Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The article analyzes the results of the international survey «Synthesis of Media Literacy Education and Media Criticism in the Modern World», conducted by the authors in May-July 2014. 64 media educators, media critics, and researchers in the field of media education and media culture participated in the survey, representing 18 countries: the USA, the UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Sweden, Finland, Greece, Cyprus, Hungary, Ukraine, Serbia, Turkey, and Russia. Analysis of the data shows that the international expert community on the whole shares the view that the synthesis of media education and media criticism is not only possible, but also necessary, especially in terms of effectively developing the audience’s critical thinking skills. However, only 9.4% of the experts believe that media critics' texts are used in media literacy education classes in their countries to a large extent. Approximately one-third (34.4% of the polled experts) believe that this is happening at a moderate level, and about the same number (32.8%) believe that this is happening to a small extent. Consequently, media education and media criticism have a lot to work to do to make their synthesis really effective in the modern world.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the question

One of the most important components of media literacy education is teaching the audience to analyze media texts of different kinds and genres. That is where, in our opinion, media criticism serves as an effective ally (Downey, Titley & Toynbee, 2014; Hermes, Van-den-Berg & Mol, 2013; Kaun, 2014; Masterman, 1985; Silverblatt, 2001; Potter, 2011). Media criticism is an area of journalism, a creative and analytical activity that requires the exercising critical awareness and the evaluation of information produced by mass media, including its social significance, relevance, and ethical aspects (Korochensky, 2003). These objectives are linked to using and analyzing media information of different genres, forms and types: and identifying economic, political, social, and/ or cultural interests connected to it.

Media criticism can be divided into academic (e.g. publication of research findings related to media understanding, aimed mainly at specialists in the field of media studies and professors/instructors in media departments); professional (publications in journals aimed at media industry professionals); and general (aimed at a general audience) (Bakanov, 2009; Korochensky, 2003; Van-de-Berg, Wenner & Gronbeck, 2014). Thus, it is primarily media critics in mass periodicals, along with media educators who strive to raise the media literacy level of the mass audience.

Media competence is multidimensional and requires a broad perspective, based on well-developed foundational knowledge. It is not a fixed category: theoretically, one can raise his/her media competence level, by perceiving, interpreting, and analyzing cognitive, emotional, aesthetic and ethical media information. The audience that is at a higher level of media literacy has a higher level of understanding and ability to manage and evaluate the world of media (Camarero, 2013; Fantin, 2010; Huerta, 2011; Potter, 2011: 12). There are still pragmatic pseudo-media education approaches –in which real media education is substituted by teaching elementary media skills or encouraging greater media consumption– in use today (Razlogov, 2005). The danger of such a simplistic attitude to media education has been emphasized by many researchers (for instance, Wallis & Buckingham, 2013).

Media criticism has great potential to facilitate educational efforts to develop the audience’s media culture. Again, it is a common feature between media criticism and media education, because one of the main objectives of media education is not only to teach the audience textual analysis techniques, but also to understand the mechanisms of their construction and function.

Moreover, British media educators (Bazalgette, 1995, Buckingham, 2006: 271-272 and others) among the six key aspects of media education emphasize the agency, the category, the technology, the media language, the representation and the audience. As a matter of fact, the same key aspects of media are subject to media criticism, appealing to both the professional and the mass audience. This is why a solid connection between media criticism and media education is so important (Hammer, 2011; Potter, 2011).

2. Materials and methods

We conducted an international survey, entitled «Synthesis of Media Literacy Education and Media Criticism in the Modern World», and analysis from May 2014 through early July 2014. We sent out 300 questionnaires to specialists in the fields of media criticism and media literacy education from different countries. The choice of experts was determined by their influence and leadership in the academic community and the number of research articles on the theme they had published in peer-review journals.


Draft Content 841122642-36822-en060.jpg

On the whole we surveyed 64 media educators, critics, and researchers in the field of media education and culture from 18 countries: the USA, the UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Sweden, Finland, Greece, Cyprus, Hungary, Ukraine, Serbia, Turkey, and Russia. Of these 50% (32 people) were from Western countries, while 32 people were from Russia and Ukraine. The list of experts includes such prominent media educators and researchers of media culture as Kathleen Tyner, Faith Rogow, W. James Potter, Marilyn A. Cohen, John Pungente, Ignacio Aguaded, Georgy Pocheptsov, Hanna Onkovich, Sergey Korkonosenko, Alexander Korochensky, Kirill Razlogov, and other experts to whom the authors are sincerely grateful.


Draft Content 841122642-36822-en061.jpg

3. Instruments

Thus, the first point of our survey offered experts a list of media criticism functions, of which they had to choose the most important ones, in their opinion. Table 1 shows the results of the first question.

The second question dealt with the genres of media criticism that are most applicable to media education.


Draft Content 841122642-36822-en062.jpg

The third question of the survey dealt with media criticism’s degree of compliance with media education functions towards the mass audience. The results are represented in table 3.

The fourth question of the survey concerned the experts’ evaluation of the degree of integration of media criticism and media education in public education institutions in their home countries (see table in the next page).

The fifth question related to the experts’ estimation of the degree to which certain texts by media critics are used in media education classes in their countries (see table in the next page).

The sixth question dealt with the experts’ estimation of which media education objectives can be more effectively reached if supported with the use of media critics’ texts. The findings are reflected in the following table.

The seventh question of the survey related to the experts’ self-assessment of the extent they synthesize media literacy education and media criticism in their teaching practice (see table in the next page).

4. Results – Discussion and conclusions

The analysis of table 1 shows that the vast majority of experts (87.5%) support the analytical function of media criticism as the most relevant for mass media education. Then follow educational (73.4%), ethical (62.5%), informational-communicative (59.4%), aesthetical (57.8%), ideological/political (56.2%) and ethical (54.7%). The rest of the functions of media criticism (entertaining, recreation; regulatory, corporate; advertising) did not gain the vote of more than 25% of the experts.

Only 12.5% of experts added other functions of media criticism; among them were the functions of critical thinking development, the audience’s socialization, and learning about the economic organization of media and its impact on what is produced. The latter, as rightly mentioned by one of the experts, is very important for facilitating discussion of such questions as: what kind of media landscape would we have if everything was financed by selling advertising? Is there still a role for public service media financed out of taxation, and if so, what is that role? Should websites like Facebook be allowed to sell personal data about their users?

We should mention here that while developing the survey, we implied that the function of critical thinking development is a part of the analytical function.

However, if we compare the answers of the experts from post-Soviet countries (Russia and Ukraine), on the one hand and experts from the Western countries, on the other hand, then we are able to see that their views on analytical, informational-communicative, educational, ethical, regulatory, corporate, artistic, and aesthetic functions of media criticism correspond closely, but their opinions about other functions differ substantially. For example, the ideological/political function, gained 49.8% of Russian and Ukrainian experts’ votes and 68.7% of Western experts’ votes. Entertainment and recreation gained 6.2% of Russian and Ukrainian experts’ votes and 31.2% of Western experts’ votes. Advertising gained 9.4% of Russian and Ukrainian experts’ votes and 40.6% of votes). This considerable difference (ranging from 18 to 31%) demonstrates that Western media educators, critics, and researchers place much more emphasis on the ideological, entertainment, and advertising functions of media criticism. We believe that this can be explained by the fact that media education in post Soviet countries has paid little attention to advertising and entertainment genres until recently; and intensive imposition of communist ideology during the Soviet regime led to media teachers’ wary attitude to ideology functions in the post-Soviet era.

