Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Teenagers inhabit a virtual universe with their own model of entertainment, learning and communication. This research work defines the consumption, creation and diffusion patterns of online audiovisual contents young students of Guipúzcoa have acquired in the fields of leisure and complementary information resources for school use, attending to three different variables: gender, grade (age) and type of educational institution (public or private). The research methodology focuses on a self-administered questionnaire filled out by 2,426 adolescents of secondary school (12 to 16 years old). The sample consists of a random selection of 120 student groups, which are distributed in 60 schools and 30 groups each course. The results verify the existence of monolithic and opposed male/female patterns in the way young people consume, create and diffuse leisure contents. Video games are the central backbone of male consumption and creation, as long as girls prefer to take pictures and videos of themselves using smartphones and to share them on social networks. These practices repeat gender stereotypes, transforming the education in equality into a relevant issue. Finally, sources of information that are complementary to formal education, especially Wikipedia, are the main references among adolescents. Consequently, it seems essential to guarantee their solvency for appropriate knowledge acquisition.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the question

Their widespread access to and use of new technologies has allowed adolescents to create a universe of their own, characterised by new patterns of consumption, creation and dissemination of audiovisual content. At the same time, this new paradigm poses a challenge for society, and a source of concern for parents and educators, as well as a challenge for the technology industry that influences the development of devices and the production and distribution of content. The objective of this study is to define the online consumption, creation and dissemination habits of adolescents in Guipuzcoa aged 12 to 16 for the purposes of leisure and school work, with a focus on differences between genders, grade levels, and school types. Consumption is defined here as the viewing of audiovisual products and the use of video games in a digital environment; creation as the production of basic content; and dissemination as sharing content via online platforms. Thus, in the context of leisure we analyse online consumption of video games, youtuber content, and tutorial videos, considering these three variables. The context of formal education is analysed in relation to the use of complementary sources like Wikipedia, tutorial videos, documentaries, forums, online texts, and websites with studies and notes. Last of all, the study examines the creation of content ?what young people produce and how? and its dissemination ?what platforms, networks or messaging apps they use? in each context. The study considers three Research Questions:

• RQ1. What are the patterns of adolescent consumption for leisure purposes?

• RQ2. What sources of complementary information do adolescents consult in their school work?

• RQ3. What leisure or academic content do adolescents create and how do they disseminate it?

In the so-called digital age, young people have been able to turn the Internet and social networks into their own vehicle for communicating and establishing relationships with their environment, creating what is known as the “network society” (Castells, 2006). Since the late 1990s, experts have been coining different terms to refer to these adolescents who navigate the Internet, process information quickly and acquire knowledge actively. The earliest definitions spoke of a “Net Generation” (Tapscott & Williams, 1998; Fernández-Planells & Figueras, 2014), of “Millennials” (Howe & Strauss, 2000), of “Generation @” (Feixa, 2000) or of “digital natives” (Prensky, 2001). Since the beginning of the 21st century, the generation gap has grown ever wider. Young people’s access to multi-function electronic devices with screens of all sizes has grown exponentially, giving rise to a generation of mobile and social network users referred to as “digital residents” (White & Le-Cornu, 2011), the “App Generation” (Gardner & Davis, 2014), or “Generation A” (Coupland, 2010).

These young people constitute a broad audience that has been able to develop its own audiovisual consumption and creation customs and practices in the context of an interconnected universe. In this new scenario, teenagers are “multi-tasking, connected, social and mobile prosumers” (Viñals, Abad, & Aguilar, 2014: 53) who have naturally adopted the tools and resources offered by the web in their everyday lives.

With the rise of the participatory culture and social interaction as its main points of reference (Aranda, Sánchez, Tabernero, & Tubella, 2010), the Internet has become the medium that best responds to their informational, educational and leisure needs, the last of these being based principally on entertainment and interpersonal relations (Buckingham & Martínez, 2013). In recent years, there has been extensive research into how young people interact with the digital environment, both in terms of their consumption habits and practices and in relation to new audiovisual content, video games, or the work of youtubers. In addition, their attitude towards the media and the impact of electronic devices like the mobile phone constitutes another prominent object of study.

Audiovisual consumption is moving progressively away from the television screen, despite its continued importance (Gewerc, Fraga, & Rodes, 2017), to give way to multi-screen and multi-task viewing. This incipient “social television” finds it best vehicles in the laptop computer and especially the smartphone, the quintessential electronic device for managing social relations between young people (Sádaba & Vidales, 2015; Mascheroni & Ólafsson, 2016). The mobile phone has thus gone from being conceived of as a mere communication device to a “multi-use, interactive” tool that allows people to perform all kinds of everyday activities (Méndiz, De-Aguilera, & Borges, 2011: 78).

In this context, free of the limitations of sequentiality that characterise traditional audiovisual consumption, teenagers are choosing to consume audiovisual content on demand, for which YouTube is the most popular platform. Initially associated with the mechanics of video game operation, or “gaming”, this platform has managed to attract millions of young followers and amass millions of views thanks to “youtubers”, who create tutorial videos or video blogs on a whole range of topics (Chau, 2010; García, Catalina, & López-de-Ayala, 2016).

In addition to being consumers, teenagers model themselves on these public figures to become creators of their own videos too, often exposing themselves publicly with no protection of their identity (Montes, García, & Menor, 2018). In the area of video games, on the other hand, the studies published reveal a slightly lower number of users among young people and the participation of a mostly male audience in products of a markedly sexist and/or violent nature (Anderson & Bushman, 2001; Díez, 2009; Alcolea, 2014).

In addition to entertainment, engaging in social relations constitutes one of the main digital consumption activities among adolescents. Noteworthy in this respect is the irrepressible growth of social networks like Facebook or Instagram, used not only for social purposes but also as a source of news and information. The latest data provided by the Basque Youth Observatory (2016) supports the findings of earlier research (Livingstone, 2008; Livingstone, Haddon, Görzig, & Ólafsson, 2011; Boyd, 2014), confirming the high level of popularity of these kinds of platforms among young people. According to these figures, nearly all Basque youth (99%) aged 15 to 29 use a social network and go online daily. Of these, a significant increase is observable in the use of instant messaging services like WhatsApp (the most widely used, at 98.2%) and, to a lesser extent, services with ephemeral content, like Snapchat (22.5%).

While the widespread use of social networks is common throughout this sector of the population, there are notable differences in behaviour patterns between genders. A number of different research projects focusing on gender (Espinar & González, 2009; Estébanez & Vázquez, 2013; Alonso, Rodríguez, Lameiras, & Carrera, 2015) reveal more habitual use, greater public exposure and a higher quantity of content exchange among girls than among boys.

Furthermore, this gender difference extends to the topics of content consumed by young people on YouTube and to video games, as well as more traditional audiovisual consumption (series, TV programs, and films). This issue, which has been the subject of extensive academic research, reflects the persistence of traditional gender stereotypes among the younger generations in relation to audiovisual consumption and creation habits, with females favouring dramatic fiction, reality shows or entertainment news, and males preferring sports and humour (Medrano, Aierbe, & Orejudo, 2009; Masanet, 2016; Pibernat, 2017).

Taking the above into account, María Ángeles Gabino (2004) exposes a clear connection between audiovisual consumption by adolescents and leisure contexts over formal and educational situations. However, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has an increasingly prominent presence in the classroom, facilitating student access to a wide range of complementary sources during school time on computers and tablets (Eynon & Malmberg, 2011; Fernández-Planells, & Maz, 2012; Solano, González, & López, 2013; Ciampa, 2014). Wikipedia is the most popular source of information used by young people today, and a regularly used academic tool in secondary education (Salmerón, Cerdán, & Naumann, 2015; Tramullas, 2016; Valverde & González, 2016).

With all of this in mind, this article offers a contribution that complements the findings of other similar studies conducted in other regions of Spain, such as Catalonia (Castellana, Sánchez-Carbonell, Chamarro, Graner, & Beranuy, 2007), Galicia (Rial, Gómez, Braña, & Varela, 2014), and Andalusia (Bernal & Angulo, 2013), as well as international studies (Gross, 2004; Arango, Bringué, & Sádaba, 2010).

