Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The effects of TV violence have been widely studied from an experimental perspective, which, to a certain extent, neglects the interaction between broadcaster and recipient. This study proposes a complementary approach, which takes into account viewers’ interpretation and construction of TV messages. Social dimensions influencing emotional experiences to TV violence will be identified and analyzed, as well as the way these emotions are construed in discourse, how they are linked to attitudes, ethical dimensions and courses of action. Eight focus groups (segmented by age, gender and educational level) were the basis of a discourse analysis that reconstructed the way audiences experience TV violence. Results show the importance of a first immediate emotional mobilisation, with references to complex emotions, and a second emotional articulation of experiences regarding repetition of scenes (type, classification and assessment of broadcasts), legitimacy (or lack thereof) of violent acts, and identification (or lack thereof) with main characters. In conclusion, the double impact (immediate and deferred) of emotions generates complex narratives that lead to a single course of action characterised by responsibility and guilt, which can only be taken into account by assuming the active role of viewer.

Download the PDF version

1. Material and methods

The discourse analysed comes from eight focus groups, with people of various ages, gender and educational level, who were invited to talk about violence on Spanish television. The composition of the groups was decided on the basis of the most relevant differences we expected to come across, although invariants were looked for in this first analysis, so no differential analyses will be conducted among the various social categories. Finding common discourses in such varied groups backs the assumption that they are widespread in society.

The focus group technique is especially suitable when phenomena need to be examined or interpreted in the terms people use to give them meaning (Denzin & Lincoln, 2005), when a collective discourse on an object as «social» as television broadcasts needs to be reconstructed (Callejo, 1995). The groups, consisting of subjects with similar characteristics, although not natural groups, produce a discourse which represents the collective the individuals belong to, and their differential characteristics emerge in the researcher/observer testimony. The researcher/observer’s task is to ensure the study subject is discussed without influencing symbolic group production. It is the group itself, with the structure created in the context of the research, which controls, emphasises, penalises and hierarchises the interventions and the discourse contents (Fern, 2001; Stewart, Shamdasani & Rook, 2007).

In this text, we construct a spectrum of feelings and emotions as they are named, and we interpret which emotional states they are related to, and what they refer to in the social context in which the viewers live. We present an analysis of interpretive repertoires (Potter & Wetherell, 1987, 2001; Potter, 2003), understood as consistent language units linked with each other, which refer to the understanding, relevance and enjoyment of violence. Furthermore, the context of the viewers’ positions was interpreted and the discourse organised as clearly and as structured as possible, in connection with the content and the social implications that the reception of violence in the various programmes may have.

2. Results

2.1. Emotional mobilisation: its first significance

The first significance of emotions experienced when watching violence is construed on the basis of the importance of first reactions, the first outlines of significance which structure the viewers’ discourse. If we summarise the wide range of words with which they are referred to, the term «impact» clearly stands out. The word impact, jolt, shock in the dictionary, but also effect, mark or impression which the impact or shock leaves, is a manner of verbalising the emotional effects, even strong emotional effects, but it does not qualify the type of emotion felt.

«I still have the image imprinted on my mind of a district here in Madrid, of that girl, Irene, with a leg torn off by an ETA bomb. I’ll never forget that. Nor many others. You start to forget them… If you put red dots on the map of Madrid, you would be amazed: twelve policemen in the Plaza de la República… There’s always one image that stays with you more than others do. Perhaps because you were younger and she was a child. But, many of images of that type have a huge impact on you» (Adult males, basic education).

Violent images «have an impact», i.e. they cause emotions, they mobilise, they awaken emotions with various levels of intensity, which, in general, are high. That intense emotion has two dimensions or qualities: on the one hand, the content of the emotions is negative, since, fundamentally, it is fear, anger, surprise and sadness, but, on the other, feeling an intense emotion is attractive, and even pleasurable.

Identification of this first aroused emotion extends in a continuum which ranges from allusions to simple reactions or emotions, such as nervousness, anxiety, disgust, repugnance, horror, sadness, anger, violence (ire), unease, to other more complex, but immediate emotions (powerlessness, depression), sometimes accompanied by very clear physiological correlates (your stomach contracts, sobbing, wanting to flee), or immediate actions (changing channel, turning off the TV, getting up from your chair).

However, the discourse contains another dimension of the impact: intense surprise, experimenting with one’s own limits, curiosity peppered with anxiety and expectation. It is a need for knowledge, which wonders about the irrational or sinister, and surprising nature of mankind, including oneself. On the one hand, we want to understand, give meaning to the violent acts occurring around us, which may affect us, but which elude understanding with daily parameters. On the other, we want to know how far our own emotions can take us.

2.2. Structuring elements of emotions towards violence

The dimensions which structure the construction and experience of emotions are: the type of scenes, their classification, legitimation or delegitimation of the acts, identification or lack of it with the characters.

The type of scenes, i.e. whether they are real-life or fictional, can modify the emotion radically, which may transform from unpleasant to pleasant. Fictional violence can be enjoyed, and this enjoyment is recognised and accepted. But it has to fulfil certain conditions, some in connection with meaning, with logic, and others with legitimation. Fictional violence must be connected to a tale. It must mean something to viewers. It must be «well placed» and sequenced, and linked to the plot (i.e. not repetitive or absurd). It must be limited in intensity. Not all violence is enjoyed, for example the most sadistic.

Viewers take control of the emotions by classifying and assessing the scenes. By breaking down the scenes into episodes and the smallest units, viewers classify them into series: «War violence», «news about abuse», «reports on harsh reality», «gender-based violence», «violent films», etc. The classification organises the viewings and intervenes in the formation of emotions, which already depend on the series they are included in. Some scenes are understood as repeated, since, although they are not the same, they are of the same series or the same type. Repetition modifies emotions, because viewers can anticipate what it concerns, and they can select what they want to see and how much of it they will see. To a certain extent, they can decide how they will be impacted.

A third dimension is the legitimation or delegitimation of events. Viewers can accept or even enjoy violence, or classify what they have seen as non-violent, when they believe that it is legitimate, that it has served a purpose or has some social function. Violence which solves a problem or something bad is considered acceptable or pleasurable. This is recognised without any problems in fiction, but not when it refers to real-life scenes.

«We always have the fight against evil. If you see the bad character kill, you feel very bad, but if you see the good one defending principles, things, your view is different: such as the triumph of good over evil» (Adult males, basic education).

Finally, identification or lack of it with the characters, which is measured by the viewer’s physical or psychological distance from the actors of the violence. We understand physical closeness to be the scenes that occur in places viewers know, frequent, or could frequent. Close geographical contexts (Spain, Madrid), contexts viewers can identify with (i.e. conflicts between groups for young people) generally substantially modify the emotional effects to emphasise the importance of feelings and the strength of the emotion aroused. Viewers are moved by what they associate with (by displacement). The similarity of the problems found in fiction is the source of feelings, effects and emotions. The ability to put oneself in another’s shoes, take their place, merge some aspects of yourself with the person watched «commits» them, involves them and they feel with him. In the discourse analysed, this process leads to a targeted, specific sensitisation involving the actors, or situations, with similar experiences, and with whom the viewer can identify (Buckingham, 1996; Schlesinger, Haynes et al, 1998; Kitzinger, 2001; Boyle, 2005). Legitimation and identification are somehow always present in the explanation of viewers’ emotional response (Buttny & Ellis, 2007), whether reference is made to real-life or fictional violence.

