Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This paper analyses the evolution of Spanish communication research published as scientific articles between 1980 and 2010. It quantifies the volume of this production with two different samples: the first sample includes national journals and offers original and unprecedented data; the second one includes international journals, defined as those indexed by the Web of Science. As a whole, more than 6,000 articles were analysed. Additionally, the collaboration patterns in authorship and internationality were also studied. On the one hand, collaboration was measured through indicators of multiple authorship and the evolution of coauthorship indexes. On the other hand, internationality was measured through the share of Spanish authors in international journals, the weight of international collaborations and the language used in national journals. Data obtained illustrate a growth and maturity process of communication as a scientific discipline: at the end of the period analysed, a tension between growing collaboration and internationalization and traditional publication patterns was found. Through the period studied, the birth of new faculties with communication studies and the growing number of journals have feed the own growth of the number of articles. However, other elements such as scientific assessment have also played a role in the internationalization of authors. As a whole, this article offers a first image of the evolution of communication as an academic discipline in Spain.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Communication as a scientific discipline is quite young. In Spain, for example, it has only been four decades since the first communication faculties were opened. Therefore, we lack solid longitudinal studies on its evolution, a situation exacerbated by the limitations of official statistics. At present, therefore, the construction of the history of this discipline has been based on theoretical essays (Martínez-Nicolás, 2006, 2008).

The aim of this paper is to close this gap in our knowledge of the discipline itself, by analysing the evolution of Spanish academic articles on communication. Based on this objective, four research questions are posed:

• RQ1): What is the volume of output of scientific articles by Spanish researchers in communication? To answer this question, we quantified the number of publications that included authors attached to Spanish institutions nationally and internationally since the first academic article was published. Although the results of scientific research are published and disseminated in various forms, journals have become key elements in communication and are valued as such by the various university assessment bodies. In addition, international longitudinal data is available through databases such as Web of Science (WoS), the most widely used in bibliometric studies and which includes the category «Communication» in its Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI). Another part of the production in communication can be found in the «Film, Radio, Television» category of the Arts & Humanities Citation Index (AHCI).

• RQ2): How and to what extent does the degree of collaboration between authors vary in Spanish communication research? This question is intended to measure the level of collaboration between the Spanish authors to establish the proportion of co-authorship in the total output and how it has varied over time. The reason for this is that previous bibliometric research shows that multiple authorship tends to increase the impact of research and thus becomes synonymous with maturity (Franceschet & Constantini, 2010; Katz & Hicks, 1997; Persson, Glänzel & Danell, 2004; The Royal Society, 2011). In the case of Spain, we know that in a recent period (2007-10) there was a significant growth in collaboration in the core of leading journals in the discipline (Fernández-Quijada, 2011a); however we do not know if this applies to other journals nor whether this extends throughout the period studied here.

• RQ3): How and to what extent is Spanish research in communication internationalised? Bibliometric studies associate internationalisation with a greater impact of the research (Elsevier, 2011; Katz & Hicks, 1997), hence the international nature of the research is considered to be an asset. Specifically in communication, internationalisation has also been applied to the study of the journals. In this regard, Lauf (2005) analysed the journals in the field and drew a division between nationally and internationally-orientated journals based on two factors: an explicit statement of internationality and a high impact factor. In the specific case of Spanish journals, Fernández-Quijada (2011b) found that the internationality was limited in terms of attracting foreign authors and the publication of texts in other languages, although it was reflected in the use of bibliographic references. In any case, the trend towards the internationalisation of research illustrates the tensions between the local and the global and raises questions regarding the role of national journals (Schönbach & Lauf, 2006). From the findings of the first three research questions, a final question arises with two variants:

• RQ4a): What factors account for the variation in the output of scientific articles by Spanish researchers in communication? RQ4b): What factors account for the variation in co-authorship and the internationalisation of Spanish research in communication? Science as a social system is determined by a number of internal and external factors which influence the productive behaviour of the authors. Based on this premise and the existing literature, this research analysed factors that could explain the growth in and internationalisation of communication research. Önder, Sevkli, Altinok and Tavukçuoglu (2008) found that the increasing internationalisation of Turkish research was due to the model of academic promotion, increased funding for research and an explicit goal of internationalisation understood in the Western (i.e. Anglo-Saxon) sense. In the Spanish case, the increase in productivity is explained by the growing international academic networks in which the academics are involved, the availability of additional human and financial resources and a new culture of assessment (Jiménez, Moya & Delgado, 2003).

2. Material and method

The longitudinal intention of this study is shown by the chosen period of the analysis, from 1980 to 2010. 1980 was chosen as the starting year because in that year the first issue of «Anàlisi» was published; this is the first communication journal published in Spain, which is still active today. The analysis finishes in 2010 in order to trace the development over three whole decades, a period that corresponds to the establishment of the studies in this discipline in Spain: whereas in 1980 there were only three universities offering communication studies, in that decade its rapid expansion in multiple universities began, and by 2010 communication courses could be taken in 50 centres across the country. The creation of educational structures requires the recruitment of teachers, who by law in Spain have to carry out both teaching and research work. The academic promotion of this staff is also largely dependent on their research work and, within this, on publication in academic journals. Hence also the importance of the chosen subject-matter of the study.

For journals published in Spain, we used those that appeared in DICE, the most extensive national bibliographic database. Additionally, DICE is used by various university evaluation bodies to determine the formal quality of national journals. On this basis, on 1 January 2013, there were a total of 45 journals indexed in the subject areas of ??Journalism and Audiovisual Communication and Advertising, the two areas making up the communication discipline. For this research, «Ad comunica» and «Revista de comunicación y salud» were discarded, since they were first published in 2011, after the period studied. The study therefore used 43 publications1. These journals published 9,240 articles during the period analysed, of which 5,783 were signed by at least one author attached to a Spanish institution. Foreign authors signed 1,907 articles, while in 1,624 cases there was no or insufficient indication of authorship to be assigned to a specific country. This lack of data is concentrated proportionally at the beginning of the period analysed, so the findings for this period are limited. Electronic and printed editions were assimilated as a single publication even though each had their own ISSN. Issues of journals relating to months between two years were assigned to the first of the years. From the general structure of articles, we selected only those that could be considered minimally scientific, excluding texts that did not fit with this premise, such as interviews, manifestos or scripts, as well as reviews and editorials or presentations of special issues or sections. Having made the selection of articles, we proceeded to extract them from the original texts in a database created ad hoc, using descriptive variables relating to the year of publication, the issue of the journal, title, language, number of authors, institutional affiliation and country of origin.

The selection of articles from international journals was carried out based on those included in the «Communication» categories of the SSCI and «Film, Radio, Television» of AHCI. In total, 296 articles included at least one author affiliated to a Spanish institution. From this list, the Spanish journals which formed part of these indexes during this period («Círculo de Lingüística aplicada a la Comunicación», «Comunicar», «Comunicación y Sociedad», «Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico», «Historia y Comunicación Social» and «L’Atalante») were excluded, as these are already included in the sample of national journals, and have a publication pattern which is more defined by nationality than by membership of WoS. Thus, the type of authorship, the number of authors per article, their institutional affiliation, the number of references per article and the journals cited show a high degree of commonality with other Spanish journals, differentiated from the patterns shown by the WoS Anglosaxon journals (Fernández-Quijada, Masip & Bergillos, 2013). Moreover, historically they have shared the same context as agents of the discipline in Spain. In this case, the articles were recovered automatically using the Web of Science export facility, and the database was normalised using the same parameters as the national articles database.

To analyse the internationality of scientific production, three different indicators were applied. The first indicator examines the evolution of the papers published in international journals. A second indicator measures the co-authorship of Spanish researchers with authors from institutions in other countries, in relation to articles published in both national and international journals. The third indicator relates to the language used in national journals. The study by González, Valderrama and Aleixandre (2012) presents an analysis similar to the one proposed in this paper, applied in this case to the Spanish research in science and technology. It uses the same type of indicators as employed here, such as participation in scientific publications included in major international databases and the analysis of papers signed in collaboration with other countries.