2. Material and methods

This study analyses data from 2,426 surveys completed by adolescents aged from 12 to 16 who are enrolled in compulsory secondary education (from 1st to 4th year of Spain’s Educación Secundaria Obligatoria) in the Basque province of Guipuzcoa. These are young people born at the turn of the millennium who have grown up in a context conditioned by new technologies. The results outlined in this article are actually based on data gathered in an extensive research project whose objective has been to conduct an in-depth examination of the influence of new technologies on changes to habits of consumption and creation of content in Basque among the adolescent population. To this end, a self-administered questionnaire was designed with 100 questions, most of which were multiple choice, divided into six blocks. This paper focuses on two of those blocks: leisure and school work, considering content in both the Spanish and Basque languages. The results can therefore be extrapolated to the rest of the Basque Country and to Spain as a whole. The data are analysed based on three categorical variables (potentially defining of behaviour): gender, grade level, and type of educational institution (public or private).

The study universe is made up of 28,817 boys and girls across 108 secondary institutions, and the sampling unit was the group. Cluster sampling was used, stratified by proportional allocation, taking into account the geographical distribution of the schools in Guipuzcoa and the educational levels. The sample is gender-balanced and is made up of a random selection from 60 schools, with a total of 120 groups (2 groups from a different grade at each school), of which there are 30 groups per grade level. The maximum sampling error is +/–1.9% for the whole territory of Guipuzcoa. The statistical confidence level is 95% (in the most unfavourable case of p=q=0.5). The field work was carried out in the months of December 2016 and January 2017. The surveys were completed in the classroom under the direction of one of the researchers and in the presence of each group’s teacher or tutor. The approximate duration of the survey was 45 minutes.

3. Results

The study data demonstrate that gender is the most defining variable of patterns of consumption, creation and dissemination of leisure content among adolescents, but has almost no impact at all on content for school use. On the other hand, the type of institution only influences academic content, while the grade level is key to revealing the evolution of trends in content consumption, creation and dissemination.

3.1. Consumption patterns3.1.1. Leisure

Video games are the preferred activity among boys, to which they dedicate an average of 76 minutes of their weekend leisure time; for girls they constitute a marginal habit on which they spend an average of 26 minutes. Girls prefer to spend most of their time (95 minutes on average) chatting, tweeting and communicating via WhatsApp, while males spend 67 minutes on this activity.

The classification of the most popular online video games among adolescents combined two criteria: the closed list of the seven most successful games, with 39.9% of users, and the list of “other” games chosen freely by 31.5% of respondents. As it can be seen in Table 1, only three video games on the closed list appear because the other three, Habbo, World of Warcraft (WOW) and Dot A are not used by more than 5%. The Sims was the only video game capable of attracting significant attention among the girls, although this was limited to younger ages. In fact, only 8% of 4th year students reported playing this game. The other video games are predominantly male and popular at all secondary grade levels. Pan European Game Information (PEGI) has classified Call of Duty and GTA as video games suitable for persons over 18, and they therefore represent a risk for underage children who use them. With respect to the mode of playing, more users prefer to play in groups (especially boys), while only a minority plays alone (predominantly girls).


Fernandez-de-Arroyabe-Olaortua et al 2018a-69566-en014.jpg

YouTube is the most popular platform with young people, and youtubers are their opinion leaders and role models. 60.4% of respondents knew at least one of the seven most successful youtubers included on the closed list, which was prepared according to information provided by students in earlier interviews. Of these, the top five have channels on gaming, and thus their audience is predominantly male. This is the case of the gamers VEGETTA777, Willyrex, and Alexby11. On the other hand, in addition to video games, Elrubius and Wismichu take a humorous look at topics of interest that attract a considerable female audience. Girls follow youtubers less than boys, although they represent the majority of the audience of the two last channels on the Table 2, Yellow Mellow and Patry Jordan. However, the youtubers with more male followers are less popular among older youths, while those with more female followers have bigger audiences at higher year levels. Finally, the survey included one open question that was answered by 68% of respondents, for which, despite a very wide range of results, 20% mentioned AuronPlay. This youtuber, who comments on internet videos, currently has more than 8 million subscribers and more than 1 billion views.


Fernandez-de-Arroyabe-Olaortua et al 2018a-69566-en015.jpg

Of all the content available on YouTube, tutorial videos attract a significant youth audience. A total of 62.4% of adolescents view them regularly, and this percentage is notably higher among older respondents. In fact, only 28.9% of 4th year secondary students report that they do not view them, compared to 48% of first year students. The most popular topics of tutorial videos are determined to a large extent by gender. Boys prefer tutorials on video games, technology and sports, while girls watch more tutorials on fashion, hairdressing and make-up, travel, and how to make movies. Older viewers are much more likely to watch tutorials on fashion (14.6% in 1st year compared to 32.3% in 4th) and travel (6.5% in 1st year and 17.8% in 4th). Finally, it is worth noting that tutorials on technology and how to make movies are common to both leisure and school work. These two categories are more popular among private school students, who are significantly more likely to view tutorials on technology (21%) and how to make movies (10.8%) than state school students (15.1% and 6.9%, respectively). Moreover, interest in technology increases with age, as these tutorials are viewed more by students in higher grades (12.1% in 1st year compared to 24.2% in 4th year).


Fernandez-de-Arroyabe-Olaortua et al 2018a-69566-en016.jpg

3.1.2. Complementary information sources for school use

Most adolescents consult internet sources other than those offered by formal education; only 14.1% admitted they did not, of which 16.4% were boys and 11.7% were girls. This percentage drops drastically with age, as the use of such sources is more common among students in higher grades: 22.3% of 1st year students stated they do no consult other sources, compared to only 7.1% in 4th year. Wikipedia, with 86.9% of users, is the most popular reference source at all grade levels, followed by tutorial videos (34.9%), texts on school subjects (31%), studies and notes available online (26.5%), documentaries (26.2%), and forums (24.9%).

With respect to gender, it is significant that girls (35.4%) consult more online texts than boys (26.5%), as this suggests a greater interest among females in acquiring higher quality and more detailed information to complement their studies. At the higher grade levels, more students consult texts (17.2% in 1st year compared to 44.3% in 3rd), online studies (17.2% in 1st year and 36.2% in 4th), and documentaries (20.8% in 1st year and 30.8% in 4th). Participation in forums also becomes common in 4th year, with 34% of respondents. Private school students use complementary sources more: 39.2% view tutorial videos, 35.2% look up texts, 28.2% view documentaries, and 28.2% participate in forums. This constitutes a notable difference from state school students, far fewer of whom consult these sources: 24.2% tutorials, 25.5% texts, 23% documentaries, and 20.6% forums.


Fernandez-de-Arroyabe-Olaortua et al 2018a-69566-en017.jpg

3.2. Content creation and dissemination patterns

Most adolescents possess the technological knowledge and skills necessary to create audio-visual content, and also have access to technological devices: 96.2% possess a mobile phone, 82.4% own a laptop, 62.4% have a desktop computer, and 77.9% have a tablet. However, they tend to consume more content than they create, as creation is the activity that they spend the least leisure time on (28 minutes on average). Girls are considerably more active in content creation, spending an average of 32 minutes compared to 23 minutes for boys.

It is thus not surprising that 85.6% of young people are not youtubers. Of the 7.4% who are, 12.1% are boys and 2.6% are girls. The percentage of youtubers is lower at older age levels, with only 4.9% of 4th year students. Only a small number of adolescents dare to expose themselves to public opinion and the pressure to attract followers. On the other hand, 12.3% of respondents create tutorials to post them on YouTube (15.1% of boys and 9.5% of girls). The 2nd year cohort has the highest percentage of content creators (15.3%), while 4th year has the lowest (9.1%). As might be expected, there is a direct correspondence between the category and hierarchical classification of tutorials adolescents consume, mainly for leisure purposes, and those they produce: tutorials on video games (51.7%) are the most common, followed by sports (32.6%), fashion and make-up (29.5%), technology (26.2%), how to make movies (18.1%), and travel (15.1%). These videos are structured works that require a certain level of audiovisual production knowledge, along with dedication and interest on the part of their creators. As in the case of consumption, tutorials on video games are more common among boys (75%), while fashion and make-up videos are more popular with girls (60.7%). The only content related to school use is technology tutorials. In this case, there are no differences between private and state school students, but age is a determining factor, as the highest percentage of creators (40%) is found among 4th year students.

Along with these tutorial videos, the mobile phone has given rise to a second type of unedited content intended for immediate distribution to friends online. This includes photographs (67.4%), recordings (62.3%), automatically edited videos (61.2%), music (39%), and audio (38.8%). Females give priority to taking and posting photos of friends and selfies, and also to record and share more videos of “friends’ stuff” and of parties and concerts.

