Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The presence of technological resources in schools and the high performance of socalled «Technology Generation» or «Generation Z» students are not enough to develop students' digital competence. The primary key is determined by the technological and pedagogical skills of teachers. In this paper, we intend to analyze the level of ICT skills of teachers in primary and secondary establishing a competency framework adapted to the Spanish educational environment, using as a basis the standards established by UNESCO in 2008 and reformulated in the year 2011. For this purpose, a questionnaire was done to show the profile of ICT teacher training faculty of the sample (80 schools and 1,433 teachers in the Community of Madrid) to study the characteristics of better trained for the development of teachers was conducted Digital jurisdiction under the Ministry of Education of Spain. The study results show a significant difference between optimal ICT skills and the low skills that teachers really have to develop learning activities with technological tools for their students. Teachers’ digital skills are very important in the development of learning processes to introduce technologies as tools in the service of education, and this study will allow us to make decisions in policy formation and throughout early career teachers.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the question

The concern throughout the education community (parents, teachers, students and society as a whole) triggered by the development and implementation in 2014 of the 2nd Education Act (Organic Law 8/2013), which establishes further measures to address core competencies, highlights the importance of reflecting on the learning processes and educational needs of the generations currently attending our schools. Such reflection must be based on a thorough understanding of what has come to be known as Generation Z. Other names have also been used to refer to this population group, such as Generation V (for virtual), Generation C (for community or content), the Silent Generation, the Internet Generation or even the Google Generation, but they all have a common denominator, information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Generation Z (Schroer, 2008) encompasses children or teenagers who were born between 1995 and 2012, as opposed to Generation Y (1977-94), also called the 2nd «Baby Boomer» Generation, and Generation X (1966-76), or the lost generation. Other authors (Mascó, 2012) have been even more specific, identifying the Z1 generation, born between late 1990 and 2000, and the Z2 generation, those born after 2005. A new generation has been proposed for those born after 2010, namely Generation a or «Google Kids» (Grail Research, 2011), defined to be the first generation of the 21st century, the most numerous to date, to be early adopters of technology, to start sooner and stay longer in school and to be focused on technology (figure 1).

However, in order to determine what the future of Generation a will be like, the Generation Z currently attending school presents a number of characteristics that authors such as Dolors Reig (Blog «El Caparazón»: http://goo.gl/VSEQ52) have attempted to study and which are summarised below (Geck, 2007; Hoffman, 2003; Posnick-Goodwin, 2010; Lay-Arellano, 2013; Aparici, 2010; Bennett, 2008): 1) Expert understanding of technology; 2) Multi-taskers; 3) Socially open through the use of technologies; 4) Fast and impatient; 5) Interactive; and 6) Resilient.

According to a Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport (MECD) report (2014), there are 8,081,972 students enrolled in general non-university education, from the 1st cycle of pre-school education to initial vocational qualification programmes. These belong to Generation Z, and are in our schools today.

The MECD (2013) has also published data on the number of teachers working in non-university education. From a total of 664,325 teachers, 10.8% are under 30 years old, 30% are between 30 and 39, 28.9% are between 40 and 49, 26.3% are between 50 to 59 and 4% are over 60 years old. Thus, about 40% belong to Generation Y (1977-1994), 30% to Generation X (1966-1976) and another 30% to the 1st generation of post War II World (1945-1965) «Baby Boomers». This generational divide between teachers and students, combined with the need to develop core competencies in compulsory education (especially digital competence), adapt to new social skills related to the use of technologies and address the new learning needs of a changing society, raise questions about the preparation of current teachers for leading the teaching-learning processes that Generation Z students will use.


Draft Content 167110571-44292-en031.jpg

Figure 1. Generation Terminology by Birth Year (Grail Research, 2011).

1.1. Teachers’ ICT teaching competencies, according to UNESCO

Teachers’ information and communication technology competencies remain a crucial element for educational development. These can be understood as the suite of necessary skills and knowledge that teachers must possess in order to make more integrated use of these technological tools as educational resources in their daily practice (Suárez-Rodríguez, Almerich, & al., 2012).

As a result of the educational importance and value given to digital competencies in present day education systems over the last decade, various legislative measures have been implemented, establishing the need to include ICT competencies in the curriculum as an essential learning tool (Organic Law 2/2006, Organic Law 8/2013). Likewise, government institutions and NGOs have developed various models of ICT competency standards for teachers (Department of Education of Victoria – Australia; International Society for Technology in Education – USA / Canada; the Enlaces (learning networks) Project of the Chilean Ministry of Education –Chile; North Carolina Department of Public Instruction – USA; ICT Competency Framework for Teachers –UNESCO; PROFORTIC of Almerich, Suárez, Orellana, Belloch, Bo & Gastaldo – Spain). Each of these studies has examined the importance of teachers’ digital competencies for the satisfactory development of ICT competencies in their students.

Several studies have explored teachers’ lack of confidence and inadequate competence in the field of ICTs from both a technological and a pedagogical perspective (Banlankast & Blamire, 2007; Hew & Brush, 2007; Mueller, Wood, Willoughby, Ross & Specht, 2008; Ramboll Management, 2006). The conclusions drawn in most of these studies raise questions about the adequacy of both initial and continuing teacher training as regards reducing the «digital divide» between teachers and students, between «digital native» students and «digital immigrant» teachers (Prensky, 2001).

In 2008, UNESCO (2008; 2011) produced and published an extremely important document for states such as Spain, and education institutions that had not yet created any specific recommendations about what their teachers should know regarding the use of ICTs in education. The guidelines for teacher training in ICTs given in the «Planning guide» of «Information and communications technologies in teacher education» published by UNESCO in 2004 include a detailed study of «standards for teacher technology competency».

In general, the UNESCO ICT Competency Standards for Teachers project (UNESCO, 2008; 2011) is aimed at improving teachers’ practice in all areas of their professional work, combining ICT competencies with innovations in teaching, the curriculum and organisation of the teaching institution. A further objective is to ensure that teachers use ICT competencies and resources to improve their teaching, cooperate with colleagues and ultimately to become innovation leaders within their institutions. The overall goal of this project is not only to improve teaching practice but also to do so in ways that contribute to improving the quality of an education system so that it furthers the economic and social development of the country (UNESCO, 2008). To this end, UNESCO has defined three levels of ICT competencies for teacher education:

• Understanding the technologies and integrating technological competencies in the curriculum (1st level: Technology Literacy).

• Use of these competencies in order to add value to society and the economy, and applying this knowledge to solve complex and real problems (2nd level: Knowledge Deepening).

• Production and subsequent leverage of new knowledge (3rd level: Knowledge creation).

These three approaches (UNESCO, 2008) correspond to alternative visions and goals for national policies on the future of education. However, each level possesses different characteristics according to the dimension analysed: 1) Policy and vision: aspects of ICTs in the curriculum; 2) Curriculum and assessment: planning and assessment of ICTs; 3) Pedagogy: ICT methodology issues; 4) ICTs: use and management of the technologies; 5) Organisation and administration: management of ICT resources; 6) Teachers’ professional learning: continuing education in ICTs.

The goal of UNESCO’s ICT-CST project has been to produce the UNESCO ICT Competency Standards for Teachers (ICT-CST) framework shown in figure 2.

A study of the standards defined by UNESCO (2008; 2011) raises a number of questions which we aimed to answer in the present study: What ICT training have today’s Generation Z teachers received? Are they equipped to help our students achieve digital competence? What characteristics do «digital immigrant» teachers possess? What aspects of teacher training should be improved in order to produce teachers with satisfactory digital competence? Are we are meeting our students’ educational needs regarding the use of technological tools for independent learning?

