (1996). El error de Descartes. La emoción, la razón y el cerebro humano. Barcelona: Crítica, Grijalbo Mondadori.

Damasio, A. (2000). Sentir lo que sucede. Santiago de Chile: Andrés Bello.

Damasio, A. (2005). En busca de Spinoza. Neurobiología de la emoción y los sentimientos. Barcelona: Crítica.

Fine, C. (2006). A Mind of its Own. How your Brain Distorts and Deceives, New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Frazzetto, G. (2014). Cómo sentimos. Sobre lo que la neurociencia puede y no puede decirnos acerca de nuestras emociones. Barcelona: Anagrama.

González, A. (2005). Motivación académica. Teoría, aplicación y evaluación. Madrid: Pirámide.

Ibarrola, B. (2013). Aprendizaje emocionante. Madrid: SM.

Igartua, J.J. (2006). Métodos cuantitativos de investigación en comunicación. Barcelona: Bosch.

James, W. (1884). What is an Emotion? Mind, 9(34), 188-205.

Jenkins, H., Clinton, K., Purushotma, R., Robison, A., & Weigel, M. (2006). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21stCentury. Chicago (IL): MacArthur Foundation.

Jenkins, H., Ito, M., & Boyd, D. (2015). Participatory Culture in a Networked Era: A Conversation on Youth, Learning, Commerce, and Politics. Cambridge: Polity Books.

Kahneman, D. (2012). Pensar rápido, pensar despacio. Barcelona: Debate.

Keysers, C. (2011). The Empathic Brain. How the Discovery of Mirror Neurons Changes our Understanding of Human Nature. Amsterdam: Social Brain Press.

LeDoux, J. (1999). El cerebro emocional. Barcelona: Ariel/Planeta.

Maturana, H., & Bloch, S. (1998). Biología del emocionar y Alba Emoting. Respiración y emoción. Santiago de Chile: Dolmen.

Mora, F. (2013). Neuroeducación. Solo se aprende aquello que se ama. Madrid: Alianza.

Pincham, H.L., Matejko, A., Obersteiner, A., Killikelly, C, Abrahao, K.P., Benavides-Varela, S. ..., Vuillier, L. (2014). Forging a New Path for Educational Neuroscience: An international Young-Researcher Perspective on Combining Neuroscience and Educational Practices. Trends in Neuroscience and Education, 3, 28-31. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tine.2014.02.002

Ramachandran, V.S. (2011). The Tell-Tale Brain. New York: W.W. Norton & Company

Rizzolatti, G., & Sinigaglia, C. (2006). Las neuronas espejo. Los mecanismos de la empatía emocional. Barcelona: Paidós.

Salmon, C.R. (2008). Storytelling. La máquina de fabricar historias y formatear las mentes. Barcelona: Península.

Serrano-Puche, J. (2016). Internet y emociones: nuevas tendencias en un campo de investigación emergente. [Internet and Emotions: New Trends in an Emerging Field of Research]. Comunicar, 46(24), 19-26. https://doi.org/10.3916/C46-2016-02

Shell, R.G., & Moussa, M. (2007). The Art of Woo: Using Strategic Persuasion to Sell Your Ideas. New York: Portfolio.

Van-Praet, D. (2012). Unconscious Branding. How Neuroscience can Empower (and Inspire) Marketing. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

Wilson, T. D. (2002). Strangers to Ourselves: Discovering the Adaptive Unconscious. United States: Harvard University Press.

Wolfe, P. (2009). Brain Research and Education: Fad or Foundation? LOEX Conference Proceedings 2007. 38. (http://bit.ly/2nsnrFd) (2017-03-27).

Zaltman, G. (2004). Cómo piensan los consumidores. Lo que nuestros clientes no pueden decirnos y nuestros competidores no saben. Barcelona: Urano.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En la investigación que da pie a estas páginas se aborda la problemática de la eficacia de la comunicación educativa mediante una doble estrategia metodológica. Se administraron más de 1.200 cuestionarios a profesionales de cuatro instituciones dedicadas a la comunicación persuasiva, dos tradicionales, la iglesia y la escuela, y dos de creación más reciente, el periodismo y la publicidad. Probablemente son los cuatro colectivos con más fuerza socializadora en los últimos siglos. Para este artículo se analizaron de manera especial las respuestas de los educadores en torno a la concepción de los procesos comunicativos y a los requisitos necesarios para la eficacia comunicativa, y se compararon con las de los demás colectivos, sobre todo con las de los profesionales de la publicidad. Finalmente se confrontaron todas estas respuestas con algunas aportaciones que se han hecho desde la neurociencia durante las últimas décadas en torno al funcionamiento de la mente humana, especialmente en relación con la toma de decisiones, para ver qué propuestas comunicativas ofrecen una mayor garantía de eficacia. Del conjunto de los resultados se desprende para los educadores la necesidad de superar una comunicación polarizada estrictamente en lo cognitivo, centrada en la transmisión, más preocupada por garantizar la oferta que por crear una demanda, y la de abrirse a las potencialidades comunicativas de la emoción, de la interacción y del storytelling.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

El neurobiólogo Giovanni Frazzetto (2014) afirma que por primera vez en la historia de la humanidad tenemos la oportunidad de conocernos a nosotros mismos a través de la ciencia. Esta oportunidad es especialmente útil para todos aquellos profesionales de la comunicación cuya eficacia depende de su habilidad para influir en las mentes de los demás.