However, creating and sharing audiovisual content does not seem to be a widespread activity among young people, as 57.2% of respondents report they have never uploaded a video to the Internet, compared to 40.8% who have. YouTube is the channel most widely used by youths for sharing their content publicly. It is followed by Instagram, with a similar gender distribution. The WhatsApp messaging service, used more by boys, and Snapchat, the platform preferred by girls, occupy third and fourth positions, respectively. Finally, Twitter and Facebook rate lower with adolescents. In terms of use by age level, YouTube is more popular at younger ages, while only 38.3% of 4th years use it; on the other hand, use of Snapchat at this year level is higher, at 42.2%.


Fernandez-de-Arroyabe-Olaortua et al 2018a-69566-en018.jpg

4. Discussion and conclusions

The results of this research confirm that leisure is the predominant purpose for the consumption, creation and dissemination of audiovisual content by adolescents. Male and female consumption patterns, closed and diametrically opposed to each other, effectively determine content creation and dissemination. In other words, the types of products they consume online directly influence the content they create and the way they share that content. Adolescents are bigger consumers than creators; only a minority dare to become youtubers. Those who do create produce two types of content: on the one hand, the smartphone is the main tool for the virtually automatic “production” of minimalist audio-visual pieces, an activity led by girls; on the other hand, boys produce fewer videos, but the videos they do produce are more structured and of higher quality. In short, the “creation” of content is associated with entertainment and confirms that the vast majority of teens lack the critical capacity to produce audio-visual work, despite having the skills and technical means within their reach.

Video games are the focus of the monolithic profile of male consumption and determine the preference for consuming youtuber and tutorial videos dealing with this subject. This consumption influences production by males of YouTube channels and video game tutorials, resulting in structured content shared mainly on this platform. The gaming habit does not change with age, but the consumption of gamer videos and video game tutorials, as well as the production of the latter, is notably higher among older males. As noted in studies by Craig A. Anderson and Brad J. Bushman (2001), Enrique Díez (2009), Beatriz Muros, Yolanda Aragón and Antonio Bustos (2013), and Gema Alcolea (2014), there is a significant number of minors playing extremely violent video games not suitable for their age level. Call of Duty “justifies” the death of the enemy because the player is a soldier of war. In GTA, the violence is gratuitous; the player is the member of a gang who breaks the law and engages in activity that is denigrating to women. These kinds of games naturalise violence and sexist attitudes that clash with the values of tolerance and diversity that young people should be learning. What is needed, therefore, is a line of research that will explore the possibility of producing non-violent video games that promote gender equality.

Interest in personal life experiences, the importance of fashion and the desire to share content and communicate online are characteristics inherent to internet use by females. In their “productions” they present their image and their public lives, disseminating them on Instagram and WhatsApp. These practices pose risks that need to be investigated in greater depth: the careless, unrestricted exhibition of their private lives (Montes, García, & Menor, 2018) and the influence of the aesthetic standards imposed by the fashion world in the consumption, creation and dissemination of content by females. Youtubers and tutorial videos reproduce these standards, which are then reflected in the photos and videos made by girls, in which they project an image of themselves that attempts to emulate an aesthetic ideal and repeats stereotypical female behaviour.

In the area of school work, the most prominent unregulated source is Wikipedia, while other text sources are of secondary importance. Girls are more concerned with information quality given that they look up and consult more online texts. Audiovisual content is in second place with tutorials on technology or how to make a movie, viewed mostly by private school students, although the level of creation of such videos is similar in state and private schools. However, there is a significant gender imbalance, with boys producing considerably more videos. Forums are used by a minority of respondents, although they become more significant in the higher grade levels, as do tutorials. It is urgent to investigate the repercussions that the systematic use in schools of unregulated sources has on the quality of youth education and to propose measures that will ensure the reliability of these sources.

Funding agency

This article presents part of the results of the research project titled “The presence of Basque in online audiovisual content consumption, creation and dissemination habits of adolescents (12-16) in Guipuzcoa”, financed by the Guipuzcoa provincial council in the context of “The Future Constructed” partnership agreement with the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), which awarded the project to the Basque Government’s consolidated research group “Mutations of the Contemporary Audiovisual” (IT1048-16).

References

Alcolea, G. (2014). Análisis del consumo adolescente, con variables de género, de series y videojuegos: Formas de acceso y actividad multitarea. VI Congreso Internacional Latina de Comunicación Social, Universidad de la Laguna, 1-14. https://bit.ly/2wAs3j8

Alonso, P., Rodríguez, Y., Lameiras, M., & Carrera, M.V. (2015). Hábitos de uso en las redes sociales de los y las adolescentes: Análisis de género. Revista de Estudios e Investigación en Psicología y Educación, 13, 54-57. https://doi.org/10.17979/reipe.2015.0.13.317

Anderson, C.A., & Bushman, B.J. (2001). Effects of violent video games on aggressive behavior, aggressive cognition, aggressive affect, physiological arousal, and prosocial behavior: A meta-analytic review of the scientific literature. Psychological Science, 12(5), 353-359. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9280.00366

Aranda, D., Sánchez, J., Tabernero, C., & Tubella, I. (2010). Los jóvenes del siglo XXI: Prácticas comunicativas y consumo cultural. II Congreso Internacional AE-IC Comunicación y desarrollo en la era digital, Universidad de Málaga (1-20). https://bit.ly/2rzUHMk

Arango, G., Bringué, X., & Sádaba, C. (2010). La generación interactiva en Colombia: Adolescentes frente a la Internet, el celular y los videojuegos. Anagramas, 9(17), 45-56. https://bit.ly/2wuBMYo

Bernal, C., & Angulo, F. (2013). Interactions of young Andalusian people inside social networks [Interacciones de los jóvenes andaluces en las redes sociales]. Comunicar, 40, 15-23. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-02

Boyd, D. (2014). It’s complicated: The social lives of networked teens. New Haven (Connecticut): Yale University Press. https://bit.ly/2IxtlQI

Buckingham, D., & Martínez, J.B. (2013). Interactive youth: New citizenship between social networks and school settings. [Jóvenes interactivos: Nueva ciudadanía entre redes sociales y escenarios escolares]. Comunicar, 40, 10-14. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-00

Castellana, M., Sánchez-Carbonell, X., Chamarro, A., Graner, C., & Beranuy, M. (2007). Les noves addicions en l’adolescència: Internet, mòbil i videjocs. Projecte d’investigació PFCEE-Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Lull.

Castells, M. (2006). La sociedad red: una visión global. Madrid: Alianza.

Chau, C. (2010). YouTube as a participatory culture. New Directions for Youth Development, 128, 65-74. https://doi.org/10.1002/yd.376

Ciampa, K. (2014). Learning in a mobile age: An investigation of student motivation. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 30(1), 82-96. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcal.12036

Coupland, D. (2010). Generation A. Toronto: Random House.

Díez, E. (2009). Sexismo y violencia: La socialización a través de los videojuegos. Feminismo/s, 14, 35-52. https://bit.ly/2Iu4yx1

Espinar, E., & González, M.J. (2009). Jóvenes en las redes sociales virtuales: Un análisis exploratorio de las diferencias de géneros. Feminimo/s, 14, 87-106. https://bit.ly/2KTBmxJ

Estébanez, I., & Vázquez, N. (2013). La desigualdad de género y el sexismo en las redes sociales. Vitoria-Gasteiz: ONA. https://bit.ly/2rCjCOD

Eynon, R., & Malmberg, L. (2011). A typology of young people’s Internet use: Implications for education. Computers & Education, 56(3), 585-595. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.09.020

Feixa, C. (2000). Generación @. La juventud en la era digital. Nómadas, 13, 75-91. https://bit.ly/2rzNs6r

Fenández-Planells, A., & Maz, M. (2012). Internet en las tareas escolares, ¿obstáculo u oportunidad? El impacto de la Red en los hábitos de estudio de alumnos de Secundaria de Barcelona y Lima. Sphera Pública, (12), 161-182. https://bit.ly/2ELbkIy

Fernández-Planells, A., & Figueras, M. (2014). De la guerra de pantallas a la sinergia entre pantallas: El multitasking en jóvenes. In A. Huertas, & M. Figueras (Eds.), Audiencias juveniles y cultura digital (87-107). Bellaterra (Barcelona): Institut de la Comunicació. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. https://bit.ly/2Kfa7N2

Gabino, M.A. (2004). Children and young people as virtual and interactive users and receivers. [Niños y jóvenes como usuarios-receptores virtuales e interactivos]. Comunicar, 22, 120-125. https://bit.ly/2KcOXyT

García, A., Catalina, B., & López-de-Ayala, M.C. (2016). Adolescents and YouTube: Creation, participation and consumption. Prisma Social, 1, 60-89. https://bit.ly/2I8BLhV

Gardner, H., & Davis, K. (2014). The app generation: How today’s youth navigate identity, intimacy, and imagination in a digital world. New Haven: Yale University Press. https://bit.ly/2KbzdMQ

Gewerc, A., Fraga, F., & Rodes, V. (2017). Niños y adolescentes frente a la competencia digital. Entre el teléfono móvil, youtubers y videojuegos. Revista Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado, 89, 171-186. https://bit.ly/2rBmpZf

Gross, E.F. (2004). Adolescent Internet use: What we expect, what teens report. Applied Developmental Psychology, 25(6), 633-649. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2004.09.005

Howe, N., & Strauss, W. (2000). Millenials Rising. The next great generation. New York: Vintage Books.