The overall objective of this study was to analyse the level of ICT competencies among primary and secondary education teachers in the Community of Madrid in order to identify teacher training needs, based on a theoretical study using UNESCO’s ICT competency standards for teachers and the design of an instrument which made it possible to conduct the pertinent analyses and identify the factors associated with differences in the ICT teacher training profile.


Draft Content 167110571-44292-en032.jpg

Figure 2. Modules of the UNESCO ICT Competency Framework for Teachers (UNESCO, 2008).

2. Material and methods

This was a non-experimental study, since it was not possible to manipulate the variables or randomly assign participants or treatment (Kerlinger & Lee, 2002). It therefore comprised an «ex-post-facto» study in which it was necessary for the phenomenon to occur naturally and conduct subsequent analyses, as the independent variables could not be manipulated.

2.1. Sample

The study was conducted with teachers working in primary and secondary schools in the Community of Madrid; 80 primary schools and secondary schools participated, of which 43.75% were public schools, 11.25% were private and 45% were state-funded private schools. The establishment of the core competencies defined in the 2006 Education Act and in the 2014 Organic Law for the Improvement of Educational Quality has meant that all schools in the Community of Madrid are required to include the development of digital competencies in the curriculum.

A total of 1,433 teachers participated, of whom 66.57% were female and 33.43% male. Participants were selected by means of incidental non-probability sampling (Kerlinger & Lee, 2002; Bisquerra, 2004); 70% of the study participants were aged between 26 and 45 years old (Generation X), 81.09% were teachers (the rest were members of the management team or ICT coordinators) and 35.05% had between 0 and 5 years of teaching experience. A total of 53.73% of the teachers who participated in the study taught in primary education, 42.78% taught in secondary schools and 3.49% taught at both educational levels.

2.2. Design of the instrument

To carry out this study, a questionnaire was developed as a tool for collecting information to assess the ICT teacher training profile of teaching staff in the Community of Madrid, and identify the underlying and observable relationships between the dimensions and variables studied.

The questionnaire consisted of a series of items referring to the ICT teacher training profile according to UNESCO. Subjects responded to each item by indicating their score, situation, knowledge or attitude using a 5-point Likert-type scale where 1 was the lowest score and 5 was the highest score.

The variable studied (the dependent variable) was the ICT teacher training profile (UNESCO), establishing three different profiles: Profile 1: Technology literacy; Profile 2: Knowledge deepening; Profile 3: Knowledge generation.

To better define the dependent variable, and in accordance with the standards established by UNESCO, this was divided into the following sub-dimensions, which were subsequently operationalised in the questionnaire items: curricular aspects of ICTs, planning and assessment of ICTs, methodological aspects of ICTs, use of ICTs, management of ICT resources, continuing education in ICTs.

2.3. Instrument reliability

The SPSS statistical package was used to study the reliability of the instrument (George & Mallery, 1995), employing Cronbach’s a. This is the most widely used coefficient in this kind of analysis, and it indicates the internal consistency of a scale. An analysis of the overall a obtained for the instrument yielded the results shown in table 1.


Draft Content 167110571-44292-en033.jpg

Homogeneity indices (corrected item-total correlation) were within what could be termed «Excellent», as they were all above 0.3. In conclusion, the instrument employed to study the ICT teacher training profile presented excellent reliability, obtaining a Cronbach’s a of .973 (George & Mallery, 1995).

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Descriptive and differential analysis

The overall score obtained was 2.78 on an assessment scale of 1 to 5, indicating that the ICT training profile of schools in the sample was medium-low. Almost 39.71% of the teachers possessed an «Average» ICT training profile (UNESCO), although it should be noted that 36.85% had a «Poor» profile and 9.56% had a «Very poor» profile. In other words, a total of 46.31% of teachers presented a negative profile in terms of ICT training in education. The 20, 40, 60 and 80 percentiles were used for these assessments, enabling us to identify a «Very poor profile» with scores below 1.6, a «Poor profile» with scores between 1.7 and 2.5, an «Average profile» with scores between 2.6 and 3.4, a «Good profile» with scores between 3.5 and 4.3, and a «Very good profile» with scores between 4.4 and 5.

Table 2 summarises the differential analyses conducted to identify the variables influencing the ICT teacher training profile according to the UNESCO standards in each of the sub-dimensions. Two statistical tests were used for this, the Student’s t-test and one-way ANOVA, both for independent groups (together with subsequent Scheffé contrasts). In the differential analyses, the value of statistical power (P) was added to determine the rejection or acceptance of the hypothesis with a higher degree of certainty and significance. Therefore, when significance was high and power was close to 0.8, the values were considered significant Cohen, 1992).


Draft Content 167110571-44292-en034.jpg

The differential analyses performed (ANOVA - p=0.01) according to the «Post» variable (Teacher, ICT Coordinator and Management and Coordination) clearly indicated significant and important differences in all sub-dimensions (CA, PA, MA, ICT, MR and CE) and in the questionnaire in general (0.000 sig. and 23.819 F), and as was to be expected, those who were ICT coordinators presented a higher level in the ICT teacher training profile.

When the Student’s t-test was applied to the «Sex» variable (with an alpha of 0.05), no statistically significant differences were observed in any of the sub-dimensions or in the questionnaire in general (0.158 sig.), and no differences were obtained between men and women in relation to their ICT teacher training profile.

However, an analysis of the «Age» and «Teaching Experience» variables (ANOVA - p=0.01 = 0.000 sig. /9.826 F for Age and 0.000 sig. /9.942 F for Experience) indicated that teachers who were older (56 - 66 years old) and had more teaching experience presented a much lower level of ICT teacher training profile than teachers who were younger and had less experience, and teachers aged between 20 and 25 years old had the best profile.

As regards the variable «Degree» held by teachers (ANOVA - p<.01), the analyses only revealed statistically significant differences in some sub-dimensions (PA, ICT and CE), while for the questionnaire in general (0.014 sig. and 4.248 F) there was lack of significance in the difference of variation between groups (teaching and undergraduate degrees). The mean differences in all sub-dimensions presented very low levels of statistical significance and were not considered relevant in the ICT teacher training profile in relation to the degree held.

The «Educational Stage» variable was also analysed (ANOVA - p<.01), revealing statistically significant differences in almost all sub-dimensions (except CA and MR) and in the questionnaire in general (0.000 sig. and 8.614 F), and an important difference of means, whereby teachers working in secondary education presented a better profile than those working in primary education.

Similarly, important significant differences (ANOVA - p<.01) (questionnaire 0.000 sig. and 6.972 F) were observed between teachers forming the study sample for the «Subject Taught» variable, whereby teachers in the fields of Technology and the Experimental Sciences presented a better ICT teacher training profile.

Lastly, the final differential analyses (ANOVA - p<.01) revealed important and statistically significant differences regarding the «Technologies at Home», «Usefulness of ICTs», «Attitude towards ICTs», «Level of ICT training» and «ICT training received» variables. The data obtained indicated that teachers who had a computer and Internet access at home were convinced of the usefulness of ICTs for improving the teaching-learning process, presented a good attitude, had a good level of training in ICTs, had received both technical and teacher training on the use of ICTs, and had a better ICT teacher training profile according to the UNESCO standards. These data were corroborated by the values ??of statistical power, all above 0.8 (Cohen, 1992), indicating a high probability of obtaining a statistically significant result.

4. Discussion and conclusions

Teacher training in the application of ICTs in education has a long way to go, and requires identification of the factors that can help improve the competencies that current and future teachers must acquire in order to implement digital literacy in our schools.