The analysis of table 2 demonstrated that the most relevant media criticism genres for media education are considered to be analytical articles about events and processes (present or past) in the media sphere (78.1% experts’ votes), comments on a media topic (57.8%), interview, talk, discussion with media personalities (54.7%), short review (film/radio/TV/Internet) (43.7%), essay on a media topic (43.7%), long review of a specific media text (film/radio/Internet) (42.2%), and report on a media topic (35.9%). The remaining media criticism genres (memoir on a media topic, open letter on a media topic, parody on a media topic, portrait (characteristics) of a person from the media, pamphlet, satire on a media topic) did not exceed 30% of the experts’ votes. Only 10.9% of experts supplied other genres. They mentioned pitches, presentations, intercultural dialogue, open discussions, evaluation of public service announcements, readers’ Internet forum inspired by a media critic’s publication, etc. In our opinion, this attests to the fact that we have managed to represent the main genres of modern media criticism in our survey.

However, if we compare the answers of experts from post-Soviet countries (Russia and Ukraine) and experts from the Western countries, then we can see that while they are quite close in their views about such genres of media criticism as short review (film/radio/TV/Internet), long review of a specific media text (film/radio/Internet), open letter on a media topic, report on a media topic, pamphlet, and satire on a media topic, they differ drastically about such genres as comments on a media topic (experts from Russia and Ukraine, 46.9% of votes, Western experts, 68.7%), interview, talk, or discussion with media personalities (experts from Russia and Ukraine, 78.1%, Western experts, 31.2%), memoir on a media topic (experts from Russia and Ukraine, 12.5%, Western experts, 3.1%), essay on a media topic (experts from Russia and Ukraine, 34.4%, Western experts, 53.1%), parody on a media topic (experts from Russia and Ukraine, 12.5%, Western experts, 46.9%), portrait (characteristics) of a person from the media (experts from Russia and Ukraine, 37.5%, Western experts, 18.7%).

This significant difference (reaching 47% in the case of interview, talk, or discussion with media personalities) shows that in Western countries, media educators, critics and researchers lay more emphasis on entertaining genres of media criticism (e.g. a parody) on the one hand, and on the other hand – prefer contents and composition of «loose» media criticism genres (such as comments and essays). At the same time the analysis of the data in table 2 shows that Russian and Ukrainian experts tend to a larger degree to prioritize genres popular in the post-Soviet media such as interview, talk, or discussion with media personalities and memoirs on a media topic. However, let us bear in mind that it is about priorities, because in their comments many experts wrote that all the suggested genres are important.

The analysis of data in table 3 shows that on the whole experts think that media criticism realizes educational functions on a medium level (40.6% of surveyed experts) or to a small extent (46.9%). Only 6.2% of experts believe that media criticism exercises educational functions to a great degree in their home countries. In the meantime, if the answers of experts from post-Soviet countries (Russia and Ukraine) are compared to the answers of their Western colleagues, we can see that the latter are more optimistic: 12.5% of them do believe that media criticism performs educational functions to a large extent and 43.7% – to a medium extent. However, more than one third of the experts from western countries believe that media criticism has little educational effect. These data, in our opinion, testify to the fact that even in European and North American countries, according to experts’ views, the media educational potential of criticism most often remains untapped.

The analysis of the data in table 4 indicates that only 7.8% of experts in general consider that media criticism is integrated with the media literacy education of school and university students to a considerable degree. About one third (32.2% of those polled) think that this integration is at the medium level, and over one half (56.2%) – to a small degree.


Draft Content 841122642-36822-en063.jpg

Still, comparing the answers of experts from post-Soviet countries on the one hand, and the Western countries on the other hand, we can trace the difference: 15.6% of the latter are sure of considerable degree of usage of media criticism in media education classrooms in schools and universities, while all the experts from Russia and Ukraine left this column blank. This means that experts from post-Soviet countries do not see the examples of considerable integration of media criticism and formal education practices, so it is only logical that 81.2% of them claim that this process is developing very little in their countries. This is accounted for by for the sad fact that the media criticism potential remains untapped in educational institutions.

Table 5 demonstrates that 9.4% of experts in general believe that media critics’ texts are used in media literacy education classes in their countries quite often. Around one third (34.4% of those polled) think that the educational application of concrete texts of media critics is implemented at a medium level, and about the same number (32.8% of votes) consider that this is almost not happening.


Draft Content 841122642-36822-en064.jpg

Among the names of media critics whose texts are widely used in educational practices, Western experts mentioned Marshall McLuhan, David Buckingham, Roland Barthes, Noam Chomsky, Neil Postman, and Denis McQuail, and experts from Russia and Ukraine referred to Irina Petrovskaya, Alexander Korochensky, Georgy Pocheptsov, Roman Bakanov, and Len Masterman. A closer look at these names reveals that Western experts mostly named well-known English-speaking authors (UK, USA, and Canada). For example, authors from Australia and Northern Europe have entered this list at minimum, and Russian and Ukrainian authors were not included at all. On the contrary, experts from Russia and Ukraine gave preference to Russian-speaking authors. In our opinion, this fact confirms the general tendency of both the Western and post-Soviet expert community not to address the wider spectrum of their colleagues’ works but instead to focus on a familiar names, mainly from countries that share their mother tongue.

However, if we compare the answers of experts from post-Soviet countries (Russia and Ukraine) and those from the Western countries, then we can see that the number of Western experts that are sure of a moderate level of media criticism application in educational institutions is over one half (53.1%, vs. 15.6% of experts from post-Soviet countries). 43.7% of Russian and Ukrainian experts are sure that this process is undeveloped and one third (31.2%) found it difficult to answer this question at all.

These data, to our mind, account for the fact that in experts’ opinion, specific texts by media critics are used in media education practice in schools and universities little or only somewhat. This correlates to the data from table 4 as well.

The analysis of table 6 demonstrates that, according to the experts’ opinions, the most important media literacy education objectives that can be facilitated by using media critics’ texts in media literacy education classes are the following:


Draft Content 841122642-36822-en065.jpg

• Development of analytical/critical thinking, autonomy of the individual in terms of media (87.5% of those polled).

• Development of skills of political/ideological analysis of different aspects of media/media culture (75.0%);

• Development of the audience’s ability to perceive, understand and analyze the language of media texts (64.1%).

• Amplification of analytical skills related to the cultural and social context of media texts (62.5%).

• Protection from harmful media effects (59.4%).

• Preparation of the audience for living in a democratic society (56.2%).

• Development of good aesthetic perception, taste, understanding, and appreciation of artistic qualities of a media text (53.1%).

• Development of the audience’s ability to create and publish their own media texts (53.1% of respondents).


Draft Content 841122642-36822-en066.jpg

If we compare the answers of the experts from post-Soviet countries (Russia and Ukraine) and experts from Western countries, then we can see the relatively similar views about such media education objectives as the development of analytical/critical thinking, autonomy of the individual in terms of media, protection from harmful media effects, development of the audience’s skills in perceiving, understanding and analyzing the language of media texts, and development of communicative skills of the individual. The positions of experts in Russia and Ukraine differ considerably from Western experts about such objectives as: Preparation of the audience for living in a democratic society (experts from Russia and Ukraine –43.7% of votes, Western experts– 68.7%). Development of the audience’s ability to create and publish their own media texts (experts from Russia and Ukraine –40.6%, Western experts– 65.6%), Development of the audience’s skills in carrying out moral, spiritual, and psychological analysis of aspects of media and media culture (experts from Russia and Ukraine –59.4%, Western experts– 37.5%). Satisfaction of various needs of the audience in terms of media (experts from Russia and Ukraine –21.9%, Western experts– 40.6%). Learning about the theory of media and media culture (experts from Russia and Ukraine –31.2%, Western experts– 50.0%). Learning about the history of media and media culture (experts from Russia and Ukraine –34.4%, Western experts– 46.9%). Development of good aesthetic perception, taste, understanding, and appreciation of artistic qualities of a media text (experts from Russia and Ukraine – 59.4%, Western experts– 46.9%). Development of skills of political/ideological analysis of different aspects of media/ media culture (experts from Russia and Ukraine –68.7%, Western experts– 81.2%). Amplification of analytical skills related to cultural, and social context of media texts (experts from Russia and Ukraine –56.2%, Western experts– 68.7%).