2.3. The emotional impact produced by the perception of violence

The content and the type of emotions betray how variable they are when we compare the emotional impact of violence perceived as real with fictional violence. Whilst real-life violence emphasises the emotional impact of negative content, fictional violence keeps the memory of extreme experience alive. The emotional impact of real-life violence can last for a long time, since it leads to a feeling of powerlessness, fear for the future, a need to flee… The emotional impact of fictional violence is much shorter, centring on almost physical experiences as a result of the level of tension, interest, surprise and fear, although, at times, it can approach or exceed some people’s tolerance limits.

»Yes, I like to be afraid, to feel violence, to feel bad, that has happened. And then you laugh with your friends, but you end up thinking: Do I like seeing violence and fear?» (Young males, university students).

One of the most pronounced differences between the perception of real-life and fictional violence is, therefore, how long the emotional impact lasts. With fictional violence, the emotion is consumed immediately: it is enjoyed or rejected. If it is repeated, it responds to the repetition patterns of other cultural and leisure acts: if the effect produced is pleasurable, then it is re-experienced, but with the loss of the surprise factor, and, if it is an effect shared with other stimuli, with less intensity than the first time. If the violence is real, the situation is very different. The emotional impact is combined with new impacts and impressions producing singular effects.

As in the extensive literature on desensitisation, the effect of the repetition of images figures widely in the discourse of all the groups. Phrases such as «one image makes me forget the previous one», «so much violence makes us numb», «we like images that are more shocking than the last», etc., demonstrate the importance of considering emotional reactions taking their repetition into account. Nevertheless, the effect of the repetition is neither unique nor uniform. We have detected at least five possible consequences.

1) Accumulated emotional impact. The new impact comes on top of the previous one, and it is added to it, producing an effect that just one scene would not have. Viewers react emotionally when they are impacted on several occasions, with repeated scenes or of the same type.

«Well, we are going to feel it, but it all depends on what they show us. If we see it once a week, it's not the same as if it's on a channel all day. I saw what happened at Atocha in the morning and I said «God, what a slaughter». And it didn’t have such an impact on me. But I watched it on the TV all day, and in the end I was crying because of so many images one after another, so much pain… And luckily I didn’t know anyone there, but I ended up feeling as upset as anyone there» (Young males, university students).

2) Reducing the intensity of emotions. In this case, the previous impact «buffers» the effect of the new one. Instead of accumulating it, it is absorbed. The original impact remains, but repetition only reactivates its presence with less intensity than the first time.

«I think they are the same feelings, but less intense, in other words you are always going to feel rage even if you’ve seen it throughout the year, but it isn’t the same because when you see it for the first time, it is something new, something you have never seen, it is shocking» (Young women, basic education).

3) Becoming normal, routine. The buffering in this case is not limited to the intensity of the emotions aroused, but it also affects their cognitive production. Repetition makes you feel that the violence cannot be changed, that nothing can be done about it. Consequently, viewers disassociate themselves from it and accept it. The emotion is controlled and does not form an attitude towards the facts presented by the images.

«I feel numbed by it, I am numb, because I see it every day. I only see one news programme a day and I am numb. I know what they’re going to say tonight because it’s the same as it was yesterday. In the beginning, it has an impact on you, like that Allah business that’s happening at the moment [they are referring to the demonstrations and disturbances in the Islamic world after the publication of caricatures of Muhammad in a Danish newspaper], but after they’ve been saying it for a week… It’s like football for women, all the matches seem the same, 22 blokes running about» (Adult males, university students).

4) Fictionalisation of the images. In some cases, the first step towards accepting the perception of images as normal is by starting to consider them as fictional rather than real. It is seen as a self-protection strategy in view of the difficulty of accepting something which is incomprehensible or unacceptable as «normal». The real-life image is viewed as if it was a film, which makes it possible to distance oneself from the characters.

«I remember those bombs which looked so small… but then you imagined the dead people… and it’s like… God, I’m looking at a corpse… but now they show you them all the time and… One more or less… it becomes a film» (Young males, basic education).

Naturally, desensitisation tends to mainly occur when the incidents are far removed. They do not endanger us, or those suffering them are psychologically distant. No instance of fictionalisation or desensitisation occurred with the images of 11-M, for example.

5) Reaffirmation. In some cases, the effect of the more shocking images does not wear off. It is very persistent, inevitable, and the subject believes that it «will always be there». The images arouse the same feelings with the same intensity. The impact reactivates with every new viewing. The example refers to the images of 11-M.

«I saw them four or five times [the images of the terrorist attacks on 11 March 2004 in Madrid], and every time I saw them, they had the same impact on me, I don’t know, a feeling of anger and sorrow, powerlessness and wanting to cry. I felt that every time I looked at the images, it didn't change» (Young women, basic education).

2.4 From emotions to ethical attitudes

The impact produced by watching real-life violence on television is essentially emotional, but it has attitudinal and behavioural consequences. The «educational» discourse, the positive function of showing violence to make people aware of conflicts and of the «horrors» of reality, is oft repeated on television.

«If she was older, it wouldn't affect you as much. But it is still just as hard. An older prostitute is still the same, but it doesn’t affect you as much. And they are images you have to see to become aware and decide to take action. These are images that try to get people involved and out onto the streets and doing something» (Young women, university students).

It can mobilise people by making them aware of what is happening in society outside their immediate context. The images provide awareness and information with a veracity that forces viewers to feel an agent in this situation.

«I don’t think TV violence is a bad thing. It is necessary to make society aware of what’s going on. Because you go out and live in a bubble, but when you see it directly… that’s what I think, anyway (…). It’s to inform you: they are real-life events which happen, and people need to know about them, to report them to the police or whatever» (Young males, university students).

Arguments on the role of images in the formation of ethical attitudes are not the same across the board. Intuitively reproducing the various effects caused by the repetition of watching real-life violence, the participants’ discourses vary, ranging from the effectiveness of the mobilising impact to paralysation due to saturation. On the one hand, as we have seen, the effectiveness and need to show violence to make people aware, denounce, be responsible or propose social changes was defended. The simple dissemination of information, the fact that the information circulates, is explained, demonstrated, and is present in interaction is considered positive. Knowledge and testimony seem to be a necessary step for taking responsibility for something, to start something that transforms the conditions in which violence emerges. On the other hand, scepticism is evident on the effectiveness of the images to transform anything, and they are viewed as an unnecessary emotional appeal to viewers which is too harsh and leads to saturation, desensitisation and «non-productive» guilt, i.e., only punitive without any transfer into social action.

«This crudeness, which, starting with the parents, affects me. That crudeness of seeing so many images, so much reality… Or even what there was before, when someone saw another fight and intervened, helped people. Now people ignore it, they have got used to it, it is so every day that… For me, that crudeness really dehumanises people a lot, because they’re showing them all day… again and again» (Adult males, university students).