This study has revealed the existence of a significant deficit in teacher training in the use of ICTs and their application in the classroom, an inherent aspect of digital competence established by Organic Law 2/2006 and Organic Law 8/2013.

According to the sub-dimensions established by UNESCO (2008; 2011), it can be concluded that the ICT teacher training profile corresponds to a medium-low level. As has been seen in the sub-dimension of «General curricular aspects», most teachers do not know what is meant by digital competence in education or how to achieve this in the classroom. Similarly, the results for the «Planning and assessment» sub-dimension indicate that further work is required as regards planning activities and assessment of competencies by means of rubrics with the incorporation of ICT resources. Continuing in this pedagogical line, one of the most important sub-dimensions for the definition of the ICT teacher training profile is that of «Methodological and instructional aspects». The results of this study have revealed that teachers’ classroom strategies regarding the use of ICT resources as an avenue for complex and collaborative learning have not yet been implemented as teaching methods in the development of students’ digital competence.

The poor results obtained for teachers’ instructional application of ICT resources may be explained by the data provided by the sub-dimension «Use of ICTs». This sub-dimension has made it possible to assess teachers’ technical competencies regarding the use of technologies, yielding a very low profile among teaching staff. This is one of the problems facing the incorporation of ICTs in education: if teachers do not possess technical knowledge about the use and application of digital tools, these are unlikely to be implemented in education. Teachers’ lack of knowledge about the use of technological tools effectively prevents them from applying these in educational activities with their students, as has been reported in other studies (Suárez-Rodríguez, Almerich, & al., 2012). These conclusions are supported by the results obtained for the sub-dimension «Continuing teacher education in ICTs», which revealed a considerable need for teachers working in public and private schools to update their knowledge. Although there are many training courses related to ICTs in education promoted by the different authorities, only a very small percentage of teachers attend these courses, as described in European Union reports (Eurydice, 2011) which state that only 16% to 25% of primary education students are taught by teachers who have participated in continuing education programmes on the use of ICTs.

Lastly, the sub-dimension «Management of ICT resources» obtained very low results, supporting the idea that an ICT coordinator is an indispensable member in the school.

Based on the structure suggested by UNESCO regarding ICT teacher training profiles, it can be concluded that:

• Teachers who are older (56 - 66 years old) and have more teaching experience present a much lower ICT teacher training profile than teachers who are younger and have less experience, and teachers aged between 20 and 25 years old have the best profile.

• No large discrepancies exist between primary and secondary school teacher profiles. Both obtained a poor profile according to UNESCO indicators. This suggests that the initial training of both teaching professionals (teaching degree or diploma for the former and a master’s degree in secondary education for the latter) exerts no influence on the application of ICT tools in education, and further reveals the limited training that pre-service teachers receive in terms of digital competence in education faculties, as reported by Prendes and others (2010).

• This study indicates that teachers working in secondary education have a better profile than those teaching in primary education. As the above suggests, although the initial qualification does not lead to a better or worse teacher training profile, continuing professional development (life-long learning) does endow secondary education teachers with greater specialisation in digital competence throughout their professional careers.

• As corroborated by this study, science and technology teachers present better digital competencies; teachers in the fields of Technology and the Experimental Sciences possessed a better ICT teacher training profile.

• Other studies (Tejedor, 2014) have shown that teachers with ICT tools at home present a better attitude and better training in the use of these resources in education. Likewise, in the present study, teachers who had a computer (PC, laptop, tablet or smartphone) and an Internet connection at home presented a better ICT teacher training profile.

• As regards attitude and inclination towards ICTs, the results also indicate that there is a better ICT teacher profile among teachers who believe in the usefulness of these technologies in education, have a positive attitude and are convinced of their usefulness for improving the teaching-learning process, as has been reported in numerous studies (Alonso & al., 2014).

• This study has highlighted the need for teachers to be trained in the application of digital competence in the classroom. Thus, teachers who have received training that combined technical aspects of the use of technological tools and pedagogical aspects regarding their instructional application in learning activities, had a better ICT teacher training profile according to UNESCO standards.

The results suggest that further work is required in terms of incorporating information and communication technologies in education into teacher training programmes, whether in education faculties as part of the initial training or on courses organised by public and private education institutions that promote continuing professional development in order to develop digital competence among teachers. They also highlight the considerable difference between Generation Z, corresponding to students currently attending our primary and secondary schools (basic education in which they must develop digital competence according to the LOE and LOMCE) and the scant training received by present day teachers to implement this. It is therefore important to define teacher training programmes (both initial and continuing) in greater depth in order to help improve the training teachers receive in relation to digital competence and reduce the «digital divide» between teachers and their students.

In sum, this study has revealed clear indications of a lack of preparation among current teaching staff to facilitate the development of digital competence in students. Clearly, teachers cannot help students develop a competence that they themselves do not possess in depth.

References

Alonso, F.G., González, M.C., Vidal, J.E., & García, O.A. (2014). Niños 2.0, una experiencia formativa en actitudes y valores para el profesorado ante la Web 2.0 y TIC. Metodologías de aprendizaje colaborativo a través de las tecnologías. Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca.

Aparici, R. (2010). Conectados en el ciberespacio. Madrid: UNED.

Area, M. (2011). Informe ¿Qué opina el profesorado sobre el Programa Escuela 2.0? Un análisis por Comunidades Autónomas. (http://goo.gl/Jyvzgd) (03-07-2014).

Balanskat, A., & Blamire, R. (2007). ICT in Schools: Trends, Innovations and Issues in 2006-07. European Schoolnet. (http://goo.gl/FdDFYs) (05-11-2014).

Bennett, S., Maton, K., & Kervin, L. (2008). The Digital Natives Debate: A Critical Review of the Evidence. British Journal of Educational Technology, 39, 775-786. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2007.00793.x

Bisquerra, R. (2004). Metodología de la investigación educativa. Madrid: Plaza.

Cohen, J. (1992). A Power Primer. Psychological Bulletin, 112, 155-159. (http://goo.gl/vBcYFJ) (01-02-2015). doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.112.1.155

Colón, A.O., Moreno, L.A., León, M.P., & Zagalaz, J.C. (2014). Formación en TIC de futuros maestros desde el análisis de la práctica en la Universidad de Jaén. Píxel-Bit, 44, 127-142. (http://goo.gl/g6WSRy) (01-02-2015).

Eurydice (2011). Cifras clave sobre el uso de las TIC para el aprendizaje y la innovación en los centros escolares de Europa 2011. Bruselas: Agencia Ejecutiva en el ámbito educativo, audiovisual y cultural. (http://goo.gl/DXXLJw) (02-05-2014).

Geck, C. (2007). The Generation Z Connection: Teaching Information Literacy to the Newest Net Generation. Toward a 21st-Century. School Library Media Program, 235. (http://goo.gl/1tur7F) (01-12-2014).

George D., & Mallery, P. (1995). SPSS/PC + Step by: A Simple Guide and Reference. Belmont (CA): Wadsworth Publishing Company.

Grail Research (2011). Consumers of tomorrow insights and observations about Generation Z. (http://goo.gl/7qYuWt) (17-08-2014)

Hew, K.F., & Brush, T. (2007). Integrating Technology into K-12 Teaching and Learning: Current Knowledge Gaps and Recommendations for Future Research. Educational Technology Research Development, 55(3), 227-243. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11423-006-9022-5

Hoffman, T. (2003). Preparing Generation Z. Computerworld, 37 (34), 41. (http://goo.gl/w6jIt9) (05-10-2014).

International Society for Technology in Education (Ed.) (2008). NETS for Teachers: National Educational. (http://goo.gl/a9ur) (15-12-2014).