Livingstone, S. (2008). Taking risky opportunities in youthful content creation: Teenagers’ use of social networking sites for intimacy, privacy and self-expression. New Media & Society, 10(3), 393-411. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444808089415

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A., & Ólafsson, K. (2011). Risks and safety on the Internet: The perspective of European children: Full findings and policy implications from the EU Kids Online survey of 9-16 year olds and their parents in 25 countries. LSE, London: EU Kids Online. https://bit.ly/1jOA4AL

Masanet, M.J. (2016). Pervivencia de los estereotipos de género en los hábitos de consumo mediático de los adolescentes: Drama para las chicas y humor para los chicos. Cuadernos.info, 39, 39-53. https://doi.org/10.7764/cdi.39.1027

Mascheroni, G., & Ólafsson, K. (2016). The mobile Internet: Access, use, opportunities and divides among European children. New Media & Society, 18(8), 1657-1679. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444814567986

Medrano, C., Aierbe, A., & Orejudo, S. (2009). El perfil de consumo televisivo en adolescentes: Diferencias en función del sexo y estereotipos sociales. Infancia y Aprendizaje, 32(3), 293-306. https://doi.org/10.1174/021037009788964150

Méndiz, A., De-Aguilera, M., & Borges, E. (2011). Young people’s attitudes towards and evaluations of mobile. [Actitudes y valoraciones de los jóvenes ante la TV móvil]. Comunicar, 36, 77-85. https://doi.org/10.3916/C36-2011-02-08

Montes, M., García, A., & Menor, J. (2018). Teen videos on YouTube: Features and digital vulnerabilities. [Los vídeos de los adolescentes en YouTube: Características y vulnerabilidades digitales]. Comunicar, 54, 61-69. https://doi.org/10.3916/C54-2018-06

Observatorio Vasco de la Juventud (2016). La juventud vasca en las redes sociales. Vitoria: Gobierno Vasco, Departamento de Educación, Política Lingüística y Cultura. https://bit.ly/2I7G1hY

Pibernat, M. (2017). ¿Nuevas socializaciones, viejas cuestiones? Adolescencia y género en la era audiovisual. Investigaciones feministas: papeles de estudios de mujeres, feministas y de género, 8(2), 529-544. https://doi.org/10.5209/INFE.54976

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants. On the Horizon 9(5), 1-6. https://bit.ly/2IatWsg

Rial, A., Gómez, P., Braña, T., & Varela, J. (2014). Actitudes, percepciones y uso de Internet y las redes sociales entre los adolescentes de la comunidad gallega. Anales de Psicología, 30(2), 642-655. https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.30.2.159111

Sádaba, C., & Vidales, M.J. (2015). El impacto de la comunicación mediada por la tecnología en el capital social: adolescentes y teléfonos móviles. Virtualis, 11(1), 75-92. https://bit.ly/2KRsoku

Salmerón, L., Cerdán, R., & Naumann, J. (2015). ¿Cómo navegan los adolescentes en Wikipedia para contestar preguntas? Infancia y Aprendizaje, 38(2), 435-471. https://doi.org/10.1080/02103702.2015.1016750

Solano, I. M., González, V., & López, P. (2013). Adolescentes y comunicación: las TIC como recurso para la interacción social en educación secundaria. Pixel-Bit, 42, 23-35. https://bit.ly/2KVdeLa

Tapscott, D., & Williams, A.D. (1998). Wikinomics: How mass collaboration changes everything. New York: Portfolio.

Tramullas, J. (2016). Competencias informacionales básicas y uso de Wikipedia en entornos educativos. Gestión de la Innovación en Educación Superior, 1(1), 79-95. https://bit.ly/2jQabru

Valverde, D., & González, J. (2016). Búsqueda y selección de información en recursos digitales: Percepciones de alumnos de Física y Química de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria y Bachillerato sobre Wikipedia. Revista Eureka sobre Enseñanza y Divulgación de las Ciencias, 13(1), 67-83. https://bit.ly/2rCW4tJ

Viñals, A., Abad, M., & Aguilar, E. (2014). Jóvenes conectados: Una aproximación al ocio digital de los jóvenes españoles. Comunication Papers, 3(4), 52-68. https://bit.ly/2KgpcOh

White, D., & Le-Cornu, A. (2011). Visitors and residents: A new typology for online engafement. First Monday, 16(9), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.5210/fm.v16i9.3171



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Los adolescentes viven inmersos en un universo virtual en el que han construido un modelo propio de entretenimiento, aprendizaje y comunicación. El objetivo de este trabajo es definir los patrones de consumo, creación y difusión de contenidos audiovisuales de Internet en los ámbitos del ocio y las fuentes de información complementarias para uso escolar de los jóvenes guipuzcoanos, atendiendo a las variables de género, curso y tipo de centro. La metodología partió del diseño de un cuestionario autorrellenable que cumplimentaron 2.426 adolescentes (de 12 a 16 años), estudiantes de los cuatro cursos de ESO. La muestra es una selección aleatoria de 60 centros de Guipúzcoa y un total de 120 grupos, 30 por cada curso. Los resultados corroboran que los patrones de consumo, creación y difusión de contenidos de ocio masculinos y femeninos son monolíticos y opuestos entre sí. Los videojuegos son el eje vertebrador del consumo y creación masculino, mientras que la toma y difusión de fotografías y vídeos de sí mismas es el de las chicas. Estas prácticas repiten los estereotipos de género, por lo que la formación en igualdad se perfila como en un aspecto relevante. Por último, las fuentes de información complementarias a la educación reglada, principalmente Wikipedia, se imponen como referencia entre los adolescentes, por lo que es imprescindible garantizar su solvencia para una adecuada adquisición de conocimientos.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

El acceso y uso generalizado de las nuevas tecnologías, Internet y las redes sociales por parte de los adolescentes han construido un universo propio en el que se han instaurado nuevos patrones de consumo, creación y difusión de contenidos audiovisuales. Este nuevo paradigma supone, al mismo tiempo, un reto social, que preocupa a padres y educadores, y un reto para la industria tecnológica, que condiciona el desarrollo de los dispositivos y la producción y difusión de contenidos. El objetivo de este trabajo es precisamente definir los hábitos de consumo, creación y difusión en Internet de los adolescentes guipuzcoanos de entre 12 y 16 años en dos ámbitos, el del ocio y el escolar, poniendo el foco en las diferencias de género, curso y tipo de centro. El consumo, entendido como visionado de productos audiovisuales y uso de videojuegos en el entorno digital; la creación, como confección de contenidos básicos; y la difusión, como compartir contenidos en Internet a través de plataformas. Así, en el terreno del ocio se analiza el consumo online de videojuegos, «youtubers» y videotutoriales en función de estas tres variables. En el de la educación reglada, se hace lo propio con la consulta de fuentes complementarias como Wikipedia, vídeos tutoriales, documentales, foros, textos online y páginas web con trabajos y apuntes. Y, por último, el estudio observa la creación de contenidos ?qué producen y cómo? y su difusión ?qué plataformas, redes o aplicaciones de mensajería utilizan? en cada ámbito. El trabajo plantea tres preguntas de investigación:

• RQ1. ¿Cuáles son los patrones de consumo adolescente en el ámbito del ocio?

• RQ2. ¿Qué fuentes de información complementarias consultan los adolescentes en el ámbito escolar?

• RQ3. ¿Qué contenidos de ocio y de uso escolar crean los adolescentes y cómo los difunden?