Hasta ahora la educación no parece haber sido muy consciente de la necesidad de aprovechar esta oportunidad, a diferencia de otros colectivos. Cuando se habla de la década del cerebro, se hace referencia a los años noventa del siglo XX, porque se considera que se aprendió más sobre el funcionamiento del cerebro humano durante esta década que en toda la historia previa de la Humanidad.

Pues bien, el Neuromarketing surgió a finales de la década de los ochenta; antes, pues, de que la neurociencia hubiera hecho su eclosión. Las aportaciones de Daniel Kahneman (2012), Premio Nobel de Economía, hicieron añicos el paradigma en el que se había sustentado la economía clásica y propiciaron la aparición de la Neuroeconomía y del Neuromarketing (Braidot, 2005; Van-Praet, 2012). No tardaron en aparecer nuevas disciplinas dispuestas a beneficiarse del conocimiento científico de la mente humana: la Neuropolítica, la Neuroética, la Neuropsicología, la Neurosociología, etc. La educación tardó en subirse al carro. Solo recientemente están adquiriendo relieve las investigaciones y publicaciones en torno a la Neuroeducación, la Neuropedagogía y la Neurodidáctica (Ansari, De-Smedt, & Grabner, 2012; Bueno, 2015; Bueno, 2017; Mora, 2013; Pincham & al., 2014). Pat Wolfe (2001) ya había anunciado que el descubrimiento más innovador en educación es la Neurociencia, y Leslie Hart había advertido que educar sin saber cómo funciona el cerebro es como diseñar un guante sin haber visto nunca una mano (Ibarrola, 2013). Es en este marco donde hay que inscribir la presente investigación, en la que se confrontan de manera especial las visiones sobre la comunicación de un colectivo, el de los publicitarios, que se dejó interpelar por la neurociencia desde hace décadas, con las de otro, el de los educadores, que hasta ahora ha vivido casi al margen. Por descontado, existen diferencias muy significativas entre la comunicación publicitaria y la educativa en cuanto a contexto y a objetivos, pero no hay duda de que comparten algunas preocupaciones: han de vencer las indiferencias y reticencias por parte de los receptores, a priori poco interesados por sus mensajes; han de ser capaces de modificar conocimientos, actitudes, valores y pautas de comportamiento de los receptores; están obligados a adecuar su mensaje a un target definido y a sintonizar con sus preocupaciones e intereses; y la eficacia de su labor está condicionada por su capacidad de conocer y gestionar el cerebro de sus interlocutores.

Los descubrimientos más sorprendentes de la neurociencia tienen que ver con el papel capital que cumplen las emociones y el inconsciente en los procesos mentales, incluidos los procesos racionales. «Las emociones constituyen el fundamento de todo lo que hacemos, incluido el razonar» (Maturana & Bloch, 1998: 137). «Las emociones crean una furia de actividad dedicada a un solo objetivo. Los pensamientos, a no ser que activen los mecanismos emocionales, no hacen esto» (LeDoux, 1999: 337). Damasio (1996: 282) abunda en ello: «El sentimiento es un componente integral de la maquinaria de la razón». Y en otra obra (2000: 57): «Emociones bien dirigidas y bien desplegadas parecen elegir un sistema de soporte sin el cual el edificio de la razón no puede operar adecuadamente».

También el inconsciente forma parte de los grandes descubrimientos de la neurociencia. Cordelia Fine (2006) lo denomina el comando secreto. «La mayor parte de las decisiones que se adoptan tienen un responsable: el inconsciente» (Barchrach, 2013: 31), hasta el punto de que «los juicios inconscientes no solo suceden antes de los conscientes, sino que, además, los orientan» (Zaltman, 2003: 95).

Entre los aportes de la neurociencia hay que destacar, en fin, el descubrimiento de las neuronas espejo (Rizzolatti & Sinigaglia, 2006; Keysers, 2011) y la importancia que mediante ellas adquiere el storytelling como forma de comunicación persuasiva (Ramachandran, 2011; Salmon, 2008).

2. Material y método

2.1. Objetivos

Con la investigación se pretende averiguar qué entienden por comunicación diversos profesionales de la comunicación, conocer cómo afrontan el reto de interaccionar con las mentes de los demás, saber qué dificultades y retos encuentran en los procesos comunicativos y cómo los encaran, y conocer qué percepción tienen de su propio colectivo y del resto en cuanto a comunicadores. Una vez detectadas las diferencias más significativas, confrontándolas con los hallazgos de la neurociencia en torno al funcionamiento de la mente humana, se pretende descubrir qué propuestas comunicativas ofrecen más garantías de eficacia.

2.2. Selección de la muestra

La muestra quedó constituido por 1.272 profesionales de cuatro ámbitos diferenciados de la comunicación persuasiva: 533 profesionales de la educación (infantil, primaria y secundaria), 295 periodistas, 225 publicitarios y 219 sacerdotes. Se recurrió a un muestreo «estratégico o de conveniencia» (Cea-D’Ancona, 1996; Igartua, 2006). Se utilizó la técnica de la «bola de nieve» para poder acceder a los perfiles de la investigación y obtener el mayor número posible de respuestas. Se aplicó una prueba de fiabilidad y se obtuvo una precisión del 2,7%.

2.3. Método y análisis

Se utilizó una metodología cuantitativa, basada en la encuesta descriptiva. Como instrumento de análisis se recurrió a un cuestionario, desarrollado por expertos/as en los ámbitos de la comunicación y la educación. Aparte de las preguntas de identificación –profesión, edad y comunidad–, había preguntas de selección múltiple, escalas autoaplicadas tipo Likert de cinco puntos basadas en el grado de acuerdo, valoración o frecuencia, y preguntas abiertas. Las respuestas a las preguntas abiertas fueron analizadas por expertos/as que las categorizaron para tratarlas de manera cuantitativa.