3. Analysis and findings

The findings are presented in large groups that relate to the first three research questions: firstly, the volume of production and authorship, secondly, the information relating to collaboration, and lastly, internationalisation.

3.1. Production

The volume of Spanish production in communication published in national journals underwent a progressive increase between 1980 and 2010 (Figure 1). In the early years the numbers are very low, both due to it being a period of few publications and because journals did not specify the institutional affiliation of the authors. Later, there is a gradual increase, while significant jumps occur in specific years such as 1998, 2000, 2005 or the last three years. The last five years are particularly significant given that after 2005 there is a constant increase, which even accelerates from 2008. For example, in just four years, from 2004 to 2008, production almost doubled. And in 2010, the last year analysed, the figures are equivalent to one tenth of the total accumulated production over the three decades studied.


Draft Content 806332012-26764-en001.jpg

Internationally, during the period analysed, Spanish researchers published a total of 296 articles in the journals indexed in SSCI and AHCI. Of these, 274 are within the «Communication» section of the SSCI and 23 in the «Film, Radio, Television» section of AHCI (one article appears in both categories). The first Spanish article in these databases does not appear until 1985. From that time there is a permanent Spanish presence (except in 1990), although the figures are merely token. This trend changes drastically in the last five years (2006-2010), in which almost 60% of the Spanish production is concentrated and culminates an upward trend which had already begun in the first years of the 21st century.

Although the addition of new publications in the «Communication» category could explain this increase, the analysis of the figures allows us to rule out that effect. The increase in the Spanish production accelerates above the average from 2005, intensifying its development and its international importance.

3.2. Authorship

One aspect of authorship that also shows its evolution is the co-authorship index, i.e. the average number of authors who sign each article. Over the period analysed, the co-authorship index also increases for the articles published in Spanish journals, from 1.00 in the early years to 1.46 in 2010, reaching its highest point. The anomaly of 1985, with an index of 1.27 which is only exceeded from 2008, is due to the limited availability of data, given that this figure is based on a single journal. The fluctuations of the period seem to be overcome by 2006, the year in which growth becomes constant.

Among the sample of international journals, the co-authorship index reaches 2.76 and by 2010 rises to 3.23, more than double that of Spanish journals. Over the years analysed no significant differences were observed, except for 2001 and 2003, which showed co-authorship rates well above average. This anomaly is explained by the low level of production that coincides with work signed by multiple authors. In those years there were papers attributed to 26, 23 and 17 researchers. In general, the increase in the volume of articles in recent years helps to stabilise the data and makes it more reliable, not being dependent on fluctuations due to specific articles with high levels of co-authorship.

In articles published in Spanish journals, single authorship is the predominant form (Figure 2). Over the last five years, however, there is a slight change in the patterns of type of authorship in Spain for over 30 years, with collective authorship amounting to almost a third of all articles.


Draft Content 806332012-26764-en002.jpg

In contrast, joint authorship is predominant in the international journals during most of the period of analysis and grows steadily from the last few years of the last century, although the increase is particularly marked after 2000 (Figure 3). Over these three decades, it amounts to 63% of total authorship. Despite the high international co-authorship, it is worth noting the different behaviour of the authors according to the areas of publication. Among international journals, all the articles published in the journals in the «Film, Radio, Television» section of AHCI are signed by a single author, with the exception of a paper published in a journal that was also included in the «Communication» category of the SSCI.


Draft Content 806332012-26764-en003.jpg

3.3. Internationalisation

International collaboration in national journals is a phenomenon of the last few years of the period analysed. After a first example in 1985, the next case of this is in 1994, and then in 1998, after which it is always present and increases to 12 collaborations in 2010, just a year after the maximum of 11 in 2009. Over the three decades, 66 collaborations between Spanish and foreign authors are identified, only 1.1% of the total articles attributed to Spanish authors.

International collaboration is common among Spanish authors who publish in WoS journals: it accounts for over 45% of the joint contributions. In absolute terms, international collaborations are limited and fluctuate until 2005. After that date, there is a clear upward trend, especially evident in the last two years. Despite these figures, a more detailed analysis enables us to detect that in relative terms the incidence of international collaboration declines in importance. Whereas for years the limited Spanish presence in major communication journals was in conjunction with foreign researchers, especially Anglo-Saxons, from the beginning of 2000 they have increased autonomy, and the percentage number of articles of Spanish researchers in collaboration with Spanish colleagues increases.

Logically, some countries are favoured over others in this international collaboration, with a total of 20 countries involved in the case of articles published in national journals. In this regard, the data show a clear preference for cooperation with Latin American countries, which account for two thirds of the co-authorships. The list is led by Brazil, Mexico, Peru and Argentina. In fifth place are the first countries outside this geopolitical region, the US and the UK. Overall, Europe accounts for only one-sixth of total contributions whereas if the Anglo-Saxon countries are grouped, the figure is one fifth.

International collaboration in WoS journals is spread over 39 countries, although most of the research work is signed by US and UK researchers; the two countries together represent over 40% of international cooperation. Some distance away are the Netherlands, Italy and Ireland, which have ten, seven and five papers signed with Spanish researchers respectively. The prevalence of joint work with the US, UK and the Netherlands can be considered logical given that these countries are the leaders in global output in communication. The close relationship with Ireland and Italy must be attributed to other factors, such as the specific participation in international projects in which researchers from those countries take part.

Contrary to the situation for national journals, collaboration with Latin American countries is limited. Over the 30 years analysed, only 13 joint projects were published with 14 different authors, which involved researchers from seven countries: Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Peru, Mexico, Bolivia and Venezuela. This represents 9.5% of the total international collaboration.

The last internationalisation factor considered was language. Many Spanish journals allow authors to submit their texts in various Romance languages ??and almost all of them also accept English. The data, however, show a predominance of Spanish, the language used in 92.1% of the articles published by Spanish authors. The other official languages ??of Spain account for another 6.7%, almost entirely attributable to Catalan. Thus the group of official languages of Spain is used in 98.8% of the articles published by Spanish authors in the country’s journals. Of the remainder, 1% relates to English, 0.1% to each of Portuguese and French and, lastly, Italian does not even amount to a tenth. The year with the greatest use of foreign languages ??was 2002, when it represented 2.4% of the total.

4. Discussion and conclusions

This article analyses the changes in Spanish research in communication throughout its three decades of consolidation as a university discipline. The longitudinal nature of the study enables us to detect significant changes over the period which confirm the rapid path towards the coming of age as a scientific discipline.

In relation to the first question posed, we observe that the volume of published articles constantly increases, especially significantly after the turn of century. Although this increase is observed both in articles published in international journals and in Spanish journals, the patterns are slightly different. In the case of production in Spanish journals, the increase has taken place especially since 1998, and coincides with the proliferation of new journals. In terms of production in international journals, the increase is equally evident and, although somewhat later, has led to Spain being positioned among the leading European countries. In 2009, Spain had become the fourth European country in volume of output (Masip, 2010, 2011a, 2011b), only behind the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Germany, moving up four positions from the period 1994-2004 (Masip, 2005). This jump is in line with other areas of Spanish science (González, Valderrama & Aleixandre, 2012; Jiménez, Faba & Moya, 2001), although the reasons, as discussed below, vary.

The second research question was aimed at identifying the forms of authorship and collaboration followed by Spanish researchers. In this case, the patterns observed are diametrically different depending on the nature of the journals in which they are published. Thus, while in Spanish journals individual authorship predominates, averaging 83% over the 30 years of analysis, when Spanish researchers publish in international journals they tend to do so with other colleagues, multiple authorship reaching 63.2%. This indicator is reinforced by the co-authorship index figures, which in the case of Spanish journals is 1.24, much lower than the figure of 2.76 for international journals.