Kerlinger, F., & Lee, H. (2002). Investigación del comportamiento. Métodos de investigación en Ciencias Sociales. México: McGraw Hill.

Lay-Arellano, I.T. (2013). Los jóvenes y la apropiación de la tecnología. Paakat, 4. (http://goo.gl/5L7z43) (07-10-2014).

Ley Orgánica 2/2006, de 3 de mayo, de Educación. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 106, de 4 de mayo de 2006. (http://goo.gl/mxokeX) (29-07-2015).

Ley Orgánica 8/2013, de 9 de diciembre, para la mejora de la calidad educativa. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 295, de 10 de diciembre de 2013. (http://goo.gl/UpKyig) (29-07-2014).

Lieberman, A., Fullan, M., & Hopkins, D. (Eds.) (2010). Segundo manual internacional del cambio educativo. Dordrecht: Springer.

Martín, A.H. (2014). La formación del profesorado para la integración de las TIC en el currículum: nuevos roles, competencias y espacios de formación. En Investigación y tecnologías de la información y comunicación al servicio de la innovación educativa. Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca.

Mascó, A. (2012). Entre Generaciones. No te quedes fuera del futuro. Buenos Aires: Temas.

MECD (2013). Datos y cifras. Curso escolar 2013-14. (http://goo.gl/IGLloE) (25-02-2015).

MECD (2014). Estadística de las Enseñanzas no universitarias. Datos 2013-14. (http://goo.gl/C6grdz) (25-02-2015).

Ministerio de Educación de Chile (2006). Estándares en la Tecnología de la Información y la Comunicación para la formación inicial del docente. Santiago de Chile: Ministerio de Educación de Chile. (http://goo.gl/oKrNPF) (16-09-2014).

Mueller, J., Wood, E., Willoughby, T., Ross, C., & Specht, J. (2008). Identifying discriminating variables between teachers who fully integrate computers and teachers with limited integration. Computers & Education, 51(4), 1.523-1.537. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2008.02.003

North Caroline Department of Public Instruction (2000). Basic Technology Competencies for Educators. (North Caroline Department of Public Instruction, 2000). (http://goo.gl/ORjJDe) (23-09-2014).

Posnick-Goodwin, S. (2010). Meet Generation Z. California Teachers Association. (http://goo.gl/oq8J99) (23-09-2014).

Prendes, M.P., Castañeda, L., & Gutiérrez, I. (2010). Competencias para el uso de TIC de los futuros maestros. Comunicar, 35, 21. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C35-2010-03-11

Prensky, M. (2001). Nativos digitales, inmigrantes digitales. On the Horizon, 9(5). (http://goo.gl/4oYb) (23-05-2014).

Ramboll Management. (2006). E-Learning Nordic 2006: Impact of ICT on education. Denmark: Ramboll Management. (http://goo.gl/8VircM) (23-05-2014).

Schroer, W. (2008). Defining, Managing, and Marketing to Generations X, Y, and Z. The Portal, 10, 9. (http://goo.gl/Fc40dB) (15-02-2015).

Suárez-Rodríguez, J.M., Almerich, G., Díaz-García, I. & Fernández-Piqueras, R. (2012). Competencias del profesorado en las TIC. Influencia de factores personales y contextuales. Universitas Psychologica, 11(1), 293-309. (http://goo.gl/VCz6jD) (24-07-2014).

Tejedor, F.J. (2014). Presentación de datos globales. En Evaluación de procesos de innovación escolar basados en el uso de las TIC desarrollados en la Comunidad de Castilla y León. Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca.

UNESCO (2004). Las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en la formación docente. París: Informe UNESCO (http://goo.gl/ZRj7l) (23-05-2013).

UNESCO (2008). Normas UNESCO sobre competencias en TIC para docentes. (http://goo.gl/pGPDGv) (15-06-2013).

UNESCO (2011). UNESCO ICT Competency Framework for Teachers. (http://goo.gl/oKUkB) (24-05-2014).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La mera presencia de recursos tecnológicos en los centros y las altas capacidades de los alumnos de la «Generación Tecnológica» o «Generación Z», no son suficientes para desarrollar en los alumnos la competencia digital. La clave fundamental viene determinada por las competencias tecnológicas y pedagógicas de los docentes. En este trabajo, se pretende analizar el nivel de competencias en TIC de los profesores de Primaria y Secundaria estableciendo un marco competencial de referencia adaptado al ámbito educativo español, utilizando como base los estándares establecidos por la UNESCO en el año 2008 y reformulados en el año 2011. Para ello, se realizó un cuestionario que permitió establecer el perfil de formación docente en TIC del profesorado de la muestra (80 colegios y 1.433 profesores de la Comunidad de Madrid), para estudiar las características del profesorado mejor formado para el desarrollo de la competencia digital que establece el Ministerio de Educación de España. Los resultados muestran una alarmante diferencia entre las competencias que debieran tener los profesores para desarrollar la competencia digital en sus alumnos y la que verdaderamente tienen. Las competencias digitales del profesorado son muy relevantes en el desarrollo de procedimientos de aprendizaje que introduzcan las tecnologías como herramientas al servicio de la educación y este estudio nos permitirá tomar decisiones en política de formación inicial y a lo largo de la carrera profesional del profesorado.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

La preocupación que surge en toda la comunidad educativa (padres, profesores, alumnos y sociedad en su conjunto) acerca del desarrollo e implantación en el año 2014 de la 2ª Ley Educativa (Ley Orgánica 8/2013) que profundiza en el trabajo de las Competencias Básicas, nos hace ver la importancia de reflexionar sobre los procesos de aprendizaje y necesidades educativas de las generaciones que están en nuestras escuelas. Por eso, se debe partir de un conocimiento profundo de lo que se ha llegado a denominar Generación Z. También se han utilizado otros nombres para referirse a este grupo de la población, como Generación V (por virtual), Generación C (por comunidad o contenido), Generación Silenciosa, Generación de Internet o incluso Generación Google, cuyas características comunes que los definen son las tecnologías de la información y comunicación (TIC).

La Generación Z (Schroer, 2008) se refiere a niños o adolescentes que han nacido entre los años 1995 y 2012, en contraposición a la Generación Y (1977-94), llamada también la Segunda «Baby Boomers» y la Generación X (1966-76), o generación perdida. Según otros autores (Mascó, 2012), siendo más específicos, nos encontramos a los Z1, nacidos entre finales de 1990 y 2000, y los Z2, los que nacieron a partir de 2005. A partir de 2010 se habla de una nueva generación, la Generación a o «Google Kids» (Grail Research, 2011), caracterizada por ser la primera generación del siglo XXI, la más numerosa hasta la fecha, por adoptar la tecnología con mayor rapidez, por empezar y permanecer más tiempo en la escuela y por estar enfocada hacia la tecnología (figura 1).

Pero la Generación Z, actualmente en nuestras escuelas –y con la preocupación de visualizar la futura Generación a–, tiene una serie de características que autores como Reig (Blog «El Caparazón»: http://goo.gl/VSEQ52) han querido estudiar, y que se resumen a continuación (Geck, 2007; Hoffman, 2003; Posnick-Goodwin, 2010; Lay Arellano, 2013; Aparici, 2010; Bennett, 2008): 1) Expertos en la comprensión de la tecnología; 2) Multitarea; 3) Abiertos socialmente desde las tecnologías; 4) Rapidez e impaciencia; 5) Interactivos; y 6) Resilientes.

Según el Informe MECD (2014) hay 8.081.972 alumnos matriculados en las enseñanzas de régimen general no universitarias, desde 1er ciclo de Educación Infantil hasta los programas de cualificación profesional inicial. Todos ellos son la Generación Z y están en nuestros centros educativos en la actualidad.