This significant difference (ranging from 12% to 25%) demonstrates that Western media educators, critics, and researchers place more emphasis on the preparation of the audience for living in a democratic society, developing the audience’s ability to create and publish their own media texts, satisfaction of various needs of the audience in terms of media, learning about theory and history of media and media culture, development of skills of political/ideological analysis of different aspects of media/media culture, and amplification of analytical skills related to the cultural, and social context of media texts. On the other hand, Russian and Ukrainian educators, critics, and researchers emphasize the development of the audience’s skills in carrying out moral, spiritual, and psychological analysis of aspects of media, and media culture; and development of good aesthetic perception, taste, understanding, and appreciation of the artistic qualities of a media text. Developing the audience’s ability to create and publish their own media texts, satisfaction of various needs of the audience in terms of media, and learning about the theory and history of media and media culture get less attention.

We think that these differences are connected to the fact that the development of the audience’s skills in carrying out moral, spiritual, and psychological analysis of aspects of media and media culture and development of good aesthetic perception, taste, understanding, and appreciation of artistic qualities of a media text are traditional points of emphasis for the media education of the Soviet and post-Soviet period, while the preparation of the audience for living in a democratic society is more typical of the Western approach.

As for the development of skills of political/ideological analysis of different aspects of media/media culture, the differences in approaches, as reflected in table 1, are linked to the fact that the imposition of communist ideology in Soviet times led to a skeptical attitude toward this function later on.

The analysis of data in table 7 shows that 39.1% of experts in general think that as teachers they integrate media criticism and media literacy education to a considerable degree, and 29.7% of experts believe that they do this somewhat. However, only one-fourth of experts confess that they integrate media criticism little in their classes.

Additionally, if the answers of Russian and Ukrainian experts are compared to the answers of their Western colleagues, one can see that the number of Western professionals sure of considerable integration of media criticism in their classes is over one-half (56.6%) while in post-Soviet countries this number is only 21.9%.

While one-third (34.4%) of Russian and Ukrainian specialists acknowledge the weak degree of application of media criticism in their classrooms, only 12.5% of Western experts hold the same view. These data, in our opinion, attest that:

• Even among the expert community around half (53.1%) integrate media criticism and media literacy education fairly little or very little.

• Russian and Ukrainian media educators integrate criticism in their classrooms far less than their western colleagues.

This is in spite of the fact that, according to the table 3 data, the majority of experts do recognize that the educational potential of media criticism in educational institutions remains untapped.

Because of the conflicting political, economic and media situation around Ukraine that occurred in 2014, we considered it essential to compare not only the differences in expert opinions between post-Soviet countries and Western countries, but between Russian and Ukrainian ones as well. With all the similarities of approaches detected by the survey answers, it appears that many Ukrainian experts are sensitive about the correlation of the current political situation with the position of media criticism in education.

Despite the relatively small number of respondents, it is important to note that the survey results to one of the key questions, shown in table 6 (What media literacy education objectives can be facilitated by using media critics’ texts in media literacy education classes?) almost completely coincided with the results of our previous sociological research (Fedorov, 2003). In 2003 we surveyed 26 experts in the field of media education/literacy from 10 countries. In particular, they answered questions about the main objectives of media education/media literacy. The comparative analysis of both surveys reveals the following characteristic congruence about the objectives of media education:

• Development of analytical/critical thinking, autonomy of the individual in terms of media (84.3% in 2003 and 87.5% in 2014).

• Development in the area of cultural/social media context (61.5% in 2003 and 62.5 in 2014).

• Development of good aesthetic perception, taste, understanding, and appreciation of artistic qualities of a media text (54.9% in 2003 and 53.1 in 2014).

• Development of the audience’s ability to create and publish their own media texts (53.8% in 2003 and 53.1 in 2014).

• Learning about the history of media and media culture (37.8% in 2003 and 40.6% in 2014).

• Learning about the theory of media and media culture (47.9% in 2003 and 40.6 in 2014).

• Preparation of the audience for living in a democratic society (61.9% in 2003 and 56.2 in 2014).

However, there are some differences, for example, the objective of the development of communicative skills of the individual (57.3% in 2003 and 28.1% in 2014). In our opinion, this fact is not connected to a decrease in number of experts who chose this media education objective as one of the most important in 2014, because the share of Western experts in the 2003 questionnaire remained almost the same in 2014 (in the survey of 2003 14 (53.8%) Western experts were among the 26 participants, and in 2014 – 32 (50%) Western experts out of 64 respondents). We tend to believe that the fall in popularity of the objective of the development of communicative skills is due to the fact that 2014 experts reasonably think that communicative skills development by itself cannot be the aim of media education. There are now more vital objectives such as development of analytical/critical thinking, autonomy of the individual in terms of media, development of skills of political/ideological analysis of different aspects of media/media culture, amplification of analytical skills related to the cultural and social context of media texts, and preparation of the audience for living in a democratic society (56.2% of votes).

Quite reasonably, one of the leading Russian experts added in the margins of our survey that the development of mass media criticism in Russia as well as in foreign countries is hindered by the lack of interest on the part of the authorities and the media business in having a media-competent audience of active citizens (which is an essential prerequisite of democratic development in a modern media saturated society). But media criticism is more and more often used as a new information propaganda resource, used to influence communities of media professionals and mass audiences during crisis situations.

To sum up, media criticism and education have a lot in common: for instance, both media education and criticism place great emphasis on the development of analytical thinking in the audience. One of the main objectives of media education is, in fact, to teach the audience not only to analyze media texts of various types and genres, but to understand the mechanisms of their construction and functioning in society. As a matter of fact, media criticism deals with the same thing, appealing to professional and mass audiences. Therefore, in our opinion, the synthesis of media education and criticism is very important. For this reason, the discussion about the role and function of media in society and analysis of various media texts in educational institutions is very important. Both media criticism and education have great potential in terms of the support of the efforts of educational institutions to develop the media competence of the audience (Buckingham, 2003; Fenton, 2009; Hobbs, 2007; Korochensky, 2003; Miller, 2009; Sparks, 2013). We should expand the participation of academic communities, researchers, specialists in different fields (teachers, sociologists, psychologists, cultural studies experts, journalists and philosophers), institutions of culture and education, social organizations and funds in order to promote the development of media literacy/media competence of the citizens, and to create organizational structures able to implement the whole spectrum of media education objectives in alliance with media critics.

Support and acknowledgement

This article is written within the framework of a study supported by the grant of the Russian Science Foundation (RSF). Project 14-18-00014 «Synthesis of media education and media criticism in the preparation of future teachers», performed at Taganrog Management and Economics Institute.

References

Bakanov, R.P. (2009). Media Criticism of the Federal Periodicals of 1990s. Information Field of Modern Russia: The Practices and Effects. Kazan: Kazan University Press, 109-116.

