Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

A striking increase in the use of new information and communication technology has come about in recent years. This study analysed the characteristics and habits of Internet use in a sample of pre-adolescents between 10 and 13 years of age, enrolled in the 6th grade of primary school in Navarra (Spain). Likewise, the existence of differential patterns in Internet use by sex was analysed, and risk behaviours were detected. The sample was composed of 364 students (206 boys and 158 girls) who were evaluated at their schools. Information about socio-demographic characteristics, Internet use habits, and online behaviours was collected using a data-gathering tool specifically designed for the study. The results demonstrated high Internet use by the adolescents studied. Girls used the Internet more for social relationships, whereas boys tended to use it differently, including accessing online games. Moreover, some risky behaviours were found, including interactions with strangers, giving out personal information, and sending photos and videos. Likewise, behaviours associated with «cyber-bullying» were detected. These results indicate the necessity of establishing prevention programs for safe and responsible Internet use.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and background

In recent years, there has been a spectacular increase in the use of information and communication technologies (ICT). The Internet has gone from being a limited tool used by groups of scientists and academics to a resource for the general population and, especially, for young people (Estévez & al., 2009; Gallagher, 2005; Holtz and Appel, 2011; Labrador and Villadangos, 2009). Studies show Internet usage rates of more than 90% in teenagers, primarily for the purpose of online communication – communication in real time through the Internet. (García & al., 2013; Gross & al., 2002; Valkenburg & Peter, 2007; Van-der-Aa & al., 2009).

The dizzying advance of new technologies and their use in families has opened a digital gap between adults and adolescents (Aftab, 2005; Echeburúa & al., 2009; Sureda & al., 2010; Thurlow & McKay, 2003). Children become the experts, whereas many parents lack even the most basic knowledge of new technologies (Mayorgas, 2009). As a result, parents worry when they see how their children develop behaviours associated with ICT that are very different from what they would expect. Parents do not understand why their children spend hours in front of a computer screen or a mobile phone. It is hard for parents to understand that instead of playing with friends outside, their children either close themselves up at home and speak with their friends using instant messengers and cell phones or connect to virtual social networks (Echeburúa & al., 2009). However, parental concern is not always justified. In many cases, it arises more from the lack of knowledge of ICT than from its incorrect use. Thus, it is essential to establish clear criteria regarding the appropriate use of a computer, along with indicators of its inappropriate use. Alarm signals should sound when the adolescent avoids homework and academic performance suffers, when he or she reacts with anger if interrupted or if time limits are placed on computer use, when meet-ups with friends happen less frequently, or when children give up on their real friendships to spend more time in front of a computer connected to virtual friends (Becoña, 2006; Echeburúa & Requesens, 2012; García-del-Castillo & al., 2008; Mayorgas, 2009; Milani & al., 2009; Van-der-Aa & al., 2009).

Some studies performed by the Spanish NGOs Protégeles [Protect them] (2002) and Foro Generaciones Interactivas [Interactive Generation Forum] (Bringué & Sádaba, 2011) have produced some worrying data on the use of Internet by minors. According to these studies, 18% of minors who access the Internet do so specifically to join sex-related chat rooms, 30% of minors who habitually use the Internet have given out their phone number at some time, 14% have arranged some type of meet-up with a stranger, and 44% of minors have felt sexually harassed (Melamud & al., 2009).

However, there appear to be differences related to Internet use arising out of the factor of gender. Different studies demonstrate that boys primarily access video game pages, whereas girls prefer to use the Internet for online communication through social networks (Gentile & al., 2004; Holtz and Appel, 2011; Jackson, 2008; Rideout & al., 2005). It is important to account for these differences in Internet use because in general, it appears that time spent online has a positive correlation with better academic performance (Jackson & al., 2006; 2008). However, some studies note that time specifically dedicated to online video games is related to both poorer academic results (Jackson & al., 2008) and poorer social and familial relationships (Punamäki & al., 2009). These are preliminary results that require greater research. It is necessary to obtain more precise data on the characteristics of Internet use by adolescents, the type of content that adolescents access, and their real knowledge about aspects of ICT, particularly the Internet.

Accordingly, this study’s primary objective is to ascertain the characteristics of Internet use in a sample of preadolescents in the 6th grade of primary school. It attempts to determine the real level of ICT penetration, particularly that of the Internet, in this particular age group. Once an Internet use pattern has been established, more specific objectives include determining whether there is a different use profile based on gender by comparing results for boys and girls for all variables studied. Another goal is to detect the existence of risk behaviours in the sampled subjects. These data allow an evaluation of whether a real problem exists, along with the need to implement specific prevention programs.

2. Materials and methods

2.1. Participants

The study sample is composed of 364 6th grade primary school students at different schools in Navarra. Specifically, 8 schools (4 public, 4 private) located in urban and rural areas participated. These schools were chosen at random and represent the current situation of the Navarra (Spain) school system. After the schools were selected, all students in the schools’ 6th grades participated in the study. The evaluation was performed at the beginning of the school year, between September and October 2011.

The following selection criteria were considered: a) enrolled in the 6th grade; b) aged between 10 and 13; and c) voluntarily participating in the study after parents and teachers were duly informed of its characteristics.

With respect to the sample’s socio-demographic characteristics (table 1), the median age of the subjects was 11 (range=10-13). 56.6% of the sample was boys (N=206) and 43.4% were girls (N=158).


Draft Content 587597889-32646-en051.jpg

2.2. Evaluation measures

To gather the necessary information for this study, we made a list of 142 questions pertaining to 11 areas related to new technologies: introduction of ICT in homes, introduction of Internet in homes, the place held by the Internet in the child’s daily life, training (either formal or informal) received in ICT, degree of conceptual digital literacy, degree of procedural digital literacy, degree of attitudinal digital literacy, Internet user profiles, mobile-phone user characteristics, access to and creation of Internet content, and activities carried out online. In general, the questions called for yes/no answers.

2.3. Procedure

Data collection was performed by two professionals from the research team: an educational psychologist and a teacher, both experienced in this type of issue. After the necessary permissions had been granted by the Government of Navarra to enter the schools, the evaluation was performed in a single session. The two aforementioned professionals were present during the evaluation, along with the teacher in every classroom evaluated.

2.4. Statistical analysis

The statistical analyses have been performed using the SPSS program (version 15.0 for Windows). To determine the sample’s characteristics, a descriptive analysis was performed (percentages, medians, and standard deviations). The comparison between groups was performed using a chi square test in the case of categorical variables and Student’s T-test in the case of quantitative variables.