El Ministerio de Educación (MECD, 2013) ha publicado el número de profesores de los centros de enseñanzas de régimen general no universitarias. Esta cifra alcanza los 664.325 profesores, de los cuáles el 10,8% tiene menos de 30 años, un 30% tiene entre 30 y 39 años, un 28,9% tiene entre 40 y 49 años, un 26,3% tiene entre 50 y 59 años y un 4% tiene más de 60 años. Es decir, que alrededor de un 40% son de la Generación Y (1977-94), un 30% son de la Generación X (1966-76) y otro 30% son de la 1ª Generación «Baby Boomers», post II Guerra Mundial (1945-1965). Este contraste de generaciones entre el profesorado y los alumnos, la exigencia del desarrollo de las competencias básicas en la enseñanza obligatoria –sobre todo la competencia digital–, el cambio y la adaptación a las nuevas habilidades sociales que tienen que ver con el uso de las tecnologías y las necesidades de nuevos aprendizajes para una sociedad cambiante, hacen que nos preguntemos sobre la preparación del profesorado actual para liderar los procesos de enseñanza-aprendizaje de los alumnos de la Generación Z.


Draft Content 167110571-44292 ov-es031.jpg

Figura 1. Generation Terminology by Birth Year (Grail Research, 2011).

1.1. Las Competencias docentes del profesorado TIC, según la UNESCO

Las competencias del profesorado en las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación siguen siendo un elemento crucial para el desarrollo educativo. Podemos entenderlas como el conjunto de conocimientos y habilidades necesarios que se deben poseer para utilizar estas herramientas tecnológicas como unos recursos educativos más integrados en su práctica diaria (Suárez-Rodríguez, Almerich, & al., 2012).

Fruto de la importancia y relevancia educativa que las competencias digitales han tenido en los sistemas educativos actuales a lo largo de la última década, se han ido desarrollado diversos avances legislativos que han incidido en la necesidad de la inclusión curricular de las habilidades en el uso de las TIC como herramienta imprescindible para el aprendizaje (Ley Orgánica 2/2006; Ley Orgánica 8/2013). De igual forma, instituciones gubernamentales y no gubernamentales (Departamento de Educación de Victoria en Australia; la Sociedad Internacional para la Tecnología Educativa de Estados Unidos y Canadá; el Proyecto «Enlaces» del Ministerio de Educación de Chile; el Departamento de Educación Pública de Carolina del Norte de Estados Unidos; Marco de Competencias TIC para Docentes de UNESCO; PROFORTIC de Almerich, Suárez, Orellana, Belloch, Bo & Gastaldo en España) han ido desarrollando diversos modelos de estándares de competencias en TIC para el profesorado. Cada uno de estos estudios, inciden en la relevancia de las competencias digitales que poseen los docentes para el idóneo desarrollo de las competencias TIC en sus alumnos.

Existen diferentes investigaciones que inciden en la falta de seguridad y en la insuficiente competencia en el dominio de las TIC que tiene el profesorado, tanto desde un punto de vista tecnológico como pedagógico (Banlankast & Blamire, 2007; Hew & Brush, 2007; Mueller, Wood, Willoughby, Ross, & Specht, 2008; Ramboll Management, 2006). Las conclusiones a las que llegan la mayoría de estos estudios nos hacen reflexionar sobre la idoneidad de la formación del profesorado, tanto inicial como a lo largo de su carrera docente, para hacer menos extensa la «brecha digital» que existe entre los profesores y los alumnos, entre alumnos «nativos digitales» y profesores «inmigrantes digitales» (Prensky, 2001).

En el año 2008, la UNESCO (2008; 2011) elabora y publica un documento extremadamente importante para los estados e instituciones educativas que todavía no tienen unas indicaciones puntuales sobre lo que sus docentes deben saber en el uso de las TIC en el mundo educativo, como es el caso de España. Bajo las indicaciones sobre la formación docente en TIC en la «Guía de planificación» de «Las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en la formación docente» de la UNESCO del año 2004, se hace un estudio detallado sobre «Los estándares de competencias en TIC para docentes».

El proyecto relativo a las Normas UNESCO sobre competencias en TIC para docentes (UNESCO, 2008; 2011) apunta, en general, a mejorar la práctica de los docentes en todas las áreas de su labor profesional, combinando las competencias en TIC con innovaciones en la pedagogía, el plan de estudios y la organización del centro docente. También tiene por objetivo lograr que los docentes utilicen las competencias y recursos en TIC para mejorar su enseñanza, cooperar con sus colegas y, en última instancia, poder convertirse en líderes de la innovación dentro de sus respectivas instituciones. La finalidad global de este proyecto no sólo es mejorar la práctica de los docentes, sino también hacerlo de manera que contribuya a mejorar la calidad del sistema educativo, a fin de que éste pueda hacer progresar el desarrollo económico y social del país (UNESCO, 2008). Para ello, la UNESCO definió tres niveles de profundización de las competencias TIC para la formación del docente:

• Comprender las tecnologías, integrando competencias tecnológicas en los planes de estudios (1º nivel: Nociones básicas de tecnología).

• Utilizar los conocimientos con vistas a añadir valor a la sociedad y a la economía, aplicando dichos conocimientos para resolver problemas complejos y reales (2º nivel: Profundización de los conocimientos).

• Producir nuevos conocimientos y sacar provecho de éstos (3º nivel: Creación de conocimientos).

Estos tres enfoques (UNESCO, 2008) corresponden a visiones y objetivos alternativos de políticas nacionales para el futuro de la educación. Sin embargo, cada nivel tiene diferentes características en función de la dimensión a estudiar: 1) Política y visión: aspectos curriculares en TIC; 2) Plan de estudios y evaluación: planificación y evaluación TIC; 3) Pedagógica: aspectos metodológicos en TIC; 4) TIC: Uso y manejo de las tecnologías; 5) Organización y administración: gestión de recursos TIC; 6) Formación profesional del docente: formación continua en TIC.

El objetivo del proyecto ECD-TIC de la UNESCO es la elaboración de un marco de estándares UNESCO de competencias en TIC para docentes (ECD-TIC), que podemos observar en la figura 2.

A la luz del estudio de los estándares definidos por la UNESCO (2008 y 2011), nos planteamos una serie de interrogantes a los que pretendemos dar respuesta con esta investigación: ¿Qué formación en TIC tienen los actuales profesores de la Generación Z?, ¿están capacitados para desarrollar en nuestros alumnos la competencia digital?, ¿qué características posee el docente que es «inmigrante digital»?, ¿qué aspectos de la formación docente se deben mejorar para el desarrollo de profesores con una adecuada competencia digital?, ¿estamos atendiendo a las necesidades educativas de nuestros alumnos en el uso de las herramientas tecnológicas para el aprendizaje autónomo?

El objetivo general de este estudio es analizar el nivel de competencias en TIC de los profesores de Primaria y Secundaria de la Comunidad de Madrid para identificar las necesidades de formación docente, fundamentando el estudio teóricamente a través de los Estándares de Formación Docente en TIC elaborados por la UNESCO, desarrollando un instrumento que posibilite realizar los análisis pertinentes e identificar los factores asociados a las diferencias en el perfil de formación docente en TIC.


Draft Content 167110571-44292 ov-es032.jpg

Figura 2. Módulos UNESCO para las competencias TIC para docentes (UNESCO, 2008).

2. Material y métodos

Este estudio se enmarca dentro de la investigación no experimental, ya que no es posible manipular las variables o asignar aleatoriamente a los participantes o el tratamiento (Kerlinger & Lee, 2002). Se trata de una investigación «ex-post-facto» ya que no se pueden manipular las variables independientes, sino que se espera a que el fenómeno haya ocurrido de manera natural para posteriormente analizarlo.