Ethical attitudes produced by watching serious real-life scenes of violence are responsibility and guilt. Allusions to these attitudes are expressed in words such as responsibility, pricking one’s conscience, doing your bit, need to do something, etc. Responsibility is a short-term mobilising attitude. It arises when people perceive that something can be done. Guilt, on the other hand, is linked to helplessness and powerlessness. A more detailed analysis of the social implications of the two attitudes needs to be conducted.

«You see it and say: I cannot do anything. It makes you live with a feeling of guilt. People are dying in the world because they kill each other for political reasons, and I cannot do anything about it» (Young women, university students).

An emotional impact forces viewers to be active, to take on the role as a witness to the violence, or to reject this demand.

3. Discussion

Research on the emotions aroused by the perception of audiovisual contents has examined the physiological correlates in more depth (Morris, Klahr & al., 2009) or the identification of short- and medium-term effects (Browne & Hamilton-Giachritsis, 2005). However, the results obtained in the research presented reaffirm a line that complements these results: viewers are not passive, nor are they isolated when producing emotions, especially as a result of the perception of these contents (Pinto da Mota, 2005).

The physiological correlates of emotions cannot be denied, but the language with which they are presented and told in social life is not just a way of naming them. The terms and narratives of emotions reveal a structure, a history, a mode of constructing them and a specific cultural context (Hong, 2004, on the emotions of shame and guilt in Taiwan). In fact, emotions have been considered a communication interface, so they partly depend on the recipient of them (Fernández-Dols, Carrera & Casado, 2001), and they may lead to conflicting interpretations when facial expressions are intentionally modified (Russell, Bachorowski, & Fernández-Dols, 2003). A more complex aspect of communication is verbalising the emotions experienced, since it means constructing something that was not previously delimited either physiologically or verbally, and which depends on those involved in the interaction, the fellow participants or recipients of the telling. For example, it has been proved that group production of the emotions caused by violence takes place by controlling the discourse of some children towards others, and it is explained by the immediate context in which they are found, i.e.: the classroom (Tisseron, 2003; Lacasa, Reina & Alburquerque, 2000). Emotions are a public phenomenon, which is why it is important to use methodologies which maintain this basic aspect of emotions.

Consequently, cognition is an inseparable dimension of the emotion. People have a prior assessment, probably intuitive, of the context which is going to affect the emotion experienced and expressed. However, at the same time, emotion impacts on the later production of the significance of what has been viewed, and the understanding of the situations seen on TV modifies the emotions experienced (Smith & Moyer-Gusé, 2006). The relation is one-to-one interaction. Unz, Schwab and Winterhoff-Spurk (2008) show how the feelings of fear and anger generated by violent news are complemented by sadness and powerlessness when it is perceived that the violence has been intentional, and the victims are recognised as innocent.

Emotions not only have the capacity to modulate and activate various cognitive dimensions, but also various action tendencies (Muramatsu & Hanoch, 2005). Viewers’ agency is revealed in both their active role of perceiving the violent contents and in the consequences of this perception. Viewers, immersed in a (immediate and general) context, establish a differential relation with what is perceived depending on how close it is and the importance (Scherer, 1993) attributed to it. And, furthermore, with the importance they want to attribute to it. Consequently, «avoidance» viewers, those who avoid being exposed to violent news (Unz & al., 2008), do not generate the feelings of compassion, pity or responsibility which those who are exposed repeatedly to information on violent events do, thus further highlighting the complex importance of repetition in the perception of violent contents.

The unavoidably contextualised production of what has been perceived leads directly to reflecting on what should be done, what would be the most appropriate thing for a viewer to do in connection with what has been seen (Cosmides & Tooby, 2000). The connection between emotions and social action is influenced by moral criteria on justice and it is connected with the same viewer’s relation with social reality and perceived (or desired) possibilities to change it, resulting in true «moral emotions» (Rozin, Lowery & al., 1999).

The discourse on emotions encompasses «situated» concepts with a complexity of feelings that is only decipherable with viewers’ previous experience. The «impact» of violent images is more than emotional activation, or behaviour after viewing includes awakening from a process that leads to reflection, thought, the production of ideas, arguments, and conclusions based on individuals’ personal or social experience.

According to Linde (2005), the effects of violent images are unpredictable. Many of them include victims’ pain and suffering or death, which are assessed in a specific context of values and social standards. Emotional discourse is a narrative recourse that accompanies emotional activation. When people or groups interpret that they have been harassed, traumatised or humiliated, emotions are a fundamental recourse to construct the injustice of the situation, and assess the past or current situation among the participants. The emotional impact goes beyond reactions: not only does it express physiological sensations, but it also involves the individual and others in the responsible action. Despite the research already conducted into the perception of TV violence, many of its consequences on viewers are still unknown. This research has highlighted the complexity and importance of repetition, but its role needs to be studied in more depth, specifically, the relation between the voluntary or involuntary nature of being exposed to the repetition. More attention also needs to be paid to the importance of agency with regard to initiative in the structure of emotions in a group, so that the key factors behind it can be determined, as well as to how permanent the resolve to take social action is, etc. All these unknown entities demonstrate the need to continue with this type of research.

Support

These focus groups took place within the framework of the research project: « TV Violence: Viewers’ Representation, Legitimation and Reception (2004-07), financed by the MICINN (Ministry of Science and Innovation) (Ref. SEJ-2004-07129/SOCI ).

References

Anderson, C.A. (2004). An Update on the Effects of Violent Video Games. Journal of Adolescence, 27; 133-122.

Barrios, C. (2005). La violencia audiovisual y sus efectos evolutivos: un estudio teórico y empírico. Comunicar, 25.

Boyle, K. (2005). Media and Violence. London: Sage.

Browne, K.D. & Hamilton-Giachritsis, C. (2005). The Influence of Violent Media on Children and Adolescents: A Public-health Approach. The Lancet, 365; 702-710.

Buckingham, D. (1996). Moving Images: Understanding Children's Emotional Responses to Television. Manchester, Manchester University Press.

Buttny, R. & Ellis. D.G (2007). Accounts of Violence from Arabs and Israelis on Nightline. Discourse Society, 18; 139-163.

Callejo, J. (1995). La audiencia activa. El discurso televisivo: discursos y estrategias. Madrid: Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas.

Cantor, J. (2002). Fright Reactions to Mass Media, in Bryant, J. & Zillmann, D. (Eds.). Media Effects: Advances in Theory and Research. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum; 287-306.

Cantor, J., & Nathanson, A. (1996). Children’s Fright Reactions to Television News. Journal of Communication, 46; 139-152.

Cosmides, L. & Tooby, J. (2000). Evolutionary Psychology and the Emotions, in Lewis, M. & Haviland-Jones, J.M. (Eds.). Handbook of Emotions. New York: Guilford; 91-115.

Denzin, N.K. & Lincoln, Y.S. (Eds.) (2005). The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Fern, E.F. (2001). Advanced Focus Group Research. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Fernández-Dols, J.M.; Carrera, P. & Casado, C. (2001). The Meaning of Expression: Views from Art and Other Sources, in Anolli, L.; Ciceri, R. & Riva, G. (Eds.). New Perspectives on Miscommunication. Amsterdam: IOS Press; 122-137.

Harré, R. & Langenhove, V. (1999). Positioning Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.