Para la prueba piloto se administraron 37 cuestionarios a profesionales de los diferentes perfiles y de diversas Comunidades autónomas, de manera presencial y online. Con los presenciales se pretendía observar si al profesional le resultaba demasiado largo, si alguna pregunta no se entendía, etc. Los datos de la prueba piloto fueron tratados con el programa SPSS. Los investigadores realizaron los cambios oportunos a partir de las observaciones y resultados obtenidos.

El cuestionario se administró entre 2014 y 2015 en papel y online. Para la administración online se creó una aplicación que contabilizaba de manera automática el perfil y procedencia de cada cuestionario recibido. Una vez administrados los cuestionarios, se creó una base de datos en el software SPSS para su tratamiento estadístico. Se llevó a cabo un análisis descriptivo univariante1.

3. Resultados

3.1. Paradójica relación entre educadores y publicitarios

Una de las conclusiones más sorprendentes que se desprenden de las respuestas es la paradójica relación que los educadores mantienen con los publicitarios. Por una parte, demuestran tenerlos en gran consideración. Cuando se pidió a los comunicadores que puntuaran del 1 al 5 el grado de influencia que atribuyen a los educadores, sacerdotes, periodistas y publicitarios en la manera de ser, de hacer y de pensar de la mayoría de la gente, los educadores/as consideraron que los publicitarios son los comunicadores más influyentes. Les otorgaron 4,01 puntos sobre 5, mientras que a los miembros de su propio colectivo les otorgaron 3,6.

En contrapartida, cuando se pidió que puntuaran del 1 al 5 cuánto creían que deberían aprender de cada uno de los colectivos, los educadores puntuaron con 4,06 puntos sobre 5 a su propio colectivo y con 2,76 al de los publicitarios, una puntuación casi tan baja como la que otorgaron a los sacerdotes, 2,35 puntos.

Sorprende que consideren que los publicitarios son los comunicadores con un mayor nivel de influencia y piensen que no han de aprender de ellos, o que, considerándolos más influyentes que a los miembros de su propio colectivo, piensen que han de aprender más de sus colegas que de ellos.

Hay datos que ayudan a comprender esta paradoja. Cuando se preguntó a los comunicadores «¿Quién cree que conseguiría convencer más fácilmente a alguien sobre la bondad de un determinado valor social?», casi la mitad de los profesionales de la educación (49,1%; n=259) respondieron que los educadores, y solo el 38% (n=200) que los publicitarios (Gráfico 1).


Draft Content 306442922-58985 ov-es024.jpg

Hay paradojas similares en las respuestas del colectivo de los sacerdotes. Cuando se les pidió que puntuaran el nivel de influencia de los diversos colectivos en la manera de ser, de hacer y de pensar de la mayoría de la gente, otorgaron la máxima puntuación (3,75 sobre 5) a los publicitarios, y solo 2,73 a su propio colectivo. En cambio, cuando se les preguntó quién conseguiría convencer más fácilmente sobre la bondad de un valor social, casi un tercio (30,9%; n=67) votaron a su colectivo, dos puntos por encima de los publicitarios (28,6%; n=62) (Gráfico 2).


Draft Content 306442922-58985 ov-es025.jpg

Estas paradojas en ambos colectivos revelan unos equívocos compartidos: equiparar conocimiento con capacidad de comunicación de este conocimiento, pensar ingenuamente que el que sabe sobre un contenido (un valor en este caso) va a ser el que mejor lo comunique, que quien tiene más interés por un valor va a ser quien mejor contagie ese interés.

Por otra parte, cuando se pidió a los comunicadores que definieran con una sola palabra a cada colectivo en cuanto a comunicadores, el mayor porcentaje de educadores (17,6%; n=94) recurrió, para definir a los publicitarios, a términos vinculados al campo semántico de la manipulación (manipuladores, embaucadores, mentirosos, lobos, engañosos…), casi cinco puntos por encima de los que recurrieron a conceptos pertenecientes al campo semántico de la creatividad (12,9%; n=69) o de la eficacia (12,8%; n=68).

En definitiva, aunque los educadores y los sacerdotes consideren que los publicitarios son los comunicadores que más influyen en la manera de ser, de hacer y de pensar de la mayoría de la gente, piensan que son manipuladores y que, en consecuencia, no son los más eficaces en la transmisión de un valor positivo. Consideran que la eficacia comunicativa depende más del dominio del contenido que del dominio del procedimiento, depende más del conocimiento de lo que se ha de comunicar que del conocimiento de la mente de la persona a la que se ha de comunicar.

Reflexionaremos sobre estas paradojas. En las siguientes páginas se analizan algunos rasgos en la concepción del proceso comunicativo que se han detectado en los educadores, en contraste con las de los publicitarios. Son tres: una comunicación focalizada en la transmisión, en lo cognitivo y en la oferta. Luego se confrontan estas diferencias con algunas aportaciones recientes de la neurociencia.

3.2. Comunicación focalizada en la transmisión

Se preguntó a los comunicadores cuál es el principal objetivo que pretenden conseguir con su trabajo. El porcentaje de educadores que expresan una concepción unidireccional del proceso comunicativo (40%; n=213) es muy superior al de los que expresan una bidireccional (3%; n=16): «Hacer llegar la máxima información posible», «Transmitir información», «Que lleguen los contenidos a los alumnos», «Inculcar contenidos y valores»... El resto de educadores dieron respuestas ambiguas (54,2%; n=289) o respondieron NS/NC (2,8%; n=15).