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Availability of new technologies and Internet use

Almost the entire sample has a home computer and knows how to use it. The majority also has a video game console and more than half have a mobile phone. Moreover, an Internet connection and Internet use is present for the majority of the adolescents studied.


Draft Content 587597889-32646-en052.jpg

With respect to Internet use characteristics, the majority of adolescents in the sample use the Internet at home and (for the most part) alone, without any parental oversight (table 3). Webcam use is observed in one-third of the cases, with significant differences according to sex. Girls use webcams with significantly greater frequency than do boys.


Draft Content 587597889-32646-en053.jpg

One important figure to note is daily Internet use. The majority of the students surveyed go online every day, and few stop during the weekends, which are a period of heavy Internet use. Accordingly, the use of social networks stands out (Messenger, Facebook, Tuenti, etc.) in spite of the fact that the students are below the legal age to access those networks. When the type of people with whom they communicate using these networks is analysed, there are significant differences between boys and girls. The girls use the Internet more for communication with other people, primarily friends and family. The boys use it significantly less than girls for communicating with other people, and communicate to a greater extent than girls with virtual friends whom they do not know face to face.

Thus, it is important to note that the median number of friends that adolescents have on social networks is 82.4 (SD=74.8), with a significantly higher number (t=2.89; p<0.01) in the case of boys (M=96.9 friends; SD=82.9) in comparison with girls (M=67.8 friends; SD=62.1).

3.2. Internet behaviour

The primary results for online behaviour are shown in table 4.


Draft Content 587597889-32646-en054.jpg

The primary Internet behaviours involve the development of social relationships. The Internet is used to make plans or hang out with friends, to add them to social networks, to send them messages, or to converse with them in real time.

However, behaviours are also observed that should be highlighted, although they are less frequent: Between 20% and 30% of the sample use the Internet to lie, saying that they are older than their real age or even saying that their physical appearance is different. In fact, 59.8% use social networks while below the legal age of access, thus lying about their real age.

Noticeably risky behaviours are also observed in the results, when taking into account the age of the sample: sending photographs or videos to strangers, adding strangers to friend lists, giving out telephone numbers or other types of personal information, sending photos or videos through the network, or the most dangerous behaviour of all: meeting up directly with strangers. The comparison based on gender reflects significant differences in three of the variables studied. Boys are more likely to meet with strangers, whereas girls use the Internet more to send personal messages to friends and to lie about their age.

Finally, it is important to highlight some observed cases of harassment behaviour. Nine point four percent have received email threats, and 13.7% have been insulted online. Twelve point three percent note having insulted other classmates while online.

It is worth highlighting that in 13.5% of cases, the Internet is used to speak about things that one would not discuss face to face, and that in 22.2% of cases, it is easier for students to be themselves while online. In both cases, there are significant differences based on gender, with boys using the Internet for such purposes significantly more frequently.

4. Discussion and conclusions

The results obtained in this descriptive study demonstrate that Internet use is extensive among the preadolescents studied. Nearly the entire sample has at least one computer in the home and Internet access. Likewise, in most cases, the daily median Internet use is around an hour. These data coincide with data found in recent studies showing Internet use rates of more than 90% in different samples. The study conducted in Austria by Holtz and Appel (2011), for example, used a sample of 205 students between 10 and 14 years of age and showed that 98% of sampled adolescents had a home computer, with nearly half (48.8%) having one in their bedroom. As in our study, this Austrian study showed a daily median connection time of between 1 and 1.5 hours, without any difference according to sex. Similar results have been found in Spain (Viñas, 2009) and other countries: Holland (Van-der-Aa & al., 2009). Finland (Punamäki & al., 2009) and the United States (Gross & al., 2002).

An important aspect to highlight in this study involves the differences found related to gender. Although both boys and girls show high rates of Internet use, there are still significant differences regarding not only the type of content that they access but also their risk behaviours and the precautions that are taken as a result. The results demonstrate that girls are more likely to use the Internet for everything related to social relationships (social networks, email, etc.). Boys tend to use it for different purposes, including access to online gaming. These results support the data from some previous studies (Gentile & al., 2004; Jiménez & al., 2012; Rideout & al., 2005). The difference in the content accessed by each group likely explains the significantly higher use of webcams by girls than by boys.

These differences in usage according to sex are significant. In the study by Punamäki & al. (2009) of 478 preadolescents in Finland, the results show that the greater the amount of Internet use for entertainment purposes (online games and navigation), the poorer the relationship with both friends and parents. That notwithstanding, use of the Internet for communication (email and chat) is related to better friend relationships but poorer parental relationships. This study does not result in those types of conclusions. However, the data found support the need to study the relationship between differential use and the quality of not only social and family relationships but also academic performance.

This study has also found some behaviours that represent an alarm signal related to preadolescent Internet use. Approximately 1 in 10 students use the Web to relate to virtual friends they do not know. This behaviour stands out, particularly in the case of boys, a significantly higher percentage of whom than girls make contact with strangers. Moreover, in some cases (5.6% of the sample) students have even met strangers in person. Fortunately, the great majority of the sample studied does not show these behaviours. Still, the cases found demonstrate the need to implement preventive measures for these ages. Similar results have been found in other studies (Brenner, 1997; García-del-Castillo & al., 2008; Jackson & al., 2006; Jiménez & al., 2012), but it is especially novel to find them in such an early age range.

From a different perspective, some of the behaviours detected in the sample relate directly to «cyber-bullying». The data found are clearly worrying, particularly when one considers the age studied. The spectacular growth of Internet use has transformed many harassment (bullying) practices into Web-based harassment (cyber-bullying). This type of virtual harassment behaviour is the subject of many new studies (Buelga, 2013; Félix & al., 2010; Perren & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, 2012), but it is notable to find them at such young ages. It is difficult to understand that more than 12% of students in the 6th grade of primary school have used the web to insult other classmates, that more than 13% have been direct victims of others’ insults and that more than 9% have received threats via email. There can be no doubt that these results should alert the educational community and the family regarding the online behaviours of 11-year-old children. It is surprising, therefore, that in the majority of cases, the Internet is used at home and alone, without any type of parental oversight. Again, these results indicated the necessity of establishing prevention programs for the secure and responsible use of the Internet.