Hoffner, C. & Heafner, M.J. (1994). Children’s News Interest during the Gulf War: The Role of Negative Affect. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 38, 193-204.

Hong, G. (2004). Emotions in Culturally-constituted Relational Worlds. Culture & Psychology, 10, 53-63.

Kitzinger, J. (2001). Transformations of Public and Private Knowledge: Audience Reception, Feminism and the Experience of Childhood Sexual Abuse. Feminist Media Studies, 1; 91-104.

Lacasa, P.; Reina, A. & Alburquerque, M. (2000). Rethinking Emotions: Discourse, Self and Television in the Classroom. Paper presented at III Conference for Sociocultural Research, Brazil.

Linde, A. (2005). Reflexiones sobre los efectos de las imágenes de dolor, muerte y sufrimiento en los espectadores. Comunicar, 25.

Morris, J.D.; Klahr, N.J. & alt. (2009). Mapping a Multidimensional Emotion in Response to Television Commercials. Human Brain Mapping, 30; 789-796.

Muramatsu, R. & Hanoch, Y. (2005). Emotions as a Mechanism for Boundedly Rational Agents: The Fast and Frugal Way. Journal of Economic Psychology, 26; 201-221.

Pinto da Mota, A. (2005). Televisão e violência: (para) novas formas de olhar. Comunicar, 25.

Potter, J. & Wetherell, M. (1987). Discourse and Social Psychology: Beyond Attitudes and Behaviour. Londres: Sage.

Potter, J. & Wetherell, M. (2001). Unfolding Discourse Analysis, in Wetherell, M.; Taylor, S., & Yates, S.J. (eds.), Discourse Theory and practice, Londres: Sage; 198-209.

Potter, J. (2003). Discourse Analysis and Discursive Psychology, in Camic, P.M. & Rhodes, J.E. (Eds.). Qualitative Research in Psychology: Expanding Perspectives in Methodology and Design. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association; 73-94.

Rozin, P.; Lowery, L. & alt. (1999). The CAD Triad Hypothesis: A Mapping between three Moral Emotions (Contempt, Anger, Disgust) and three Moral Codes (Community, Autonomy, Divinity). Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 76; 574-586.

Russell, J.A., Bachorowski, J.A. & Fernández-Dols, J.M. (2003). Emotional Expressions. Annual Review of Psychology, 54; 329-349.

Saylor, C.F.; Cowart, B.L. & alt. (2003). Media Exposure to September 11: Elementary School Students’ Experiences and Posttraumatic Symptoms. American Behavioral Scientist, 46; 1.622-1.642.

Scherer, K. (1993). Studying the Emotion-antecedent Appraisal Process: An Expert-system Approach. Cognition and Emotion, 7; 325-355.

Schlesinger, P.; Haynes, R. & alt. (1998). Men Viewing Violence. London: Broadcasting Standards Commission.

Shanahan, J. (1999).Television and Its Viewers: Cultivation Theory and Research. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Smith, S.L. & Moyer-Gusé, E. (2006). Children and the War on Iraq: Developmental Differences in Fear Responses to Television News Coverage. Media Psychology, 8; 213-237.

Smith, S.L. & Wilson, B.J. (2002). Children's Comprehension of and Fear Reactions to Television News. Media Psychology, 4; 1-26.

Stewart, D.W.; Shamdasani, P.N. & Rook, D. (2007). Focus Groups: Theory and Practice. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Tisseron, S. (2003). Comment Hitchcock m´a guéri. Paris: Albin Michel.

Unz, D.; Schwab, F. & Winterhoff-Spurk, P. (2008). TV News - The Daily Horror? Emotional Effects of Violent Television News. Journal of Media Psychology, 20; 141-155.

Valkenburg, P.M. (2004). Children’s Responses to the Screen: A Media Psychological Approach. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Wertsch, J.V. (1999). La mente en acción. Buenos Aires: Aique.

Wilson, B.J.; Martins, N. & Marske, A.L. (2005). Children’s and Parents’ Fright Reactions to Kidnapping Stories in the News. Communication Monographs, 72; 46-70.

Zillmann, D., & Weaver, J.B. (1999). Effects of Prolonged Exposure to Gratuitous Media Violence on Provoked and Unprovoked Hostile Behavior. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 29; 145-165.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Los efectos de la violencia en la televisión han sido ampliamente estudiados desde una perspectiva experimental, que soslaya en cierto modo la interacción entre emisor y receptor. El presente trabajo plantea una perspectiva complementaria que tiene en cuenta la interpretación y la elaboración que los espectadores hacen de las emisiones. Se propone identificar y analizar las dimensiones sociales que mediatizan las experiencias emocionales ante la violencia vista en televisión y cómo esas dimensiones emocionales, que se construyen en el discurso, están ligadas a actitudes, dimensiones éticas y posiciones de acción. El discurso analizado procede de ocho grupos de discusión –compuestos diferencialmente respecto al género, la edad y el nivel educativo–, que se analizaron a partir de las emociones que experimentan ante la violencia en la televisión. El análisis del discurso muestra, en primer lugar, la importancia de una primera movilización emocional, con referencias a emociones complejas y, en segundo lugar, una articulación de la experiencia emocional respecto de la repetición de escenas (modalidad, clasificación y evaluación), los actos (legitimación o no) y los personajes (identificación o desidentificación). En conclusión, el doble impacto de las emociones (inmediato y diferido) genera narrativas complejas que abocan a un único curso de acción caracterizado por la responsabilidad y la culpa, que solo puede tenerse en cuenta asumiendo el papel activo del espectador.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Material y métodos

El discurso analizado procede de ocho grupos de discusión, focales, con personas de diferente edad, sexo y nivel educativo a las que se invitó a hablar sobre la violencia en la televisión de España. La composición de los grupos fue decidida en función de las diferencias más relevantes que esperamos encontrar, aunque en este primer análisis se han buscado los invariantes, por lo que no se harán análisis diferenciales entre las distintas categorías sociales. El encontrar discursos comunes en grupos tan variados avala la suposición de que son generales a la sociedad.

El grupo de discusión focal es una técnica especialmente adecuada cuando se trata de dar sentido, o interpretar, fenómenos en los términos en los que les dan sentido las personas (Denzin & Lincoln, 2005), cuando se trata de reconstruir un discurso colectivo sobre un objeto tan «social» como las emisiones televisivas (Callejo, 1995). Los grupos, compuestos por sujetos de similares características, aunque no son grupos naturales, producen un discurso que representa al colectivo al que pertenecen los sujetos, con sus características diferenciales que emergen bajo el testimonio del investigador-observador. El investigador-observador actúa para conseguir que se trate la temática del objeto de estudio sin mediatizar la producción simbólica grupal. Es el propio grupo, con la estructura que se crea en el contexto de la investigación, el que controla, enfatiza, sanciona o jerarquiza las intervenciones y los contenidos del discurso (Fern, 2001; Stewart, Shamdasani & Rook, 2007).

