Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The eGames business (online video games) in Spain generated more than 1.8 trillion euros in profits in 2016. Advertising is no stranger to the potential of this market, and brands study the best ways of approaching and adapting to the world of eGames. In this report, we analyze which the most effective advertising strategies for brands in the online video game world are. To do this, the players (eGamers) answered a 60 question survey that addressed issues such as playful habits, the viewing of advertisements in games, the purchase of advertised items and advertising in competitions. Korean and Spanish players answered the same questionnaire considering that South Korea has the most advanced video game industry in the world and Spain is the fourth European country in eGames and our subject of study. After the investigation, some of the most relevant results indicate that conventional online advertising does not attract the attention of gamers as consumers. We determined that the best strategy would be based on brand presence through products that are prescribed or used by professional gamers, since spectators, as they watch the games, also observe what elements and accessories the players use.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the question

Video games have generated more than $200 million in profits for sponsors and more than $150 million for conventional advertisers according to data obtained in the 2017 “Global Games Market per Region” conducted by Newzoo (2016a) and based on data from 2016 (Newzoo is the leading provider of market intelligence that encompasses all global games, eSports, and mobile markets. All of those with research on the video game field), which also affirms in its 2017 “Global eSports Market Report” (Newzoo, 2016b) that gaming is one of the favorite pastimes of millennials, that “complicated” audience that brands so desire to conquer.

Advertising has always been present in the video game business. However, it is during the last two decades that the “game” has evolved dynamically due to the development and consolidation of the Internet, and advertisers must adapt and be aware of the business potential that this entails (Scalvinoni, 2012; Sempere, 2016). Brands themselves, (whether they are media, platforms, electronic or telephone firms), have relied for a few years on what we have coined as eGames (electronic video games that are played online).

1.1. eGames in Spain

Being in ninth place in the world ranking and in fourth place within the European framework (behind Germany, the United Kingdom, and France, in descending order of revenues), the eGames industry in Spain generated more than 1.8 trillion euros in profit during 2016 (Newzoo, 2017). According to the “Infographic Spanish Games Market 2016” study, the Spanish population was around 47.2 million, of which 36 million were Internet users, and 24 million were gamers. And the 1st Electronic Sport Observatory in Spain 2016, conducted by Arena Media, states that: 1) 1 out of 2 Spanish players spends money on eGames and not only downloads or plays online for free; 2) The average player spends approximately 130 euros per year; 3) 2 out of 3 Internet users in Spain play some type of video game on some device.

In addition, according to the White Book on Video Game Development in Spain 2016, promoted by DEV (Spanish Association of Video Game and Entertainment Software Development Companies), 40% of the income comes from other sources, i.e., the sale of their services and training. However, it states that 34% of revenue comes from digital sales, that is, from eGames. Moreover, another 10% comes from advertising in “free to play” video games. With this data we can see how an industry that was previously based on the physical sale and the use of devices such as the PlayStation (former “queen” of video game devices) has now changed and that the “new king” is the Internet, with the computer being the star device on which to play games. The digital era has consolidated despite the fact that consoles continue to be used, but with an Internet connection (Pérez-Latorre, 2012; Salva-Ruiz & al., 2016).

However, the use of screens and video games has also evolved. At present, simultaneous multiscreen use is a reality that we must acknowledge and explore. In this sense, we must be aware that one in three players alternates between four screens (television, computer, tablets, and smartphones) (Vivian, 2017; Sempere, 2016; Parra, 2009).

1.2. eSports and MMO games

At present, the union of PCs or computers with digital sales and competitions give rise to the so-called eSports. This term was coined by the Arena Media Institute in 2016 at the 1st Observatory of Electronic Sport in Spain. In this study, “electronic sport” is used to refer to eSports, which are competitions that are played on computer screens and/or consoles.

eSports have values that allow brands to be part of this world either by embracing or renewing them if they have similar values. These games have a strategic component that attracts people with this type of skill, who know how to work in teams and have leadership skills (Sedeño, 2010). In addition, these games are avant-garde in terms of design and spectacle. On the other hand, the fundamental element that marks the origin of eSports is the community, given that in its beginnings it did not have the economic support of large companies for these competitions (Márquez, 2017).

The Newzoo analysis (2016c) focused mainly on computer games: “League of Legends (LoL)”, “Counter-Strike: Global Offensive”, “Dota 2” and other multiplatform games such as “Overwatch” and “Hearthstone”; all of them were studied in 10 countries, including Spain. These video games are part of the so-called MMO category “Massive Multiplayer Online games”, which configure the eSports competitions. However, within the MMO video games, there are the following subcategories:

• MOBA (battle arena: “LoL”, “Dota 2”...).

• MMORPG (online multiplayer role-playing games: “World of Warcraft”, “Final Fantasy”...).

• Shooter (video games with shooting weapons: “Call of Duty”, “Overwatch”, “Counter-Strike”...).

• Strategy video games (“Starcraft”, “Clash of Clans”...).

• Fighting video games (“Street Fighter”, “Dragon Ball”...).

• Sports video games (FIFA, NBA, “Grand Slam Tennis”...).

• Others (“Hearthstone”…).

1.3. Current advertising strategies in Spain

The main tactics developing within the current Spanish advertising framework in the eGames field are sponsorship and branded content. In Spain, the eGame and eSport sectors are advancing significantly, but there is still no business model to follow. The good thing about this field for brands is that, since it is new, the rules are not dictated or formulated as they may be in other sports sponsorships. These circumstances enable the creation of an abundance of new sponsorship formats in leagues and teams (Cavusgil & al., 2017; Muros & al., 2013).