Likewise, it is worth mentioning the use of the Internet for behaviours that would not occur outside of the Internet. The results show that for approximately 2 of every 10 preadolescents studied find it easier to be themselves while online and to speak about things that they would never discuss face to face. The Internet facilitates the creation of virtual relationships with friends and strangers. Anonymity and an absence of nonverbal communication elements make interaction with others easier and make it possible to hide one’s identity. The possibility of developing problems, especially for those with difficulty with interpersonal relationships and social anxiety, is thus increased (Carbonell & al., 2012; Chóliz & Marco, 2011; Echeburúa & al., 2009).

This study has some limitations, however. First of all, it is a descriptive study that covers a concrete sampling of students in the 6th grade of primary school in Navarra. It would help to conduct studies analysing broader samples, with a greater age range, thus making it possible to establish specific use patterns for each age group. Second, given their descriptive nature, the results do not allow for uncovering risk factors and specific vulnerabilities for developing problematic behaviours online. It is necessary to design longitudinal studies demonstrating risk behaviours and the consequences arising from those behaviours. Thus, it is possible to develop preventive guidelines for developing safe and healthy online behaviours. Conversely, the results demonstrate differences based on gender. Future studies must account for this difference and carefully analyse the differential behaviours of boys and girls. Finally, it would be helpful to analyse the existing relationship between Internet use and other variable types such as academic performance or familial relationships, supplementing the study with a qualitative analysis of the topic.

In any case, this study presents an approach to understanding the characteristics of preadolescent Internet use. The results constitute an alarm signal and point to the need to establish preventive programs for safe and responsible Internet use. Used correctly, the Web represents an extraordinary tool for information and communication, but it also poses risks. For this reason, it is necessary to develop guidelines that clearly draw the line between appropriate Internet use, inappropriate Internet use, and abuse (Gallagher, 2005; Tejedor and Pulido, 2012). It is necessary to give Internet use a natural place in a subject’s activities, while avoiding the risks and dangers of indiscriminate use. In this environment, the great challenge is to maximise positive effects and minimise negative effects.

References

Aftab, P. (2005). Internet con los menores riesgos. Bilbao: Observatorio Vasco de la Juventud.

Becoña, E. (2006). Adicción a nuevas tecnologías. Vigo: Nova Galicia Edicións.

Brenner, V. (1997). Psychology of Computer Use: Parameters of Internet use, Abuse and Addiction: The First 90 Days of the Internet Usage Survey. Psychological Reports, 80, 879-882. (DOI: http://doi.org/cq5).

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C. (2011). Menores y redes sociales. Madrid: Colección Foro Generaciones Interactivas/Fundación Telefónica.

Buelga, S. (2013). El ciberbullying: cuando la red no es un lugar seguro. In E. Estévez (Ed.), Los problemas en la adolescencia: respuestas y sugerencias para padres y profesionales (pp. 121-140). Madrid: Síntesis.

Carbonell, X., Chamarro, A. & al. (2012). Problematic Internet and Cell Phone Use in Spanish Teenagers and Young Students. Anales de Psicología, 28, 789-796.

Chóliz, M. & Marco, C. (2011). Patterns of Use and Dependence on Video Games in Infancy and Adolescence. Anales de Psicología, 27, 418-426.

Echeburúa, E. & Requesens, A. (2012). Adicción a las redes sociales y nuevas tecnologías en niños y adolescentes. Madrid: Pirámide.

Echeburúa, E., Labrador, F.J. & Becoña, E. (2009). Adicción a las nuevas tecnologías en adolescentes y jóvenes. Madrid: Pirámide.

Estévez, L., Bayón, C., De-la-Cruz, J. & Fernández-Liria, A. (2009). Uso y abuso de Internet en adolescentes. In E. Echeburúa, F.J. Labrador & E. Becoña (Eds.), Adicción a las nuevas tecnologías en adolescentes y jóvenes (pp. 101-128). Madrid: Pirámide.

Félix, V., Soriano, M., Godoy, C. & Sancho, S. (2010). El ciberacoso en la enseñanza obligatoria. Aula Abierta, 38, 47-58.

Gallagher, B. (2005). New Technology: Helping or Harming Children. Child Abuse Review, 14, 367-373. (DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/car.923).

García, A., López de Ayala, M.C. & Catalina, B. (2013). Hábitos de uso en Internet y en las redes sociales de los adolescentes españoles. Comunicar, 41, 195-204. (DOI: http://doi.org/tj7).

García-del-Castillo, J.A., Terol, M.C. & al. (2008). Uso y abuso de Internet en jóvenes universitarios. Adicciones, 20, 131-142.

Gentile, D.A., Lynch, P.J., Linder, J.R. & Walsh, D.A. (2004). The Effects of Violent Video Game Habits on Adolescent Hostility, Aggressive Behaviors, and School Performance. Journal of Adolescence, 27, 5-22. (DOI: http://doi.org/d3b6dd).

Gross, E.F., Juvonen, J. & Gable, S.L. (2002). Internet Use and Well-being in Adolescence. Journal of Social Issues, 58, 75-90. (DOI: http://doi.org/d5bxfd).

Holtz, P. & Appel, M. (2011). Internet Use and Video Gaming Predict problem Behavior in Early Adolescence. Journal of Adolescence, 34, 49-58. (DOI: http://doi.org/dwkv5q).

Jackson, L.A. (2008). Adolescents and the Internet. In D. Romer & P. Jamieson (Eds.), The Changing Portrayal of American Youth in Popular Media. (pp. 377-410). New York: Oxford University Press.

Jackson, L.A., von Eye, A. & al. (2006). Children's Home Internet Use: Antecedents and Psychological, Social, and Academic Consequences. In R. Kraut, M. Brynin & S. Kiesler (Eds.), Computers, phones, and the Internet: Domesticating information technology (pp. 145-167). New York: Oxford University Press.

Jackson, L.A., Zhao, Y. & al. (2008). Race, Gender, and Information Technology Use: The New Digital Divide. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 11, 437-442.

Jiménez, M.I., Piqueras, J.A. & al. (2012). Diferencias de sexo, características de personalidad y afrontamiento en el uso de Internet, el móvil y los videojuegos en la adolescencia. Health and Addictions/Salud y Drogas, 12, 61-82.