En este texto construimos un espectro de los sentimientos y emociones tal como son nombrados e interpretamos con qué estados emocionales se relacionan, a qué se refieren en el contexto social en el que los espectadores viven. Presentamos un análisis de repertorios interpretativos (Potter & Wetherell, 1987, 2001; Potter, 2003), entendidos como unidades de lenguaje consistentes y vinculadas entre sí que se refieren a la comprensión, relevancia y disfrute de la violencia. Asimismo, se ha interpretado el contexto de las posiciones de los espectadores y organizado el discurso de la forma más clara y estructurada, en relación con el contenido y las implicaciones sociales que puede tener la recepción de violencia en los diversos programas.

2. Resultados

2.1. La movilización emocional: sus primeros significados

El primer significado de las emociones vividas ante la visión de violencia se construye a partir de los significantes de las primeras reacciones, los primeros esquemas de significación que articulan el discurso de los espectadores. Si resumimos el amplio abanico de palabras con los que se alude a ellas, sobresale con claridad el término «impacto». La palabra impacto –golpe, choque en el diccionario, pero también efecto, huella o señal que deja el golpe o choque–, es una forma de verbalizar los efectos emocionales, incluso efectos emocionales fuertes, pero no cualifica la modalidad de la emoción sentida.

«Yo tengo todavía una imagen grabada de un barrio aquí en Madrid, de la chica esta, Irene, con una pierna arrancada por una bomba de ETA. Eso no se me olvidará. Ni otras más. Uno las va echando en el olvido... Si ahora mismo pusieras puntos rojos en el plano de Madrid, pues te quedarías alucinado: doce guardia civiles en la Plaza de la República... Siempre hay alguna imagen que se te queda más. Quizás porque eres más joven y era una niña. Pero, vamos, muchas imágenes de esas te impactan mucho» (hombres adultos, estudios básicos).

Las imágenes de violencia «impactan», es decir, emocionan, movilizan, despiertan emociones con diferentes grados de intensidad que, en general, son altos. Esa emoción intensa tiene dos dimensiones o cualidades: por un lado, el contenido de las emociones es negativo, ya que se trata fundamentalmente de miedo, ira, sorpresa y tristeza, pero, por otro, el sentir una emoción intensa es atrayente, incluso placentero.

La identificación de esa primera emoción suscitada se extiende en un continuo que va desde las alusiones a reacciones o emociones simples como nerviosismo, ansiedad, asco, repugnancia, horror, tristeza, enfado, violencia (ira), malestar, a otras más complejas, pero inmediatas (impotencia, depresión), acompañadas a veces de correlatos fisiológicos muy claros (se te encoge el estómago, llanto, ganas de huir), o acciones inmediatas (cambiar de canal, apagar la tele, levantarse de la silla).

Pero el discurso recoge otra dimensión del impacto: sorpresa intensa, experimentación de los propios límites, curiosidad cuajada de angustia y expectación. Se trata de una necesidad de conocimiento que se pregunta por la naturaleza irracional o siniestra, sorprendente del género humano, incluyéndose a sí mismo. Por un lado, quiere entender, dar algún sentido a hechos violentos que ocurren a su alrededor, que les pueden afectar pero que eluden una comprensión con parámetros cotidianos; por otro, saber hasta dónde puede llegar uno en sus propias emociones.

2.2. Elementos articuladores de las emociones ante la violencia

Las dimensiones que articulan la construcción y la experiencia de las emociones son: la modalidad de las escenas, la clasificación de las mismas, la legitimación o deslegitimación de los actos y la identificación o desidentificación con los personajes.

La modalidad de las escenas, el que sean etiquetadas como reales o de ficción, es sustancial para modificar radicalmente la emoción, que puede transformarse de desagradable en agradable. La violencia de ficción se puede disfrutar y dicho disfrute se reconoce y se acepta. Pero tiene que reunir ciertas condiciones, algunas en relación con el sentido, con la lógica y otras con la legitimación. La violencia de ficción debe ir conectada al relato, debe tener sentido para los espectadores, debe verse «bien colocada» y secuenciada, ligada a la trama (por ejemplo, no repetitiva o absurda). Debe tener una intensidad limitada, no se disfruta de cualquier violencia, por ejemplo, de la más sádica.

Los espectadores mediatizan las emociones a través de la clasificación y evaluación de las escenas. Descendiendo a los episodios y a las unidades de análisis más pequeñas, los espectadores clasifican las escenas en series: «Violencia de guerras», «anuncios de maltratos», los «reportajes de realidades crudas», «la violencia de género», las «películas violentas», etc. La clasificación organiza los visionados e interviene en la formación de emociones que ya dependen de la serie en la que se incluyen. Algunas escenas son entendidas como repetidas, ya que aunque no sean iguales, son de la misma serie o del mismo tipo. La repetición modifica las emociones porque los espectadores pueden anticipar de qué se trata, y pueden seleccionar lo que quieren ver y en qué medida lo verán. En cierto modo pueden decidir cómo ser impactados.

Una tercera dimensión es la legitimación o deslegitimación de los actos. Los espectadores pueden aceptar, o incluso disfrutar de la violencia, o llegar a calificar lo visto como no violento, cuando consideran que está legitimada, que ha servido para algo o que tiene una función social. La violencia que acaba con algún problema o algún mal es considerada aceptable o placentera, lo cual se reconoce sin problemas en la ficción, no tanto cuando se refiere a las escenas reales.

«La lucha del bien contra el mal siempre la tenemos ahí. Si vemos al malo matar te sienta muy mal, pero si vemos al bueno que está defendiendo unos principios, unas cosas, pues lo vemos de otra manera: como el triunfo del bien sobre el mal» (hombres adultos, estudios básicos).

Finalmente, la identificación o desidentificación con los personajes, que está mediada por la distancia física o psicológica del espectador con los actores de la violencia. Entendemos por cercanía física las escenas que se desarrollan en lugares que los espectadores conocen, frecuentan o podrían frecuentar. Los contextos geográficos próximos (de España, de Madrid), los ambientes más próximos a los espectadores (por ejemplo los conflictos entre grupos para los jóvenes), modifican sustancialmente los efectos emocionales generalmente para acentuar la importancia de los sentimientos y la fuerza de la emoción suscitada. Conmueve lo que se asocia (por desplazamiento) con el espectador. La similitud de la problemática que se despliega en la ficción es origen de sentimientos, efectos y emociones. La capacidad de ponerse en lugar del otro, situarse en su lugar, fundir algunos aspectos del yo con el otro mirado, les «compromete», les implica y sienten con él. Este proceso se traduce en el discurso analizado en una sensibilización dirigida, particularizada con los actores o situaciones que tienen vivencias similares y con los que el espectador se puede identificar (Buckingham, 1996; Schlesinger, Haynes & otros, 1998; Kitzinger, 2001; Boyle, 2005). La legitimación y la identificación están de alguna manera siempre presentes en la explicación de la respuesta emocional de los espectadores (Buttny & Ellis, 2007), ya se haga referencia a violencia real o de ficción.

2.3. La huella emocional producida por la percepción de violencia

El contenido y la modalidad de las emociones muestran su sustancial variabilidad cuando comparamos la huella emocional de la violencia percibida como real y como ficticia. Mientras que la violencia real enfatiza la huella emocional de contenido negativo, la violencia de ficción mantiene el recuerdo de la experiencia extrema. La huella emocional de la violencia real puede llegar a apuntar una permanencia prolongada al instalar una sensación de impotencia, de temor al futuro, una necesidad de huir… La huella emocional de la violencia de ficción es mucho más corta centrándose en experiencias casi físicas por el nivel de tensión, interés, sorpresa y temor, aunque a veces pueda acercarse o sobrepasar los límites de tolerancia de algunas personas.