En la llamada era digital, los jóvenes han sabido encontrar en Internet y en las redes sociales un vehículo propio para comunicarse y establecer relaciones con su entorno, creando lo que se conoce como «sociedad red» (Castells, 2006). Desde finales de los noventa, los expertos han acuñado distintas denominaciones para referirse a estos adolescentes que navegan por Internet, procesan rápidamente la información y adquieren conocimientos de forma activa. Las primeras definiciones hablaban de una «Net Generation» (Tapscott & Williams, 1998; Fernández-Planells & Figueras, 2014), de los «Millennials» (Howe & Strauss, 2000), de la «Generación @» (Feixa, 2000) o de los nativos digitales (Prensky, 2001). A comienzos del siglo XXI, la brecha generacional se fue haciendo más profunda. El acceso de los jóvenes a dispositivos electrónicos con pantallas de todos los tamaños y múltiples prestaciones es cada vez mayor, dando lugar a la generación de los móviles y las redes sociales, bautizada como la de los residentes digitales (White & Le-Cornu, 2011), la «App Generation» (Gardner & Davis, 2014), o la «Generación A» (Coupland, 2010).

Estos jóvenes constituyen un público amplio que ha sabido desarrollar usos y hábitos de consumo y creación audiovisual propios en el marco de este universo interconectado. En este nuevo escenario, nos encontramos ante unos adolescentes «multitarea, conectados, prosumidores, sociales y móviles» (Viñals, Abad, & Aguilar, 2014: 53) que han adoptado de forma natural las herramientas y recursos que ofrece la Red en su día a día.

Con el impulso de la cultura participativa y la sociabilidad como sus principales referentes (Aranda, Sánchez, Tabernero, & Tubella, 2010), Internet se perfila como el medio que da respuesta a sus necesidades informativas, educativas y de ocio, basadas estas últimas principalmente en el entretenimiento y las relaciones interpersonales (Buckingham & Martínez, 2013). En los últimos años, la manera en la que los jóvenes se desenvuelven en el entorno digital ha sido profusamente investigada, tanto en lo que respecta a sus prácticas y hábitos de consumo como a los nuevos contenidos audiovisuales, videojuegos o «youtubers». Al mismo tiempo, su actitud frente a los medios de comunicación y el impacto de los dispositivos electrónicos como el teléfono móvil constituyen otro de los principales objetos de estudio.

El consumo audiovisual abandona progresivamente la pantalla televisiva, a pesar de continuar manteniendo su soberanía (Gewerc, Fraga, & Rodes, 2017), para dar lugar a un visionado multipantalla y multitarea. Esta incipiente «televisión social» encuentra su mejor vehículo en el ordenador portátil y en el «smartphone», el dispositivo electrónico por excelencia que rige las relaciones sociales entre los jóvenes (Sádaba & Vidales, 2015; Mascheroni & Ólafsson, 2016). En este sentido, atrás queda la concepción del teléfono móvil como mero dispositivo de comunicación para convertirse en un elemento «multiuso e interactivo» con el que es posible desempeñar cualquier actividad cotidiana (Méndiz, De-Aguilera, & Borges, 2011: 78).

En este contexto, lejos de los límites de secuencialidad marcados por el consumo audiovisual tradicional, los adolescentes se decantan por un consumo de contenidos audiovisuales a demanda en el que YouTube se sitúa a la cabeza. Asociada inicialmente a la mecánica de funcionamiento de los videojuegos o «gaming», esta plataforma ha logrado atraer a millones de jóvenes seguidores y acumular otras tantas visualizaciones a través de «youtubers» que optan por crear videotutoriales o videoblogs de las más diversas temáticas (Chau, 2010; García, Catalina, & López-de-Ayala, 2016).

Los adolescentes, además de consumidores, toman como referente a estas figuras públicas para convertirse también en creadores de sus propios vídeos, los cuales exponen en muchas ocasiones de manera pública y sin proteger su identidad (Montes, García, & Menor, 2018). En el área de los videojuegos, por el contrario, los estudios realizados ponen de manifiesto un índice ligeramente menor de usuarios entre los jóvenes y la adhesión de un público mayoritariamente masculino a productos de marcado carácter sexista y/o violento (Anderson & Bushman, 2001; Díez, 2009; Alcolea, 2014).

Además del entretenimiento, el desarrollo de las relaciones sociales constituye una de las principales características del consumo digital adolescente. Cabe destacar el imparable crecimiento de redes sociales como Facebook o Instagram utilizadas no solo en el ámbito social sino también como fuente a través de la que tienen acceso a la actualidad informativa. Los últimos datos aportados por el Observatorio Vasco de la Juventud (2016) a este respecto siguen la línea trazada en investigaciones precursoras (Livingstone, 2008; Livingstone, Haddon, Görzig, & Ólafsson, 2011; Boyd, 2014), corroborando la mayoritaria penetración de este tipo de plataformas entre los jóvenes. De acuerdo a estas cifras, la práctica totalidad de los jóvenes vascos (99%) de entre 15 y 29 años es usuaria de alguna red social y se conecta a diario. Entre ellas se percibe un significativo aumento del uso de servicios de mensajería instantánea como WhatsApp (98,2%), el más utilizado, y en menor medida, servicios de contenido efímero como Snapchat (22,5%).

Siendo común el auge de las redes sociales entre la amplia mayoría de este sector poblacional, el género marca notables diferencias en sus pautas de comportamiento. De esta manera, sendos trabajos de investigación desarrollados en este marco (Espinar & González, 2009; Estébanez & Vázquez, 2013; Alonso, Rodríguez, Lameiras, & Carrera, 2015) ponen de manifiesto un uso más habitual, una mayor exposición pública y un profuso intercambio de contenidos por parte de las chicas frente a los chicos.

Al mismo tiempo, esta diferencia se hace extensible a la temática de los contenidos que los jóvenes consumen en YouTube y a los videojuegos, así como al consumo audiovisual más tradicional (series, programas de televisión o películas). Este ámbito, ampliamente investigado desde la Academia, refleja la perpetuidad de los tradicionales estereotipos de género entre las generaciones más jóvenes en lo que a los hábitos de consumo y creación audiovisual se refiere, vinculando al género femenino con las ficciones dramáticas, los programas de telerrealidad o la crónica rosa y al masculino con los deportes o el humor (Medrano, Aierbe, & Orejudo, 2009; Masanet, 2016; Pibernat, 2017).

Tomando en cuenta lo anteriormente mencionado, Gabino (2004) pone de relieve una manifiesta asociación del consumo audiovisual adolescente con los espacios de ocio por encima de los ámbitos formales y educativos. No obstante, las Tecnologías de la Información y de la Comunicación (TIC) gozan de una cada vez mayor presencia en las aulas, facilitando al alumnado el acceso a múltiples fuentes complementarias durante su formación académica mediante ordenadores y tabletas (Eynon & Malmberg, 2011; Fernández-Planells & Maz, 2012; Solano, González, & López, 2013; Ciampa, 2014). Wikipedia es, a día de hoy, la fuente principal de información a la que acuden los jóvenes, y la herramienta escolar de uso habitual en Educación Secundaria (Salmerón, Cerdán, & Naumann, 2015; Tramullas, 2016; Valverde & González, 2016).

Con todo ello, esta investigación aporta un complemento a la senda marcada por otros estudios similares realizados en otras comunidades autónomas españolas como Cataluña (Castellana, Sánchez-Carbonell, Chamarro, Graner, & Beranuy, 2007), Galicia (Rial, Gómez, Braña, & Varela, 2014) o Andalucía (Bernal & Angulo, 2013), así como en el ámbito internacional (Gross, 2004; Arango, Bringué, & Sádaba, 2010).

2. Material y métodos

La investigación recoge los datos de 2.426 encuestas realizadas a adolescentes entre 12 y 16 años que cursan sus estudios de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria (de 1º a 4º de la ESO) en Guipúzcoa. Se trata de jóvenes nacidos con el cambio de milenio que han crecido condicionados por las nuevas tecnologías. De hecho, los resultados expuestos en este artículo parten de los datos extraídos de un amplio trabajo de investigación, cuyo objeto de estudio ha sido abordar en profundidad la influencia de las nuevas tecnologías en el cambio de los hábitos de consumo y creación de contenidos en euskera del público adolescente. Para ello, se diseñó un cuestionario autorrellenable de 100 preguntas, en su mayoría de respuesta múltiple, divididas en seis bloques. Este trabajo se centra en dos de ellos, el ocio y el ámbito escolar, teniendo en cuenta tanto los contenidos en castellano como en euskera. Por tanto, los resultados se pueden extrapolar al resto del País Vasco y a España. Los datos se analizan a partir de tres variables de cruce (potencialmente discriminantes de comportamiento): el género, el curso y la titularidad del centro (público o privado).