Bazalgette, C. (1995). Key Aspects of Media Education. Moscow: Russian Association for Film Education.

Buckingham, D. (2003). Media Education. London: Polity Press.

Buckingham, D. (2006). Defining Digital Literacy. Digital Kompetanse, 1(4), 263-276.

Camarero, E. (2013). Training, education and innovation in audiovisual media to Social Change in Nicaragua. (http://goo.gl/pQFC3R) (07-07-2014).

Downey, J., Titley, G., & Toynbee, J. (2014). Ideology Critique: The Challenge for Media Studies. Media, Culture & Society, 36(6), 878-887. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0163443714536113

Fantin, M. (2010). Literacy, Digital Literacy and Information Literacy. International Journal of Digital Literacy and Digital Competence, 1(4), 10-15. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4018/jdldc.2010100102

Fedorov, A. (2003). Media Education and Media Literacy: Experts’ Opinions. Mentor. A Media Education Curriculum for Teachers in the Mediterranean. Paris: UNESCO.

Fenton, N. (2009). My Media Studies: Getting Political in a Global, Digital Age. Television New Media, 10, 55-57. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1527476408325100

Hammer, R. (2011). Critical Media Literacy as Engaged Pedagogy. E-learning and Digital Media, 8(4), 357-363. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2304/elea.2011.8.4.357

Hermes, J., Van-den-Berg, A., & Mol, M. (2013). Sleeping with the Enemy: Audience Studies and Critical Literacy. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 16(5), 457-473. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1367877912474547

Hobbs, R. (2007). Reading theMedia : Media literacy in High School English. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Huerta, R. (2011). Hybridation between Media Education and Visual Arts Education. Miyazaki’s Cinema as a Revulsive’. Acta Didactica Napocensia, 4(4), 55-66.

Kaun, A. (2014). I really don’t Like them! – Exploring Citizens’ Media Criticism. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 17(5), 489-506. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1367549413515259

Korochensky, A.P. (2003). Media Criticism in the Theory and Practice of Journalism. Rostov: Rostov State University Press.

Masterman, L. (1985). Teaching the Media. London: Comedia Publishing Group.

Miller, T. (2009). Media Studies 3.0. Television & New Media, 10(1), 5-6. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1527476408328932

Potter, W.J. (2011). Media Literacy. LA: Sage.

Razlogov, K.E. (2005). Media Education: What is it for? Media Education, 2, 68-75.

Sharikov, A.V. (2005). Media Education: So what is it for? Media Education, 2, 75-81.

Silverblatt, A. (2001). Media Literacy. Westport, Connecticut. London: Prager.

Sparks, C. (2013). Global Media Studies: Its Development and Dilemmas. Media, Culture & Society, 35(1), 121-131. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0163443712464566

Temple, M. (2013). The Media and the Message. Journal of Political Marketing, 12, 147-165. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15377857.2013.781479

Van-de-Berg, L.R., Wenner, L.A. & Gronbeck, B.E. (2014). Media Literacy and Television Criticism: Enabling an Informed and Engaged Citizenry. American Behavioral Scientist, 48, 219-228. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0002764204267266

Wallis, R., & Buckingham, D. (2013). Arming the Citizen-consumer: The Invention of ‘Media Literacy’ within UK Communications Policy. European Journal of Communication, 28(5), 527-540. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0267323113483605



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El artículo analiza los resultados de la encuesta internacional sobre la «Situación de la educación en medios y la competencia crítica en medios en el mundo actual», llevado a cabo por los autores en mayo-julio de 2014. Fueron entrevistados responsables de 64 medios de comunicación, educadores críticos e investigadores en el campo de la educación mediática y la cultura de los medios de comunicación de 18 países: USA, Reino Unido, Canadá, Australia, Nueva Zelanda, Alemania, Irlanda, España, Portugal, Suecia, Finlandia, Grecia, Chipre, Hungría, Ucrania, Serbia, Turquía y Rusia. El análisis global de los datos muestra que la comunidad internacional de expertos comparte la convicción de que la situación de la educación en medios y la competencia crítica no es únicamente posible sino también necesaria, sobre todo en términos del desarrollo del pensamiento crítico de la audiencia. Sin embargo, solamente el 9,4% de los expertos en general cree que se utilizan los textos críticos de los medios en las clases de alfabetización mediática en sus respectivos países. Aproximadamente un tercio (34,4% de los expertos encuestados) creen que esto está sucediendo en un nivel aceptable y un porcentaje similar (32,8% de las respuestas) considera que ocurre en una mínima parte. En consecuencia, habrá mucho trabajo que hacer para que la educación en medios y su análisis crítico consiga su implementación eficaz en el mundo actual.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

Uno de los componentes más importantes de la educación en alfabetización mediática es enseñar al público a analizar textos mediáticos de diferentes tipos y géneros. Ahí es donde, en nuestra opinión, la educación crítica en medios –media criticism– sirve como un aliado eficaz (Downey, Titley & Toynbee, 2014; Hermes, Van-den-Berg & Mol, 2013; Kaun, 2014; Masterman, 1985; Silverblatt, 2001; Potter, 2011). La educación en medios es un área del periodismo, una actividad creativa y analítica que implica el ejercicio de la conciencia crítica y la evaluación de la información producida por los medios de comunicación, incluyendo su importancia social, relevancia y los aspectos éticos (Korochensky, 2003). Estos objetivos están relacionados con el uso de la información de los medios de diferentes géneros, formas, tipos, así como su análisis y la definición de los intereses económicos, políticos, sociales y/o culturales conectados a ellos.

La crítica mediática se puede dividir desde el punto de vista académico; por ejemplo, la publicación de resultados de investigación relativos a la comprensión de la esfera mediática, principalmente dirigido a los especialistas en el campo de los estudios de medios y profesores, y educadores de los departamentos de comunicación; profesional (publicaciones en revistas dirigidas a los profesionales de la industria de medios); y en general (dirigido a la audiencia de masas) (Bakanov, 2009; Korochensky, 2003; Van-de-Berg, Wenner & Gronbeck, 2014). Por lo tanto, se trata de utilizar la educación en medios en publicaciones científicas y divulgativas junto con los educadores en medios, para que estos últimos logren elevar el nivel de alfabetización mediática de un público educativo lo más amplio posible.

La competencia mediática es un concepto multidimensional y requiere una perspectiva amplia, basada en el conocimiento fundacional bien desarrollado. No es una categoría fija; en teoría, se puede aumentar el nivel de competencia mediática, al percibir, interpretar o analizar cognitiva, emocional, estética y éticamente la información multimedia. El público que está a un nivel más alto de alfabetización mediática alcanza un mayor nivel de comprensión y capacidad para gestionar y evaluar el mundo de los medios de comunicación (Camarero, 2013; Fantin, 2010; Huerta, 2011; Potter, 2011: 12). Todavía se utilizan hoy enfoques de pseudo-educación pragmática en los cuales la educación mediática se sustituye por la enseñanza de habilidades mediáticas elementales, o alentando un mayor consumo de los medios de comunicación (Razlogov, 2005). El peligro de una actitud tan simplista en la educación mediática ha sido enfatizado por muchos investigadores (Wallis & Buckingham, 2013).

La educación crítica en medios posee un gran potencial a la hora de facilitar los esfuerzos educativos en el desarrollo de la cultura mediática de la audiencia. De nuevo, es una característica común entre la competencia y educación mediática, ya que uno de los principales objetivos de esta no es solo enseñar técnicas de análisis de audiencias textuales, sino también comprender los mecanismos de su construcción y funcionamiento.