The star collaborations are events and tournament sponsorships such as Red Bull at an international level (“Starcraft” video game competition) or “Domino’s” at a national amateur level in Spain, called “Go4LoL” (“League of Legends” video game competition); or the sponsorship of teams with brands like Phone, who is a manufacturer of peripherals (hardware devices through which the computer can interact with the exterior, such as the mouse or the keyboard) and has always been a supporter of many teams. In 2016, an important brand like Vodafone backed the G2 Vodafone team to make it a national winner. Another example is El Corte Inglés, which organizes championships inside its buildings that bring traffic to the store and increase the purchase of products; or Media Markt with online and final competitions in its stores, with the same purpose of redirecting traffic to their stores. Last summer, Orange and NSL organized their own competitions (Martín, 2010; Gutiérrez, 2017).

Creative content, not previously seen, has emerged due to fields which have not yet been explored with all their potential in Spain. This is the case of Vodafone and MTV which broadcast a documentary called “Gamers” on MTV about the G2 Vodafone team as if it were Big Brother, aimed at a more mainstream audience. This was Vodafone’s attempt to communicate the fan movement typical of the eGames public to an audience that is not so familiar with this world. It was successful in terms of audience, both in television share and on other platforms where this content was used. (Selva, 2009; Sánchez, 2017; Çinar, 2018).

Furthermore, there are many examples of brands that sponsor competitions around the world such as “Intel Extreme Masters”, a series of eSports tournaments that began in 2007 and played in different countries around the world, sponsored by the Intel brand. But not only technological brands “play” in this field. One of the first major brands to sponsor leagues or tournaments was Coca-Cola, which has been one of the two global partners of the LCS league for many years, through Coca-Cola Zero. This has allowed the brand to create its own eSports world through digital platforms such as Twitter with the @CokeEsports account, with more than 300.000 followers, a YouTube channel, etc. However, it has also created its own “Team Coca-Cola” for the video game “Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare”, organized by MLG or “Major League Gaming”, the professional world leader in the organization of eSports. Movistar has also created its own website with eSports content (León, 2017; Yuste, 2016).

1.4. eSports investment

Media Pro and LVP are a clear example of how Spanish companies invest in eSports. The LVP or Professional Video Games League was founded nationally with the purpose of exporting its business model and reproducing it in other countries and has ended up being the largest national league in Europe. The audiovisual group Media Pro bought most of the shares of this league organizer. According to statements made by LVP at a press conference, this almost 5 million euro investment was made with the intent of “professionalizing, expanding and boosting competition”, with greater resources for marketing and sponsorship departments. This has been beneficial for the teams, but the industry has not totally professionalized, and there is no audience loyalty, so we cannot connect as clearly as Santander to Fórmula 1 or Movistar to cycling. However, this does happen in South Korea, with brands like Samsung, closely linked in the unconscious of their audience to eGames for their famous “Samsung Galaxy White” team.

As a reverse example, the company GAME, which sells video games in Great Britain, absorbed SocialNAT, a Spanish platform that broadcasts eSports. This demonstrates how companies abroad are interested in and see the benefits in the viewing of eSports in Spain (Cavusgil & al., 2017; Osorio, 2016; Costa-Sánchez & al., 2017).

Twitch.tv is the leading eSport broadcasting platform worldwide. Platforms like Amazon pay to add these special audiences to their public. On August 25, 2014, Amazon’s CEO stated on his platform that Amazon had bought Twitch.tv for $970 million, according to the Media Trends portal. In 2016, Amazon launched a promotion for those who subscribed to “Amazon Prime”, offering Twitch.tv for free (Leiva & al., 2017).

Facebook has partnered with Blizzard to broadcast Blizzard games, an alliance that has appeared on eGames news platforms such as IGN Spain. More Facebook news is its cooperation with another international partner, ESL, a global eSports viewing platform that competes against Twitch to become a world leader in electronic sports streaming. Facebook has partnered with ESL to broadcast live eSports, according to the “The gamersports” platform. Facebook, therefore, ensures audience building in real time, which is what all digital platforms are currently vying for in the new digital era (Gutiérrez, 2017; Rodríguez, 2016; Valderas, 2016).

2. Material and methods

The general objective of our research was to analyze eGames in Spain, as well as the development of the industry and advertising from within. Our specific objective was to define the Spanish player’s profile and its behavior with respect to advertising and the brands that appear in games and competitions. We compared the Spanish player to the Korean player since we considered the latter as a reference of what an advanced player is (since Korea is the country with the most online players) with the aim of analyzing which advertising strategies would be most effective for this target audience and possible applications of advertising strategies of brands aimed at this sector of the Spanish public.

In order to analyze which are the most effective advertising strategies for brands in the online world of video games, we decided to investigate and compare game routines, advertising viewing, purchasing behavior and the opinions about brand image of Spanish gamers (our study object) and Korean gamers (where the gamer culture has settled in). We chose the online survey technique to conduct our research. The questionnaire is a quantitative technique which consists of investigating a representative sample of subjects in a given population. The advantages of this data collection method are that it allows us to obtain information from almost any group, it also facilitates the standardization of data. We can treat the data informatically and analyze it according to statistics (Hernández & al., 2003). We considered that the best way to reach our target was the Internet. Thanks to online surveys, it is possible to reach a large number of people at a low cost. At the same time, this tool allows interaction with the interviewee, which translates into fewer incomplete questions (Díaz, 2012).