The third research question focused on the internationalisation of Spanish research. Of the three indicators analysed, different patterns again emerged, confirming previous research (Fernández-Quijada, Masip & Bergillos, 2013). In Spanish journals, there is a token internationalisation, 66 articles in collaboration with foreign researchers in three decades. Although in recent years this form of cooperation has increased slightly (more than 50% were in the last five years), the numbers are still very small. The absolute dominance of Spanish as the usual language in national journals also explains the limited international collaboration with Latin American researchers. These data contrast with those offered by researchers who publish in WoS journals. Collaboration is the norm and international collaboration, almost as widespread as the collaboration between Spanish researchers, accounts for 45% of the joint contributions. There are also differences regarding with whom they publish. Cooperation with Anglo-Saxon countries is usual, whereas with Latin America cooperation is little more than symbolic.

The fourth question, with its two variants, opens the door to future research of an explanatory nature that allows a deeper causal analysis to be carried out. The data presented in this article merit greater discussion which would go beyond the scope of this paper. However, we offer some pointers as to possible lines of work.

Firstly, there is a clear correlation between the increase in research published in scientific articles and the increase in the number of researchers. The first communication faculties opened in the early 1970s. The Complutense University of Madrid, the University of Navarra and the Autonomous University of Barcelona took up the baton from the former «Escuelas oficiales», which had previously undertaken the training of journalists, advertising and audiovisual professionals. Since then, the number of schools offering communication studies has grown steadily (Figure 4). According to data collected in the «Libro Blanco de los Títulos de Grado de Comunicación» (White Paper on Degrees in Communication) (ANECA, 2005), in 2003, the year in which the report was issued, there were 40 faculties of communication, which have proliferated especially since the nineties. At present, according to the registry of qualifications of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport, as many as 50 Spanish universities offer at least one degree in the field of communication science.


Draft Content 806332012-26764-en004.jpg

To meet the growing demand, a substantial community of teachers has grown up, who carry out important teaching but also research activity. Although there are no reliable recent official data, the figures provided in the «Libro Blanco de los Títulos de Grado de Comunicación» enable us to state that the number of lecturers is well over 2,000. Although undoubtedly the increased critical mass affects the increase in output, it should be noted that the group that has had the greatest growth in recent years is that of associate professor, which corresponds to the profile of a part-time teacher who, in principle, has no obligation to carry out research.

Another relevant factor is the presence of the scientific journals in which the articles are published. Throughout the period new publications start up and die. From the original «Anàlisi» in 1980, 43 journals were started up and five were discontinued. However, irregularity in the frequency of appearance is fairly common, with gaps of up to 12 years in some cases. It is for this reason that we have chosen to count the active journals, meaning those which published at least one article in any given year. This number allows us to have a permanent vision over the period of the journals available to publish the research in communication (Figure 5). In the early years, the availability of journals is very limited. It is not until the 1990s that a more or less constant growth starts, with some peaks and troughs, to reach its peak in 2010, the last year of the series, in which the number increased from 29 to 38 journals.


Draft Content 806332012-26764-en005.jpg

There has been a remarkable development in scientific publishing during the period analysed. In this sense, the first contribution of this paper is to quantify the production in scientific journals for the short history of communication as a scientific discipline. Progress has also been made qualitatively, developing a proper sense of a scientific journal that did not exist at the beginning of the period, in which academic and professional journal were used as synonyms (Caffarel, Domínguez & Romano, 1989).

Furthermore, this significant increase in the volume of publications has led some writers to label it disparagingly as publicacionitis, which we can equate to the English «publish or perish», in an academic environment that rewards volume above excellence (Perceval & Fornieles, 2008; Sabés & Perceval, 2009). In fact, the increase in the number of publications and the acceleration of this growth in recent years itself would seem to indicate that the discipline has not yet reached maturity. However, other signs such as the increased co-authorship index or the various aspects of the incipient internationalisation do point to a qualitative change in line with the internationally accepted standards of maturity of scientific disciplines. This conflicting evidence may indicate a time of change within the discipline, with a division between authors who are committed to collaboration and internationalisation and those who still follow traditional patterns of publication.

Based on the examples provided by the literature on the subject and data previously noted, it seems clear that there is a feedback between the emergence of new faculties of communication (and the expansion of the courses offered within them), with its critical mass of researchers, and their output. We can also point tentatively to the incentives for financial promotion (six-year periods of research), academic promotion (accreditation) and prestige and recognition as causes of the increased output.

While the impact of financial incentives on this increase in production has been noted in other disciplines (Jiménez, Moya & Delgado, 2003), this «CNEAI effect» does not seem to occur in communication, at least in the early years of its start-up (1989), as no significant increase in production is observed in subsequent years. However, the significant growth in production and the internationalisation of Spanish research in communication does coincide in time with the start-up of the national assessment agency, ANECA. The agency was created in 2002 and lays down more precise evaluation criteria, that favour publication in scientific journals above that in monographs, a very common type of publication in the discipline. The publication and internalisation of these criteria and the resulting need to standardise scientific production to that conventionally accepted by the assessment institutions would have swung the type of production to articles, in what has been called «ANECA effect» (Soriano, 2008). Accepting this premise, we believe that the data show that this effect would occur in two stages: firstly, an increase in the volume published in national journals, and the consequent emergence of new publications in which to publish, and secondly, a growth in the volume of publication in international journals, another criterion usually considered for quality and applied in teacher assessments.

With regard to other disciplines, this internationalisation is still limited, although Spain is well-positioned in the European context. Maintaining this position will require positioning in projects at a European level, of which there are currently very few, and internationalising the results of national projects, which, although they have increased in recent years, have to date only seemed to be reflected in national publications.

Notes

1 Some issues could not be located in electronic or printed format and were excluded from the sample. Specifically, numbers 7 of «Revista de Ciencias de la Información», 35 of «Revista Latina de Comunicación Social» (2000), 0-3 of «Revista Universitaria de Publicidad y Relaciones Públicas» (1990-93) and 47 of «Telos» (1996) were not included. The extra issues published without the sequential numbering have also not been included. The number of articles analysed per journal may be viewed in the attached document.

Acknowledgements

The authors thank Ignacio Bergillos and Iván Bort for their assistance in access and extraction of the articles from journals.

References

ANECA (2005). Libro Blanco Títulos de Grado de Comunicación. Madrid: ANECA.

Caffarel, C., Domínguez, M. & Romano, V. (1989). El estado de la investigación de comunicación en España (19781987). C.in.co, 3, 4557.

De Aguilera, M. (1998). La investigación sobre comunicación en España: una visión panorámica. Comunicación y cultura, 4, 511.

Elsevier (Ed.) (2011). International Comparative Performance of the UK Research Base 2011. [London]: Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (www.bis.gov.uk/assets/biscore/science/docs/i/11p123internationalcomparativeperformanceukresearchbase2011.pdf) (17012013).

Fernández Quijada, D. (2011a). De los investigadores a las redes: una aproximación tipológica a la autoría en las revistas españolas de comunicación. In J.L. Piñuel, C. Lozano & A. García (Eds.), Investigar la comunicación en España (pp. 633648). Madrid: Universidad Rey Juan Carlos/Asociación Española de Investigación de la Comunicación [CDROM].

Fernández Quijada, D. (2011b). Appraising Internationality in Spanish Communication Journals. Journal of Scholarly Publishing, 43, 1, 90109. (DOI:10.3138/jsp.43.1.90).

Fernández Quijada, D., Masip, P. & Bergillos, I. (2013). El precio de la internacionalidad: la dualidad en los patrones de publicación de los investigadores españoles en comunicación. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 36, 2.

Franceschet, M. & Constantini, A. (2010). The Effect of Scholar Collaboration on Impact and Quality of Academic Papers. Journal of Informetrics, 4, 4, 540553. (DOI:10.1016/j.joi.2010.06.003).