El universo de estudio son 28.817 chicos y chicas distribuidos en 108 centros de ESO y la unidad de muestreo ha sido el grupo. Se optó por un muestreo por conglomerados, estratificado por afijación proporcional teniendo en cuenta la distribución geográfica de los centros en Guipúzcoa y los niveles educativos. La muestra mantiene el equilibrio de género y es una selección aleatoria de 60 centros, un total de 120 grupos (2 grupos de diferente curso por cada centro), 30 por cada curso. El error muestral máximo es de +/–1,90% para el conjunto del territorio de Guipúzcoa. El nivel de confianza estadístico es del 95% (en el supuesto más desfavorable de p=q=0,5). El trabajo de campo se realizó entre los meses de diciembre de 2016 y enero de 2017. Las encuestas se pasaron en el aula bajo la dirección de uno de los investigadores y con la presencia del profesor o tutor de cada grupo. La duración aproximada del sondeo fue de 45 minutos.

3. Resultados

Los datos del estudio evidencian que el género es la variable que define los patrones de consumo, la creación y la difusión de contenidos en el ocio adolescente, mientras que apenas tiene incidencia en el uso escolar. Igualmente, el tipo de centro influye únicamente en este último terreno y el curso es fundamental para mostrar la evolución de las tendencias de consumo, creación y difusión de contenidos.

3.1. Patrones de consumo3.1.1. Ocio

Los videojuegos son la actividad preferida de los chicos, a la que dedican 76 minutos de media de su ocio el fin de semana, y un hábito marginal para las chicas, al que asignan 26 minutos. Ellas prefieren pasar la mayor parte de su tiempo, 95 minutos de media, chateando, tuiteando y comunicándose a través de WhatsApp, mientras que los varones destinan 67 minutos a esta actividad.

La taxonomía de los videojuegos online más consumidos por los adolescentes combina dos criterios: la lista cerrada de los siete juegos de mayor éxito, con el 39,9% de los usuarios, y la lista de los «otros» juegos elegidos libremente por el 31,5% de los jóvenes. Tal y como se observa en la Tabla 1, únicamente figuran tres videojuegos en la lista cerrada porque los otros tres, «Habbo», «World of Warcraft (WOW)» y «Dot A», no superan el 5% total de usuarios. «The Sims» es el único videojuego capaz de atraer la atención mayoritaria de las chicas, aunque solo en la edad más temprana. De hecho, solo el 8% del alumnado de 4º juega con él. El resto de videojuegos son netamente masculinos y se usan durante toda la ESO. «Pan European Game Information (PEGI)» ha catalogado «Call of Duty» y «GTA» como videojuegos para mayores de 18 años, por lo que representan un riesgo para los menores que hacen uso de ellos. Respecto al modo, los usuarios prefieren jugar en grupo, sobre todo los chicos, y solo una minoría juega en solitario, preferentemente las chicas.


Fernandez-de-Arroyabe-Olaortua et al 2018a-69566 ov-es014.jpg

YouTube es la principal plataforma de los jóvenes, y los «youtubers», sus líderes de opinión y modelos a seguir. El 60,4% de los adolescentes conoce a alguno de los siete «youtubers» con más éxito incluidos en la lista cerrada, elaborada de acuerdo a la información facilitada por los alumnos en entrevistas previas. Entre ellos, los cinco primeros tienen canales sobre videojuegos, por lo que su audiencia es mayoritariamente masculina. Este es el caso de los «gamers» «VEGETTA777», «Willyrex» y «Alexby11». No obstante, además de los videojuegos, los canales de «Elrubius» y «Wismichu» tratan con humor temas de interés que atraen a una audiencia femenina considerable. Las chicas siguen menos a los «youtubers» que los chicos y son mayoría entre la audiencia de los dos últimos canales de la Tabla 2, «Yellow Mellow» y «Patry Jordan». Ahora bien, a medida que los adolescentes cumplen años, los «youtubers» más seguidos por los chicos pierden adeptos, mientras que los más seguidos por las chicas los ganan. Por último, se ha incluido una pregunta abierta que ha sido respondida por el 68% de los adolescentes, en la que, a pesar de una gran atomización de resultados, el 20% ha mencionado a «AuronPlay». A día de hoy este «youtuber» que comenta vídeos de Internet cuenta con más de 8 millones de suscriptores y rebasa las mil millones de visualizaciones.


Fernandez-de-Arroyabe-Olaortua et al 2018a-69566 ov-es015.jpg

Entre los contenidos disponibles en YouTube, los videotutoriales logran enganchar al público joven. Así, el 62,4% de los adolescentes los consulta de manera más o menos frecuente, y además este porcentaje aumenta notablemente con la edad. De hecho, solo el 28,9% de los alumnos de 4º de la ESO dice no visionarlos frente al 48% de los de 1º. La temática de los videotutoriales más consultados está determinada, en gran medida, por el género. Los chicos optan por los de videojuegos, tecnología y deportes. Las chicas consumen más tutoriales de moda, peluquería y maquillaje, viajes y cómo hacer películas. Las consultas de tutoriales de moda (14,6% en 1º y 32,3% en 4º) y viajes (6,5% en 1º y 17,8% en 4º) aumentan considerablemente con la edad. Por último, cabe señalar que los tutoriales sobre tecnología y cómo hacer películas son comunes al ocio y al uso escolar. Estos dos contenidos tienen mejor acogida entre los alumnos de centros privados, ya que consultan significativamente más tutoriales de tecnología (21%) y de cómo hacer películas (10,8%) que los de centros públicos, con un 15,1% y un 6,9% de usuarios respectivamente. Por otro lado, el interés por la tecnología aumenta con la edad, con un mayor visionado de estos tutoriales entre el alumnado de cursos superiores (12,1% en 1º y 24,2% en 4º).


Fernandez-de-Arroyabe-Olaortua et al 2018a-69566 ov-es016.jpg

3.1.2. Fuentes de información complementarias para el uso escolar

La mayoría de los adolescentes consultan otras fuentes de Internet distintas a las que ofrece la educación reglada y solo el 14,1% admite no hacerlo, de los cuales el 16,4% son chicos y el 11,7% chicas. Este porcentaje desciende drásticamente con la edad y refleja un mayor uso entre los estudiantes de cursos superiores. Esto es, del 22,3% de los alumnos de 1º que afirma no consultar otras fuentes se pasa a un 7,1% en 4º. Wikipedia, con un 86,9% de usuarios, es la principal fuente de referencia a lo largo de los cuatro cursos, seguida de los videotutoriales (34,9%), los textos sobre materias lectivas (31%), los trabajos y apuntes online (26,5%), los documentales (26,2%) y los foros (24,9%).

En cuanto al género, es significativo que las chicas (35,4%) consulten más textos online que los chicos (26,5%), ya que esto apunta a un mayor interés de las féminas por adquirir información de mayor calidad y más elaborada para complementar sus estudios. En los cursos superiores, crecen las consultas de textos (17,2% en 1º y 44,3% en 3º), trabajos online (17,2% en 1º y 36,2% en 4º) y documentales (20,8% en 1º y 30,8% en 4º), y la participación en foros se asienta en 4º con un 34% de intervinientes. Los alumnos de centros privados son los que más fuentes complementarias utilizan: el 39,2% consulta videotutoriales, el 35,2% busca textos, el 28,2% visiona documentales y el 28,2% participa en foros. Existe, en este sentido, una diferencia notable respecto a los estudiantes de centros públicos, quienes consultan mucho menos estas fuentes: el 24,2% tutoriales, el 25,5% textos, el 23% documentales y el 20,6% foros.


Fernandez-de-Arroyabe-Olaortua et al 2018a-69566 ov-es017.jpg

3.2. Patrones de creación y difusión de contenidos

La mayoría de los adolescentes poseen los conocimientos y las destrezas tecnológicas necesarias para crear contenidos audiovisuales, y además, disponen del equipamiento tecnológico: el 96,2% posee un teléfono móvil, el 82,4% ordenador portátil, el 62,4% uno de mesa, y el 77,9%, tableta. Sin embargo, son más consumidores que generadores de contenidos, puesto que la creación es la actividad a la que menos tiempo de ocio dedican (28 minutos de media). Bien es cierto que las chicas son considerablemente más activas; ellas emplean 32 minutos de media y ellos 23.