The questionnaire consisted of a total of 60 questions, 54 closed questions, and six open questions, and a total of 280 Spanish gamers answered it. The benefit of this type of questionnaire lies in the fact that closed questions require less effort from the respondent, therefore reducing completion time, in addition to the fact that it allows for easy data coding and analysis. Open questions allow for deeper insight into the issues that interested us the most. The 60 questions were structured into 5 sections: the first section was intended to confirm that the person responding to the survey was Spanish and a video game player, specifically MMO video games (those that are played in eSports); a second section called “game behavior” where the subject was asked about gaming habits, hours spent, time of day, electronic devices used, location of play, etc.; the third section was called “Internet” and it included questions about Internet use to play video games, advertising in this media, the use of streaming platforms such as Twitch, the purchase of advertised articles, etc.; the fourth section addressed eSports in terms of how the respondent viewed competitions, the advertising that can be seen in them, how the viewing of advertising or brands influences shopping behavior, the image that the audience has of professional gamers, etc.; and, finally, the “demographic data” section related to age, monthly income, occupation, personality and the use of social media.

The survey for Korean gamers was exactly the same as the one for Spanish gamers and was completed by a total of 293 players.

Both surveys were supervised and pre-tested for validation by experts in scientific research methodologies at Jaume I University and the results were introduced and cross referenced for their statistical analysis through the SPSS program version 23.0 for analysis and validation of basic statistics.

3. Analysis and results

The 60 questions for Spanish gamers analyze the way in which they consume video games and competitions, how they receive advertising, how advertising is currently being used and which could be the most effective advertising formats. Next, we expose and analyze some of the most significant results obtained.


Fanjul-Peyro et al 2019a-69580-en032.png

Figure 1. At what time of day do you play most frequently?

With regard to the questions in the first section (Habit and type of games) more than 40% play video games every day and 35%, several days a week. They were asked about the MMO video games category they play the most, to which more than half responded “Shooter”; 38%, MOBA (battle arena video games) and 35%, strategy video games. The percentages of this question add up to more than 100% since it was multiple choice. Regarding the question of whether they had ever seen an eSport competition, 53% of them answered affirmatively.


Fanjul-Peyro et al 2019a-69580-en033.png

Figure 2. What electronic device do you use to play?

Other data related to video game behavior revealed that 46% play more than 10 hours a week, while 30% play more than 3 hours daily. Almost 40% of them frequently play after dinner, between 10:00 pm. and midnight, and they all play at home.


Fanjul-Peyro et al 2019a-69580-en034.png

Figure 3. Have you ever spent money buying items in video games?

The computer is the electronic device that more than half of the surveyed Spanish gamers use, followed by a mix of mobile phone and computer, and finally the PlayStation.


Fanjul-Peyro et al 2019a-69580-en035.png

Figure 4. What gives you more confidence when buying a computer component to play eGames?

To start introducing purchase behavior in the survey, in this section we already asked if they had ever purchased items in video games, to which 25% confessed to having spent more than 500 euros, and 23% between 100 and 500 euros.

The first open, long answer question to delve deeper into the mind of this audience was “Why did you start playing online video games?”, to which 280 different answers emerged but most of them followed two strands; a significant amount of respondents play online video games because they have been playing video games since childhood, and another large part claim to have joined this community because their friends started playing.

However, more than 60% do not pay to consume these online video games, and as for the frequency in which they tend to watch the games of other players through streaming platforms such as Twitch, 60% do so on a daily or weekly basis, while 28% have seen them several times in their life but not periodically. Therefore, we can conclude that all the respondents are familiar with eSport competitions.

Delving into the advertising that appears while they play, 67% of gamers deny frequent viewing of advertisements on the screen while playing. However, 70% go on to state that they have seen product placement (mentions or samples of products or brands) within video games. We can affirm that brand advertising currently follows a strategy focused on being integral to the video game and not an external element.

The next question was about the power of prescription and influence from external agents. They were asked “What gives you more confidence when buying a computer component to play eGames?”, to which 42% responded “The recommendation of a professional gamer”. The fact that nobody answered “Advertising recommendations in video games” consolidates the idea that they are critical consumers, either they trust themselves or the professionals and that advertising such as banners and derivatives are ineffective with them.

With respect to the following open question as to whether they have ever seen video game advertisements on the Internet and/or elsewhere, the answers cited several platforms, primarily YouTube and television.

The fourth section on eSports begins with a question as to their location when they watch an eSport competition, to which more than 80% answered: “At home”. To the question “Through which device do you usually watch these competitions?” more than half responded through the computer, the same as when they play. 58% of the respondents watch the competitions by themselves. The repeated answer was that they watch them because they like to and because they can improve their technique by putting other more advanced players’ moves into practice.

As for advertising in eSports, 70% say they have seen ads, and 90% have seen product placement. When asked if seeing these advertised brands encourages them to purchase, almost 60% responded negatively, and 90% had not bought a product from having seen it in an eSport competition. We, therefore, conclude that the current type of advertising is not efficient. However, although they haven’t purchased, 50% had a good impression of brands from seeing them in tournaments.

The following questions are related to professional gamers. To the question “Would you like to become a professional gamer?” 60% responded affirmatively, and the long answer question “Why?” obtained “For passion” primarily as an answer, and “For money” in second place. As for those who answered “No”, they said that it takes a lot of time and sacrifice that they are not willing to give.

As to whether they have purchased computer accessories (peripherals) because a professional gamer uses them, 72% responded “Yes”, and the reason given was because of the perceived quality of the product.

3.1. Result comparison between Spanish and South Koreans gamers

In the second survey, we used a similar sample with the same number of questions to examine the Republic of South Korea target, 293 respondents and 60-questions.