González, G., Valderrama, J.C. & Aleixandre, R. (2012). Análisis del proceso de internacionalización de la investigación española en ciencia y tecnología (19802007). Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 35, 1, 94118. (DOI:10.3989/redc.2012.1.847).

Jiménez, E., Faba, C. & Moya, F. (2001). El destino de las revistas científicas nacionales. El caso español a través de una muestra (19501990). Revista española de documentación científica, 24, 2, 147161. (DOI:10.3989/redc.2001.v24.i2.47).

Jiménez, E., Moya, F. & Delgado, E. (2003). The Evolution of Research Activity in Spain. The Impact of National Commission for the Evaluation of Research Activity (CNEAI). Research Policy, 32, 1, 123142. (DOI: 10.1016/S0048-7333(02)00008-2).

Katz, J.S. & Hicks, D. (1997). How Much is a Collaboration Worth? A Calibrated Bibliometric Model. Scientometrics, 40, 3, 541554.

Lauf, E. (2005). National Diversity of Major International Journals in the Field of Communication. Journal of Communication, 55, 1, 139–51. (DOI:10.1111/j.1460-2466.2005.tb02663.x).

Martínez Nicolás, M. (2006). Masa (en situación) crítica. La investigación sobre periodismo en España: comunidad científica e intereses de conocimiento. Anàlisi, 33, 135170.

Martínez Nicolás, M. (2008). La investigación sobre comunicación en España. Evolución histórica y retos actuales. En: M. Martínez Nicolás (Coord.), Para investigar la comunicación. Propuestas teóricometodológicas (pp. 1352). Madrid: Tecnos.

Masip, P. (2005). European Research in Communication during the Years 19942004: A Bibliometric Approach. First European Communication Conference, Amsterdam, Holanda: European Communication Research and Education Association [CDROM].

Masip, P. (2010). Mapping Communication Research in Europe (19942009). Third European Communication Conference, Hamburgo, Alemania: European Communication Research and Education Association.

Masip, P. (2011a). Efecto ANECA: producción española en comunicación en el Social Science Citation Index. Anuario ThinkEPI, 5, 206210.

Masip, P. (2011b). Los efectos del efecto ANECA: análisis de la producción Española en comunicación en el Social Science Citation Index (19992009). In: J.L. Piñuel, C. Lozano & A. García (editores), Investigar la comunicación en España (pp. 649663). Fuenlabrada: Universidad Rey Juan Carlos/Asociación Española de Investigación de la Comunicación [CDROM].

Perceval, J.M. & Fornieles, J. (2008). Confucio contra Sócrates: la perversa relación entre la investigación y la acreditación. Anàlisi, 36, 213224.

Persson, O., Glänzel, W. & Danell, R. (2004). Inflationary Bibliometric Values: The Role of Scientific Collaboration and the Need for Relative Indicators in Evaluative Studies. Scientometrics, 60, 3, 421432. (DOI:10.1023/B:SCIE.0000034384.35498.7d).

Sabés, F. & Perceval, J.M. (2009). Retos (y peligros) de las revistas científicas de comunicación en la era digital. Actas del I Congreso Internacional Latina de Comunicación Social. (www.revistalatinacs.org/09/Sociedad/actas/27sabes.pdf) (23122012).

Schönbach, K. & Lauf, E. (2006). Are National Communication Journals Still Necessary? A Case Study and some Suggestions. Communications. The European Journal of Communication Research, 31, 4, 447454. (DOI:10.1515/COMMUN.2006.028).

Soriano, J. (2008). El efecto ANECA. Actas y memoria final. Congreso internacional fundacional AEIC, p. 118, Santiago de Compostela, España: Asociación Española de Investigación de la Comunicación [CDROM].

The Royal Society (Ed.) (2011). Knowledge, Networks and Nations. Global Scientific Collaboration in the 21st century. London: The Royal Society.

Önder, Ç., Sevkli, M. & al. (2008). Institutional Change and Scientific Research: A Preliminary Bibliometric Analysis of Institutional Influences on Turkey’s Recent Social Science Publications. Scientometrics, 76, 3, 543560. (DOI:10.1007/s11192-007-1878-6).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Este artículo analiza la evolución de la investigación española en comunicación publicada en forma de artículos científicos entre 1980 y 2010. Cuantifica este volumen de producción con dos muestras de revistas, una del ámbito nacional que aporta datos originales e inéditos hasta ahora y otra internacional a partir de Web of Science. En total, se analizan más de 6.000 artículos, estudiando las pautas de colaboración en la autoría y las de internacionalidad. Para las primeras, mediante el peso de la autoría múltiple y la evolución de los índices de coautoría. Para las segundas, mediante el peso de los autores españoles en las revistas internacionales, el volumen de colaboraciones internacionales y el idioma empleado en las revistas españolas. Los datos obtenidos muestran un proceso de crecimiento y madurez de la comunicación como disciplina científica que al final del período analizado se debate entre las tendencias crecientes a la colaboración y la internacionalización y los patrones más tradicionales de comunicación científica. A lo largo del período, el crecimiento de las facultades de comunicación y del número de revistas ha retroalimentado el propio incremento en el número de artículos. No obstante, otros elementos como la evaluación científica también han impulsado la internacionalización de los autores. Así, el artículo ofrece una primera imagen de la evolución de la disciplina en España.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La comunicación como disciplina científica es ciertamente joven. En España, por ejemplo, apenas hace cuatro décadas que se inauguraron las primeras facultades de comunicación. De ahí que carezcamos de estudios longitudinales sólidos sobre su evolución, una situación agravada por las limitaciones estadísticas oficiales. Hasta ahora, pues, la construcción de la historia de esta disciplina se ha basado en ensayos teóricos (Martínez-Nicolás, 2006, 2008).

El objetivo del presente artículo es contribuir a reducir esta laguna en nuestro conocimiento de la propia disciplina analizando la evolución de los artículos científicos españoles en comunicación. A partir de este objetivo se plantean cuatro preguntas de investigación:

• PI-1: ¿Cuál es el volumen de producción de artículos científicos de los investigadores españoles en comunicación? Para responder a esta pregunta, se cuantificó el número de publicaciones en las que participaron autores adscritos a instituciones españolas a nivel nacional e internacional desde el primer artículo científico publicado. Aunque los resultados de la investigación científica se publican y difunden de formas variadas, las revistas se han convertido en elementos centrales de esta comunicación y así son valoradas por las distintas agencias universitarias de evaluación. Además, a nivel internacional existe disponibilidad de datos de carácter longitudinal a través de bases de datos como Web of Science (WoS), la más empleada en estudios bibliométricos y que cuenta con una categoría «Communication» dentro de su Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI). Otra parte de la producción en comunicación puede encontrarse en la categoría «Film, Radio, Television» del Arts & Humanities Citation Index (AHCI).

• PI-2: ¿Cómo y en qué medida varía el nivel de colaboración entre autores en la investigación española en comunicación? Con esta pregunta se intenta medir el nivel de colaboración entre los autores españoles para establecer el peso de esta coautoría en el conjunto de la producción, así como su evolución temporal. La razón es que la investigación bibliométrica previa pone de manifiesto que la autoría múltiple tiende a incrementar el impacto de la investigación y, por tanto, se convierte en sinónimo de madurez (Franceschet & Constantini, 2010; Katz & Hicks, 1997; Persson, Glänzel & Danell, 2004; The Royal Society, 2011). En el caso español, sabemos que en un período reciente (2007-10) se ha producido un crecimiento importante de la colaboración en el núcleo de revistas centrales de la disciplina (Fernández-Quijada, 2011a) pero desconocemos si es aplicable a otras revistas ni su extensión a lo largo del período aquí estudiado.