La tendencia se confirmó cuando se les pidió que definieran en un máximo de dos líneas lo que entienden por comunicación. De entre los educadores que se manifiestan de manera explícita (84,1%; n=448), un 56,1% (n=299) conciben la comunicación educativa como un proceso unidireccional y solo un 28% (n=149) como bidireccional. La mayoría aborda la comunicación educativa como un proceso de transmisión. Para ellos consiste en «informar», «transferir información», «envío de mensajes», «hacer llegar unos contenidos», etc.

La máxima expresión de la mentalidad transmisiva de muchos educadores se observa en definiciones como estas: «Trasladar un mensaje de un emisor a un receptor», «Trasladar una información a los demás». Son minoría los que incorporan a las definiciones conceptos como intercambio, interacción o diálogo.

Las respuestas a otras preguntas confirman que predomina una concepción unidireccional y transmisiva de la comunicación. Se pedía que ordenaran del 1 al 6 los medios más eficaces en la comunicación persuasivo-seductora. Las opciones eran la comunicación interpersonal presencial, el cine, la televisión, la prensa escrita, la radio e Internet. Casi la mitad de los profesionales de la comunicación (un 43,3%; n=541) consideraron que la interpersonal presencial es la más eficaz.

Pues bien, el porcentaje subió en el colectivo de los publicitarios: más de la mitad (55%; n=121) consideraron que es la más eficaz. En cambio, el porcentaje bajó significativamente entre los educadores: no llegaron a un tercio (29%; n=152) los que la consideraron la más eficaz. Y tanto o más significativo es el hecho de que casi la misma proporción de educadores (27%; n=144) la consideraran la menos eficaz (Gráfico 3).


Draft Content 306442922-58985 ov-es026.jpg

Se preguntó igualmente qué aportaban a la comunicación persuasiva Internet y la telefonía móvil en términos de eficacia. Mientras más de un tercio de los publicitarios, el 34,2% (n=77), destacaron las posibilidades de interacción que ofrecen estas tecnologías, solo lo hizo un 10,5% (n=56) de los educadores. Parece, pues, que existe una mentalidad más transmisiva, menos interactiva y dialógica, entre los educadores, pese a trabajar en la comunicación interpersonal presencial, que entre los publicitarios, pese a que trabajan mayoritariamente en la comunicación mediada. Una nueva paradoja.

La concepción transmisiva de la comunicación educativa crece de acuerdo con los niveles de enseñanza. Entre los profesores de educación infantil lo conciben como bidireccional un 52,9% (n=36), entre los de primaria un 29,5% (n=59) y entre los de secundaria un 20,4% (n=54). Añadamos que la falta de sensibilidad respecto a la necesidad de interacciones entre los sujetos va acompañada de falta de sensibilidad en cuanto a necesidad de interacciones entre códigos. Cuando se pregunta qué aportan Internet, las redes sociales y la telefonía móvil a la comunicación persuasiva en términos de eficacia, tan solo el 3,4% de los educadores (n=18) hace referencia a la multimedialidad y la multimodalidad.

3.3. Comunicación focalizada en lo cognitivo

La mayor parte de los profesionales de la educación entienden y gestionan la comunicación desde parámetros estrictamente cognitivos. La focalizan de manera prioritaria o exclusiva en lo reflexivo, en lo racional.

Aunque un 86,5% (n=461) de los educadores dan una definición de comunicación en la que no se explicitan los efectos a conseguir, un 90,3% (n=65) de los que hacen referencia a efectos se ciñen al ámbito de lo cognitivo: «Capacidad de hacerse entender y comprender», «Que el receptor capte el sentido de lo que se intenta transmitir», «Transmisión de conocimientos de manera que el otro me entienda», «La extraordinaria posibilidad de intentar explicar la realidad a los otros y que te entiendan», «La comunicación es efectiva cuando el receptor es capaz de entender el mensaje», etc.

Cuando se preguntó cuál es el objetivo principal de su trabajo, el 40,5% (n=216) de educadores indicaron también objetivos de carácter cognitivo: «Que los alumnos se vayan a casa teniendo claro el mensaje clave que les quiero transmitir», «Hacerme entender», «Formar personas que tengan capacidad de comprensión», «Hacer llegar el mensaje de forma objetiva y clara», «Que entiendan», etc.

Si nos fijamos únicamente en los profesionales que explicitan los efectos que ha de producir la comunicación y dejamos fuera los casos ambiguos o sin respuesta, obtenemos que mientras un 82,4% (n=216) de los educadores se centraban exclusivamente en lo cognitivo, olvidando lo emocional, más de la mitad de los publicitarios (el 58,8%; n=50) incorporaban el factor emocional como prioritario: «Crear un sentimiento de necesidad hacia algo», «Hacer sentir el deseo», «Apasionar», «Movilizar la sociedad para conseguir cambios profundos en ella», «Seducir», «Enamorar», «Modificar conductas, cambiar estilos de vida», «Transmitir un mensaje persuasivo que mueva a la acción», «Hacer atractivo un producto o servicio», etc.