In the first section, all respondents claim to be Korean, and we obtained a higher percentage of video game players than in Spain; 40% of them play several days a week and half of the total play every day. We can see that the frequency with which they play is much higher compared to Spain.

Almost all respondents play MOBA video games (arena battle video games), which include the most famous eGames such as “LoL”, “War of Warcraft”, and the rest of the categories were ignored, unlike Spanish gamers who were distributed more evenly among the categories. Finally, a big difference is that 95% of the Korean respondents have seen an eSport competition at least once, with respect to 53% of the Spanish gamers.

Regarding the second section on gaming behavior, Korean gamers dedicate many more hours than Spanish gamers. Almost 80% of the respondents devote more than three hours a day to video games, which contrasts with 29% of Spanish gamers that gave the same answer. The time of day changes completely: 60% of Koreans claim to play on breaks at work/university and 25%, between 8:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon, unlike the night preference in Spain. The place to play and the device used are two of the greatest differences between both audiences. Koreans play away from home (94%) and with their mobiles (82%), while in contrast, Spaniards have an indoor profile (100 %) and use their PC (57%).

With respect to the money spent on elements in video games, almost half have spent between 124,000 and 615,000 Korean won (between 100 and 500 euros) and 30%, more than 615,000 (500 euros). Spanish players spend less, their results evenly distributed between the options “Never” and “More than 500 euros”.

In the question “Why did you start playing video games?” we find a sense of community emerging as much as we do in Spanish gamers. The majority of respondents say they started because their friends played, and now they still play, but online.

When asked if they usually see ads on the screen while they play, 88% deny it (more than in Spain), but in the next question, 94% claim to have seen product placement in video games. Therefore, we can see a growing trend of product placement in streaming platforms.

The last closed question was about where they had seen advertising, on or off the Internet. It’s important to take into account that, although they do mention digital platforms such as YouTube or Facebook, most of the answers refer to outdoor advertising, especially in the subway, something that the Spaniards did not mention.

In the next section regarding “eSports World”, we see the same big difference that was observed in the place they play since when asked where they view an eSport competition, 97% answered away from home.

The device with which they watch the competitions coincides, 53% use a mobile phone and 34% use “mobile+computer”. Another great contrast is that 70% of Koreans usually watch them alone, while the majority of Spanish gamers see them with a company. The importance of eSports in their life is evidenced by the fact that they have seen more than 20 competitions (51%, many more Koreans than Spaniards), most of them have attended a competition at least once (81%, opposed to the Spanish result), the moment to see the competitions is during university hours or work breaks (while the Spanish time of day is during the afternoon), 70% see them through Twitch.tv (same as in Spain, Twitch.tv is the key platform in both cultures and countries) and 71% tend to watch them for more than five hours a day. The majority of the answers to the open answer question “Why do you watch eSport competitions?” resembles the Spanish answer, for entertainment, and to learn new techniques from the professional gamers to improve their own strategies and skills while playing.

Questions regarding advertising and eSports have shown that 70% claim to have seen ads during eSports and 90% say they have also seen product placement, but 57% have not felt the need to shop in response to the observed advertising and 64% deny having bought something because they have seen it in eSports. However, almost all respondents (91%) have a good impression of the brands they have seen during competitions. When asked about professional gamers, 85% would like to become one and the question “Why?” obtained many answers, but the most recurrent ones were directed to seeing it as a job dream fulfilled, being able to work in their passion.

4. Discussion and conclusions

After analyzing and comparing the characteristics of the Spanish and the Korean gamers in terms of their gaming behavior, viewing of advertising, brand image, and shopping behavior, we present below some of the most significant conclusions of our study.

Thanks to the increase of gamer audience in eSports, brands that strategically link themselves to video games will be able to benefit from the full potential that eGames and eSports have to offer (competition, mass audience, community, fans) (Carcelén & al., 2017). As we have seen, conventional online advertising does not attract the attention of consumer gamers, but the products endorsed by gamers is effective. Amateur gamers rely on the criteria of professional gamers and, although they are discerning and they know that having these products will not win them competitions, they know that they are quality products. This is due to an aspirational component. On the other hand, the competitive factor, which increases even more in South Korean gamers, and the desire for personal improvement makes them want to have better products to achieve the level of their “heroes” or role models.

Therefore, one of the best advertising strategies for video games would be the use of professional eGamers as influencers who use and endorse products and brands. They would become brand ambassadors that would generate awareness of the brand. The sponsorship of these gamers would be based on the presence of the brand both during the time of the games and during the viewing of the eSports competitions. This sponsorship is essential during the broadcast of eSports since spectators, while they are watching the games, are also observing what elements the players use, from keyboards to drinks consumed (Vilaplana-Aparicio & al., 2018; Clemente & al., 2018).

Also, it is evident that sponsoring an eSports team is an effective strategy to promote branded content. The mere presence of brands in competitions also generates awareness through the aspirational component, and a perfect way to do this is by creating a team of professional gamers. The interest in the development of these teams, together with the feeling of community and the fan phenomenon generated by these games, facilitates the creation of branded content linked to offering team followers an added value beyond the participation or the viewing of eSports.

An issue which caught our attention was the information obtained about where they tend to see more video game advertising. The Spanish gamers mentioned online platforms such as Facebook or YouTube, and South Koreans, for the most part, refer to outdoor advertising in places like the subway. The subway is public transportation that is used a lot in big capitals like Seoul or Madrid by “millennials” who are young people at the forefront of technology, many of the gamers themselves. Therefore, it is possible to think about the benefits of the implantation of an outdoor and avant-garde advertising campaign, such as the new dynamic LED support that has already been launched in Madrid’s subway. It has been in use for years in Seoul, the capital of the Republic of South Korea. This format creates a moving image outside the metro wagons that would attract the attention of passerby’s and would mesh perfectly with the eGames’ vanguard attitudes.