Por otra parte, los educadores mediáticos británicos (Bazalgette, 1995; Buckingham & al., 2006: 271-272), destacan entre los seis aspectos clave de la educación mediática: las agencias de los medios, los lenguajes, las categorías, las representaciones, las técnicas de producción y los públicos. Es un hecho constatado que estos mismos aspectos clave de los medios de comunicación están sujetos a la competencia mediática, apelando tanto al profesional como al público de masas. Por eso es tan importante una conexión sólida entre la crítica y la educación mediática (Hammer, 2011; Potter, 2011; Van-de-Berg, Wenner & Gronbeck, 2014).

2. Materiales y metodología

Hemos llevado a cabo una encuesta internacional, titulada «Situación de la educación mediática y la competencia crítica en la formación de los futuros docentes», así como su análisis desde mayo de 2014 hasta principios de julio de 2014. Enviamos 300 cuestionarios a especialistas en el campo de la crítica y la educación mediática de diferentes países. La selección de expertos fue determinada por su influencia y liderazgo en la comunidad académica y el número de artículos científicos sobre el tema, publicados en revistas de revisión por pares.


Draft Content 841122642-36822 ov-es060.jpg

Fueron encuestados en total 64 expertos entre educadores mediáticos, críticos e investigadores en el campo de la educación mediática y para la cultura de 18 países: EEUU, Reino Unido, Canadá, Australia, Nueva Zelanda, Alemania, Irlanda, España, Portugal, Suecia, Finlandia, Grecia, Chipre, Hungría, Ucrania, Serbia, Turquía y Rusia. De ellos el 50% (32 personas) proviene de países occidentales, mientras que 32 personas vienen de Rusia y Ucrania. La lista de expertos incluye docentes o investigadores de la cultura mediática tan destacados como Kathleen Tyner, Faith Rogow, W. James Potter, Marilyn A. Cohen, John Pungente, Ignacio Aguaded, Georgy Pocheptsov, Hanna Onkovich, Sergey Korkonosenko, Alexander Korochensky, Kirill Razlogov y otros expertos a los que estamos realmente agradecidos por su colaboración en este estudio.


Draft Content 841122642-36822 ov-es061.jpg

3. Instrumentos

El primer punto de nuestra encuesta se refería a las posibles funciones de la educación mediática. Los expertos encuestados debían elegir, según su opinión, los más importantes. La tabla 1 muestra los resultados de esta primera pregunta.

La segunda pregunta trataba de establecer los géneros de educación mediática que, según los expertos, pueden aplicarse a la educación mediática.


Draft Content 841122642-36822 ov-es062.jpg

La tercera pregunta de la encuesta se refirió al grado de efectividad de la educación mediática con las funciones de la educación mediática en su relación con el público de masas. Los resultados se representan en la tabla 3.

La cuarta pregunta de la encuesta se refería a la evaluación de los expertos sobre el grado de integración de la competencia y la educación mediática en las instituciones de enseñanza pública en sus países de origen (tabla 4 en la página siguiente).

La quinta pregunta establecía la estimación de los expertos sobre la frecuencia con la que en sus países son utilizados en el aula textos sobre competencia mediática (tabla 5 en la página siguiente).

La sexta pregunta se refería a la estimación de los expertos sobre qué objetivos de la educación mediática pueden ser alcanzados de forma más efectiva utilizando textos de crítica mediática. Los resultados se reflejan en la siguiente tabla.

La séptima pregunta de la encuesta buscaba la auto-evaluación de los expertos sobre la magnitud del uso conjunto de la educación y la alfabetización mediática y la competencia mediática en sus prácticas docentes (tabla 6 en la página siguiente).

4. Resultados: Discusión y conclusiones

El análisis de la tabla 1 muestra que la gran mayoría de los expertos (87,5%) admite la función analítica de la competencia mediática como lo más relevante para la educación en mass-media. A continuación, le siguen la función educativa (73,4%), ética (62,5%), informativo-comunicacional (59,4%), estética (57,8%), ideológica, política (56,2%) y ética (54,7%). El resto de las funciones críticas de los medios (entretenimiento, reguladora, corporativa, publicitaria) no alcanzaron el voto de más del 25% de los expertos.

Solo el 12,5% de los expertos añadió otras funciones a la competencia mediática, entre ellas la función del desarrollo del pensamiento crítico, la socialización de la audiencia, el aprendizaje sobre la organización económica de los medios de comunicación y su impacto en la producción de ingresos. En este último caso, como acertadamente mencionó uno de los expertos, es un factor muy importante para encontrar respuesta a preguntas como ¿qué tipo de paisaje mediático tendríamos si todos estuvieran financiados por la publicidad?; ¿existe todavía una vocación de servicio público en los medios de comunicación financiada con los impuestos? Y si es así ¿qué rol deben desempeñar?, ¿debería permitirse a sitios web como Facebook que pudieran vender los datos personales de sus usuarios?

Cabe mencionar aquí que durante el desarrollo de la encuesta, de forma implícita se daba a entender que la función del desarrollo del pensamiento crítico forma parte de la función analítica.

Sin embargo, si comparamos las respuestas de los expertos de los países post-soviéticos (Rusia y Ucrania), por un lado, y los expertos de los países occidentales por otro lado, observamos que existe una relativa cercanía de opinión sobre la educación en medios y sus funciones analítica, info-comunicacional, educativa, ética, normativa, empresarial, artística y estética; en cambio las opiniones sobre el resto de funciones difieren sustancialmente. La función ideológica-política alcanzó el 49,8% de votos de los expertos de Rusia y Ucrania, frente al 68,7% de los expertos occidentales; el entretenimiento, un 6,2% frente a un 31,2%; la publicitaria un 9,4% frente a un 40,6%. Esta considerable diferencia (que va del 18% al 31%), demuestra que los educadores e investigadores en comunicación occidentales ponen especial énfasis en las funciones ideológicas, de entretenimiento y publicidad de la competencia mediática. Creemos que esto se puede explicar por el hecho de que la educación mediática de los países post-soviéticos ha prestado hasta hace poco escasa atención a los géneros de publicidad y entretenimiento; la intensa imposición de la ideología comunista durante el régimen soviético llevó a los profesores de comunicación a mantener una actitud en guardia frente a las funciones ideológicas ya en el tiempo post-soviético.

El análisis de la tabla 2 demuestra que los géneros críticos ante los medios considerados los más importantes para la educación mediática son los artículos de análisis sobre eventos y procesos (presentes o pasados) en la esfera de medios (78,1%), comentarios sobre un tópico mediático (57,8%), entrevista, debate, discusión con personalidades de los medios (54,7%), la reseña breve sobre una película, radio, TV e Internet (43,7%), el ensayo sobre un tópico mediático (43,7%), la reseña amplia sobre un texto mediático especifico de cine/radio/Internet (42,2%), y el informe sobre un tópico mediático (35,9%). El resto de los elementos críticos de los medios (memorias, carta abierta o parodia sobre un tópico mediático, semblanza de una persona de la esfera mediática, folleto, sátira sobre un tópico mediático) no superaron el 30% de las calificaciones de los expertos. Solo el 10,9% de los expertos se refirieron a otros géneros; mencionaron lanzamientos, presentaciones, el diálogo intercultural, debates abiertos, evaluación de campañas de concienciación, foros en Internet de lectores inspirados por una publicación de educación en medios, etc. En nuestra opinión, estos resultados dan fe del hecho de que hemos logrado representar a los principales géneros del criticismo mediático moderno en nuestra encuesta.