• PI-3: ¿Cómo y en qué medida se internacionaliza la investigación española en comunicación? Los estudios bibliométricos relacionan la internacionalización con un mayor impacto de la investigación (Elsevier, 2011; Katz & Hicks, 1997), de ahí que el carácter internacional de la investigación sea considerado algo positivo. Específicamente en comunicación, la internacionalización se ha aplicado también al estudio de las revistas. Así, Lauf (2005) analizó las revistas del ámbito y trazó una división entre revistas orientadas al ámbito nacional y al internacional a partir de dos factores: una declaración explícita de internacionalidad y un elevado factor de impacto. Para el caso específico de las revistas españolas, Fernández-Quijada (2011b) determinó que su internacionalidad era limitada en cuanto a la atracción de autores foráneos y a la publicación de textos en otras lenguas, mientras que sí se reflejaba en la utilización de referencias bibliográficas. En todo caso, la tendencia a la internacionalización de la investigación muestra las tensiones entre lo local y lo global y plantea cuál es el rol de las revistas nacionales (Schönbach & Lauf, 2006). A partir del resultado obtenido en las tres primeras preguntas de investigación, se plantea una última cuestión con dos variantes:

• PI-4a: ¿Qué factores explican la variación de la producción de artículos científicos de los investigadores españoles en comunicación? PI-4b: ¿Qué factores explican la variación de las colaboraciones y de la internacionalización de la investigación española en comunicación? La ciencia, como sistema social, viene determinada por una serie de factores internos y externos que influyen en el comportamiento productivo de los autores. Partiendo de esta premisa y de la literatura existente, en esta investigación se analizan factores que pudieran explicar el crecimiento y la internacionalización de la investigación en comunicación. Así, Önder, Sevkli, Altinok y Tavukçuoglu (2008) detectaron que la creciente internacionalización de la investigación turca respondía al modelo de promoción académica, el aumento de los fondos destinados a investigación y un objetivo explícito de internacionalización entendido en el sentido occidental (léase anglosajón). En el caso español, el incremento en productividad se explica por las crecientes redes científicas internacionales en las que se integran los científicos, la disponibilidad de nuevos recursos humanos y económicos y una nueva cultura de evaluación (Jiménez, Moya & Delgado, 2003).

2. Material y método

La voluntad longitudinal del presente estudio se manifiesta en el período de análisis elegido, que va de 1980 a 2010. El año de inicio se eligió porque en 1980 se edita el primer número de la que es la primera revista académica de comunicación todavía viva editada en España, «Anàlisi». Finalizar el análisis en 2010 permite trazar su evolución a lo largo de tres décadas completas, un período que se corresponde con el asentamiento de los estudios de esta disciplina en España: en 1980 existían solo tres universidades que ofrecieran estudios de comunicación pero es en esa década cuando empieza su rápida eclosión en múltiples universidades, lo que lleva a que en 2010 las carreras de comunicación se pudieran estudiar en 50 centros de todo el país. La creación de estructuras docentes requiere de la contratación de personal, dedicado por ley en España tanto a labores de docencia como de investigación. La promoción académica de este personal depende en gran medida de su labor investigadora y, dentro de ésta, de la publicación en revistas científicas. De ahí también la relevancia del objeto de estudio elegido.

Para las revistas editadas en España se tomaron aquellas que aparecían en DICE, la base de datos bibliográfica nacional más extensa. Además, DICE es usada por diferentes agencias de evaluación universitaria para determinar la calidad formal de las revistas nacionales. En esta base, el total de revistas indizadas en las áreas de conocimiento de Periodismo y de Comunicación Audiovisual y Publicidad, las dos en que se divide la disciplina de comunicación, ascendía a 45 en fecha 1 de enero de 2013. Para este trabajo se descartaron «Ad comunica» y «Revista de comunicación y salud», ya que empezaron a publicarse en 2011, con posterioridad al período estudiado. El estudio, por tanto, se ciñó a 43 publicaciones1. Estas revistas publicaron 9.240 artículos durante el período de análisis, de los que 5.783 estaban firmados al menos por un autor vinculado a una institución española. Los autores foráneos firmaron 1.907 artículos, mientras que en 1.624 casos no había indicaciones sobre autoría o eran insuficientes para ser asignada a un país concreto. Esta falta de datos se concentra proporcionalmente en el inicio del período analizado, por lo que los resultados para éste son limitados. Las ediciones electrónicas y en papel se asimilaron como una misma publicación a pesar de que contaran con ISSN propio. A los números de revistas correspondientes a meses entre dos años se les asignó el primero de los años. A partir de la estructura general de los artículos, se seleccionaron únicamente aquellos que mínimamente pudieran ser considerados científicos, excluyendo textos que no cumplían esta premisa, como entrevistas, manifiestos o guiones, además de reseñas y editoriales o presentaciones de números o secciones especiales. Una vez hecha la selección de artículos, se procedió a su vaciado a partir de los textos originales en una base de datos creada ad hoc, con variables descriptivas referidas a año de publicación, número de la revista, título, idioma, número de autores, afiliación institucional y país de origen.

La selección de artículos en revistas internacionales se realizó a partir de aquellas incluidas en las categorías «Communication» del SSCI y «Film, Radio, Television» del AHCI; incluían un total 296 artículos con al menos un firmante afiliado a una institución española. De esta lista se excluyeron las revistas españolas que durante este período han formado parte de estos índices («Círculo de lingüística aplicada a la comunicación», «Comunicar», «Comunicación y sociedad», «Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico», «Historia y Comunicación Social» y «L’Atalante»), al estar ya incluidas en la muestra de revistas nacionales, y tener unos patrones de publicación más definidos por la nacionalidad que por la pertenencia a WoS. Así, el tipo de autoría, el número de autores por artículo, la afiliación institucional de estos, el número de referencias por artículo y las revistas citadas muestran un alto grado de coincidencia con el resto de revistas españolas, alejándose de los patrones de las revistas anglosajonas del WoS (Fernández-Quijada, Masip & Bergillos, 2013). Además, históricamente han compartido un mismo contexto como agentes de la disciplina en el país. En este caso, la recuperación de los artículos se hizo de forma automática con las opciones de exportación de Web of Science, normalizándose la base de datos con los mismos parámetros que la base de artículos nacionales.

Para el análisis de la producción científica se aplicaron tres indicadores distintos. Un primer indicador analiza la evolución de los trabajos publicados en revistas internacionales. Un segundo indicador es la medición de las colaboraciones de investigadores españoles con autores de instituciones de otros países, tanto para los artículos publicados en revistas nacionales como internacionales. El tercer indicador se refiere al idioma empleado en las revistas nacionales. El trabajo de González, Valderrama y Aleixandre (2012) presenta un análisis similar al propuesto en este trabajo, aplicado en este caso a la investigación española en ciencia y tecnología. Para ello utiliza el mismo tipo de indicadores que aquí se proponen, como la participación en las publicaciones científicas recogidas por las principales bases de datos internacionales y el análisis de los trabajos firmados en colaboración con otros países.

3. Análisis y resultados

Los resultados se presentan en los grandes bloques a los que se refieren las tres primeras preguntas de investigación: en primer término, el volumen de producción y su autoría; en segundo, los datos relativos a la colaboración; y finalmente, la internacionalización.

3.1. Producción

El volumen de producción española en comunicación publicado en revistas nacionales sufre un progresivo incremento entre 1980 y 2010 (figura 1). En los primeros años las cifras son muy bajas, tanto por ser un período de pocas publicaciones como por no ser habitual la identificación institucional de los autores de los textos. Después, el aumento es progresivo aunque se dan saltos importantes en años concretos como 1998, 2000, 2005 o los tres últimos. El último lustro resulta especialmente significativo, ya que desde 2005 el incremento es constante, incluso acelerándose a partir de 2008. Por ejemplo, tan solo en cuatro años, de 2004 a 2008, la producción prácticamente se dobla. Y en 2010, último año analizado, los datos equivalen a una décima parte de la producción total acumulada en las tres décadas analizadas.