2.1. Muestra

El estudio se realizó con profesores de centros de Educación Primaria y Secundaria de toda la Comunidad de Madrid; concretamente, participaron 80 centros de Primaria y Secundaria, de los cuales el 43,75% eran centros públicos, el 11,25% privados y el 45% privados subvencionados con fondos públicos (concertados). La implantación de las competencias básicas definidas en la Ley Orgánica de Educación del 2006 y en la Ley Orgánica de Mejora de la Calidad Educativa del 2014, determinaba que todos los centros de la Comunidad de Madrid debían tener incluido en su currículum el desarrollo de las competencias digitales.

En concreto, participaron 1.433 profesores, de los cuáles el 66,57% eran mujeres y el 33,43% hombres. El muestreo no probabilístico (Bisquerra, 2004) e incidental (Kerlinger & Lee, 2002) determinó que el 70% del profesorado que participó en el estudio tenían entre 26 y 45 años (Generación X), el 81,09% eran profesores (el resto eran miembros del equipo directivo y coordinadores TIC) y un 35,05% tenían entre 0 y 5 años de experiencia docente. De todos los profesores que participaron en el estudio, un 53,73% desempeñaba su docencia en Primaria, un 42,78% lo hacía en Secundaria y un 3,49% trabajaba en ambas etapas educativas.

2.2. Elaboración del instrumento

Para la realización de este estudio se elaboró un cuestionario como instrumento de recogida de información para evaluar el perfil de formación docente en TIC del profesorado de la Comunidad de Madrid, identificando las relaciones existentes entre las dimensiones, observables y subyacentes, que pueden darse entre las variables estudiadas.

El cuestionario utiliza una escala tipo Likert, formada por un conjunto de ítems referentes al perfil de formación docente en TIC según la UNESCO, en la que los sujetos responden indicando su valoración, situación, conocimiento o actitud. Se establecieron cinco posibilidades de respuesta a cada ítem, donde 1 es la menor valoración y 5 la mayor.

La variable que se pretende estudiar (variable dependiente) es el perfil de formación TIC del docente (UNESCO), estableciéndose tres perfiles diferentes: Perfil 1: Nociones básicas de TIC; Perfil 2: Profundización del conocimiento; Perfil 3: Generación de conocimiento

Para definir mejor la variable dependiente y atendiendo a los estándares establecidos por la UNESCO, se estructuraron las siguientes subdimensiones de la misma, que posteriormente se operativizaron en los ítems del cuestionario: aspectos curriculares TIC, planificación y evaluación TIC, aspectos metodológicos TIC, uso de las TIC, gestión de recursos TIC, formación continua TIC.

2.3. Fiabilidad del instrumento

En el estudio de la fiabilidad del instrumento (George & Mallery, 1995), se utilizó el paquete estadístico SPSS, utilizándose el a de Cronbach, que es el coeficiente más ampliamente utilizado en este tipo de análisis. Este coeficiente determina la consistencia interna de una escala. Al interpretar el a global del instrumento se encuentran los resultados expresados en la tabla 1.


Draft Content 167110571-44292 ov-es033.jpg

Los índices de homogeneidad (correlación elemento-total corregida) están dentro de lo que podríamos denominar «Excelente», al estar todos por encima de 0,3. En conclusión, podemos afirmar que el instrumento que se ha utilizado para el estudio del perfil de formación docente en TIC tiene una fiabilidad excelente, con un ,973 en el a de Cronbach (George & Mallery, 1995).

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Análisis descriptivo y diferencial

La valoración global es de 2,78 en una escala de 1 al 5, lo que indica que el perfil de formación en TIC en los centros de la muestra es Medio-Bajo. Cerca del 39,71% de los profesores poseen un perfil formativo en TIC (UNESCO) «Medio», aunque se debe resaltar que el 36,85% tiene un perfil «Malo» y un 9,56% «Muy malo», es decir, un total del 46,31% de profesores tienen un perfil negativo en cuanto a su formación TIC en el mundo educativo. Para estas valoraciones se utilizó la distribución de los percentiles 20, 40, 60 y 80 que nos permitió identificar al «Muy bajo perfil» con puntuaciones por debajo de 1,6; «Bajo perfil» entre 1,7 y 2,5; «Perfil medio» con puntuaciones entre 2,6 y 3,4; «Buen perfil», entre 3,5 y 4,3; y «Muy Buen perfil» con puntuaciones entre 4,4 y 5.

En la tabla 2 se han recogido sintéticamente los análisis diferenciales que se han realizado para identificar las variables que afectan al perfil de formación docente en TIC según los estándares de la UNESCO en cada una de sus subdimensiones. Para ello se utilizaron dos pruebas estadísticas: t de Student y ANOVA de un factor, ambas para grupos independientes (junto con Scheffé para los contrastes posteriores). En los estudios diferenciales se han añadido el valor del estadístico Potencia (P) para certificar el rechazo o la aceptación de las hipótesis con un mayor grado de certeza y significatividad, por lo que si la significatividad es alta y la potencia es cercana a 0,8, se tomarán como significativos dichos valores (Cohen, 1992).


Draft Content 167110571-44292 ov-es034.jpg

Los análisis diferenciales llevados a cabo (ANOVA - p=0,01) según la variable «Cargo» (profesor, coordinador TIC, y dirección y coordinación), indican diferencias claramente significativas y relevantes en todas las subdimensiones (AC, PE, MD, TI, GR y FD), así como en el cuestionario en general (0,000 sig. y 23,819 F), siendo aquellos que son Coordinadores TIC, como es obvio, los que obtienen un mayor nivel en el perfil de formación docente en TIC.

Al aplicar la prueba t de Student en relación a la variable «Sexo» (a un alfa de 0,05) se observa que no existen diferencias estadísticamente significativas en todas las subdimensiones y en el cuestionario en general (0,158 sig.), no obteniendo diferencias entre el perfil del hombre y el de la mujer en relación a su formación docente en TIC.

Por otro lado, analizando la variable «Edad» y «Experiencia docente» (ANOVA - p=0,01=0,000 sig. /9,826 F en Edad y 0,000 sig. /9,942 en Experiencia) encontramos que los análisis realizados indican que aquellos profesores que tienen más edad (56- 66 años) y tienen mayor experiencia docente, poseen un perfil de formación docente en TIC mucho más bajo que aquellos profesores que son más jóvenes o tienen menor experiencia, siendo aquellos que tienen entre 20 y 25 años los que mejor perfil tienen.

En relación a la variable «Titulación» del profesorado, (ANOVA - p<.01) los análisis muestran que sólo existen diferencias estadísticamente significativas en algunas subdimensiones (PE, TI y FD), observando en el cuestionario en general (0,014 sig. y 4,248 F) la ausencia de significatividad en las diferencias de variación entre los grupos (Graduado en Magisterio y Licenciado). Las diferencias de medias en todas las subdimensiones son estadísticamente muy poco significativas y se considera no relevante en el perfil formativo del docente en TIC en relación a la titulación que disponen.

También se estudió la variable «Etapa Educativa» (ANOVA - p<.01), observando que existe significatividad en casi todas las subdimensiones (salvo en AC y GR) y en el cuestionario en general (0,000 sig. y 8,614 F) y una diferencia de medias relevante, observando que los profesores que trabajan en Secundaria tienen un mejor perfil que el que trabaja en Primaria.