In conclusion, we want to state that we are aware that this research is not a categorical or conclusive study on the subject, but simply an approach to the reality and the evolution of advertising strategies within the eGames market. Continuous observation and a deeper investigation to analyze the effectiveness of advertising actions in games and competitions, as well as the evolution of players’ behavior, as a result, would be necessary.

Funding Agency

This article was written with the help of the research project “The advertising business in the digital society: agency structure, professional profiles, and new creative trends”. Research Promotion Plan of the Jaume I University. Project code P1-1B2015-27.

References

Carcelén, S., Alameda, D., & Pintado, T. (2017). Prácticas, competencias y tendencias de la comunicación publicitaria digital: una visión desde la perspectiva de los anunciantes españoles. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 72, 1648-1669. https://doi

Cavusgil, S.T., Knight, G., & Riesenberger, J. (2017). International business. The new realities. Boston: Pearson.

Çinar, N. (2018). An evaluation of source effects in consumer generated ads. Comunicación y Sociedad, 31(1), 147-167. https://doi.org/10.15581/003.31.1.147-167

Clemente, J., & Sebastián, A. (2018). New discourses in Brand communication in Spain: Adaptation vs. Renewal of target audience. Comunicación y Sociedad, 31(2), 25-38. https://doi.org/10.15581/003.31.2.25-38

Costa-Sánchez, C. (2017). Estrategias de videomarketing online. Tipología por sectores de negocio. Comunicación y Sociedad, 30(1), 17-38. https://doi.org/10.15581/003.30.1.17-38

DEV (2016). Libro Blanco del desarrollo español de videojuegos 2016. Asociación española de empresas productoras y desarrolladoras de videojuegos y software de entretenimiento. https://bit.ly/2mWmLaG

Díaz-de-Rada, V. (2012). Ventajas e inconvenientes de la encuesta por Internet. Papers, 91, 193-223. https://doi.org/10.5565/rev/papers/v97n1.71

Gutiérrez, R. (2017). ESL y Facebook se alían para emitir eSports en directo. The Gamer eSports. Azarplus, 1, 1. https://bit.ly/2r8PVXv

Hernández, R., Fernández, C., & Baptista, L. (2013). Metodología de la investigación. México: McGraw-Hill.

Leiva, R., Benavides, C., & Wilkinson, K.T. (2017). Young hispanics’ motivations to use smartphones: A three-country comparative study. Comunicación y Sociedad, 30(4), 13-26. https://doi.org/10.15581/003.30.3.13-26

León, A. (2017). Documentales de eSports que tienes que ver. Redbull. https://win.gs/2w6sXkA

Márquez, R. (2017). Las universidades americanas ya ofrecen becas deportivas a jugadores. eSports. Xataka Esports, 1, 1. https://bit.ly/2wjej93

Martín, E. (2010). Videojuegos y publicidad. Cómo alcanzar a las audiencias que escapan de los medios tradicionales. Telos, 82, 78-87. https://bit.ly/2PsGqvc

Muros, B., Aragón, Y., & Bustos, A. (2013). Youth’s usage of leisure time with video games and social networks. [La ocupación del tiempo libre de jóvenes en el uso de videojuegos y redes]. Comunicar, 40, 31-39. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-03

Newzoo (2016a). Global Games Market Report. Newzoo, empresa de datos e inteligencia de mercado de videojuegos, dispositivos móviles y deportes electrónicos. https://bit.ly/2w4gptY

Newzoo (2016b). Game revenues of top 25 public companies up 14% in 2015. Newzoo, empresa de datos e inteligencia de mercado de videojuegos, dispositivos móviles y deportes electrónicos. https://bit.ly/2w86nIC

Newzoo (2017). Global Esports Market Report. Newzoo, empresa de datos e inteligencia de mercado de videojuegos, dispositivos móviles y deportes electrónicos. https://bit.ly/2o3bjtT

Osorio, V.M. (2016). ¿Cuál es la realidad de los eSports en el mundo y en España? Expansión.com. https://bit.ly/2BFLbim

Parra, D. (2009). Hábitos de uso de los videojuegos en España entre los mayores de 35 años. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 64, 694-707. https://doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-64-2009-854-694-707

Pérez-Latorre, O. (2012). From chess to StarCraft. A comparative analysis of traditional games and videogames. [Del ajedrez a StarCraft. Análisis comparativo de juegos tradicionales y videojuegos]. Comunicar, 38, 121-129. https://doi.org/10.3916/c38-2012

Rodríguez, J.A. (2016). Blizzard y Facebook unen fuerzas. IGN España. https://bit.ly/2P2JJsb

Sánchez, V.S. (2017). Ariana Grande ficha por ‘Final Fantasy’. El Periódico. https://bit.ly/2MNFnHU

Scalvinoni, L.O. (2012). Social gaming ¿Un fenómeno de moda o revolución marketiniana? PuroMarketing. https://bit.ly/2MLLvAp

Sedeño, A. (2010). Videogames as cultural devices: Development of spatial skills and application in learning [Videojuegos como dispositivos culturales: Las competencias espaciales en educación]. Comunicar, 34, 183-189. https://doi.org/10.3916/C34-2010-03