Draft Content 806332012-26764 ov-es001.jpg

En el ámbito internacional, durante el período analizado los investigadores españoles publicaron un total de 296 artículos en las revistas indizadas en SSCI y AHCI. De ellos, 274 se enmarcan en la sección «Communication» del SSCI y 23 en la «Film, Radio, Television» de AHCI (un artículo aparece en ambas categorías). La primera presencia española en esas bases de datos no se produce hasta 1985. A partir de ese momento la aparición española es permanente (excepto en 1990), aunque con cifras meramente testimoniales. Esta tendencia se ve alterada de manera drástica a partir del último lustro (2006-2010), que concentra hasta casi el 60% de la producción española y culmina una evolución al alza iniciada ya en los primeros años de los dos mil.

Aunque la incorporación de nuevos títulos en la categoría «Communication» podría explicar este incremento, el análisis de las cifras permite descartar tal efecto. El aumento de la producción española se acelera por encima del promedio a partir de 2005, intensificándose su desarrollo y su peso internacional.

3.2. Autoría

Un aspecto de la autoría que también nos indica su evolución es el índice de coautoría, es decir, el número medio de autores que firman cada artículo. El índice de coautoría a lo largo del período analizado sigue también una evolución al alza en los artículos publicados en revistas españolas, desde 1,00 en los primeros años hasta el 1,46 alcanzado en 2010, su punto más alto. La anomalía del año 1985, con un índice de 1,27 que solo se supera a partir de 2008, se debe a la poca disponibilidad de datos, ya que ese índice se deriva de una única revista. Los diversos altibajos del período parecen quedar superados a partir de 2006, año en que el crecimiento se convierte en constante.

Entre la muestra de revistas internacionales, el índice de coautoría asciende a 2,76 y alcanza para 2010 el 3,23, más del doble que en el caso de las revistas españolas. A lo largo de los años analizados no se observan diferencias importantes, excepción hecha de los años 2001 y 2003 que ofrecen índices de coautoría muy por encima de la media. Esta anomalía se explica por la existencia de una producción todavía escasa que coincide con trabajos firmados por múltiples autores. En esos años se observan trabajos atribuidos a 26, 23 y 17 investigadores. En general, el aumento del volumen de artículos en los últimos años ayuda a la estabilización de los datos y los hace más fiables al no depender de fluctuaciones debido a artículos concretos con alta colaboración.

En los artículos publicados en revistas españolas, la autoría única es la forma predominante de firma (figura 2). En el último lustro, sin embargo, se observa una tímida alteración de la dinámica que ha marcado el tipo de autoría en España durante más de 30 años, alcanzando la autoría colectiva casi una tercera parte del total de artículos.


Draft Content 806332012-26764 ov-es002.jpg

En contraste, la autoría en colaboración es mayoritaria entre las revistas internacionales durante la mayor parte del período de análisis y crece de forma constante desde los últimos años del siglo pasado, aunque el incremento es especialmente evidente a partir de 2000 (figura 3). A lo largo de estas tres décadas llega a un 63% del total de autorías. A pesar de la elevada colaboración internacional, cabe destacar el distinto comportamiento de los autores según los ámbitos de publicación. Entre las revistas internacionales, la totalidad de los artículos aparecidos en las revistas de la sección «Film, Radio, Television» del AHCI están firmados por un único autor, con la excepción de un trabajo difundido en una revista incluida también en la categoría «Communication» del SSCI.


Draft Content 806332012-26764 ov-es003.jpg

3.3. Internacionalización

La colaboración internacional en las revistas nacionales es un fenómeno propio de los últimos años del período analizado. Tras un primer ejemplo en 1985, hay que esperar a 1994 para volver a encontrarlo y, posteriormente, hasta 1998, año a partir del cual siempre se halla presente y en aumento hasta alcanzar la decena de colaboraciones en 2010, justo un año después del máximo de 11 de 2009. A lo largo de tres décadas, se detectan 66 colaboraciones entre autores españoles y foráneos, apenas un 1,1% del total de artículos atribuidos a autores españoles.

La colaboración internacional es habitual entre los autores españoles que publican en las revistas de WoS: supone más del 45% de las contribuciones conjuntas. En términos absolutos, las colaboraciones internacionales son escasas y fluctuantes hasta el año 2005. A partir de entonces, la tendencia es claramente alcista, especialmente evidente en los dos últimos años. A pesar de esas cifras, un análisis más detallado permite detectar que en términos relativos la colaboración internacional pierde peso. Si durante años la escasa presencia española en las principales revistas de comunicación se producía de la mano de investigadores extranjeros, en particular anglosajones, a partir de los primeros dos mil su aparición gana en autonomía, incrementándose porcentualmente el número de artículos de investigadores españoles en colaboración con otros colegas del estado.

Lógicamente, esta colaboración internacional privilegia a unos países por encima de otros, con un total de 20 países implicados para el caso de los artículos publicados en revistas nacionales. Así, los datos muestran una clara preferencia por la colaboración con países de América Latina, que representan las dos terceras partes de las colaboraciones. La lista está liderada por Brasil, México, Perú y Argentina. En quinta posición aparecen los primeros países externos a este ámbito geopolítico, USA y el Reino Unido. En conjunto, Europa representa apenas una sexta parte del total de colaboraciones mientras que si se agrupan los países anglosajones, la cifra llega a una quinta parte.

La colaboración internacional en revistas del WoS se distribuye entre 39 países, si bien la mayoría de los trabajos aparecen firmados con investigadores de USA y el Reino Unido; entre ambos países protagonizan más del 40% de la cooperación internacional. A mayor distancia se encuentran Holanda, Italia e Irlanda, respectivamente con diez, siete y cinco trabajos firmados con investigadores españoles. El predominio de trabajos conjuntos con USA, Reino Unido y Holanda se puede considerar lógico atendiendo a que son los países que lideran la producción mundial en comunicación. La estrecha relación con Irlanda e Italia debe atribuirse a otros factores, como la participación puntual en proyectos internacionales con presencia de investigadores de esos países.

Al contrario de lo que sucede en las revistas nacionales, aquí la colaboración con países latinoamericanos es escasa. A lo largo de los 30 años analizados únicamente se publicaron 13 trabajos conjuntos, con 14 firmas distintas, que suponen la implicación de investigadores de siete países: Brasil, Argentina, Chile, Perú, México, Bolivia y Venezuela. Estas cifras representan el 9,5% del total de la colaboración internacional.

El último factor de internacionalización considerado fue el idioma. Muchas revistas españolas permiten que los autores envíen sus textos en diferentes lenguas románicas y casi todas ellas aceptan también el inglés. Los datos, no obstante, muestran un predominio del castellano, idioma en el que se escribió el 92,1% de los artículos publicados por autores españoles. Las otras lenguas oficiales del país suman otro 6,7%, casi en su totalidad atribuible al catalán. Así, el conjunto de lenguas oficiales españolas es utilizado en el 98,8% de los textos publicados por los autores españoles en las revistas del país. Del resto, un 1% corresponde al inglés, un 0,1% al portugués y francés y, finalmente, el italiano ni tan siquiera alcanza esa décima. El año con mayor uso de lenguas extranjeras fue 2002, en que supuso un 2,4% del total.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Este artículo analiza la evolución de la investigación española en comunicación a lo largo de sus tres décadas de consolidación como disciplina universitaria. El carácter longitudinal del trabajo permite detectar cambios relevantes a lo largo del período que confirman el rápido camino hacia la mayoría de edad como disciplina científica.