Labrador, F.J. & Villadangos, S.M. (2009). Adicciones a nuevas tecnologías en jóvenes y adolescentes. In E. Echeburúa, F.J. Labrador & E. Becoña (eds.), Adicción a las nuevas tecnologías en adolescentes y jóvenes (pp. 45-75). Madrid: Pirámide.

Mayorgas, M.J. (2009). Programas de prevención de la adicción a las nuevas tecnologías en jóvenes y adolescentes. In E. Echeburúa, F.J. Labrador & E. Becoña (Eds.), Adicción a las nuevas tecnologías en adolescentes y jóvenes. (pp. 101-128). Madrid: Pirámide.

Melamud, A, Nasanovsky, J. & al. (2009). Usos de Internet en hogares con niños de entre 4 y 18 años. Control de los padres sobre este uso. Resultados de una encuesta nacional. Archivos Argentinos de Pediatría, 107, 30-36.

Milani, L., Osualdella, D. & Blasio, P. (2009). Quality of Interpersonal Relationship and Problematic Use in Adolescence. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 12, 681-684. (DOI: http://doi.org/dccsz2).

Perren, S. & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, E. (2012). Cyberbullying and Traditional Bullying in Adolescence: Differential Roles of Moral Disengagement, Moral Emotions, and Moral Values. European Journal of Developmental Psychology, 9, 195-209. (DOI: http://doi.org/tj8).

Protégeles (Ed.) (2002). Seguridad infantil y costumbres de los menores en Internet. (http://goo.gl/bwGLw5) (08-08-2012).

Punamäki, R.J., Wallenius, M., Hölttö, H., Nygard, C.H. & Rimpelä, A. (2009). The Associations between Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Peer and Parent Relations in Early Adolescence. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 33, 556-564. (DOI: http://doi.org/bn9sk7).

Rideout, V.J., Roberts, D.F. & Foehr, U.G. (2005). Generation M: Mediain the Lives of 8-18 year-olds. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Sureda, J., Comas, R. & Morey, M. (2010). Menores y acceso a Internet en el hogar: las normas familiares. Comunicar, 34, 135-143. (DOI: http://doi.org/b3jp2h).

Tejedor, S. & Pulido, C. (2012). Retos y riesgos del uso de Internet por parte de los menores. ¿Cómo empoderarlos? Comunicar, 39, 65-72. (DOI: http://doi.org/tkb).

Thurlow, C. & McKay, S. (2003). Profiling ‘New’ Communication Technologies in Adolescence. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 22, 94-103. (DOI: http://doi.org/bzz6z2).

Valkenburg, P.M. & Peter, J. (2007). Preadolescents’ and Adolescents’ Online Communication and their Closeness to Friends. Developmental Psychology, 43, 267-277. (DOI: http://doi.org/dwmd5z).

Van-der-Aa, N., Overbeek, G. & al. (2009). Daily and Compulsive Internet Use and Well-being in Adolescence: A Diathesis-stress Model Based on Big Five Personality Traits. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 38, 765-776. (DOI: http://doi.org/bktkbf).

Viñas, F. (2009). Uso autoinformado de Internet en adolescentes: perfil psicológico de un uso elevado de la red. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 9, 109-122.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En los últimos años se ha producido un aumento espectacular del uso de las nuevas tecnologías de la información y de la comunicación. En este estudio se analizaron las características y el patrón del uso de Internet en una muestra de preadolescentes de entre 10 y 13 años, que cursan 6º curso de Educación Primaria en Navarra (España). Asimismo, se analizó la existencia de un perfil diferencial en el uso de Internet en función del sexo y se detectó la existencia de conductas de riesgo. La muestra estaba compuesta por 364 estudiantes (206 chicos y 158 chicas), que fueron evaluados en sus centros educativos. Se recogió información sobre las características sociodemográficas, los hábitos de uso de Internet y los comportamientos desarrollados en la Red a través de un instrumento de recogida de datos diseñado específicamente para la investigación. Los resultados mostraron un uso elevado de Internet por parte de los adolescentes estudiados. Las chicas usaban más Internet para las relaciones sociales, mientras que los chicos tendían a darle otro tipo de usos, como el acceso a juegos online. Además, se encontraron algunas conductas de riesgo, como quedar con desconocidos, dar datos personales o enviar fotos y vídeos. Asimismo, se encontraron comportamientos relacionados con el «ciberbullying». Estos resultados indican la necesidad de establecer programas de prevención para el uso seguro y responsable de Internet.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

En los últimos años se ha producido un aumento espectacular del uso de las tecnologías de la información y comunicación (TIC). En el caso concreto de Internet, ha pasado de ser un instrumento limitado a grupos de científicos y académicos a ser un recurso de la población en general y, especialmente, de los más jóvenes (Estévez & al., 2009; Gallagher, 2005; Holtz y Appel, 2011; Labrador y Villadangos, 2009). Los estudios desarrollados hasta la fecha muestran tasas de uso superiores al 90% de los adolescentes, principalmente con fines de comunicación online –comunicación en tiempo real a través de Internet– (García & al., 2013; Gross & al., 2002; Valkenburg & Peter, 2007; VanderAa & al., 2009). Este avance vertiginoso de las nuevas tecnologías y de su uso a nivel familiar ha abierto brechas digitales entre adultos y adolescentes (Aftab, 2005; Echeburúa & al., 2009; Sureda & al., 2010; Thurlow & McKay, 2003). Los hijos se convierten en expertos mientras que muchos padres carecen de los mínimos conocimientos sobre las mismas (Mayorgas, 2009). Como consecuencia, los padres se preocupan cuando ven cómo sus hijos desarrollan comportamientos relacionados con las TIC muy diferentes a lo que ellos esperan. No entienden que sus hijos pasen horas ante una pantalla de ordenador o un teléfono móvil. Les cuesta comprender que, en lugar de estar jugando con los amigos en la calle, se encierren en casa a hablar con ellos por Messenger o móvil, o se conecten a las redes sociales virtuales (Echeburúa & al., 2009).

Sin embargo, la preocupación que muestran los padres no siempre está justificada y, en muchas ocasiones, proviene más del desconocimiento sobre las TIC que de una mala utilización de las mismas. Por ello, es fundamental tener criterios claros sobre el uso adecuado del ordenador, así como de los indicadores del mal uso del mismo. Los signos de alarma deben saltar cuando el adolescente descuida las tareas escolares y desciende el rendimiento académico, cuando reacciona con irritación si se le interrumpe o se le imponen limitaciones horarias al uso del ordenador, cuando abandona aficiones o actividades de tiempo libre para pasar más horas frente al ordenador, o cuando los encuentros con los amigos se hacen cada vez menos frecuentes e incluso llegan a abandonar a sus amistades reales para pasar más tiempo frente al ordenador, conectados con las amistades virtuales (Becoña, 2006; Echeburúa & Requesens, 2012; GarcíadelCastillo & al., 2008; Mayorgas, 2009; Milani & al., 2009; VanderAa & al., 2009).