Selva, D. (2009). El videojuego como herramienta de comunicación publicitaria: una aproximación al concepto de ‘advergaming’. Comunicación, 7(1), 141-166. https://bit.ly/1kYfrBn

Selva-Ruiz, D., & Caro-Castaño, L. (2016). Use of data in advertising creativity: The case of Google’s Art, Copy & Code. [Uso de datos en la creatividad publicitaria: El caso de Art, Copy & Code de Google]. El Profesional de la Información, 25, 4, 642-651

Sempere, P. (2016). La publicidad, a la conquista definitiva de los eSports. Cinco Días. https://bit.ly/2MJhqRW

Valderas, M. (2016). Blizzard lanza un documental centrado en los eSports universitarios. El Desmarque. https://bit.ly/2w82bbT

Vilaplana-Aparicio, M.J., Iglesias-García, M., & Martín-Llaguno, M. (2018). Communication of innovation through online media. [Comunicación de la innovación a través de los medios online]. El Profesional de la Información, 27, 4, 840-848. https://doi.org

Vivian, J. (2017). The media of mass communication. Boston, MA: Pearson Education Inc.

Yuste, A.G. (2016). eSports: Documentales sobre eSports. Marca.com. https://bit.ly/2wkTeLy



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El negocio de los eGames (videojuegos online) en España ha conseguido más de 1,8 billones de euros de beneficio en el año 2016. La publicidad no es ajena al potencial de este mercado y las marcas estudian cuáles son las mejores formas de acercarse y adaptarse al entorno de los eGames. En el presente trabajo se analizan las estrategias publicitarias más eficaces para las marcas en el mundo de los videojuegos en red. Para ello, se han investigado a los jugadores (eGamers) a través de una encuesta de 60 preguntas que abordaban cuestiones como hábitos lúdicos, visionado de publicidad en los juegos, compra de artículos anunciados o publicidad en competiciones. El mismo cuestionario se ha realizado tanto a jugadores coreanos, ya que la industria de los videojuegos en Corea del Sur es la más avanzada del mundo, como a jugadores españoles, al ser España el cuarto país europeo en eGames y ser nuestro objeto de estudio. Tras la investigación, algunos de los resultados más relevantes indican que la publicidad online convencional no llama la atención a los consumidores «gamers» y se determina que la mejor estrategia se basaría en la presencia de marca a través de productos prescritos o utilizados por los «gamers» profesionales, ya que los espectadores, a la vez que ven las partidas, observan qué elementos usan los jugadores.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

Los videojuegos han obtenido más de 200 millones de dólares de beneficio por patrocinios y más de 150 millones por publicidad convencional, según datos obtenidos en el 2017 «Global Games Market per Region» realizado por Newzoo (2016a) y basado en datos de 2016 (Newzoo es el proveedor líder de inteligencia de mercado que abarca los juegos globales, eSports y mercados móviles, con investigaciones en el ámbito de los videojuegos), que además afirma en su 2017 «Global Esports Market Report» (Newzoo, 2016b) que el «gaming» es uno de los pasatiempos favoritos de los «millennials» (jóvenes nacidos a partir de los años 80; esa «complicada» audiencia que las marcas ansían conquistar).

En el negocio de los videojuegos siempre ha estado presente la publicidad. No obstante, es durante estas dos últimas décadas cuando el «juego», por el desarrollo y consolidación de Internet, ha evolucionado geométricamente y la publicidad debe adaptarse y ser consciente del potencial de negocio que esto conlleva (Scalvinoni, 2012; Sempere, 2016). Son las propias marcas –ya sean medios de comunicación, plataformas, firmas de electrónica o telefonía– las que desde hace unos años están apostando por lo que hemos acuñado como los eGames (videojuegos electrónicos que se juegan online).

1.1. Los videojuegos en red (eGames) en España

Estando en noveno lugar en el ranking mundial y en cuarto puesto con respecto al marco europeo –por detrás de Alemania, Reino Unido y Francia, en orden descendente de ingresos–, la industria de los videojuegos en red en España ha recaudado más de 1,8 billones de euros de beneficios en 2016 (Newzoo, 2017). Según el estudio del «Infographic Spanish Games Market 2016», la población española contaba con 47,2 millones de personas de las cuales 36 millones eran internautas y 24 millones de ellos eran jugadores (gamers: personas que juegan a través del móvil, PC o dispositivos digitales análogos tipo consolas o tabletas). Y el 1º Observatorio de Deporte Electrónico en España 2016, realizado por Arena Media, afirma que: 1) 1 de cada 2 jugadores españoles gasta dinero en los eGames y no solo se lo descarga o juega online de forma gratuita; 2) El gasto promedio de jugador por año es de 130 euros; 3) 2 de cada 3 internautas en España juegan a algún tipo de videojuego en cualquier dispositivo.

Además, según el Libro Blanco del Desarrollo Español de Videojuegos 2016, realizado por DEV (Asociación Española de Empresas Productoras y Desarrolladoras de Videojuegos y Software de Entretenimiento), el 40% de estos ingresos son gracias a diferentes fuentes alternativas, como el desarrollo de terceros, la venta de servicios y la formación. Sin embargo, establece que el 34% de los ingresos provienen de la venta digital, es decir, videojuegos que se juegan de forma online. Y otro 10%, de la publicidad en los videojuegos «free to play». Con estos datos podemos ver cómo la industria que antes se basaba en la venta física y la utilización de dispositivos como la PlayStation (anterior «reina» de los dispositivos para videojuegos) ahora ha cambiado y que el «nuevo rey» es Internet, con el ordenador como dispositivo estrella. La era digital se ha consolidado a pesar de que se sigan usando consolas, pero con conexión a Internet (Pérez-Latorre, 2012; Salva-Ruiz & al., 2016).