Del mismo modo, se encontraron diferencias significativas y relevantes (ANOVA - p<.01) (cuestionario 0,000 sig. y 6,972 F) en la variable «Asignatura que imparte» el profesorado de la muestra, siendo los docentes de las áreas de Tecnología y Ciencias Experimentales los que poseen un mejor perfil de formación docente en TIC.

Finalmente, los últimos análisis diferenciales (ANOVA - p<.01), muestran diferencias estadísticamente significativas y relevantes en relación a las variables «Tecnologías que se poseen en casa», «Utilidad de las TIC», la «Actitud hacia las TIC», «Nivel de formación en TIC» y «Formación recibida en TIC». Los datos obtenidos revelan que aquellos profesores que disponen en casa de ordenador e Internet, que están convencidos de la utilidad de las TIC para mejorar el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje, que tienen una buena actitud, que tienen un buen nivel de formación en TIC y que reciben tanto formación técnica como pedagógica sobre el uso de las TIC, tienen un mejor perfil de formación docente en TIC según los estándares de la UNESCO. Todos estos datos son corroborados por los valores del estadístico Potencia, todos ellos por encima de 0,8 (Cohen, 1992), lo que indica una alta probabilidad de obtener un resultado estadísticamente significativo.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

La formación docente en la aplicación de las TIC al mundo educativo tiene mucho camino por recorrer, implicando el reconocimiento de los factores que pueden influir a la hora de mejorar las competencias que el profesorado actual y el futuro debe adquirir en la puesta en marcha de la competencia digital en nuestros centros educativos.

Este estudio ha permitido comprobar la existencia de una laguna importante en la formación del profesorado en el uso de las TIC y su aplicación en las aulas, aspecto inherente a la competencia digital establecida en la Ley Orgánica 2/2006 y la Ley Orgánica 8/2013.

Según las subdimensiones establecidas por las UNESCO (2008 y 2011), se puede concluir que el perfil de formación docente en TIC corresponde con un nivel medio-bajo. Como se ha podido comprobar en la subdimensión de «Aspectos curriculares generales», gran parte del profesorado desconoce qué se entiende por competencia digital en educación y cómo se lleva al aula. Del mismo modo, se encuentran en los resultados de la subdimensión «Planificación y evaluación» datos que indican que todavía se debe profundizar mejor en la planificación de las actividades y la evaluación de competencias mediante rúbricas con la incorporación de recursos TIC. Siguiendo en esta línea pedagógica, una de las subdimensiones más importantes es la de «Aspectos metodológicos y didácticos» para la definición del perfil de formación docente en TIC. Con los resultados del estudio, se ha detectado que las estrategias de aula que poseen los profesores en la utilización de los recursos TIC como medio de aprendizaje complejo y colaborativo todavía no están desarrollándose como procedimientos didácticos en el desarrollo de la competencia digital en sus alumnos.

Quizás los malos resultados en la aplicación didáctica de los recursos TIC por parte del profesorado se pueden justificar con los datos aportados por la subdimensión «Uso de las TIC». En ella, se ha podido evaluar las habilidades técnicas que poseen los profesores en relación al uso de las tecnologías, dando como resultado un perfil muy bajo en el profesorado. Estamos ante una de las premisas para la incorporación de las TIC al mundo educativo: si no se poseen conocimientos técnicos del uso y aplicación de las herramientas digitales, difícilmente se podrán implementar en el mundo educativo. La carencia que tiene el profesorado en el manejo de las herramientas tecnológicas les impide aplicarlas con efectividad en las actividades educativas con sus alumnos, tal y como reflejan otros estudios (Suárez-Rodríguez, Almerich, & al., 2012). Estas conclusiones son corroboradas por los resultados obtenidos en la subdimensión «Formación docente continua en TIC» donde se encuentra una gran necesidad de actualización del docente en el campo educativo, tanto en los centros públicos como privados. Aunque existe un gran catálogo de cursos de formación relacionados con las TIC en educación promovidos por las diferentes administraciones, solo un porcentaje muy bajo de profesores acuden a estos cursos de formación, tal y como mencionan los informes de la Unión Europea (Eurydice, 2011), donde se menciona que entre un 16% y un 25% de los alumnos de Primaria tienen profesores que habían participado en actividades de formación permanente sobre el uso de las TIC.

Finalmente, la subdimensión «Gestión de los recursos TIC» obtiene unos resultados muy bajos, lo que apoya la tesis de la necesidad de la figura del Coordinador TIC como miembro indispensable en el centro.

Partiendo de la estructura sugerida por la UNESCO en cuanto a los perfiles de formación docente en TIC, se puede concluir que:

• Los profesores que tienen más edad (56-66 años) y tienen mayor experiencia docente, poseen un perfil de formación docente en TIC mucho más bajo que aquellos profesores que son más jóvenes o tienen menor experiencia, siendo aquellos que tienen entre 20 y 25 años los que mejor perfil obtienen.

• No existen grandes discrepancias entre el perfil del maestro de Primaria con respecto al profesorado de Secundaria. Ambos obtienen unos perfiles bajos con respecto a los indicadores de la UNESCO. Este indicio revela que la formación inicial didáctica de ambos profesionales (Grado o Diplomatura de Magisterio para unos y Máster de Profesorado de Secundaria para otros) no incide en la aplicación de las herramientas TIC en el mundo educativo. Esto revela la escasa formación que reciben en cuanto a la competencia digital los futuros maestros en las Facultades de Educación, tal y como menciona Prendes y otros (2010).

• Este estudio indica que los profesores que trabajan en Secundaria tienen un mejor perfil que el que trabaja en Primaria. Como se aprecia en el punto anterior, si bien la titulación inicial no incide en un mejor o peor perfil de formación docente, la formación continua (long life learning) lleva a que el profesorado de Secundaria incida en una mejor especialización de la competencia digital a lo largo de su labor como docente.

• Aquellos profesores de la rama científico-tecnológica han mostrado mejores competencias digitales, aspecto que corrobora este estudio, siendo los docentes de las áreas de Tecnología y Ciencias Experimentales los que poseían un mejor perfil de formación docente en TIC.

• Como indican otros estudios (Tejedor, 2014), la presencia de herramientas TIC en el ámbito doméstico del profesorado incide en una mayor disposición y mejor formación en el uso de dichos recursos en el ámbito educativo. Por ello, aquellos profesores que poseen ordenador (pc, portátil, tablet o smartphone) y una conexión a Internet en sus casas, obtienen en el estudio un mejor perfil de formación docente en TIC.

• En cuanto a la predisposición y la actitud hacia las TIC, también se encuentran indicios que revelan que el perfil docente en TIC es mayor en aquellos profesores que creen en la utilidad de las tecnologías en el mundo educativo y además poseen un actitud positiva y un convencimiento real de su utilidad para mejorar el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje, tal y como reflejan numerosos estudios (Alonso & al., 2014).

• En este estudio se resalta la necesidad de una formación por parte del profesorado en la aplicación de la competencia digital en el aula. Por eso, aquellos profesores que han recibido una formación conjunta que agrupe elementos técnicos del uso de las herramientas tecnológicas y elementos pedagógicos que incidan en su aplicación didáctica en las actividades de aprendizaje, obtienen mejor perfil de formación docente en TIC según los estándares de la UNESCO.

Los resultados obtenidos sugieren ahondar en la estructuración de los planes de formación del profesorado en relación a las tecnologías de la información y comunicación en el mundo educativo, tanto desde las propias facultades de educación en la formación inicial, como en los cursos que generen los organismos educativos públicos y privados que favorezcan la formación continua en el desarrollo de la competencia digital del docente. Se trata además de evidenciar la gran diferencia que existe entre la Generación Z correspondiente al alumno actual de nuestros centros educativos de Primaria y Secundaria (Educación Básica donde se debe desarrollar la competencia digital según la LOE y la LOMCE) y la escasa formación que poseen los actuales docentes para llevarla a cabo. Por eso, es importante profundizar en la definición de los planes de formación del profesorado (inicial o continua) que ayuden a mejorar la preparación de los actuales docentes en relación a su competencia digital y que haga reducir la «brecha digital» entre el profesor y su alumno.