Entre los educadores que explicitan los efectos solo el 17,6% (n=46) incorporan objetivos de carácter afectivo, actitudinal: «Despertar ilusión, interés, curiosidad», «Fomentar las ganas de aprender de los alumnos», «Motivar», «Crear interés», «Despertar la necesidad y la ilusión por aprender y saber», «Apasionar a mis alumnos sobre la asignatura», etc. Respuestas sugerentes, pero minoritarias.


Draft Content 306442922-58985 ov-es027.jpg

3.4. Comunicación focalizada en la oferta

Cuando se preguntó cuál es el principal obstáculo para lograr el objetivo que se persigue, la máxima puntuación entre los educadores fueron las respuestas en torno a la falta de interés y motivación por parte del receptor (26,8%; n=143), doblando casi a las relacionadas con la falta de habilidades y formación del propio comunicador (13,9%; n=74), o con el entorno social desfavorable (13,5%; n=72), si bien superando a otras vinculadas con la saturación de informaciones (9,4%; n=50) y el entorno político (7,1%; n= 38).

En cambio entre los publicitarios obtuvieron la máxima puntuación respuestas en torno a la saturación de informaciones (25,3%; n=57), seguidas por las de las limitaciones económicas (20,9%; n=47). Solo el 9,3% (n=21) se refirió a la falta de motivación de los interlocutores.

Algo similar ocurrió cuando se preguntó por el punto débil de su profesión. Casi una cuarta parte de los educadores (22,7%; n=121) se refirió a factores relacionados con la falta de interés y motivación por parte de los interlocutores. Entre los publicitarios solo lo hizo un 1,8% (n=4).

A diferencia de los publicitarios, los educadores consideran, pues, que las mayores dificultades están fuera de su responsabilidad. No consideran que sea una carencia en su formación la dificultad de motivar a sus estudiantes, de vencer su indiferencia, sus reticencias. Se podría concluir que se plantean la comunicación como si fueran vendedores, en vez de planteársela como si fueran publicitarios.

El diccionario de la Real Academia Española define al vendedor como «persona que ofrece géneros y mercancías para quien las quiera comprar». Si adaptáramos esta definición al publicitario, habría que decir: «Persona que ofrece géneros y mercancías para que las quieran comprar». El vendedor responde a una demanda, el publicitario la crea. El vendedor se puede quejar de falta de interés de los interlocutores. El publicitario no, porque es responsable de crearlo.

Las quejas de los educadores por el pasotismo y el desinterés de niños y jóvenes demuestran que consciente o inconscientemente actúan como vendedores. Se han eximido de la responsabilidad de motivar a sus alumnos («Motivado se viene de casa»).

En educación infantil el porcentaje que se refirió a la falta de motivación de los alumnos como principal obstáculo para sus objetivos como comunicador fue del 17,6% (n=12), en primaria del 27% (n=54) y en secundaria del 29,1% (n=77). Y el porcentaje de los que consideraron la falta de motivación e interés de los alumnos como el punto débil de su profesión fue del 13,2% (n=9) en infantil, del 20,5% (n=41) en primaria y del 26,8% (n=71) en secundaria.

Los periodistas mostraron una tendencia similar a focalizar la comunicación en la oferta: «Dar a conocer acciones y opiniones a públicos que puedan estar interesados», «Informar al receptor de algún hecho que le interesa», «Transmitir información veraz a lectores interesados». El interés se da por supuesto. No pensaba así Lorenzo Gomis cuando afirmaba que el periodismo es el arte de conseguir que lo que pasa interese a la gente. Solo un periodista da una respuesta en esta línea: «Hacer que los lectores se apasionen al leer una historia del mismo modo que lo hago yo».


Draft Content 306442922-58985 ov-es028.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusiones

4.1. La insuficiencia de la focalización en lo cognitivo

Los publicitarios saben que el conocimiento de un producto y la comprensión de los mensajes mediante los que se promociona son factores imprescindibles pero insuficientes para garantizar la adhesión y la adquisición. De poco sirve que un cliente potencial conozca la Pepsi Cola y comprenda su publicidad si lo que desea es tomar Coca Cola.

Tampoco la indiferencia o el rechazo que provocan algunos líderes políticos se solucionan potenciando la comprensión de sus mensajes. La comprensión ha de ir acompañada de la activación de una respuesta emocional. No es potente el mensaje comprendido, sino el que moviliza en la dirección adecuada.

La revisión de la literatura científica en torno a los mecanismos por los que se rigen los procesos mentales sirve para poner en entredicho una comunicación educativa focalizada estrictamente en lo cognitivo (Serrano-Puche, 2016).

¿Tenemos miedo porque temblamos o temblamos porque tenemos miedo? Es una pregunta que se formuló hace más de cien años William James (1884) y hoy sigue la polémica. Desde el paradigma cartesiano, no cabe duda de que temblamos porque tenemos miedo. La respuesta del temblor (acción) sería el resultado de una evaluación consciente (reflexión) que la mente racional haría de un estímulo (percepción). La mente sería como un bocadillo en el que percepción y acción flanquearían a la cognición consciente, elemento sustancial que da sentido y sabor al todo. La emoción y el inconsciente serían irrelevantes. Y no digamos el cuerpo.

Damasio (1996) habló del error de Descartes para cuestionar el paradigma cartesiano. La razón y la conciencia no son el eje en torno al que pivota la actividad mental. La neurociencia ha llegado a esta certeza al descubrir que una persona con lesiones que afectan a su cerebro emocional, aunque mantenga intacta su capacidad de razonar, es incapaz de tomar decisiones adecuadas en cuanto a la eficacia y la ética (Damasio, 1996).