Pero el uso de las pantallas y los videojuegos va más allá. En la actualidad, el consumo multipantalla o uso simultáneo de varios medios o dispositivos es una realidad que tenemos que asumir y aprovechar. En este sentido, hay que ser conscientes de que uno de cada tres jugadores alterna las cuatro pantallas (televisión, ordenador, tabletas y smartphones) (Vivian, 2017; Sempere, 2016; Parra, 2009).

1.2. Los deportes electrónicos (eSports) y los MMO juegos (MMO games)

En la actualidad, la unión del PC u ordenador con la venta digital y la competición, dan lugar a los denominados eSports. Este término fue acuñado por el Instituto de Arena Media en 2016 en el 1º Observatorio del Deporte Electrónico en España. En este estudio, se utilizan las palabras «deporte electrónico» en el título, referidas a los eSports, por lo que en la propia cabecera ya nos dice que los eSports son las competiciones que se juegan a través de la pantalla del ordenador y/o consola.

Más allá de las audiencias, los deportes electrónicos tienen detrás unos valores que permiten a las marcas formar parte de este mundo para adherirse a ellos o reformar los de la marca, si son similares en valores. Estos juegos tienen un componente estratégico que atrae a personas con este tipo de habilidades que saben trabajar en equipo y que tienen dotes de liderazgo (Sedeño, 2010). Además, estos juegos son vanguardistas en cuanto al diseño y al espectáculo que están dando. Por otro lado, la pieza fundamental del origen de los deportes electrónicos es la comunidad, dado que en sus inicios no contaba con grandes empresas que apoyaran estas competiciones de manera económica (Márquez, 2017).

El análisis de Newzoo (2016b) se centró principalmente en los videojuegos de ordenador: «League of Legends (LoL)», «Counter-Strike: Global Offensive», «Dota 2» y otros juegos multiplataforma como «Overwatch» y «Hearthstone», todos estudiados sobre 10 países, entre ellos España. Estos videojuegos forman parte de la denominada categoría MMO «Massive Multiplayer Online games», los cuales configuran las competiciones eSports. No obstante, dentro de los videojuegos MMO, existen las siguientes subcategorías:

• MOBA (videojuegos de batalla y estrategia colectiva: «LoL», «Dota 2», etc.).

• MMORPG (videojuegos de rol multijugador online: «World of Warcraft», «Final Fantasy», etc.).

• «Shooter» (videojuegos «de tiros» con armas: «Call of Duty», «Overwatch», «Counter-Strike», etc.).

• Videojuegos de estrategia («Starcraft», «Clash of Clans», etc.).

• Videojuegos de lucha («Street Fighter», «Dragon Ball», etc.).

• Videojuegos de deporte (FIFA, NBA, «Grand Slam Tennis», etc.).

• Otros («Hearthstone», etc.).

1.3. Estrategias publicitarias actuales en España

En el marco actual de la publicidad en el sector de los videojuegos en red en España, las principales tácticas que se están desarrollando son el patrocino y los contenidos de marca (branded content). En este país, el sector de los videojuegos en red (eGames) y los deportes electrónicos (eSports) está experimentando un gran avance, pero aún no existe un modelo de negocio a seguir. Lo bueno de este territorio para las marcas es que, al ser nuevo, las normas no están dictadas o asentadas, como puede ser en otros patrocinios deportivos. Por lo tanto, incita a una riqueza o abundancia mucho más importante por parte de las ligas o los equipos a hacer activaciones y entradas diferentes de las marcas (Cavusgil & al., 2017; Muros & al., 2013).

Los tipos de colaboraciones estrellas son patrocinios de eventos y torneos como Red Bull a nivel internacional (competición del videojuego «Starcraft») o «Domino´s» a nivel amateur nacional en España, llamado «Go4LoL» (competición del videojuego «League of Legends») o el patrocinio de equipos con marcas como Phone, que es un fabricante de periféricos (dispositivos de hardware a través de los cuales el ordenador puede interactuar con el exterior, como el ratón o el teclado) y que ha estado siempre apoyando a muchos equipos. En 2016, una gran marca como Vodafone apostó por un equipo para hacerlo ganador nacional; el equipo G2 Vodafone. Otro ejemplo es el de El Corte Inglés, organizando campeonatos dentro de sus edificios que le trae tráfico a la tienda y a la compra de productos; o Media Markt con competiciones online y finales en sus tiendas, con el mismo propósito de redirigir tráfico a sus tiendas. Orange organizó en agosto de 2017 competiciones propias de la mano de la NSL (Martín, 2010; Gutiérrez, 2017).

Debido a la mayor generación de otro tipo de contenidos gracias a un territorio que aún no ha sido explotado con toda su potencialidad en España, se crean contenidos creativos no vistos con anterioridad, como el caso de Vodafone de la mano de MTV, que retransmitió un documental llamado «Gamers» del equipo G2 Vodafone y emitido por MTV, como si se tratara de Gran Hermano, dirigido a un público más genérico. Este fue el intento de Vodafone de comunicar o trasladar el movimiento fan o forofo, propio del público que se encuentra dentro del mundo de los videojuegos en red y que son jugadores, a un público que no está tan familiarizado con este mundo. Tuvo éxito en términos de audiencia tanto en cuota televisiva como en otras plataformas donde se distribuyó este contenido teniendo cobertura en otras audiencias (Selva, 2009; Sánchez, 2017; Çinar, 2018).