Sin embargo, si comparamos las respuestas de los expertos de los países post-soviéticos (Rusia y Ucrania) y la de los expertos de los países occidentales, entonces podemos observar que mientras los resultados son cercanos acerca de géneros tales como la reseña breve sobre una película, radio, TV, Internet, película, y radio e Internet, la reseña amplia sobre un texto mediático especifico de cine, radio e Internet, la carta abierta, el informe o el folleto y la sátira sobre un tópico mediático difieren drásticamente sobre géneros tales como comentarios sobre un tópico mediático (expertos de Rusia y Ucrania 46,9% de los votos, frente a 68,7% de los expertos occidentales); entrevistas, debates con personalidades de los medios (78,1%, los frente al 31,2%); las memorias sobre un tópico mediático (12,5% frente al 3,1%); ensayo sobre un tópico mediático (34,4% frente al 53,1%), parodia sobre un tópico mediático (12,5% frente al 46,9%), semblanza de una personalidad de los medios de comunicación (37,5%, frente al 18,7% de los encuestados).

Esta diferencia significativa (alcanzando el 47% en el caso de la entrevista, debate y discusión con personalidades de los medios) muestra, por un lado, que en los países occidentales los educadores, críticos e investigadores mediáticos ponen más énfasis en los géneros de entretenimiento crítico ante los medios (por ejemplo, una parodia) que sus colegas post-soviéticos, y por otro lado, prefieren los contenidos y componentes de géneros «poco precisos» como comentarios y ensayos. Al mismo tiempo, el análisis de los datos de la tabla 2 muestra que los expertos rusos y ucranianos tienden a dar mayor prioridad a los géneros populares en los medios post-soviéticos tales como la entrevista, el «talk show», el debate con personalidades de los medios y las memorias sobre un tópico mediático. Sin embargo, debemos tener en cuenta que se trata solo de prioridades, ya que en sus comentarios un gran número de expertos afirmó que todos los géneros propuestos son importantes.

El análisis de los datos de la tabla 3 muestra que, en conjunto, los expertos creen que la educación en medios es consciente de sus funciones educativas en un grado medio (40,6% de los expertos encuestados) o en un pequeño grado (46,9%). Solo el 6,2% de los expertos consideran que la competencia mediática ejerce en gran medida funciones educativas en sus países de origen. Por otro lado, si las respuestas de los expertos de los países post-soviéticos (Rusia y Ucrania) se comparan con las respuestas de sus colegas occidentales, podemos observar que estos últimos son más optimistas: el 12,5% de ellos creen que la educación en medios lleva a cabo en gran medida funciones educativas, y el 43,7% en un grado medio. Sin embargo, más de un tercio de los expertos de los países occidentales asumen que la competencia mediática tiene poco efecto educativo. Estos datos, en nuestra opinión, dan testimonio del hecho de que incluso en los países europeos y de América del Norte, de acuerdo a las opiniones de los expertos, el potencial educativo de la educación en medios permanece aún sin explotar.

El análisis de los datos de la tabla 4 indica que solo el 7,8% de los expertos considera que la educación en medios está integrada en la alfabetización mediática de los escolares y universitarios de forma considerable. Alrededor de un tercio (32,2% de los encuestados), estiman que esta integración está en un nivel medio, y más de la mitad (56,2%), en un pequeño grado.


Draft Content 841122642-36822 ov-es063.jpg

Aun así, la comparación de las respuestas de los expertos de los países post-soviéticos por un lado, y los países occidentales, por otro, nos permite trazar la diferencia: el 15,6% de estos últimos afirma que la educación en medios se integra de forma considerable en las aulas de educación mediática de colegios y universidades, mientras que todos los expertos de Rusia y Ucrania dejaron esta columna en blanco. Esto significa que los expertos de los países post-soviéticos no encuentran ejemplos de integración reseñable de la educación en medios en las prácticas de educación, así que es lógico que el 81,2% de ellos afirmen que este proceso se encuentra escasamente desarrollado en sus países. Ello confirma la triste realidad de que el potencial de la educación en medios permanece sin explotar en sus instituciones educativas.

En la tabla 5 se comprueba que el 9,4% de los expertos, en general, cree que los textos de educación mediática se utilizan con bastante frecuencia en las clases de educación y alfabetización mediática en sus países. Alrededor de un tercio (34,4% de los encuestados) piensa que la aplicación educativa de los textos concretos de críticos de los medios se implementa en un nivel medio, y aproximadamente el mismo número (32,8% de los votos) considera que esto casi nunca ocurre.


Draft Content 841122642-36822 ov-es064.jpg

Entre los nombres de los críticos de los medios cuyos textos son ampliamente utilizados en las prácticas educativas, los expertos occidentales mencionan a Marshall McLuhan, David Buckingham, Roland Barthes, Noam Chomsky, Neil Postman y Denis McQuail, y los expertos de Rusia y Ucrania se refieren a Irina Petrovskaya, Alexander Korochensky, Georgy Pocheptsov, Roman Bakanov, y Len Masterman. Una mirada más de cerca a estos nombres revela que los expertos occidentales más nombrados son autores de habla inglesa (Reino Unido, EEUU y Canadá). Son escasos los autores de Australia y el norte de Europa en esta lista, y los autores rusos y ucranianos no aparecen en absoluto. A su vez, los expertos de Rusia y Ucrania dieron sus preferencias a los autores de habla rusa. En nuestra opinión, este hecho confirma la tendencia general tanto de la comunidad de expertos occidentales y la de los post-soviéticos, de que no siempre se aborda de forma amplia las obras de sus colegas, sino que se centran en nombres ya conocidos, principalmente de los países que comparten su lengua materna.

Sin embargo, si a continuación comparamos las respuestas de los expertos de los países post-soviéticos (Rusia y Ucrania) y la de los expertos de los países occidentales, podemos ver que en este segundo grupo más de la mitad (53,1% frente a 15,6% de los expertos de los países post-soviéticos), afirman que existe un grado medio en la utilización de la competencia mediática en las instituciones educativas. El 43,7% de los expertos rusos y ucranianos está seguro de que este proceso no está desarrollado, y a un tercio (31,2%) le resultó difícil responder a esta pregunta o no lo sabía.

En nuestra opinión estos datos explican el hecho de que, según los expertos, los textos específicos de educación en medios se utilizan poco o algunas veces en la práctica de la educación mediática en las escuelas y universidades. Estas afirmaciones se correlacionan también con los datos de la tabla 4.

El análisis de la tabla 6 demuestra que, según la opinión de los expertos, los objetivos más importantes de la alfabetización mediática que pueden alcanzarse más fácilmente mediante el uso de textos de educación en medios en las clases de educación y alfabetización mediática son los siguientes:


Draft Content 841122642-36822 ov-es065.jpg

• Desarrollo de un pensamiento crítico-analítico, así como de la autonomía del individuo en términos de medios de comunicación (87,5% de los encuestados).

• Desarrollo de habilidades de análisis político-ideológico de diferentes aspectos de los medios de comunicación y cultura de los medios (75%).

• Desarrollo de las habilidades de la audiencia para percibir, entender y analizar el lenguaje de los textos mediáticos (64,1%).

• Ampliación de la capacidad de análisis en relación con el contexto cultural y social de los textos mediáticos (62,5%).

• Protección contra los efectos nocivos de los medios (59,4%).

• Preparación de la audiencia para vivir en una sociedad democrática (56,2%).

• Desarrollo de una buena percepción estética, del gusto, la comprensión y apreciación de las cualidades artísticas de un texto mediático (53,1%).

• Fomento de la capacidad del público para crear y publicar sus propios textos mediáticos (53,1% de los encuestados).