Se ha descubierto también que las respuestas inconscientes son previas a las conscientes y las condicionan. Nuestro cerebro procesa 11 millones de bits cada segundo, pero solo unos 40 alcanzan los niveles de la conciencia (Wilson, 2004). Durante siglos de evolución el cerebro humano ha aprendido a gestionar una multiplicidad de estímulos filtrándolos, seleccionando aquellos que representan una oportunidad o una amenaza. El resto queda relegado a la indiferencia, al «yamiqué».

Los únicos estímulos que superan el «yamiqué» son los que están asociados, por genética o aprendizaje, a un marcador somático (Damasio, 1996), aquellos que son emocionalmente competentes para el sujeto (Damasio, 2005). Estos suscitan automática e inconscientemente una respuesta corporal que predispone a la acción. En definitiva, tengo miedo porque tiemblo. La reacción corporal inconsciente se produce antes de que sepamos que tenemos miedo. Luego el cerebro racional accede a esta reacción corporal y puede evaluarla reflexivamente, pero condicionado por la reacción emocional previa.

Los procesos mentales son, pues, más complejos de lo que explica el paradigma cartesiano. Son una experiencia integral, que incorpora lo sensitivo, lo corporal, lo emocional y lo cognitivo. El cerebro emocional (a menudo inconsciente) es clave en la selección de los pocos estímulos inconscientes que acceden a la conciencia y de los pocos conscientes que desencadenan la acción.

Una comunicación que atiende solo a lo cognitivo está condenada al fracaso, porque el sistema límbico o cerebro emocional «es la central energética del cerebro» (Carter, 2002: 54). La eficacia comunicativa exige capacidad de gestión de la central energética. La comunicación educativa es ineficaz cuando está saturada de pensamientos que no activan emociones y que, en consecuencia, no movilizan. En palabras de Kahneman (2012: 48), «el cerebro racional es un personaje secundario que se cree protagonista». La comunicación educativa debería, pues, reescribir sus textos incorporando nuevos protagonistas.

4.2. La insuficiencia de la focalización en lo transmisivo

Aunque la cultura oficial invite a pensar lo contrario, la hegemonía social y cultural de tecnologías de carácter transmisivo representa un paréntesis en la historia de la comunicación. La imprenta apareció a mitades del siglo XV, el cine en 1896, la televisión en los años treinta del siglo XX. Estas tecnologías hicieron posible que un mensaje llegara al mismo tiempo y de manera unidireccional a una multitud diversa y a menudo dispersa de receptores. La escuela surgió en este contexto y siguiendo este modelo comunicativo, alejada de los parámetros hegemónicos durante la mayor parte de la evolución humana.

Desde el origen de la especie, hace 2,4 millones de años, nuestros antepasados han vivido unas 84.000 generaciones como cazadores-recolectores. Solo siete como era industrial y solo dos como era digital. Nuestras mentes están, pues, diseñadas para resolver los problemas de los cazadores-recolectores (Van-Praet, 2012).

Durante millones de años el cerebro humano evolucionó mediante procesos de interacción con la naturaleza y con los demás seres humanos. A diferencia de lo que ocurre con la transmisión unidireccional, la interacción permite adecuar en cada momento el mensaje a la receptividad del interlocutor, a su grado de interés, su capacidad de comprensión y su ritmo de aprendizaje. Esta flexibilidad se pierde en la comunicación transmisiva, sobre todo cuando funciona de uno a muchos.

En la interacción dialógica con el educador o con la máquina que sustenta el aprendizaje los sujetos se benefician de la posibilidad de controlar en cada instante tanto la motivación e interés del interlocutor como su comprensión y niveles de asimilación. En el trabajo colaborativo los sujetos se benefician además de la posibilidad de aprender haciendo, crear sinergias, confrontar puntos de vista y convertir la diversidad en oportunidad. Como señalan Jenkins y otros (2006) y Jenkins, Ito y Boyd (2015), vivimos en una cultura participativa, pero la escuela ha reaccionado tarde a esta nueva realidad y no ha sabido aprovechar sus oportunidades. El cambio es necesario. La cultura participativa nos obliga a movernos de la expresión individual a la participación de la comunidad.

En la comunicación educativa la falta de interacción entre sujetos suele ir acompañada, en fin, de la falta de interacción entre los códigos. Si el educador recurriera a una comunicación multimodal, tendría la oportunidad de utilizar cada forma de expresión para los contenidos más adecuados y para las funciones didácticas que puede cumplir mejor. La palabra será más útil para designar, la imagen para mostrar, el gráfico para estructurar y la comunicación audiovisual para contenidos audio-visual-cinéticos. La palabra es más funcional para abstraer, la imagen y lo audiovisual para mostrar y motivar, y el gráfico para sistematizar.

4.3. La insuficiencia de la focalización en la oferta: los límites de las estrategias del vendedor

Si el educador se siente incómodo ante la invitación a comportarse como publicitario y no como vendedor, puede plantearse asumir las funciones del mediador. Neil Rackham, experto en Neuromarketing, ha dedicado gran parte de su trabajo profesional a investigar las estrategias utilizadas por los grandes comunicadores persuasivos. La principal conclusión de sus investigaciones es que los mejores negociadores y mediadores dedican el 40% de su tiempo de preparación a buscar y gestionar los intereses de la otra parte (Shell & Moussa, 2007), una estrategia muy alejada de la praxis usual en la comunicación educativa, obsesionada casi exclusivamente por la comprensión.