Por consiguiente, no es de extrañar que el 85,6% de los jóvenes no sean «youtubers». Del 7,4% que sí lo son, el 12,1% son chicos y el 2,6% chicas. El porcentaje de «youtubers» disminuye además con la edad, solo el 4,9% de los alumnos de 4º lo son. Solo unos pocos se atreven a exponerse al veredicto del público y a la presión para conseguir seguidores. Asimismo, los adolescentes que crean tutoriales para difundirlos en YouTube constituyen el 12,3% (15,1% chicos y 9,5% chicas). Los alumnos de 2º son los que más crean (15,3%) y los de 4º los que menos (9,1%). Como es lógico, hay una correspondencia directa entre la tipología y la clasificación jerárquica de los tutoriales que consumen, orientados principalmente al ocio, y los que producen: los de videojuegos (51,7%) son los más prolíficos, seguidos por los de deportes (32,6%), moda y maquillaje (29,5%), tecnología (26,2%), cómo hacer películas (18,1%) y viajes (15,1%). Se trata de vídeos estructurados que requieren de un cierto nivel de conocimiento audiovisual y una dedicación e interés por parte de los autores. Al igual que ocurría con su consumo, los tutoriales de videojuegos son obra de chicos (75%) y los de moda y maquillaje, de chicas (60,7%). El único contenido relacionado con el uso escolar son los tutoriales de tecnología. En este caso, no hay diferencias entre los alumnos de centros privados y públicos, pero la edad sí es un factor determinante, ya que su creación alcanza el mayor porcentaje (40%) entre los alumnos de 4º.

Junto a estos videotutoriales, el teléfono móvil ha dado lugar también a un segundo tipo de contenidos no elaborados cuyo objetivo es su difusión inmediata entre las amistades a través de Internet. Se trata de fotografías (67,4%), grabaciones (62,3%), vídeos editados automáticamente (61,2%), música (39%) y audios (38,8%). Las féminas dan prioridad a tomar y difundir fotografías de amigos y retratos personales o «selfis», y también son las que más vídeos de «asuntos de amigos» y de fiestas y conciertos graban y comparten.

Sin embargo, generar y difundir contenidos audiovisuales no parece ser una actividad extendida entre la mayoría de los jóvenes, ya que el 57,2% de los jóvenes afirma no haber subido nunca un vídeo a Internet frente el 40,8% que sí lo ha hecho. YouTube es el canal más utilizado por ellos para difundir sus contenidos en público. Le sigue Instagram, con una similar distribución de géneros. El servicio de mensajería WhatsApp, utilizado más por los chicos, y Snapchat, la plataforma preferida por las chicas, ocupan la tercera y cuarta posición. Finalmente, Twitter y Facebook tienen menor incidencia entre los adolescentes. En lo que respecta al uso por edades, YouTube se usa más entre los de menor edad, bajando al 38,3% en 4º, y, sin embargo, Snapchat sube al 42,2% en ese curso.


Fernandez-de-Arroyabe-Olaortua et al 2018a-69566 ov-es018.jpg

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Los resultados de esta investigación corroboran que el ocio es el ámbito preponderante en el consumo, creación y difusión de contenidos de los adolescentes. Los patrones de consumo masculinos y femeninos, cerrados y diametralmente opuestos entre sí, condicionan la creación y difusión de contenidos. Es decir, la tipología de productos que consumen en Internet se proyecta directamente en los contenidos que generan y en la manera en la que los comparten. Los adolescentes son más consumidores que creadores, solo una minoría se atreve a ser «youtuber» y generan dos tipos de contenidos: de un lado, el «smartphone» es la herramienta principal para la «confección» de audiovisuales frugales y casi automáticos que lideran las chicas. Los chicos producen menos, pero son vídeos estructurados y de mayor calidad. En definitiva, la creación de contenidos va ligada al entretenimiento y confirma que la gran mayoría de ellos carece de capacidad crítica para producir audiovisuales, a pesar de contar con las destrezas y los medios técnicos a su alcance.

Los videojuegos son el eje del perfil monolítico de los varones y condicionan el consumo preferente de «youtubers» y videotutoriales sobre esta área. Este consumo se proyecta en la producción masculina de canales de YouTube y tutoriales de videojuegos, contenidos estructurados que comparten mayoritariamente a través de esta plataforma. El hábito de juego no cambia con la edad, pero el consumo de «gamers» y tutoriales de videojuegos, así como la producción de estos últimos aumenta notablemente. En la línea de los estudios de Craig A. Anderson y Brad J. Bushman (2001), Enrique Díez (2009), Beatriz Muros, Yolanda Aragón y Antonio Bustos (2013), y Gema Alcolea (2014), existe un número importante de menores que juegan con videojuegos extremadamente violentos no aptos para su edad. «Call of Duty» «justifica» la muerte del enemigo porque el jugador es un soldado en guerra. En «GTA» la violencia es gratuita, el jugador, miembro de una banda, atenta contra la ley y lleva a cabo acciones que denigran a la mujer. Este tipo de juegos naturalizan la violencia y las actitudes machistas que chocan con los valores de tolerancia y diversidad en los que deben educarse los menores. Por ello, es necesaria una línea de investigación que explore la posibilidad de producir videojuegos no violentos que fomenten la igualdad de género.

El interés por las experiencias vitales e íntimas, el peso de la moda y la necesidad de compartir contenidos y comunicarse a través de Internet son las características inherentes al modelo femenino. En sus «producciones», exhiben su imagen y su vida pública y la difunden a través de Instagram y WhatsApp. Estas prácticas presentan dos riesgos sobre los que investigar en profundidad: la exhibición despreocupada y sin límites de la intimidad (Montes, García, & Menor, 2018) y la influencia de los cánones estéticos impuestos por la moda en el consumo, creación y difusión de contenidos femeninos. Las «youtubers» y los videotutoriales reproducen estos cánones que se trasladan a los retratos y los vídeos hechos por chicas en los que proyectan una imagen de sí mismas que trata de acercarse a un ideal estético y repite comportamientos femeninos estereotipados.

En el ámbito escolar, la fuente no reglada de referencia es Wikipedia, los demás recursos escritos son secundarios. Las chicas son las que más se preocupan por la calidad de la información puesto que buscan y consultan más textos online. El audiovisual ocupa la segunda posición con los tutoriales de tecnología o de cómo hacer una película que consultan en su mayoría alumnos de centros privados, aunque su creación es similar en la escuela pública y privada. Sin embargo, la diferencia de género es muy significativa porque son los chicos quienes más los producen.

Los foros son minoritarios y junto con los tutoriales adquieren relevancia en los últimos cursos. Resulta perentorio indagar sobre las repercusiones que el uso escolar sistemático de fuentes no regladas tiene en la calidad de la formación de los jóvenes y plantear medidas para garantizar la solvencia de estas fuentes.

Apoyos

Este trabajo presenta parte de los resultados de la investigación, «La presencia del euskera en los hábitos de consumo, creación y difusión de contenidos audiovisuales de los adolescentes guipuzcoanos (12-16) en Internet», financiada por la Diputación Foral de Gipuzkoa dentro de un convenio de colaboración «Etorkizuna Eraikiz» con la Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), que adjudicó el trabajo al grupo de investigación consolidado del Gobierno Vasco, Mutaciones del Audiovisual Contemporáneo (IT1048-16).

Referencias

Alcolea, G. (2014). Análisis del consumo adolescente, con variables de género, de series y videojuegos: Formas de acceso y actividad multitarea. VI Congreso Internacional Latina de Comunicación Social, Universidad de la Laguna, 1-14. https://bit.ly/2wAs3j8

Alonso, P., Rodríguez, Y., Lameiras, M., & Carrera, M.V. (2015). Hábitos de uso en las redes sociales de los y las adolescentes: Análisis de género. Revista de Estudios e Investigación en Psicología y Educación, 13, 54-57. https://doi.org/10.17979/reipe.2015.0.13.317

Anderson, C.A., & Bushman, B.J. (2001). Effects of violent video games on aggressive behavior, aggressive cognition, aggressive affect, physiological arousal, and prosocial behavior: A meta-analytic review of the scientific literature. Psychological Science, 12(5), 353-359. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9280.00366

Aranda, D., Sánchez, J., Tabernero, C., & Tubella, I. (2010). Los jóvenes del siglo XXI: Prácticas comunicativas y consumo cultural. II Congreso Internacional AE-IC Comunicación y desarrollo en la era digital, Universidad de Málaga (1-20). https://bit.ly/2rzUHMk

Arango, G., Bringué, X., & Sádaba, C. (2010). La generación interactiva en Colombia: Adolescentes frente a la Internet, el celular y los videojuegos. Anagramas, 9(17), 45-56. https://bit.ly/2wuBMYo

Bernal, C., & Angulo, F. (2013). Interactions of young Andalusian people inside social networks [Interacciones de los jóvenes andaluces en las redes sociales]. Comunicar, 40, 15-23. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-02

Boyd, D. (2014). It’s complicated: The social lives of networked teens. New Haven (Connecticut): Yale University Press. https://bit.ly/2IxtlQI

Buckingham, D., & Martínez, J.B. (2013). Interactive youth: New citizenship between social networks and school settings. [Jóvenes interactivos: Nueva ciudadanía entre redes sociales y escenarios escolares]. Comunicar, 40, 10-14. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-00

Castellana, M., Sánchez-Carbonell, X., Chamarro, A., Graner, C., & Beranuy, M. (2007). Les noves addicions en l’adolescència: Internet, mòbil i videjocs. Projecte d’investigació PFCEE-Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Lull.