«Claro, me gusta sentir miedo, sentir violencia, el sentirme mal, se ha pasado a eso. Y luego te ríes con los colegas, pero acabas pensando: ¿Me gustará ver violencia y miedo?» (hombres jóvenes, universitarios).

Entre las diferencias más acusadas entre la percepción de violencia real y de ficción está, pues, la prolongación de la huella emocional. En la violencia de ficción, la emoción se consume inmediatamente: se disfruta o se rechaza. Si se repite, responde a los patrones de la repetición de otros actos culturales o de ocio: si el efecto producido es placentero, éste se reexperimenta pero con la pérdida del factor sorpresa y, si es un efecto común a otros estímulos, con menor intensidad que la primera vez. En el caso de la violencia real la situación es bien distinta. La huella emocional se combina con los nuevos impactos y huellas produciendo efectos singulares.

Del mismo modo que en la amplia literatura sobre insensibilización, el efecto de la repetición de las imágenes está ampliamente recogida en el discurso de todos los grupos. Frases como «una imagen me hace olvidar la anterior», «tanta violencia nos acorcha», «nos gustan imágenes cada vez más fuertes», etc., nos indican la importancia de considerar las reacciones emocionales teniendo en cuenta su repetición. No obstante, el efecto de la repetición no es único ni uniforme. Al menos hemos detectado cinco posibles consecuencias.

1) Impacto emocional acumulado. El nuevo impacto se recibe sobre la huella anterior y se acumula a ésta, produciendo un efecto que no tendría una sola escena. El espectador reacciona emocionalmente cuando es impactado durante varias ocasiones, con escenas repetidas o del mismo tipo.

«Nosotros, sentirlo lo vamos a sentir, pero todo depende de lo que nos enseñen. Si lo vemos una vez en una semana, no es lo mismo que si te lo ponen todo el día en un canal. Yo vi lo de Atocha por la mañana y dije «joder que faena». Y no me impactaba tanto. Pero estuve todo el día viendo la tele y al final acabé llorando de tantas imágenes que me venían, de tanto dolor... Y por suerte no tenía allí a nadie, pero acabé sintiéndome tan dolorido como cualquier otra persona de allí» (hombres jóvenes, universitarios).

2) Reducción de la intensidad de las emociones. En este caso, la huella anterior «amortigua» el efecto del nuevo impacto. En lugar de acumularlo, lo absorbe. La huella original permanece, pero la repetición solo reactiva su presencia con menor intensidad que la primera vez.

«Yo creo que son los mismos sentimientos pero con menos intensidad, o sea, la rabia siempre la vas a tener aunque las hayas visto durante todo el año, pero no es lo mismo porque cuando las ves por primera vez es algo nuevo, algo que no has visto, es un choque» (mujeres jóvenes, estudios básicos).

3) Normalización, rutinización. La amortiguación en este caso no se limita a la intensidad de las emociones suscitadas sino que también afecta a su elaboración cognitiva. La repetición hace pensar que la violencia no va a poder ser cambiada, que no se puede hacer nada. En consecuencia, se disocia del espectador y se acepta. Se controla la emoción y no se genera una actitud hacia los hechos que presentan las imágenes.

«A mí me acorcha, yo estoy acorchado, es que lo veo todos los días, solo veo un telediario y estoy acorchado, sé lo que van a decir esta noche porque es lo mismo del día anterior. Al principio te impacta, como esto de Alá que está pasando ahora [se refieren a las movilizaciones y disturbios en el mundo islámico tras la publicación de caricaturas de Mahoma en un periódico danés] pero en cuanto llevan una semana diciéndolo. Es como el fútbol para las mujeres, que todos los partidos les parecen lo mismo, 22 tíos ahí corriendo» (hombres adultos, universitarios).

4) Ficcionalización de las imágenes. En algún caso, la aceptación de la normalización de lo percibido tiene que pasar por la transformación de considerarlas ficción más que real. Se muestra como una estrategia autoprotectora ante la dificultad de aceptar como «normal» lo incomprensible o inaceptable. La imagen real se ve como si fuese una película, lo cual permite el distanciamiento de los personajes.

«Yo me acuerdo esas bombas que se veían tan pequeñitas... pero luego te imaginabas los muertos... y es como… joder, estoy viendo un muerto... pero ahora te los ponen a montones y ya... Uno más uno menos... se convierte en una película» (hombres jóvenes, estudios básicos).

Naturalmente la insensibilización tiende a producirse principalmente cuando los incidentes son lejanos, no nos ponen en peligro o quienes los sufren son psicológicamente distantes. No apareció ninguna instancia de ficcionalización ni insensibilización con las imágenes del 11-M, por ejemplo.

5) Reafirmación. En algunos casos el efecto de las imágenes más fuertes no se gasta, es muy persistente, inevitable y el sujeto cree que «siempre lo va a tener». Las imágenes suscitan los mismos sentimientos con la misma intensidad. La huella se reactiva con cada nuevo visionado. El ejemplo se refiere a las imágenes del 11-M.

«Yo es que las vi cuatro o cinco veces [las imágenes de los atentados del 11 de marzo de 2004 en Madrid] y cada vez que las veía me impactaba igual, no sé, el sentimiento de rabia y de pena, impotencia y ganas de llorar, cada vez que miraba las imágenes yo sentía eso, no era ni más ni menos» (mujeres jóvenes, estudios básicos).

2.4. De las emociones a las actitudes éticas

El impacto producido por la visión de violencia real en la televisión es fundamentalmente emocional, pero tiene consecuencias actitudinales y comportamentales. Es reiterado el discurso «pedagógico» de la televisión, la función positiva que cumple: enseñar la violencia para tomar conciencia de los conflictos y los «horrores» de la realidad.

«Si fuera mayor no te afectaría tanto. Y sigue siendo igual de duro. Una prostituta mayor sigue siendo lo mismo, pero no te afecta tanto. Y son imágenes que tienes que ver para que tengas conciencia y para que te decidas a hacer algo. Esas son imágenes que intentan que la gente se implique y salga a la calle y haga algo» (mujeres jóvenes, universitarias).

Puede movilizar a las personas haciendo que tengan conocimiento de lo que sucede en la sociedad más allá de su contexto inmediato. Las imágenes dotan al conocimiento, a la información, de una veracidad que obliga al espectador a sentirse agente respecto a esa situación.

«No creo que sea mala la violencia en televisión. Es necesaria para concienciar a la sociedad de lo que hay. Porque tu sales a la calle y vives en un burbuja, pero cuando ya lo ves de manera directa... yo es lo que pienso, vamos (…). Es para informar: son hechos reales que pasan y la gente necesita saberlos, para denunciarlos o para lo que sea» (hombres jóvenes, universitarios).