El educador debería estar más cerca del mediador que del vendedor. Solo este se puede permitir una comunicación en la que se da por supuesta la motivación. Si un cliente entra en una tienda, puede dar por supuesto que desea el producto. En cambio, el publicitario debe iniciar el proceso comunicativo dando por supuesta, como mínimo, la indiferencia del interlocutor. Y el mediador deberá iniciarlo dando por supuesta la oposición del interlocutor. El publicitario y el mediador no tendrán éxito si no generan demanda, y no lograrán generarla sin la capacidad de gestionar las emociones del interlocutor.

Francisco Mora (2013) afirma que solo se aprende aquello que se ama. Según David Bueno (2015), la neurociencia demuestra que la expresión «la letra con sangre entra» es acertada. No son declaraciones contradictorias. Lo contrario del amor a unos contenidos no es el miedo, sino la indiferencia, el pasotismo: el «yamiqué». El amor y el deseo son motores de acción y, en consecuencia, estímulos para el aprendizaje, pero también lo puede ser el miedo. La necesidad de liberarse del dolor es un acicate para la acción. Solo la indiferencia impide el aprendizaje.

La falta de comprensión no es la causa primordial por la que algunos mensajes dejan indiferentes o provocan oposición o rechazo. Para el educador la falta de motivación debería ser más preocupante que la falta de comprensión.

El incremento en las dificultades de motivación que se constata a medida que se avanza en las etapas educativas se explica en este contexto. El paso de la educación infantil a la primaria, y más a la secundaria, es el paso de un entorno en el que los alumnos tienen la oportunidad de preguntar constantemente sobre cuestiones que les interesan a otro en el que están obligados a responder continuamente a cuestiones que no les interesan.

4.4. La insuficiencia de la focalización en la oferta: los límites del discurso

No debería sorprender que el storytelling se haya convertido en una forma de comunicación hegemónica en todos los ámbitos de la comunicación persuasiva en los que resulta imprescindible crear demanda: desde la comunicación publicitaria hasta la política, pasando por el liderazgo, la economía, el derecho, el management y la gestión empresarial. Hay pruebas de su eficacia en el sistema educativo (Bautista, 2009).

Si la eficacia del discurso se sustenta en el paradigma cartesiano, la del relato lo hace en el paradigma de las neuronas espejo, unas neuronas peculiares que no cumplen como las demás una función sino varias. No es que tengan una configuración especial. Tienen una potente capacidad asociativa. Conectan el sistema perceptivo con el motor, el emotivo y el cognitivo (Keysers, 2011).

Cuando veo (en la realidad o en la ficción, o simplemente cuando leo o escucho en un relato) que dos personas se besan, además de activarse el sistema perceptivo, se movilizan, gracias a las neuronas espejo, el sistema motor (se activan algunas de las neuronas que se activan cuando yo mismo beso), el emotivo (siento algo parecido a lo que siento cuando beso) y el cognitivo (comprendo a partir de haber experimentado).

Poco importa que el relato sea realidad o ficción. La mente lo simula y, en consecuencia, lo convierte en real, lo vive como real, implicada, en una experiencia globalizadora.

Es el sistema mediante el que el ser humano ha realizado sus aprendizajes durante 86.000 generaciones de cazadores-recolectores. Para el aprendizaje era similar la experiencia del adolescente que acompañaba a los adultos a buscar alimento que la del niño que por la noche escuchaba en torno al fuego los relatos de estas aventuras. En ambos casos el aprendizaje se producía no mediante el discurso, que tiende a activar solo el sistema racional, sino mediante el relato, una experiencia integral, sinérgica, en la que los sistemas perceptivo, motor y emotivo juegan una función determinante, propulsora de la cognición.

4.5. Reflexiones finales

Sabemos por la ciencia que la metáfora más adecuada para definir la mente es la de la Red. Pues bien, si la comunicación educativa pretende influir en la mente ha de adecuarse a las exigencias interactivas de la metáfora de la Red. El educador ha de ser capaz de crear redes de interacción en el trabajo colaborativo, en las relaciones dialógicas entre profesor y alumno, en las relaciones sinérgicas entre alumnos, en la integración de las herramientas tecnológicas, en la interacción entre códigos para crear una síntesis expresiva (comunicación multimedial), en la combinación de códigos para extraer el máximo partido de cada forma de expresión (comunicación multimodal). Redes de interacción también en la potenciación de la modularidad cerebral. El error de Descartes es el error de la escuela: disociar la mente del cuerpo, lo racional de lo emocional, lo abstracto de lo perceptivo, la conciencia del inconsciente. Es lógico que los movimientos de renovación se basen en la potenciación de la motivación y en estrategias integradoras, creando sinergias entre cuerpo y mente, abstracción y percepción, razón y emoción. Para influir en los demás es más importante conocer las mentes de las personas a las que se quiere influir que los contenidos mediante los que se pretende influir.

La central energética del cerebro no es el sistema cognitivo sino el emotivo. El mayor enemigo de la comunicación persuasiva no es la dificultad de comprensión sino la indiferencia, el «yamiqué». Potenciar la dimensión emocional en la comunicación educativa comporta diseñar estrategias en las que se atienda la multiplicidad de intereses diversos que mueven a unos estudiantes y a otros. En definitiva, la habilidad más preciada de un comunicador educativo es la capacidad de movilización, implicación e interacción.