Draft Content 841122642-36822 ov-es066.jpg

Si comparamos a continuación las respuestas de los expertos de los países post-soviéticos (Rusia y Ucrania) y los expertos de los países occidentales, podemos observar la relativa cercanía de puntos de vista acerca de objetivos de educación mediática tales como el desarrollo del pensamiento analítico y crítico, la autonomía del individuo en términos de medios de comunicación, la protección contra los efectos nocivos de los medios, el desarrollo de las habilidades de la audiencia para percibir, comprender y analizar el lenguaje de los textos mediáticos o el desarrollo de las habilidades comunicativas de los individuos. Mientras que las posiciones de los expertos varían considerablemente sobre objetivos tales como la preparación de la audiencia para vivir en una sociedad democrática (expertos de Rusia y Ucrania con el 43,7% de los votos, frente al 68,7% de los expertos occidentales); fomentar la capacidad del público para crear y publicar sus propios textos mediáticos (40,6% frente al 65,6%); desarrollo por parte de la audiencia de habilidades morales, espirituales y de análisis psicológico sobre los medios de comunicación y cultura mediática (59,4%, frente al 37,5%); satisfacción por parte de la audiencia de sus necesidades en relación con los medios (21,9% frente al 40,6%); aprender sobre la teoría de los medios de comunicación y cultura mediática (31,2% frente al 50%); aprender sobre la historia de los medios de comunicación y cultura mediática (34,4%, frente al 46,9%); desarrollo de una buena percepción estética, del gusto, la comprensión y apreciación de las cualidades artísticas de un texto mediático (59,4% frente al 46,9%); desarrollo de habilidades de análisis político-ideológico de los diferentes aspectos de los medios de comunicación y cultura mediática (68,7% frente al 81,2%); ampliación de la capacidad de análisis en relación con el contexto cultural y social de los textos mediáticos (56,2% frente al 68,7%).

Esta diferencia significativa (que va del 12% al 25%) demuestra que los educadores, críticos e investigadores mediáticos occidentales ponen más énfasis en aspectos como la preparación de la audiencia para vivir en una sociedad democrática, el fomento de la capacidad del público para crear y publicar sus propios textos mediáticos, la satisfacción de las diversas necesidades de la audiencia en términos de medios de comunicación, el aprendizaje acerca de la teoría y la historia de los medios de comunicación y cultura mediática, el desarrollo de habilidades de análisis político-ideológico de los diferentes aspectos de los medios de comunicación y cultura mediática, la amplificación de la capacidad de análisis relacionados con la cultura, y contexto social de los textos mediáticos. Por otro lado, los educadores, críticos e investigadores rusos y ucranianos, enfatizan más el desarrollo de habilidades de la audiencia para llevar a cabo un análisis moral, espiritual y psicológico de aspectos de los medios de comunicación y cultura mediática; el desarrollo de una buena percepción estética, del gusto, la comprensión y apreciación de las cualidades artísticas de un texto mediático. Reciben menos atención el fomento de la capacidad del público para crear y publicar sus propios textos mediáticos, la satisfacción de las diversas necesidades de la audiencia en términos de medios de comunicación y aprender acerca de la teoría y la historia de los medios de comunicación y cultura mediática.

Creemos que estas diferencias tienen relación con el hecho de que el desarrollo por parte de la audiencia de habilidades morales, espirituales y de análisis psicológico sobre los medios de comunicación y cultura mediática y el desarrollo de la buena percepción estética, el gusto, el entendimiento y la apreciación de las cualidades artísticas de un texto mediático, son tradicionales de la educación mediática de la época soviética y post-soviética, mientras que la preparación de la audiencia para vivir en una sociedad democrática es más típico del enfoque occidental.

En cuanto al desarrollo de las habilidades de análisis político-ideológico de diferentes aspectos de los medios de comunicación y cultura mediática, las diferencias en los enfoques, como se refleja en la tabla 1, están vinculadas al hecho de que la imposición de la ideología comunista en la época soviética condujo más adelante a una actitud escéptica respecto a esta función.

El análisis de los datos de la tabla 7 muestra que, en general, el 39,1% de los expertos cree que de forma considerable los profesores integran la educación en medios en la alfabetización mediática, mientras que el 29,7% de los expertos estima que lo hacen algunas veces. Sin embargo, solo una cuarta parte de los expertos confiesa que integran poco la educación mediática en sus clases.

Junto a ello, si las respuestas de los expertos rusos y ucranianos se comparan con las respuestas de sus colegas occidentales, puede observarse que el número de profesionales occidentales que afirma que existe una considerable integración de la educación en los medios en sus clases es de más de la mitad (56,6%), mientras que en los países post-soviéticos este porcentaje es solo del 21,9%.

Mientras que un tercio (34,4%) de los especialistas rusos y ucranianos reconoce que existe una débil educación en medios en sus aulas, solo el 12,5% de los expertos occidentales sostiene la misma opinión. En nuestra opinión, estos datos dan fe de que:

• Entre la comunidad de expertos en torno a la mitad (53,1%) integran poco o muy poco la educación en medios en la alfabetización mediática.

• Los educadores mediáticos rusos y ucranianos integran la educación en medios en sus clases mucho menos que sus colegas occidentales.

Y todo ello, a pesar del hecho de que, según los datos de la tabla 3, la mayoría de los expertos sí reconoce que el potencial educativo de la competencia mediática en las instituciones educativas permanece sin explotar.

A causa del conflicto político y la situación económica y de los medios de comunicación en Ucrania durante 2014, se consideró esencial contar con la opinión de expertos ucranianos para comparar las diferencias entre los países post-soviéticos y los países occidentales. Analizando las similitudes de enfoques detectadas por las respuestas de la encuesta, parece que una gran cantidad de expertos ucranianos se muestran sensibles acerca de la correlación entre la situación política actual del país con la posición crítica ante los medios en la educación.

A pesar del número relativamente pequeño de encuestados, es importante tener en cuenta que los resultados de la encuesta a una de las preguntas clave que se muestra en la tabla 6: ¿Qué objetivos de la educación y alfabetización mediática pueden alcanzarse de forma más fácil utilizando textos de educación mediática en las aulas? De forma casi completa, coincide con los resultados de nuestra investigación sociológica anterior (Fedorov, 2003). En 2003, encuestamos a 26 expertos en el campo de la educación y alfabetización mediática de 10 países, dando respuestas a la pregunta sobre los principales objetivos de la educación y alfabetización mediática. El análisis comparativo de ambas encuestas revela las siguientes congruencias en relación con los objetivos de la educación mediática:

• Desarrollo de un pensamiento crítico-analítico, así como de la autonomía del individuo en términos de medios de comunicación (84,3% en 2003 y 87,5% en 2014).

• Desarrollo en el área cultural y social del contexto mediático (61,5% en 2003 y 62,5% en 2014).

• Desarrollo de una buena percepción estética, del gusto, la comprensión y apreciación de las cualidades artísticas de un texto mediático (54,9% en 2003 y 53,1% en 2014).

• Desarrollo de la capacidad del público para crear y publicar sus propios textos mediáticos (53,8% en 2003 y 53,1% en 2014).

• Aprender sobre la historia de los medios de comunicación y cultura mediática (37,8% en 2003 y 40,6% en 2014).

• Aprender sobre la teoría de los medios y cultura mediática (47,9% en 2003 y 40,6% en 2014).

• Preparación de la audiencia para vivir en una sociedad democrática (61,9% en 2003 y 56,2% en 2014).