En relación a la primera pregunta planteada, se observa que el volumen de artículos publicados sufre un incremento constante, especialmente significativo a partir del traspaso de siglo. A pesar de que dicho aumento se observa tanto en artículos publicados en revistas españolas como en internacionales, las dinámicas son ligeramente distintas. En el caso de la producción en revistas españolas, el despegue se produce especialmente a partir de 1998, y coincide con la proliferación de nuevas revistas. En el caso de la producción en revistas internacionales, el incremento es igualmente evidente y, aunque algo más tardío, ha conducido a situar a España entre los primeros países europeos. En 2009, España ya era el cuarto país europeo en volumen de producción (Masip, 2010; 2011a; 2011b), tan solo por detrás del Reino Unido, Holanda y Alemania, avanzando cuatro posiciones respecto al período 1994-2004 (Masip, 2005). Este salto se sitúa a la par de otras áreas de la ciencia española (González, Valderrama & Aleixandre, 2012; Jiménez, Faba & Moya, 2001), aunque las razones, como se discute más adelante, varían.

La segunda pregunta de investigación perseguía identificar las formas de autoría y de colaboración que emplean los investigadores españoles. En este caso, las dinámicas observadas son diametralmente distintas según la naturaleza de las revistas en las que se publica. Así, mientras que en las revistas españolas predomina la autoría única, con una media a lo largo de los 30 años de análisis que alcanza el 83%, cuando los investigadores españoles publican en revistas internacionales tienden a hacerlo con otros colegas, alcanzando la autoría múltiple el 63,2%. Este indicador se refuerza con las cifras del índice de coautoría, que en el caso de las revistas españolas es de 1,24, lejos del 2,76 de las revistas internacionales.

La internacionalización de la investigación española era el foco de la tercera pregunta de investigación. De los tres indicadores analizados se desprenden, una vez más, dinámicas bien diferenciadas, confirmando investigaciones previas (Fernández-Quijada, Masip & Bergillos, 2013). En las revistas españolas, la internacionalización es testimonial, 66 artículos en colaboración con investigadores extranjeros en tres décadas. Y aunque en los últimos años esta forma de cooperación ha aumentado ligeramente (más del 50% se ha producido en el último lustro), las cifras son todavía ínfimas. El predominio absoluto del español como lengua de uso habitual en las revistas nacionales explicaría también que la escasa colaboración internacional se realice con investigadores latinoamericanos. Estos datos contrastan con los ofrecidos por los investigadores que publican en revistas del WoS. La colaboración es la norma y la colaboración internacional, casi tan abundante como la colaboración entre investigadores españoles, supone el 45% de las contribuciones conjuntas. También existen diferencias sobre con quién se publica. La cooperación con países anglosajones es habitual, siendo la que se realiza con América Latina poco más que testimonial.

La cuarta pregunta, con sus dos variantes, abre la puerta a futuras investigaciones de carácter explicativo que permitan llegar a análisis causales más profundos. Los datos ofrecidos en este artículo merecen una discusión mayor que sobrepasaría los límites de este trabajo. Con todo, ofrecemos algunos indicadores que marcan posibles líneas de trabajo.

En primer lugar, hay una evidente correlación entre el aumento de la investigación publicada en artículos científicos y el aumento de la masa de investigadores. Las primeras facultades de comunicación abrieron sus puertas en los primeros años setenta. La Universidad Complutense de Madrid, la Universidad de Navarra y la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona cogieron el testigo de las antiguas Escuelas Oficiales, que hasta entonces habían asumido la formación de periodistas, publicitarios y profesionales del sector audiovisual. Desde entonces, el número de centros que imparten estudios de comunicación no ha hecho más que crecer de forma constante (figura 4). De acuerdo con los datos recogidos en el «Libro Blanco de los Títulos de Grado de Comunicación» (ANECA, 2005), en 2003, año de redacción del informe, existían 40 facultades de comunicación, que proliferaron especialmente a partir de los años noventa. En la actualidad, según el registro de titulaciones del Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte, hasta 50 universidades españolas ofrecen al menos un grado del ámbito de las ciencias de la comunicación.


Draft Content 806332012-26764 ov-es004.jpg

Para poder satisfacer la creciente demanda, se ha consolidado numéricamente una importante comunidad de profesores que desarrollan una relevante actividad docente, pero también investigadora. Aunque no existen datos públicos recientes y fiables, las cifras que se desprenden del «Libro Blanco de los Títulos de Grado de Comunicación» permiten afirmar que el número de profesores supera ampliamente las 2.000 personas. Aunque sin lugar a dudas el aumento de la masa crítica incide en el aumento de producción, debe tenerse en cuenta que la categoría que más ha crecido en los últimos años es la de profesor asociado, que responde a un perfil de profesor a tiempo parcial en principio sin obligaciones en investigación.

Otro factor relevante es la presencia de las propias revistas científicas en las que se publican los artículos. A lo largo del período nacen y mueren nuevas cabeceras. Desde la original «Anàlisi» en 1980, se observan 43 nacimientos y cinco defunciones. De todas maneras, la irregularidad en la frecuencia de aparición es bastante habitual, con «agujeros» de hasta 12 años en algunos casos. Es por eso por lo que aquí se ha optado por contabilizar las revistas vivas, entendiendo por tales las que publicaron al menos un artículo en un año determinado. Esa cifra permite tener una visión permanente a lo largo del período de las cabeceras disponibles para hacer pública la investigación en comunicación (figura 5). En los primeros años, la disponibilidad de revistas es muy limitada y no es hasta los años noventa que empieza un crecimiento más o menos constante que, con algún altibajo, llega a su cénit precisamente en 2010, el último año de la serie, en el que se pasa de 29 a 38 revistas.


Draft Content 806332012-26764 ov-es005.jpg

El avance en la publicación científica ha sido notable durante el período analizado. Así, la primera aportación de este trabajo es cuantificar la producción en revistas científicas para la corta historia de la comunicación como disciplina científica. El progreso también se ha producido en el aspecto cualitativo, desarrollándose un sentido propio de revista científica que no existía al inicio del período, en el que revista académica y profesional se usaban como sinónimos (Caffarel, Domínguez & Romano, 1989).

Por otro lado, este aumento importante del volumen de publicaciones lleva a algunos autores a calificarla despectivamente como «publicacionitis» –que podríamos asimilar a la tradicional expresión inglesa de «publish or perish»–, en un contexto académico que premia la abundancia sobre la excelencia (Perceval & Fornieles, 2008; Sabés & Perceval, 2009). De hecho, el incremento en el número de publicaciones y la propia aceleración de este crecimiento en los últimos años, parecería indicar que la disciplina aún no ha alcanzado su madurez. No obstante, otros signos como el aumento del índice de coautoría o la incipiente internacionalización en sus distintas vertientes sí que apuntan hacia un cambio cualitativo acorde con los patrones internacionalmente aceptados de maduración de las disciplinas científicas. Estas evidencias contrapuestas podrían indicar un momento de cambio dentro de la disciplina, con una división entre autores que apuestan por la colaboración y la internacionalización y los que todavía siguen con los patrones tradicionales de publicación.

A partir de los ejemplos que nos da la literatura sobre la materia y algunos datos apuntados previamente, parece evidente que hay una retroalimentación entre el nacimiento de nuevas facultades de comunicación (y la ampliación de los estudios ofertados dentro de estas), con su masa crítica de investigadores, y la producción de estos; los incentivos de promoción económica (sexenios de investigación), académica (acreditaciones) y de prestigio y reconocimiento también se pueden apuntar tentativamente como causas del incremento de la producción.