Castells, M. (2006). La sociedad red: una visión global. Madrid: Alianza.

Chau, C. (2010). YouTube as a participatory culture. New Directions for Youth Development, 128, 65-74. https://doi.org/10.1002/yd.376

Ciampa, K. (2014). Learning in a mobile age: An investigation of student motivation. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 30(1), 82-96. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcal.12036

Coupland, D. (2010). Generation A. Toronto: Random House.

Díez, E. (2009). Sexismo y violencia: La socialización a través de los videojuegos. Feminismo/s, 14, 35-52. https://bit.ly/2Iu4yx1

Espinar, E., & González, M.J. (2009). Jóvenes en las redes sociales virtuales: Un análisis exploratorio de las diferencias de géneros. Feminimo/s, 14, 87-106. https://bit.ly/2KTBmxJ

Estébanez, I., & Vázquez, N. (2013). La desigualdad de género y el sexismo en las redes sociales. Vitoria-Gasteiz: ONA. https://bit.ly/2rCjCOD

Eynon, R., & Malmberg, L. (2011). A typology of young people’s Internet use: Implications for education. Computers & Education, 56(3), 585-595. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.09.020

Feixa, C. (2000). Generación @. La juventud en la era digital. Nómadas, 13, 75-91. https://bit.ly/2rzNs6r

Fenández-Planells, A., & Maz, M. (2012). Internet en las tareas escolares, ¿obstáculo u oportunidad? El impacto de la Red en los hábitos de estudio de alumnos de Secundaria de Barcelona y Lima. Sphera Pública, (12), 161-182. https://bit.ly/2ELbkIy

Fernández-Planells, A., & Figueras, M. (2014). De la guerra de pantallas a la sinergia entre pantallas: El multitasking en jóvenes. In A. Huertas, & M. Figueras (Eds.), Audiencias juveniles y cultura digital (87-107). Bellaterra (Barcelona): Institut de la Comunicació. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. https://bit.ly/2Kfa7N2

Gabino, M.A. (2004). Children and young people as virtual and interactive users and receivers. [Niños y jóvenes como usuarios-receptores virtuales e interactivos]. Comunicar, 22, 120-125. https://bit.ly/2KcOXyT

García, A., Catalina, B., & López-de-Ayala, M.C. (2016). Adolescents and YouTube: Creation, participation and consumption. Prisma Social, 1, 60-89. https://bit.ly/2I8BLhV

Gardner, H., & Davis, K. (2014). The app generation: How today’s youth navigate identity, intimacy, and imagination in a digital world. New Haven: Yale University Press. https://bit.ly/2KbzdMQ

Gewerc, A., Fraga, F., & Rodes, V. (2017). Niños y adolescentes frente a la competencia digital. Entre el teléfono móvil, youtubers y videojuegos. Revista Interuniversitaria de Formación del Profesorado, 89, 171-186. https://bit.ly/2rBmpZf

Gross, E.F. (2004). Adolescent Internet use: What we expect, what teens report. Applied Developmental Psychology, 25(6), 633-649. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appdev.2004.09.005

Howe, N., & Strauss, W. (2000). Millenials Rising. The next great generation. New York: Vintage Books.

Livingstone, S. (2008). Taking risky opportunities in youthful content creation: Teenagers’ use of social networking sites for intimacy, privacy and self-expression. New Media & Society, 10(3), 393-411. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444808089415

Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., Görzig, A., & Ólafsson, K. (2011). Risks and safety on the Internet: The perspective of European children: Full findings and policy implications from the EU Kids Online survey of 9-16 year olds and their parents in 25 countries. LSE, London: EU Kids Online. https://bit.ly/1jOA4AL

Masanet, M.J. (2016). Pervivencia de los estereotipos de género en los hábitos de consumo mediático de los adolescentes: Drama para las chicas y humor para los chicos. Cuadernos.info, 39, 39-53. https://doi.org/10.7764/cdi.39.1027

Mascheroni, G., & Ólafsson, K. (2016). The mobile Internet: Access, use, opportunities and divides among European children. New Media & Society, 18(8), 1657-1679. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444814567986

Medrano, C., Aierbe, A., & Orejudo, S. (2009). El perfil de consumo televisivo en adolescentes: Diferencias en función del sexo y estereotipos sociales. Infancia y Aprendizaje, 32(3), 293-306. https://doi.org/10.1174/021037009788964150

Méndiz, A., De-Aguilera, M., & Borges, E. (2011). Young people’s attitudes towards and evaluations of mobile. [Actitudes y valoraciones de los jóvenes ante la TV móvil]. Comunicar, 36, 77-85. https://doi.org/10.3916/C36-2011-02-08

Montes, M., García, A., & Menor, J. (2018). Teen videos on YouTube: Features and digital vulnerabilities. [Los vídeos de los adolescentes en YouTube: Características y vulnerabilidades digitales]. Comunicar, 54, 61-69. https://doi.org/10.3916/C54-2018-06

Observatorio Vasco de la Juventud (2016). La juventud vasca en las redes sociales. Vitoria: Gobierno Vasco, Departamento de Educación, Política Lingüística y Cultura. https://bit.ly/2I7G1hY

Pibernat, M. (2017). ¿Nuevas socializaciones, viejas cuestiones? Adolescencia y género en la era audiovisual. Investigaciones feministas: papeles de estudios de mujeres, feministas y de género, 8(2), 529-544. https://doi.org/10.5209/INFE.54976

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants. On the Horizon 9(5), 1-6. https://bit.ly/2IatWsg

Rial, A., Gómez, P., Braña, T., & Varela, J. (2014). Actitudes, percepciones y uso de Internet y las redes sociales entre los adolescentes de la comunidad gallega. Anales de Psicología, 30(2), 642-655. https://doi.org/10.6018/analesps.30.2.159111

Sádaba, C., & Vidales, M.J. (2015). El impacto de la comunicación mediada por la tecnología en el capital social: adolescentes y teléfonos móviles. Virtualis, 11(1), 75-92. https://bit.ly/2KRsoku

Salmerón, L., Cerdán, R., & Naumann, J. (2015). ¿Cómo navegan los adolescentes en Wikipedia para contestar preguntas? Infancia y Aprendizaje, 38(2), 435-471. https://doi.org/10.1080/02103702.2015.1016750

Solano, I. M., González, V., & López, P. (2013). Adolescentes y comunicación: las TIC como recurso para la interacción social en educación secundaria. Pixel-Bit, 42, 23-35. https://bit.ly/2KVdeLa

Tapscott, D., & Williams, A.D. (1998). Wikinomics: How mass collaboration changes everything. New York: Portfolio.

Tramullas, J. (2016). Competencias informacionales básicas y uso de Wikipedia en entornos educativos. Gestión de la Innovación en Educación Superior, 1(1), 79-95. https://bit.ly/2jQabru

Valverde, D., & González, J. (2016). Búsqueda y selección de información en recursos digitales: Percepciones de alumnos de Física y Química de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria y Bachillerato sobre Wikipedia. Revista Eureka sobre Enseñanza y Divulgación de las Ciencias, 13(1), 67-83. https://bit.ly/2rCW4tJ

Viñals, A., Abad, M., & Aguilar, E. (2014). Jóvenes conectados: Una aproximación al ocio digital de los jóvenes españoles. Comunication Papers, 3(4), 52-68. https://bit.ly/2KgpcOh

White, D., & Le-Cornu, A. (2011). Visitors and residents: A new typology for online engafement. First Monday, 16(9), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.5210/fm.v16i9.3171

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/18
Accepted on 30/09/18
Submitted on 30/09/18

Volume 26, Issue 2, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C57-2018-06
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 1
Views 4
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?