Sin embargo, debemos hacer notar que existen algunas diferencias. Por ejemplo, el objetivo del desarrollo de las habilidades comunicativas de los individuos (57,3% en 2003 y 28,1% en 2014). En nuestra opinión, este hecho no está conectado a una disminución en el número de expertos que eligieron este objetivo de la educación mediática como uno de los más importantes en 2014, ya que el porcentaje de expertos occidentales que participaron en el cuestionario de 2003 se mantuvo casi igual en el año 2014, 53,8%, frente al 50% (en 2003 fueron 14 expertos occidentales de un total de 26, y en 2014 los expertos occidental fueron 32 de un total de 64 encuestados). Tendemos a pensar que la caída de la popularidad del objetivo del desarrollo de las habilidades comunicativas se debe al hecho de que en 2014 los expertos creen mayoritariamente que el desarrollo de habilidades comunicativas por sí mismo no puede ser un objetivo de la educación mediática. En la actualidad hay objetivos más vitales, como el desarrollo del pensamiento crítico-analítico, la autonomía del individuo en términos de medios de comunicación, el desarrollo de habilidades de análisis político-ideológico de los diferentes aspectos de los medios de comunicación y cultura mediática, la amplificación de la capacidad de análisis relacionada con el patrimonio cultural, el contexto social de los textos mediáticos y la preparación de la audiencia para vivir en una sociedad democrática (el 56,2% de los votos).

De forma muy razonable, uno de los expertos rusos añadió «en los márgenes» de nuestra encuesta que el desarrollo crítico de los medios tanto en Rusia como en otros países se ve obstaculizado por la falta de interés por parte de las autoridades y de la industria de los medios de comunicación en tener un público competente y ciudadanos activos en los mass-media (que es un requisito esencial del desarrollo de la democracia en una sociedad saturada de medios de comunicación modernos). Pero la educación en medios es cada vez más a menudo utilizada como un nuevo recurso de propaganda informativa, usada para influir especialmente en situaciones de crisis en las comunidades de profesionales de los medios y las audiencias masivas.

En resumen, la competencia mediática y la educación tienen mucho en común: por ejemplo, la educación y la competencia mediática ponen ambas gran énfasis en el desarrollo del pensamiento analítico en la audiencia. Uno de los principales objetivos de la educación mediática es, de hecho, enseñar a la audiencia no solo a analizar textos mediáticos de diferentes tipos y géneros, sino enseñar a comprender los mecanismos de su producción y funcionamiento en la sociedad. Como un hecho comprobado, la educación en medios trata en gran medida de lo mismo, apelando a un público profesional y de masas. Por lo tanto, en nuestra opinión, la síntesis de la educación mediática es muy importante; la discusión sobre el papel y las funciones de los medios de comunicación en la sociedad, y el análisis de diversos textos mediáticos en las instituciones educativas es esencial en nuestras sociedades. La educación mediática tiene un gran potencial en términos de apoyo a los esfuerzos de las instituciones educativas para desarrollar competencias mediáticas en la audiencia (Buckingham, 2003; Fenton, 2009; Hobbs, 2007; Korochensky, 2003; Miller, 2009; Sparks, 2013). Probablemente, con el fin de promover el desarrollo de las competencias y la alfabetización mediática de los ciudadanos, deberíamos ampliar la participación a las comunidades académicas, investigadores, especialistas en diferentes campos (profesores, sociólogos, psicólogos, expertos en estudios culturales, periodistas y filósofos), las instituciones de la cultura y la educación, las organizaciones sociales.... Y también para crear estructuras organizativas capaces de poner en práctica todo el espectro de objetivos de la educación mediática en alianza con los críticos de los medios.

Apoyos y reconocimiento

Este artículo se realizó en el marco de un estudio subvencionado por la Fundación de Ciencias de Rusia (RSF) (Proyecto 14-18-00014: «Situación de la educación mediática y la competencia crítica en la formación de los futuros docentes», realizadas en el Instituto de Gestión y Economía de Taganrog).

Referencias

Bakanov, R.P. (2009). Media Criticism of the Federal Periodicals of 1990s. Information Field of Modern Russia: The Practices and Effects. Kazan: Kazan University Press, 109-116.

Bazalgette, C. (1995). Key Aspects of Media Education. Moscow: Russian Association for Film Education.

Buckingham, D. (2003). Media Education. London: Polity Press.

Buckingham, D. (2006). Defining Digital Literacy. Digital Kompetanse, 1(4), 263-276.

Camarero, E. (2013). Training, education and innovation in audiovisual media to Social Change in Nicaragua. (http://goo.gl/pQFC3R) (07-07-2014).

Downey, J., Titley, G., & Toynbee, J. (2014). Ideology Critique: The Challenge for Media Studies. Media, Culture & Society, 36(6), 878-887. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0163443714536113

Fantin, M. (2010). Literacy, Digital Literacy and Information Literacy. International Journal of Digital Literacy and Digital Competence, 1(4), 10-15. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4018/jdldc.2010100102

Fedorov, A. (2003). Media Education and Media Literacy: Experts’ Opinions. Mentor. A Media Education Curriculum for Teachers in the Mediterranean. Paris: UNESCO.

Fenton, N. (2009). My Media Studies: Getting Political in a Global, Digital Age. Television New Media, 10, 55-57. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1527476408325100

Hammer, R. (2011). Critical Media Literacy as Engaged Pedagogy. E-learning and Digital Media, 8(4), 357-363. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2304/elea.2011.8.4.357

Hermes, J., Van-den-Berg, A., & Mol, M. (2013). Sleeping with the Enemy: Audience Studies and Critical Literacy. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 16(5), 457-473. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1367877912474547

Hobbs, R. (2007). Reading theMedia : Media literacy in High School English. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.

Huerta, R. (2011). Hybridation between Media Education and Visual Arts Education. Miyazaki’s Cinema as a Revulsive’. Acta Didactica Napocensia, 4(4), 55-66.

Kaun, A. (2014). I really don’t Like them! – Exploring Citizens’ Media Criticism. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 17(5), 489-506. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1367549413515259

Korochensky, A.P. (2003). Media Criticism in the Theory and Practice of Journalism. Rostov: Rostov State University Press.

Masterman, L. (1985). Teaching the Media. London: Comedia Publishing Group.

Miller, T. (2009). Media Studies 3.0. Television & New Media, 10(1), 5-6. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1527476408328932

Potter, W.J. (2011). Media Literacy. LA: Sage.

Razlogov, K.E. (2005). Media Education: What is it for? Media Education, 2, 68-75.

Sharikov, A.V. (2005). Media Education: So what is it for? Media Education, 2, 75-81.

Silverblatt, A. (2001). Media Literacy. Westport, Connecticut. London: Prager.

Sparks, C. (2013). Global Media Studies: Its Development and Dilemmas. Media, Culture & Society, 35(1), 121-131. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0163443712464566

Temple, M. (2013). The Media and the Message. Journal of Political Marketing, 12, 147-165. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15377857.2013.781479

Van-de-Berg, L.R., Wenner, L.A. & Gronbeck, B.E. (2014). Media Literacy and Television Criticism: Enabling an Informed and Engaged Citizenry. American Behavioral Scientist, 48, 219-228. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0002764204267266

Wallis, R., & Buckingham, D. (2013). Arming the Citizen-consumer: The Invention of ‘Media Literacy’ within UK Communications Policy. European Journal of Communication, 28(5), 527-540. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0267323113483605

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/15
Accepted on 30/06/15
Submitted on 30/06/15

Volume 23, Issue 2, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C45-2015-11
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 18
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?