Apoyos

Este trabajo ha sido financiado por los proyectos I+D+i «La competencia en comunicación audiovisual en un entorno digital. Diagnóstico de necesidades en tres ámbitos sociales» (EDU 2010-21395-C03) y «Competencias mediáticas de la ciudadanía en medios digitales emergentes en entornos universitarios» (EDU2015-64015-C3-2-R) del Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (España).

Referencias

Ansari, D., De-Smedt, B., & Grabner, R.H. (2012). Neuroeducation. A Critical Overview of an Emerging Field. Neuroethics, 5, 105-117. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12152-011-9119-3

Bachrach, E. (2013). ÁgilMente: aprende cómo funciona tu cerebro para potenciar tu creatividad y vivir mejor. Barcelona: Conecta.

Bautista, A. (2009). Relaciones interculturales en educación mediadas por narraciones audiovisuales. [Audiovisual Narrations Based on Intercultural Relationships in Education]. Comunicar, 33(17), 149-156. https://doi.org/10.3916/c33-2009-03-006

Braidot, N.P. (2005). Neuromarketing. Neuroeconomía y Negocios. Madrid: Puerto Norte-Sur.

Bueno, D. (2015). La mirada de aprobación del maestro es más gratificante que un 10, El diario.es, 16/04/2015. (https://goo.gl/vcXT87) (2016-11-30).

Bueno, D. (2017). Neurociència per a educadors. Barcelona: Associació de Mestres Rosa Sensat.

Carter, R. (2002). El nuevo mapa del cerebro. Barcelona: RBA Libros.

Cea-D’Ancona, M.A. (1996). Metodología cuantitativa: estrategias y técnicas de investigación social. Madrid: Síntesis.

Damasio, A. (1996). El error de Descartes. La emoción, la razón y el cerebro humano. Barcelona: Crítica, Grijalbo Mondadori.

Damasio, A. (2000). Sentir lo que sucede. Santiago de Chile: Andrés Bello.

Damasio, A. (2005). En busca de Spinoza. Neurobiología de la emoción y los sentimientos. Barcelona: Crítica.

Fine, C. (2006). A Mind of its Own. How your Brain Distorts and Deceives, New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Frazzetto, G. (2014). Cómo sentimos. Sobre lo que la neurociencia puede y no puede decirnos acerca de nuestras emociones. Barcelona: Anagrama.

González, A. (2005). Motivación académica. Teoría, aplicación y evaluación. Madrid: Pirámide.

Ibarrola, B. (2013). Aprendizaje emocionante. Madrid: SM.

Igartua, J.J. (2006). Métodos cuantitativos de investigación en comunicación. Barcelona: Bosch.

James, W. (1884). What is an Emotion? Mind, 9(34), 188-205.

Jenkins, H., Clinton, K., Purushotma, R., Robison, A., & Weigel, M. (2006). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21stCentury. Chicago (IL): MacArthur Foundation.

Jenkins, H., Ito, M., & Boyd, D. (2015). Participatory Culture in a Networked Era: A Conversation on Youth, Learning, Commerce, and Politics. Cambridge: Polity Books.

Kahneman, D. (2012). Pensar rápido, pensar despacio. Barcelona: Debate.

Keysers, C. (2011). The Empathic Brain. How the Discovery of Mirror Neurons Changes our Understanding of Human Nature. Amsterdam: Social Brain Press.

LeDoux, J. (1999). El cerebro emocional. Barcelona: Ariel/Planeta.

Maturana, H., & Bloch, S. (1998). Biología del emocionar y Alba Emoting. Respiración y emoción. Santiago de Chile: Dolmen.

Mora, F. (2013). Neuroeducación. Solo se aprende aquello que se ama. Madrid: Alianza.

Pincham, H.L., Matejko, A., Obersteiner, A., Killikelly, C, Abrahao, K.P., Benavides-Varela, S. ..., Vuillier, L. (2014). Forging a New Path for Educational Neuroscience: An international Young-Researcher Perspective on Combining Neuroscience and Educational Practices. Trends in Neuroscience and Education, 3, 28-31. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tine.2014.02.002

Ramachandran, V.S. (2011). The Tell-Tale Brain. New York: W.W. Norton & Company

Rizzolatti, G., & Sinigaglia, C. (2006). Las neuronas espejo. Los mecanismos de la empatía emocional. Barcelona: Paidós.

Salmon, C.R. (2008). Storytelling. La máquina de fabricar historias y formatear las mentes. Barcelona: Península.

Serrano-Puche, J. (2016). Internet y emociones: nuevas tendencias en un campo de investigación emergente. [Internet and Emotions: New Trends in an Emerging Field of Research]. Comunicar, 46(24), 19-26. https://doi.org/10.3916/C46-2016-02

Shell, R.G., & Moussa, M. (2007). The Art of Woo: Using Strategic Persuasion to Sell Your Ideas. New York: Portfolio.

Van-Praet, D. (2012). Unconscious Branding. How Neuroscience can Empower (and Inspire) Marketing. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

Wilson, T. D. (2002). Strangers to Ourselves: Discovering the Adaptive Unconscious. United States: Harvard University Press.

Wolfe, P. (2009). Brain Research and Education: Fad or Foundation? LOEX Conference Proceedings 2007. 38. (http://bit.ly/2nsnrFd) (2017-03-27).

Zaltman, G. (2004). Cómo piensan los consumidores. Lo que nuestros clientes no pueden decirnos y nuestros competidores no saben. Barcelona: Urano.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/17
Accepted on 30/06/17
Submitted on 30/06/17

Volume 25, Issue 2, 2017
DOI: 10.3916/C52-2017-05
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 5
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?