Algunos estudios llevados a cabo por las ONG españolas Protégeles (2002) y Foro Generaciones Interactivas (Bringué & Sádaba, 2011), han puesto de manifiesto algunos datos preocupantes sobre el uso de Internet por parte de los menores. Según estos estudios, un 18% de los menores que accede a la Web lo hace a salas de chat específicas sobre sexo, un 30% de los menores que habitualmente utilizan Internet ha facilitado su número de teléfono en alguna ocasión, un 14% ha concertado alguna cita con un desconocido y un 44% de los menores se ha sentido acosado sexualmente (Melamud & al., 2009).

Por otra parte, parece haber diferencias en cuanto al uso de Internet en función del sexo. Distintos estudios muestran cómo los chicos acceden fundamentalmente a páginas de videojuegos, mientras que las chicas prefieren la red para la comunicación online a través de las redes sociales (Gentile & al., 2004; Holtz y Appel, 2011; Jackson, 2008; Rideout & al., 2005). Es importante tener en cuenta estas diferencias en el uso de Internet, ya que, en general, parece que el tiempo dedicado a la red se relaciona de forma positiva con unos mejores resultados académicos (Jackson & al., 2006; 2008). Sin embargo, algunos estudios señalan que el tiempo dedicado específicamente a los videojuegos online se relaciona con unos resultados académicos más pobres (Jackson & al., 2008), así como con peores relaciones sociales y familiares (Punamäki & al., 2009). Se trata todavía de resultados provisionales, que requieren una mayor investigación. Se hace necesario contar con datos más precisos sobre las características del uso de Internet por parte de los adolescentes, el tipo de contenidos a los que se accede, así como los conocimientos reales que tienen sobre los aspectos implicados en las TIC y, especialmente, Internet.

En este sentido, el objetivo principal de este estudio es conocer las características del uso de Internet en una muestra de preadolescentes de sexto curso de Educación Primaria. Se trata de determinar el grado real de penetración que las TIC, y principalmente Internet, tiene en estas edades. Como objetivos más específicos, se pretende, una vez establecido el patrón de uso de Internet, determinar si existe un perfil diferencial en función del sexo, comparando los resultados obtenidos por chicos y chicas en todas las variables estudiadas. Asimismo, se pretende detectar la existencia de conductas de riesgo entre los sujetos de la muestra. Estos datos permitirán evaluar la existencia o no de un problema real, así como la necesidad de implementar programas específicos de prevención.

2. Material y métodos

2.1. Participantes

La muestra de este estudio está compuesta por 364 alumnos de sexto curso de Educación Primaria en distintos centros educativos de Navarra. En concreto, han participado un total de ocho centros educativos (cuatro públicos y cuatro concertados), tanto de zonas urbanas como rurales. Se trata de centros escogidos al azar y que representan la realidad del sistema escolar de Navarra (España). Tras seleccionar los centros, participó en la investigación todo el alumnado de sexto de Educación Primaria perteneciente a los mismos. La evaluación de todos los participantes se llevó a cabo al comienzo del curso académico, entre septiembre y octubre de 2011.

En la selección de la muestra se han tenido en cuenta los siguientes criterios de admisión: a) cursar 6º de Educación Primaria; b) tener una edad comprendida entre los 10 y 13 años; y c) participar voluntariamente en la investigación, una vez que los padres y profesores habían sido debidamente informados de las características de la misma.

En lo que se refiere a las características sociodemográficas de la muestra (tabla 1), la edad media de los sujetos era de 11 años (rango = 1013). El 56,6% de la muestra eran chicos (N=206) y el 43,4% eran chicas (N=158).


Draft Content 587597889-32646 ov-es051.jpg

2.2. Medidas de evaluación

Para recoger la información necesaria para este estudio se elaboró un listado de 142 preguntas que recogen información sobre 11 áreas relacionadas con las nuevas tecnologías: introducción de las TIC en los hogares, introducción de Internet en los hogares, lugar que ocupa Internet en la vida cotidiana del niño, formación recibida en TIC (reglada y no reglada), grado de alfabetización digital conceptual, grado de alfabetización digital procedimental, grado de alfabetización digital actitudinal, perfil de los usuarios de Internet, características de los usuarios de teléfono móvil, acceso y creación de contenidos en Internet, y actividades desarrolladas en Internet. Se trata, en su mayor parte, de preguntas con respuesta dicotómica (sí/no).

2.3. Procedimiento

La recogida de datos se llevó a cabo por dos profesionales que forman parte del equipo de investigación encargado de desarrollar este trabajo. En concreto, se trataba de una psicóloga educativa y de una pedagoga, ambas con experiencia en este tipo de problemáticas. Una vez obtenidos los permisos correspondientes del Gobierno de Navarra para entrar en los colegios, la evaluación se desarrolló en una sola sesión. En ella estaban presentes las dos profesionales indicadas, así como el profesor tutor de cada aula evaluada.

2.4. Análisis estadísticos

Los análisis estadísticos han sido llevados a cabo con el programa SPSS (versión 15.0 para Windows). Para determinar las características de la muestra se ha llevado a cabo un análisis de carácter descriptivo (porcentajes, medias y desviaciones típicas). La comparación entre los grupos se ha realizado mediante la prueba Chi cuadrado, en el caso de las variables categóricas, y la T de Student para las variables cuantitativas.

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Disponibilidad de nuevas tecnologías y uso de Internet

En la tabla 2 se presentan los resultados obtenidos en cuanto a la disponibilidad de TIC en el hogar, así como la comparación de los datos en función del sexo. La práctica totalidad de la muestra cuenta con un ordenador en casa y afirma saber usarlo. La mayoría posee también una videoconsola y más de la mitad cuenta con teléfono móvil. Además, la existencia de conexión a Internet, así como el uso de la Red, es mayoritaria en los adolescentes estudiados.