Los argumentos sobre el papel de las imágenes en la formación de actitudes éticas no son homogéneos. Reproduciendo intuitivamente los distintos efectos producidos por la repetición del visionado de la violencia real, los participantes articulan varios discursos que recogen desde la eficacia del impacto movilizador hasta la paralización por la saturación. Por un lado, se defendió, como hemos visto, la eficacia y necesidad de mostrar violencia para concienciar, denunciar, responsabilizarse o proponer cambios sociales. La simple difusión de la información, el hecho de que la información circule, sea explicitada, manifestada y presente en la interacción, ya es considerada positiva. El conocimiento y el testimonio parece ser un eslabón necesario para responsabilizarse de algo, para iniciar algo que transforme las condiciones en las que emerge la violencia. Por otra, se manifiesta el escepticismo sobre la eficacia de las imágenes para transformar las cosas y la apelación emocional demasiado fuerte e innecesaria a los espectadores que les genera saturación, insensibilización y culpabilidad «no productiva», es decir, solo punitiva y sin trascendencia en la acción social.

«Esa crudeza que, empezando por los padres: a mí me afecta. Esa crudeza de ver tantas imágenes, tanta realidad... o incluso lo que había antes, que alguien veía pelearse a alguien e intervenía, ayudaba a alguien. Ahora la gente lo ignora, están acostumbrados, es tan cotidiano que... Esa crudeza para mí deshumaniza muchísimo a la gente, porque si les están mostrando todo el día… y venga, y venga» (hombres adultos, universitarios).

Las actitudes éticas producidas por la visión de las escenas de violencia real graves son la responsabilidad y la culpabilidad. Las alusiones a estas actitudes se expresan en palabras como responsabilidad, mover la conciencia, poner algo de tu parte, necesidad de hacer algo, etc. La responsabilidad es una actitud movilizadora a corto plazo. Surge cuando se percibe que se puede hacer algo. La culpabilidad, en cambio aparece ligada a la incapacidad o impotencia. Habría que hacer un análisis más detallado de las implicaciones sociales de las dos actitudes.

«Lo ves y dices: no puedo hacer nada. Te hace vivir con un sentimiento de culpabilidad: la gente se está muriendo en el mundo porque se matan unos a otros por movidas políticas y yo no puedo hacer absolutamente nada» (mujeres jóvenes, universitarias).

El impacto emocional obliga al espectador a ser activo, asumiendo su papel como testigo de la violencia o rechazando esa demanda.

3. Discusión

La investigación sobre las emociones suscitadas por la percepción de contenidos audiovisuales ha profundizado en los correlatos fisiológicos (Morris, Klahr & otros, 2009) o en la identificación de efectos a corto y medio plazo (Browne & Hamilton-Giachritsis, 2005). Sin embargo, los resultados obtenidos en la investigación presentada reafirman un línea que complementa esos resultados: los espectadores ni son pasivos ni están aislados al generar emociones, especialmente como resultado de la percepción de esos contenidos (Pinto da Mota, 2005).

No se pueden negar los correlatos fisiológicos de las emociones, pero el lenguaje con que se nos presentan y relatan en la vida social no es solo una manera de nombrarlas, los términos y las narrativas de emociones revelan una estructura, una historia, un modo de construirlas y un contexto cultural determinado (Hong, 2004, sobre las emociones de vergüenza y culpa en Taiwán). De hecho, las emociones se han considerado como una interfaz comunicativa por lo que, en parte, dependen del receptor de la misma (Fernández-Dols, Carrera & Casado, 2001) y pueden presentar conflictos de interpretaciones cuando se modifica intencionalmente la expresión facial (Russell, Bachorowski & Fernández-Dols, 2003). Más compleja en la comunicación es la verbalización de las emociones experimentadas, ya que es la construcción de algo que estaba sin delimitar ni en lo fisiológico ni en lo verbal y que se hace en función de los presentes en la interacción, los copartícipes o destinatarios del relato. Se ha constatado, por ejemplo, que la elaboración de grupo de las emociones producidas por la violencia tiene lugar mediante el control del discurso de unos niños hacia otros y se explica por el contexto inmediato en el que se encuentran, por ejemplo: la clase (Tisseron, 2003; Lacasa, Reina & Alburquerque, 2000). Las emociones son un fenómeno público, de ahí la importancia de utilizar metodologías que mantengan este aspecto básico de las emociones.

La cognición, de este modo, aparece como dimensión inseparable de la emoción. Las personas tienen una evaluación previa, probablemente intuitiva, del contexto que va a afectar a la emoción experimentada y expresada; pero, a su vez, la emoción incide en la elaboración posterior del significado de lo visto y la comprensión de las situaciones vistas en TV modifica las emociones vividas (Smith & Moyer-Gusé, 2006). La relación es de interacción biunívoca. Unz, Schwab y Winterhoff-Spurk (2008) muestran cómo los sentimientos de miedo e ira generados por noticias de violencia se complementan con tristeza e impotencia cuando se percibe que la violencia ha sido intencional y se reconoce a las víctimas como inocentes.

Las emociones no solo tienen la capacidad de modular y activar distintas dimensiones cognitivas sino también diferentes tendencias de acción (Muramatsu & Hanoch, 2005). La agencialidad del espectador se revela tanto en su papel activo percibiendo los contenidos violentos como en las consecuencias de esa percepción. El espectador, inserto en un contexto (inmediato y general), establece una relación diferencial con lo percibido según la cercanía, la importancia (Scherer, 1993), que se le atribuya. Y, más aún, con la importancia que le quiera atribuir. Así, los espectadores «evitadores», los que evitan exponerse a noticias violentas (Unz & otros, 2008), no generan los sentimientos de compasión, pena o responsabilidad como lo hacen quienes son expuestos repetidas veces a información sobre acontecimientos violentos, profundizando en la compleja importancia de la repetición de la percepción de contenidos violentos.

La elaboración de lo percibido, de modo insoslayablemente contextuado, conduce directamente a la reflexión sobre qué se debe hacer, qué sería lo más apropiado que debería hacer el espectador en relación con lo visto (Cosmides & Tooby, 2000). La conexión de las emociones con la acción social está mediatizada por criterios morales sobre la justicia y se vincula con la misma relación del espectador con la realidad social y las posibilidades percibidas (o deseadas) para cambiarla, generando auténticas «emociones morales» (Rozin, Lowery & otros, 1999).

El discurso sobre emociones presenta conceptos «situados» con una complejidad de sentidos solo descifrable desde la experiencia previa de los espectadores. El «impacto» de las imágenes violentas es más que la activación emocional, o la conducta posterior al visionado incluye el despertar de un proceso que alcanza la reflexión, el pensamiento, la elaboración de ideas, argumentos y conclusiones sobre la experiencia personal o social de los individuos. De acuerdo con Linde (2005) son imprevisibles los efectos de las imágenes violentas, muchas de las cuales incluyen el dolor y el sufrimiento o muerte de víctimas que son evaluadas en un contexto específico de valores y normas sociales. El discurso emocional es un recurso narrativo que acompaña a la activación emocional. Cuando las personas o los grupos interpretan que han sido vejados, traumatizados o humillados, las emociones resultan un recurso fundamental para construir la injusticia de la situación, evaluar la situación histórica o la actual entre los participantes. El impacto emocional va más allá de las reacciones: no solo expresa sensaciones fisiológicas sino que implica al sujeto y a otros a la acción responsable.