Así como en otras disciplinas se ha apuntado el impacto de los incentivos económicos en este aumento de producción (Jiménez, Moya & Delgado, 2003), este «efecto CNEAI» no parece darse en comunicación al menos en los primeros años de su puesta en marcha (1989), ya que no se observa ningún aumento significativo de producción en los años posteriores. No obstante, sí coincide en el tiempo el crecimiento importante de la producción y de la internacionalización de la investigación española en comunicación con la puesta en marcha de la agencia de evaluación nacional, ANECA. Esta se crea en 2002 y determina criterios de evaluación más precisos que privilegian la publicación en revistas científicas frente a las monografías, un tipo de publicación muy habitual en la disciplina. La publicación e interiorización de estos criterios y la consiguiente necesidad de homologar la producción científica a aquella convencionalmente aceptada por las instituciones evaluadoras habría hecho decantar el tipo de producción hacia los artículos, en lo que se ha denominado «efecto ANECA» (Soriano, 2008). Aceptando esta premisa, a nuestro entender los datos muestran que este efecto se produciría en dos etapas: primero, un crecimiento del volumen de publicación en revistas nacionales –y la consiguiente aparición de nuevos títulos en los que publicar–; segundo, un crecimiento del volumen de publicación en revistas internacionales, otro criterio usualmente considerado de calidad y aplicado en las evaluaciones de profesorado.

Respecto a otras disciplinas, esta internacionalización es todavía limitada, aunque España sale bien situada en el contexto europeo. Mantener esta posición exigirá posicionarse en proyectos de ámbito europeo, muy escasos en la actualidad, e internacionalizar los resultados de los proyectos nacionales, que sí que han sufrido un incremento en los últimos años que hasta ahora ha parecido reflejarse únicamente en las publicaciones nacionales.

Notas

1 Algunos números no pudieron ser localizados en versión electrónica ni en papel y han quedado fuera de la muestra. Concretamente, no se han contabilizado los números 7 de «Revista de Ciencias de la Información», 35 de «Revista Latina de Comunicación Social» (2000), 0 a 3 de «Revista Universitaria de Publicidad y Relaciones Públicas» (1990-93) y 47 de «Telos» (1996). Igualmente, han quedado fuera los números extra publicados sin la numeración correlativa. El número de artículos analizados por revista puede consultarse en el documento anexo.

Agradecimientos

Los autores agradecen a Ignacio Bergillos e Iván Bort la ayuda prestada para el acceso y vaciado de algunas revistas.

Referencias

ANECA (2005). Libro Blanco Títulos de Grado de Comunicación. Madrid: ANECA.

Caffarel, C., Domínguez, M. & Romano, V. (1989). El estado de la investigación de comunicación en España (19781987). C.in.co, 3, 4557.

De Aguilera, M. (1998). La investigación sobre comunicación en España: una visión panorámica. Comunicación y cultura, 4, 511.

Elsevier (Ed.) (2011). International Comparative Performance of the UK Research Base 2011. [London]: Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (www.bis.gov.uk/assets/biscore/science/docs/i/11p123internationalcomparativeperformanceukresearchbase2011.pdf) (17012013).

Fernández Quijada, D. (2011a). De los investigadores a las redes: una aproximación tipológica a la autoría en las revistas españolas de comunicación. In J.L. Piñuel, C. Lozano & A. García (Eds.), Investigar la comunicación en España (pp. 633648). Madrid: Universidad Rey Juan Carlos/Asociación Española de Investigación de la Comunicación [CDROM].

Fernández Quijada, D. (2011b). Appraising Internationality in Spanish Communication Journals. Journal of Scholarly Publishing, 43, 1, 90109. (DOI:10.3138/jsp.43.1.90).

Fernández Quijada, D., Masip, P. & Bergillos, I. (2013). El precio de la internacionalidad: la dualidad en los patrones de publicación de los investigadores españoles en comunicación. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 36, 2.

Franceschet, M. & Constantini, A. (2010). The Effect of Scholar Collaboration on Impact and Quality of Academic Papers. Journal of Informetrics, 4, 4, 540553. (DOI:10.1016/j.joi.2010.06.003).

González, G., Valderrama, J.C. & Aleixandre, R. (2012). Análisis del proceso de internacionalización de la investigación española en ciencia y tecnología (19802007). Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 35, 1, 94118. (DOI:10.3989/redc.2012.1.847).

Jiménez, E., Faba, C. & Moya, F. (2001). El destino de las revistas científicas nacionales. El caso español a través de una muestra (19501990). Revista española de documentación científica, 24, 2, 147161. (DOI:10.3989/redc.2001.v24.i2.47).

Jiménez, E., Moya, F. & Delgado, E. (2003). The Evolution of Research Activity in Spain. The Impact of National Commission for the Evaluation of Research Activity (CNEAI). Research Policy, 32, 1, 123142. (DOI: 10.1016/S0048-7333(02)00008-2).

Katz, J.S. & Hicks, D. (1997). How Much is a Collaboration Worth? A Calibrated Bibliometric Model. Scientometrics, 40, 3, 541554.

Lauf, E. (2005). National Diversity of Major International Journals in the Field of Communication. Journal of Communication, 55, 1, 139–51. (DOI:10.1111/j.1460-2466.2005.tb02663.x).

Martínez Nicolás, M. (2006). Masa (en situación) crítica. La investigación sobre periodismo en España: comunidad científica e intereses de conocimiento. Anàlisi, 33, 135170.

Martínez Nicolás, M. (2008). La investigación sobre comunicación en España. Evolución histórica y retos actuales. En: M. Martínez Nicolás (Coord.), Para investigar la comunicación. Propuestas teóricometodológicas (pp. 1352). Madrid: Tecnos.

Masip, P. (2005). European Research in Communication during the Years 19942004: A Bibliometric Approach. First European Communication Conference, Amsterdam, Holanda: European Communication Research and Education Association [CDROM].

Masip, P. (2010). Mapping Communication Research in Europe (19942009). Third European Communication Conference, Hamburgo, Alemania: European Communication Research and Education Association.

Masip, P. (2011a). Efecto ANECA: producción española en comunicación en el Social Science Citation Index. Anuario ThinkEPI, 5, 206210.

Masip, P. (2011b). Los efectos del efecto ANECA: análisis de la producción Española en comunicación en el Social Science Citation Index (19992009). In: J.L. Piñuel, C. Lozano & A. García (editores), Investigar la comunicación en España (pp. 649663). Fuenlabrada: Universidad Rey Juan Carlos/Asociación Española de Investigación de la Comunicación [CDROM].

Perceval, J.M. & Fornieles, J. (2008). Confucio contra Sócrates: la perversa relación entre la investigación y la acreditación. Anàlisi, 36, 213224.

Persson, O., Glänzel, W. & Danell, R. (2004). Inflationary Bibliometric Values: The Role of Scientific Collaboration and the Need for Relative Indicators in Evaluative Studies. Scientometrics, 60, 3, 421432. (DOI:10.1023/B:SCIE.0000034384.35498.7d).

Sabés, F. & Perceval, J.M. (2009). Retos (y peligros) de las revistas científicas de comunicación en la era digital. Actas del I Congreso Internacional Latina de Comunicación Social. (www.revistalatinacs.org/09/Sociedad/actas/27sabes.pdf) (23122012).

Schönbach, K. & Lauf, E. (2006). Are National Communication Journals Still Necessary? A Case Study and some Suggestions. Communications. The European Journal of Communication Research, 31, 4, 447454. (DOI:10.1515/COMMUN.2006.028).

Soriano, J. (2008). El efecto ANECA. Actas y memoria final. Congreso internacional fundacional AEIC, p. 118, Santiago de Compostela, España: Asociación Española de Investigación de la Comunicación [CDROM].

The Royal Society (Ed.) (2011). Knowledge, Networks and Nations. Global Scientific Collaboration in the 21st century. London: The Royal Society.

Önder, Ç., Sevkli, M. & al. (2008). Institutional Change and Scientific Research: A Preliminary Bibliometric Analysis of Institutional Influences on Turkey’s Recent Social Science Publications. Scientometrics, 76, 3, 543560. (DOI:10.1007/s11192-007-1878-6).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/05/13
Accepted on 31/05/13
Submitted on 31/05/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C41-2013-01
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 33
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?