Draft Content 587597889-32646 ov-es052.jpg

En lo que se refiere a las características del uso de Internet, la mayor parte de los adolescentes de la muestra utilizan Internet cuando están en casa y la mayor parte de las veces en solitario, sin ningún control por parte de los padres (tabla 3 en la página 117). El uso de la webcam se observa en uno de cada tres casos, con diferencias significativas en función de sexo. Las chicas utilizan la webcam de forma significativamente más frecuente que los chicos.


Draft Content 587597889-32646 ov-es053.jpg

Un dato importante a destacar es el uso diario de Internet. La mayor parte de los estudiantes se conecta todos los días, y son muy pocos los que dejan de hacerlo los fines de semana, momento de uso masivo de la Red. En este sentido, destaca el uso mayoritario de las redes sociales (Messenger, Facebook, Tuenti...), a pesar de encontrarse en una edad inferior a la legalmente permitida para hacerlo. Cuando se analiza el tipo de personas con las que se comunican por dichas redes sociales, hay diferencias significativas entre chicos y chicas. Ellas utilizan más Internet para la comunicación con otras personas, principalmente amigos y familiares. Ellos, aunque lo utilizan significativamente menos que las chicas para comunicarse con otras personas, se comunican más que ellas con amigos virtuales que no conocen cara a cara.

En este sentido, es importante destacar que la media de amigos que tienen los adolescentes en las redes sociales asciende a 82,4 (DT=74,8), con un número significativamente superior (t=2,89; p<0,01) en el caso de los chicos (M=96,9 amigos; DT=82,9) en comparación con las chicas (M=67,8 amigos; DT= 62,1).

3.2. Conductas desarrolladas en Internet

En relación con el comportamiento desarrollado durante el uso de Internet, los principales resultados encontrados se presentan en la tabla 4 (página 118).


Draft Content 587597889-32646 ov-es054.jpg

Las principales conductas llevadas a cabo a través de la red se relacionan con el desarrollo de las relaciones sociales. En este sentido, Internet se utiliza para quedar o hacer planes con los amigos, agregarlos a los perfiles sociales, enviarles mensajes o conversar con ellos en tiempo real.

Por otra parte, se observan comportamientos que, aun siendo menos frecuentes, son importantes de destacar. Así, entre el 20% y el 30% de la muestra miente a través de la red diciendo que tiene más edad de la real o, incluso, diciendo que su apariencia física es distinta. De hecho, el 59,8% utiliza redes sociales estando por debajo de la edad legal de acceso y, por tanto, mintiendo sobre su edad real.

En los resultados se observan también comportamientos de riesgo llamativos teniendo en cuenta la edad de la muestra: enviar fotografías o vídeos a desconocidos, añadir personas desconocidas a la lista de amigos, dar el número de teléfono o cualquier otro tipo de dato personal, enviar fotografías o vídeos a través de la Red o, lo que es más peligroso, quedar directamente con desconocidos. La comparación en función del sexo refleja diferencias significativas en tres de las variables estudiadas. Así, los chicos son más propensos a quedar con desconocidos, mientras que las chicas utilizan más Internet para enviar mensajes personales a los amigos y mienten más en relación con su edad.

Por último, en algunos casos se observan conductas de acoso importantes de destacar. El 9,4% ha recibido amenazas por correo electrónico y el 13,7% ha sido insultado a través de la Red. Un 12,3% reconoce haber insultado ellos mismos a otros compañeros a través de Internet.

Es destacable que en el 13,5% de los casos se utiliza Internet para hablar de cosas que no se hablarían a la cara y que en un 22,2% les es más fácil ser ellos mismos a través de la Red. En ambos casos hay diferencias significativas en función del sexo, siendo los chicos los que utilizan la red en este sentido de forma significativamente más frecuente.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Los resultados obtenidos en este estudio descriptivo ponen de manifiesto que el uso de Internet es masivo en los preadolescentes estudiados. La práctica totalidad de la muestra cuenta con al menos un ordenador en casa y con posibilidad de conexión a Internet. Asimismo, la media diaria de conexión a Internet oscila en torno a una hora en la mayor parte de los casos. Estos datos coinciden con los obtenidos por estudios recientes, que muestran cifras de uso de Internet superiores al 90% en las distintas muestras utilizadas. El estudio de Holtz y Appel (2011), por ejemplo, desarrollado en Austria con una muestra de 205 estudiantes de entre 10 y 14 años, mostró que el 98% de los mismos contaba con un ordenador en casa y casi la mitad (el 48,8%), lo tenían disponible en su propia habitación. Además, este estudio austriaco mostraba, al igual que nuestro estudio, una media diaria de conexión que oscilaba entre 1 y 1,5 horas, sin diferencias entre sexos. Resultados similares se han encontrado tanto en España (Viñas, 2009) como en otros países: Holanda (Van der Aa & al., 2009), Finlandia (Punamäki & al., 2009) o Estados Unidos (Gross & al., 2002).

Un aspecto importante a destacar en este estudio es el relacionado con las diferencias encontradas en función del sexo. Si bien tanto los chicos como las chicas presentan una tasa alta de uso de Internet, se aprecian diferencias importantes en cuanto al tipo de contenidos a los que se accede, así como en los comportamientos de riesgo desarrollados y en las precauciones tomadas al respecto. Los resultados han puesto de manifiesto que las chicas usan más Internet para todos los aspectos relacionados con las relaciones sociales (redes sociales, correo electrónico, etc.). Los chicos tienden a darle otro tipo de usos, como el acceso a juegos online. Estos resultados avalan los datos encontrados en este sentido en algunos estudios previos (Gentile & al., 2004; Jiménez & al., 2012; Rideout & al., 2005). Probablemente las diferencias en los contenidos a los que se accede expliquen el uso también significativamente superior que hacen las chicas de la webcam en comparación con los chicos.

Estas diferencias de uso en función del sexo son importantes. En la investigación desarrollada por Punamäki y otros (2009), con 478 preadolescentes de Finlandia, los resultados mostraron que cuanto mayor era el uso de Internet para entretenimiento (juegos online y navegar), peores eran las relaciones tanto con los amigos como con los padres. Sin embargo, el uso de Internet para la comunicación (email y chatear) se relacionaba con mejores relaciones con los amigos, pero peores relaciones con los padres. El estudio presentado no permite obtener conclusiones en este sentido. Sin embargo, los datos encontrados avalan la necesidad de estudiar la relación entre el uso diferencial y la calidad de las relaciones sociales y familiares, así como los resultados académicos.