La investigación sobre la percepción de la violencia en televisión y las consecuencias sobre los espectadores mantiene numerosas incógnitas. De esta investigación se deduce la complejidad e importancia de la repetición, pero es necesario profundizar sobre su papel y, específicamente, sobre la relación entre voluntariedad o involuntariedad de la exposición a la repetición; también reclama más atención la importancia de la agencialidad con respecto a la iniciativa en la conformación de la emociones en grupo y la determinación de las claves que orientan tal conformación; así como la permanencia de la determinación hacia la acción social, etc. Incógnitas todas ellas que muestran la necesidad de continuar con este tipo de investigaciones.

Apoyos

Estos grupos de discusión se realizaron en el marco del proyecto de investigación: «Violencia en TV: representación, legitimación y recepción por los espectadores» (2004-07), financiado por el Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación de España (ref. SEJ 2004-07129/SOCI).

Referencias

Anderson, C.A. (2004). An Update on the Effects of Violent Video Games. Journal of Adolescence, 27; 133-122.

Barrios, C. (2005). La violencia audiovisual y sus efectos evolutivos: un estudio teórico y empírico. Comunicar, 25.

Boyle, K. (2005). Media and Violence. London: Sage.

Browne, K.D. & Hamilton-Giachritsis, C. (2005). The Influence of Violent Media on Children and Adolescents: A Public-health Approach. The Lancet, 365; 702-710.

Buckingham, D. (1996). Moving Images: Understanding Children's Emotional Responses to Television. Manchester, Manchester University Press.

Buttny, R. & Ellis. D.G (2007). Accounts of Violence from Arabs and Israelis on Nightline. Discourse Society, 18; 139-163.

Callejo, J. (1995). La audiencia activa. El discurso televisivo: discursos y estrategias. Madrid: Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas.

Cantor, J. (2002). Fright Reactions to Mass Media, in Bryant, J. & Zillmann, D. (Eds.). Media Effects: Advances in Theory and Research. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum; 287-306.

Cantor, J., & Nathanson, A. (1996). Children’s Fright Reactions to Television News. Journal of Communication, 46; 139-152.

Cosmides, L. & Tooby, J. (2000). Evolutionary Psychology and the Emotions, in Lewis, M. & Haviland-Jones, J.M. (Eds.). Handbook of Emotions. New York: Guilford; 91-115.

Denzin, N.K. & Lincoln, Y.S. (Eds.) (2005). The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Fern, E.F. (2001). Advanced Focus Group Research. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Fernández-Dols, J.M.; Carrera, P. & Casado, C. (2001). The Meaning of Expression: Views from Art and Other Sources, in Anolli, L.; Ciceri, R. & Riva, G. (Eds.). New Perspectives on Miscommunication. Amsterdam: IOS Press; 122-137.

Harré, R. & Langenhove, V. (1999). Positioning Theory. Oxford: Blackwell.

Hoffner, C. & Heafner, M.J. (1994). Children’s News Interest during the Gulf War: The Role of Negative Affect. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 38, 193-204.

Hong, G. (2004). Emotions in Culturally-constituted Relational Worlds. Culture & Psychology, 10, 53-63.

Kitzinger, J. (2001). Transformations of Public and Private Knowledge: Audience Reception, Feminism and the Experience of Childhood Sexual Abuse. Feminist Media Studies, 1; 91-104.

Lacasa, P.; Reina, A. & Alburquerque, M. (2000). Rethinking Emotions: Discourse, Self and Television in the Classroom. Paper presented at III Conference for Sociocultural Research, Brazil.

Linde, A. (2005). Reflexiones sobre los efectos de las imágenes de dolor, muerte y sufrimiento en los espectadores. Comunicar, 25.

Morris, J.D.; Klahr, N.J. & alt. (2009). Mapping a Multidimensional Emotion in Response to Television Commercials. Human Brain Mapping, 30; 789-796.

Muramatsu, R. & Hanoch, Y. (2005). Emotions as a Mechanism for Boundedly Rational Agents: The Fast and Frugal Way. Journal of Economic Psychology, 26; 201-221.

Pinto da Mota, A. (2005). Televisão e violência: (para) novas formas de olhar. Comunicar, 25.

Potter, J. & Wetherell, M. (1987). Discourse and Social Psychology: Beyond Attitudes and Behaviour. Londres: Sage.

Potter, J. & Wetherell, M. (2001). Unfolding Discourse Analysis, in Wetherell, M.; Taylor, S., & Yates, S.J. (eds.), Discourse Theory and practice, Londres: Sage; 198-209.

Potter, J. (2003). Discourse Analysis and Discursive Psychology, in Camic, P.M. & Rhodes, J.E. (Eds.). Qualitative Research in Psychology: Expanding Perspectives in Methodology and Design. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association; 73-94.

Rozin, P.; Lowery, L. & alt. (1999). The CAD Triad Hypothesis: A Mapping between three Moral Emotions (Contempt, Anger, Disgust) and three Moral Codes (Community, Autonomy, Divinity). Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 76; 574-586.

Russell, J.A., Bachorowski, J.A. & Fernández-Dols, J.M. (2003). Emotional Expressions. Annual Review of Psychology, 54; 329-349.

Saylor, C.F.; Cowart, B.L. & alt. (2003). Media Exposure to September 11: Elementary School Students’ Experiences and Posttraumatic Symptoms. American Behavioral Scientist, 46; 1.622-1.642.

Scherer, K. (1993). Studying the Emotion-antecedent Appraisal Process: An Expert-system Approach. Cognition and Emotion, 7; 325-355.

Schlesinger, P.; Haynes, R. & alt. (1998). Men Viewing Violence. London: Broadcasting Standards Commission.

Shanahan, J. (1999).Television and Its Viewers: Cultivation Theory and Research. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Smith, S.L. & Moyer-Gusé, E. (2006). Children and the War on Iraq: Developmental Differences in Fear Responses to Television News Coverage. Media Psychology, 8; 213-237.

Smith, S.L. & Wilson, B.J. (2002). Children's Comprehension of and Fear Reactions to Television News. Media Psychology, 4; 1-26.

Stewart, D.W.; Shamdasani, P.N. & Rook, D. (2007). Focus Groups: Theory and Practice. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Tisseron, S. (2003). Comment Hitchcock m´a guéri. Paris: Albin Michel.

Unz, D.; Schwab, F. & Winterhoff-Spurk, P. (2008). TV News - The Daily Horror? Emotional Effects of Violent Television News. Journal of Media Psychology, 20; 141-155.

Valkenburg, P.M. (2004). Children’s Responses to the Screen: A Media Psychological Approach. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Wertsch, J.V. (1999). La mente en acción. Buenos Aires: Aique.

Wilson, B.J.; Martins, N. & Marske, A.L. (2005). Children’s and Parents’ Fright Reactions to Kidnapping Stories in the News. Communication Monographs, 72; 46-70.

Zillmann, D., & Weaver, J.B. (1999). Effects of Prolonged Exposure to Gratuitous Media Violence on Provoked and Unprovoked Hostile Behavior. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 29; 145-165.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 28/02/11
Accepted on 28/02/11
Submitted on 28/02/11

Volume 19, Issue 1, 2011
DOI: 10.3916/C36-2011-02-10
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 6
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?