A modo de síntesis, puede decirse que se han encontrado indicios claros de la falta de preparación del profesorado actual para hacerse cargo del desarrollo de la competencia digital en sus alumnos. Es evidente que un profesor no puede hacer que un alumno desarrolle una competencia que él mismo no posee en profundidad.

Referencias

Alonso, F.G., González, M.C., Vidal, J.E., & García, O.A. (2014). Niños 2.0, una experiencia formativa en actitudes y valores para el profesorado ante la Web 2.0 y TIC. Metodologías de aprendizaje colaborativo a través de las tecnologías. Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca.

Aparici, R. (2010). Conectados en el ciberespacio. Madrid: UNED.

Area, M. (2011). Informe ¿Qué opina el profesorado sobre el Programa Escuela 2.0? Un análisis por Comunidades Autónomas. (http://goo.gl/Jyvzgd) (03-07-2014).

Balanskat, A., & Blamire, R. (2007). ICT in Schools: Trends, Innovations and Issues in 2006-07. European Schoolnet. (http://goo.gl/FdDFYs) (05-11-2014).

Bennett, S., Maton, K., & Kervin, L. (2008). The Digital Natives Debate: A Critical Review of the Evidence. British Journal of Educational Technology, 39, 775-786. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2007.00793.x

Bisquerra, R. (2004). Metodología de la investigación educativa. Madrid: Plaza.

Cohen, J. (1992). A Power Primer. Psychological Bulletin, 112, 155-159. (http://goo.gl/vBcYFJ) (01-02-2015). doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0033-2909.112.1.155

Colón, A.O., Moreno, L.A., León, M.P., & Zagalaz, J.C. (2014). Formación en TIC de futuros maestros desde el análisis de la práctica en la Universidad de Jaén. Píxel-Bit, 44, 127-142. (http://goo.gl/g6WSRy) (01-02-2015).

Eurydice (2011). Cifras clave sobre el uso de las TIC para el aprendizaje y la innovación en los centros escolares de Europa 2011. Bruselas: Agencia Ejecutiva en el ámbito educativo, audiovisual y cultural. (http://goo.gl/DXXLJw) (02-05-2014).

Geck, C. (2007). The Generation Z Connection: Teaching Information Literacy to the Newest Net Generation. Toward a 21st-Century. School Library Media Program, 235. (http://goo.gl/1tur7F) (01-12-2014).

George D., & Mallery, P. (1995). SPSS/PC + Step by: A Simple Guide and Reference. Belmont (CA): Wadsworth Publishing Company.

Grail Research (2011). Consumers of tomorrow insights and observations about Generation Z. (http://goo.gl/7qYuWt) (17-08-2014)

Hew, K.F., & Brush, T. (2007). Integrating Technology into K-12 Teaching and Learning: Current Knowledge Gaps and Recommendations for Future Research. Educational Technology Research Development, 55(3), 227-243. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11423-006-9022-5

Hoffman, T. (2003). Preparing Generation Z. Computerworld, 37 (34), 41. (http://goo.gl/w6jIt9) (05-10-2014).

International Society for Technology in Education (Ed.) (2008). NETS for Teachers: National Educational. (http://goo.gl/a9ur) (15-12-2014).

Kerlinger, F., & Lee, H. (2002). Investigación del comportamiento. Métodos de investigación en Ciencias Sociales. México: McGraw Hill.

Lay-Arellano, I.T. (2013). Los jóvenes y la apropiación de la tecnología. Paakat, 4. (http://goo.gl/5L7z43) (07-10-2014).

Ley Orgánica 2/2006, de 3 de mayo, de Educación. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 106, de 4 de mayo de 2006. (http://goo.gl/mxokeX) (29-07-2015).

Ley Orgánica 8/2013, de 9 de diciembre, para la mejora de la calidad educativa. Boletín Oficial del Estado, 295, de 10 de diciembre de 2013. (http://goo.gl/UpKyig) (29-07-2014).

Lieberman, A., Fullan, M., & Hopkins, D. (Eds.) (2010). Segundo manual internacional del cambio educativo. Dordrecht: Springer.

Martín, A.H. (2014). La formación del profesorado para la integración de las TIC en el currículum: nuevos roles, competencias y espacios de formación. En Investigación y tecnologías de la información y comunicación al servicio de la innovación educativa. Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca.

Mascó, A. (2012). Entre Generaciones. No te quedes fuera del futuro. Buenos Aires: Temas.

MECD (2013). Datos y cifras. Curso escolar 2013-14. (http://goo.gl/IGLloE) (25-02-2015).

MECD (2014). Estadística de las Enseñanzas no universitarias. Datos 2013-14. (http://goo.gl/C6grdz) (25-02-2015).

Ministerio de Educación de Chile (2006). Estándares en la Tecnología de la Información y la Comunicación para la formación inicial del docente. Santiago de Chile: Ministerio de Educación de Chile. (http://goo.gl/oKrNPF) (16-09-2014).

Mueller, J., Wood, E., Willoughby, T., Ross, C., & Specht, J. (2008). Identifying discriminating variables between teachers who fully integrate computers and teachers with limited integration. Computers & Education, 51(4), 1.523-1.537. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2008.02.003

North Caroline Department of Public Instruction (2000). Basic Technology Competencies for Educators. (North Caroline Department of Public Instruction, 2000). (http://goo.gl/ORjJDe) (23-09-2014).

Posnick-Goodwin, S. (2010). Meet Generation Z. California Teachers Association. (http://goo.gl/oq8J99) (23-09-2014).

Prendes, M.P., Castañeda, L., & Gutiérrez, I. (2010). Competencias para el uso de TIC de los futuros maestros. Comunicar, 35, 21. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C35-2010-03-11

Prensky, M. (2001). Nativos digitales, inmigrantes digitales. On the Horizon, 9(5). (http://goo.gl/4oYb) (23-05-2014).

Ramboll Management. (2006). E-Learning Nordic 2006: Impact of ICT on education. Denmark: Ramboll Management. (http://goo.gl/8VircM) (23-05-2014).

Schroer, W. (2008). Defining, Managing, and Marketing to Generations X, Y, and Z. The Portal, 10, 9. (http://goo.gl/Fc40dB) (15-02-2015).

Suárez-Rodríguez, J.M., Almerich, G., Díaz-García, I. & Fernández-Piqueras, R. (2012). Competencias del profesorado en las TIC. Influencia de factores personales y contextuales. Universitas Psychologica, 11(1), 293-309. (http://goo.gl/VCz6jD) (24-07-2014).

Tejedor, F.J. (2014). Presentación de datos globales. En Evaluación de procesos de innovación escolar basados en el uso de las TIC desarrollados en la Comunidad de Castilla y León. Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca.

UNESCO (2004). Las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en la formación docente. París: Informe UNESCO (http://goo.gl/ZRj7l) (23-05-2013).

UNESCO (2008). Normas UNESCO sobre competencias en TIC para docentes. (http://goo.gl/pGPDGv) (15-06-2013).

UNESCO (2011). UNESCO ICT Competency Framework for Teachers. (http://goo.gl/oKUkB) (24-05-2014).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/15

Volume 24, Issue 1, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C46-2016-10
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 41
Views 6
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?