Por otra parte, en este estudio se han encontrado algunos comportamientos que suponen una señal de alarma en el uso de Internet en la preadolescencia. A pesar de tratarse de chicos y chicas de en torno a 11 años, aproximadamente 1 de cada 10 se relaciona a través de la red con amigos virtuales que no conocen. Este comportamiento destaca especialmente en el caso de los chicos, con un porcentaje significativamente superior al de las chicas en cuanto a contactos con desconocidos. Además, en algunos casos (el 5,6% de la muestra) han llegado incluso a quedar físicamente con desconocidos. Afortunadamente la amplia mayoría de la muestra estudiada no desarrolla estos comportamientos. Sin embargo, los casos encontrados justifican la necesidad de implementar medidas preventivas en estas edades. Resultados similares se han encontrado en otros estudios (Brenner, 1997; GarcíadelCastillo & al., 2008; Jackson & al., 2006; Jiménez & al., 2012), pero resulta especialmente novedoso detectarlos en la franja de edad tan temprana utilizada en nuestro trabajo.

Desde otra perspectiva, algunas de las conductas detectadas en la muestra se relacionan directamente con el «ciberbullying». Los datos encontrados son claramente preocupantes, sobre todo teniendo en cuenta la edad estudiada. El desarrollo espectacular del uso de Internet ha transformado muchas prácticas de acoso (bullying) en acoso a través de la Red (ciberbullying). Este tipo de comportamientos de acoso virtual está siendo en la actualidad objeto de numerosos estudios (Buelga, 2013; Félix & al., 2010; Perren & GutzwillerHelfenfinger, 2012), pero llama la atención encontrarlos a edades tan tempranas. Resulta difícil entender que más de un 12% de los estudiantes de 6º de Educación Primaria haya utilizado la Red para insultar a otros compañeros, que más de un 13% haya sido víctima directa de los insultos de otros, o que más de un 9% haya recibido amenazas por correo electrónico. Qué duda cabe que estos resultados deben poner en alerta a la comunidad educativa y al entorno familiar sobre los comportamientos desarrollados en Internet por hijos que cuentan tan solo con 11 años. Es sorprendente, en este sentido, que en la mayor parte de los casos la conexión a Internet se hace en casa y en solitario, sin ningún tipo de control parental. Nuevamente estos resultados indican la necesidad de establecer programas de prevención para el uso seguro y responsable de Internet.

Asimismo, es destacable la utilización de Internet para desarrollar conductas que no se llevarían a cabo fuera de la Red. Los resultados muestran que para aproximadamente 2 de cada 10 preadolescentes estudiados les es más fácil ser ellos mismos a través de la Red, y hablar de cosas de las que nunca hablarían cara a cara. Internet facilita el establecimiento de relaciones virtuales con amigos y desconocidos. El anonimato y la ausencia de los elementos de la comunicación no verbal facilitan la interacción con los demás y posibilitan el enmascaramiento de la identidad personal. La posibilidad de desarrollar problemas, sobre todo en aquellas personas con dificultades para las relaciones interpersonales y con ansiedad social, se ve por tanto aumentada (Carbonell & al., 2012; Chóliz & Marco, 2011; Echeburúa & al., 2009).

Este estudio presenta, no obstante, algunas limitaciones. En primer lugar, se trata de un estudio descriptivo que abarca una muestra concreta de alumnos de 6º de Primaria en Navarra. Sería conveniente contar con estudios que analicen muestras más amplias, con un mayor rango de edad, que permitan establecer patrones de uso específicos para cada edad. En segundo lugar, dada la naturaleza descriptiva, los resultados encontrados no permiten conocer los factores de riesgo y vulnerabilidad específicos para el desarrollo de conductas problemáticas en Internet. Resulta necesario desarrollar estudios longitudinales, que muestren las conductas de riesgo y las consecuencias derivadas de las mismas. Así, se podrían establecer pautas preventivas para desarrollar comportamientos seguros y saludables a través de la Red. Por otra parte, los resultados muestran diferencias en función del sexo. Los estudios futuros deberían tenerlo en cuenta y analizar detenidamente los comportamientos diferenciales entre chicos y chicas. Por último, sería conveniente analizar la relación existente entre el uso de Internet y otro tipo de variables como los resultados académicos o las relaciones familiares, así como completar el estudio con un análisis cualitativo del tema.

En cualquier caso, este trabajo supone una aproximación al conocimiento de las características del uso de la red entre los preadolescentes. Los resultados encontrados suponen una señal de alarma e indican la necesidad de establecer programas preventivos para el uso seguro y responsable de Internet. La Red, utilizada adecuadamente, representa una herramienta extraordinaria de información y comunicación, pero implica riesgos. Por ello, es necesario desarrollar pautas que delimiten claramente las fronteras entre el uso adecuado, el abuso y el mal uso de la Red (Gallagher, 2005; Tejedor & Pulido, 2012). Se trata de conseguir que el uso de Internet encuentre un espacio natural en las actividades del sujeto, evitando los riesgos y peligros derivados de una utilización indiscriminada y sin criterios específicos. El gran reto de futuro en este ámbito es maximizar los efectos positivos y minimizar los efectos negativos.

Referencias

Aftab, P. (2005). Internet con los menores riesgos. Bilbao: Observatorio Vasco de la Juventud.

Becoña, E. (2006). Adicción a nuevas tecnologías. Vigo: Nova Galicia Edicións.

Brenner, V. (1997). Psychology of Computer Use: Parameters of Internet use, Abuse and Addiction: The First 90 Days of the Internet Usage Survey. Psychological Reports, 80, 879-882. (DOI: http://doi.org/cq5).

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C. (2011). Menores y redes sociales. Madrid: Colección Foro Generaciones Interactivas/Fundación Telefónica.

Buelga, S. (2013). El ciberbullying: cuando la red no es un lugar seguro. In E. Estévez (Ed.), Los problemas en la adolescencia: respuestas y sugerencias para padres y profesionales (pp. 121-140). Madrid: Síntesis.

Carbonell, X., Chamarro, A. & al. (2012). Problematic Internet and Cell Phone Use in Spanish Teenagers and Young Students. Anales de Psicología, 28, 789-796.

Chóliz, M. & Marco, C. (2011). Patterns of Use and Dependence on Video Games in Infancy and Adolescence. Anales de Psicología, 27, 418-426.

Echeburúa, E. & Requesens, A. (2012). Adicción a las redes sociales y nuevas tecnologías en niños y adolescentes. Madrid: Pirámide.

Echeburúa, E., Labrador, F.J. & Becoña, E. (2009). Adicción a las nuevas tecnologías en adolescentes y jóvenes. Madrid: Pirámide.

Estévez, L., Bayón, C., De-la-Cruz, J. & Fernández-Liria, A. (2009). Uso y abuso de Internet en adolescentes. In E. Echeburúa, F.J. Labrador & E. Becoña (Eds.), Adicción a las nuevas tecnologías en adolescentes y jóvenes (pp. 101-128). Madrid: Pirámide.

Félix, V., Soriano, M., Godoy, C. & Sancho, S. (2010). El ciberacoso en la enseñanza obligatoria. Aula Abierta, 38, 47-58.

Gallagher, B. (2005). New Technology: Helping or Harming Children. Child Abuse Review, 14, 367-373. (DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/car.923).

García, A., López de Ayala, M.C. & Catalina, B. (2013). Hábitos de uso en Internet y en las redes sociales de los adolescentes españoles. Comunicar, 41, 195-204. (DOI: http://doi.org/tj7).

García-del-Castillo, J.A., Terol, M.C. & al. (2008). Uso y abuso de Internet en jóvenes universitarios. Adicciones, 20, 131-142.

Gentile, D.A., Lynch, P.J., Linder, J.R. & Walsh, D.A. (2004). The Effects of Violent Video Game Habits on Adolescent Hostility, Aggressive Behaviors, and School Performance. Journal of Adolescence, 27, 5-22. (DOI: http://doi.org/d3b6dd).

Gross, E.F., Juvonen, J. & Gable, S.L. (2002). Internet Use and Well-being in Adolescence. Journal of Social Issues, 58, 75-90. (DOI: http://doi.org/d5bxfd).

Holtz, P. & Appel, M. (2011). Internet Use and Video Gaming Predict problem Behavior in Early Adolescence. Journal of Adolescence, 34, 49-58. (DOI: http://doi.org/dwkv5q).

Jackson, L.A. (2008). Adolescents and the Internet. In D. Romer & P. Jamieson (Eds.), The Changing Portrayal of American Youth in Popular Media. (pp. 377-410). New York: Oxford University Press.

Jackson, L.A., von Eye, A. & al. (2006). Children's Home Internet Use: Antecedents and Psychological, Social, and Academic Consequences. In R. Kraut, M. Brynin & S. Kiesler (Eds.), Computers, phones, and the Internet: Domesticating information technology (pp. 145-167). New York: Oxford University Press.

Jackson, L.A., Zhao, Y. & al. (2008). Race, Gender, and Information Technology Use: The New Digital Divide. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 11, 437-442.

Jiménez, M.I., Piqueras, J.A. & al. (2012). Diferencias de sexo, características de personalidad y afrontamiento en el uso de Internet, el móvil y los videojuegos en la adolescencia. Health and Addictions/Salud y Drogas, 12, 61-82.

Labrador, F.J. & Villadangos, S.M. (2009). Adicciones a nuevas tecnologías en jóvenes y adolescentes. In E. Echeburúa, F.J. Labrador & E. Becoña (eds.), Adicción a las nuevas tecnologías en adolescentes y jóvenes (pp. 45-75). Madrid: Pirámide.

Mayorgas, M.J. (2009). Programas de prevención de la adicción a las nuevas tecnologías en jóvenes y adolescentes. In E. Echeburúa, F.J. Labrador & E. Becoña (Eds.), Adicción a las nuevas tecnologías en adolescentes y jóvenes. (pp. 101-128). Madrid: Pirámide.

Melamud, A, Nasanovsky, J. & al. (2009). Usos de Internet en hogares con niños de entre 4 y 18 años. Control de los padres sobre este uso. Resultados de una encuesta nacional. Archivos Argentinos de Pediatría, 107, 30-36.

Milani, L., Osualdella, D. & Blasio, P. (2009). Quality of Interpersonal Relationship and Problematic Use in Adolescence. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 12, 681-684. (DOI: http://doi.org/dccsz2).

Perren, S. & Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, E. (2012). Cyberbullying and Traditional Bullying in Adolescence: Differential Roles of Moral Disengagement, Moral Emotions, and Moral Values. European Journal of Developmental Psychology, 9, 195-209. (DOI: http://doi.org/tj8).

Protégeles (Ed.) (2002). Seguridad infantil y costumbres de los menores en Internet. (http://goo.gl/bwGLw5) (08-08-2012).

Punamäki, R.J., Wallenius, M., Hölttö, H., Nygard, C.H. & Rimpelä, A. (2009). The Associations between Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Peer and Parent Relations in Early Adolescence. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 33, 556-564. (DOI: http://doi.org/bn9sk7).

Rideout, V.J., Roberts, D.F. & Foehr, U.G. (2005). Generation M: Mediain the Lives of 8-18 year-olds. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

Sureda, J., Comas, R. & Morey, M. (2010). Menores y acceso a Internet en el hogar: las normas familiares. Comunicar, 34, 135-143. (DOI: http://doi.org/b3jp2h).

Tejedor, S. & Pulido, C. (2012). Retos y riesgos del uso de Internet por parte de los menores. ¿Cómo empoderarlos? Comunicar, 39, 65-72. (DOI: http://doi.org/tkb).

Thurlow, C. & McKay, S. (2003). Profiling ‘New’ Communication Technologies in Adolescence. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 22, 94-103. (DOI: http://doi.org/bzz6z2).

Valkenburg, P.M. & Peter, J. (2007). Preadolescents’ and Adolescents’ Online Communication and their Closeness to Friends. Developmental Psychology, 43, 267-277. (DOI: http://doi.org/dwmd5z).

Van-der-Aa, N., Overbeek, G. & al. (2009). Daily and Compulsive Internet Use and Well-being in Adolescence: A Diathesis-stress Model Based on Big Five Personality Traits. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 38, 765-776. (DOI: http://doi.org/bktkbf).

Viñas, F. (2009). Uso autoinformado de Internet en adolescentes: perfil psicológico de un uso elevado de la red. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 9, 109-122.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/14
Accepted on 31/12/14
Submitted on 31/12/14

Volume 23, Issue 1, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C44-2015-12
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 37
Views 3
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?