Por otro lado, existen muchos ejemplos sobre marcas que patrocinan competiciones por el resto del mundo como «Intel Extreme Masters», una serie de torneos de deportes electrónicos que empezó en 2007 y que se ha ido jugando en diferentes países alrededor del mundo, patrocinado por la marca Intel. Pero no solo «juegan» marcas tecnológicas en este territorio. Una de las primeras grandes marcas en patrocinar ligas o torneos fue Coca-Cola, que ha sido uno de los dos colaboradores mundiales de la liga LCS durante muchos años, a través de Coca-Cola Zero. Esto le ha permitido crear su propio mundo de deportes electrónicos con plataformas digitales como Twitter con la cuenta @CokeEsports, con más de 300.000 seguidores, canal de YouTube, etc. Pero también ha creado su propio «Team Coca-Cola» para el videojuego «Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare», organizado por la MLG o «Mayor League Gaming», el líder mundial en organización profesional de deportes electrónicos. Movistar también ha creado su propia página web sobre este tipo de contenidos (León, 2017; Yuste, 2016).

1.4. La inversión en deportes electrónicos (eSports)

El caso de Media Pro y la LVP es un claro ejemplo de cómo empresas españolas invierten en deportes electrónicos. La LVP o Liga de Videojuegos Profesional es una liga que nace nacionalmente queriendo exportar su modelo y reproducirse en otros países, y terminó siendo la liga nacional más grande a nivel europeo. El grupo audiovisual Media Pro compró la mayoría de las acciones de esta organizadora de ligas. Según declaraciones de LVP en rueda de prensa, esta inversión de casi 5 millones de euros tiene el objetivo de «profesionalizar, expandir e impulsar la competición», contando con mayores recursos para los departamentos de marketing y patrocinios. Esto tiene un beneficio para los equipos, pero no se acaba de profesionalizar la industria por lo que las audiencias se dispersan y no podemos hacer vinculaciones tan claras como el Santander a la Fórmula 1 o Movistar al ciclismo. No obstante, esto sí pasa en Corea del Sur, con marcas como Samsung muy vinculadas en el inconsciente de la audiencia a los videojuegos en red por su famoso equipo «Samsung Galaxy White».

Sobre el mismo tema pero a la inversa, la empresa GAME, que se dedica a la venta de videojuegos en Gran Bretaña, fagocitó SocialNAT, una plataforma española en la que se retransmiten eSports. Aquí vemos como empresas del extranjero muestran interés y ven beneficios en el visionado de los deportes electrónicos en España (Cavusgil & al., 2017; Osorio, 2016; Costa-Sánchez & al., 2017).

Twitch.tv es la plataforma líder en retransmisión de partidas de deportes electrónicos a nivel mundial. Plataformas como Amazon pagan por adherir estas audiencias a su público. Mediante un comunicado hecho desde la propia plataforma el 25 de agosto de 2014, el CEO de la empresa declaró que Amazon les había comprado la empresa, por la cantidad de 970 millones de dólares, según el portal «Media Trends». En 2016, Amazon lanzó una promoción en la que los que se suscribieran a «Amazon Prime» tenían derecho a consumir Twitch.tv gratuitamente (Leiva & al., 2017).

Por otro lado, Facebook se ha aliado con Blizzard para retransmitir partidas de Blizzard en Facebook, noticia de la que se han hecho eco plataformas de actualidad en videojuegos en red como IGN España en su página web. Y siguiendo con Facebook, una noticia actual es la cooperación de éste con otro colaborador internacional, la ESL, plataforma mundial de visionado de deportes electrónicos que compite contra Twitch por ser líderes mundiales en la transmisión de los deportes electrónicos. De esta forma, Facebook se ha alineado con ESL para emitir deportes electrónicos en directo, según la plataforma «Thegamersports», y de esta forma, Facebook se asegura potenciar la construcción de audiencias en tiempo real, que actualmente es lo que todas las plataformas de la industria digital están intentando generar en la nueva era digital (Gutiérrez, 2017; Rodríguez, 2016; Valderas, 2016).

2. Material y métodos

Esta investigación partió con el objetivo general de analizar los videojuegos en red en España, así como el comportamiento de la industria y de la publicidad en los mismos. Como objetivos específicos, se pretendía definir el perfil del jugador español y su conducta ante la publicidad y las marcas aparecidas en los juegos y las competiciones. La comparativa con el jugador coreano se realizó con el objetivo de tener a éste último como referente del jugador avanzado (ya que Corea es el país con más seguidores de este tipo de juegos) y poder analizar qué estrategias publicitarias podrían ser más eficaces para este tipo de público objetivo y su posible aplicación a las estrategias publicitarias de marcas dirigidas a un público español.

Con el objetivo de analizar cuáles son las estrategias publicitarias más eficaces para las marcas en el mundo de los videojuegos en red, se decidió investigar y comparar las rutinas de juego, el visionado de publicidad, los comportamientos de compra y la opinión de imagen de marca de jugadores españoles (nuestro objeto de estudio) y jugadores coreanos (donde la cultura del jugador en red está más asentada). Para realizar la investigación, se optó por la técnica del cuestionario online. El cuestionario es una técnica cuantitativa consistente en investigar una muestra de sujetos representativos de una población. Las ventajas de este método de recolección de datos son que permite obtener información de casi cualquier colectivo, además de que nos facilita la estandarización de los datos, es decir, podremos tratarlos informáticamente y analizarlos según estadísticas (Hernández & al., 2003). Se consideró que el mejor medio para alcanzar al universo objeto de estudio era Internet. Gracias al cuestionario online, se puede alcanzar a un amplio número de personas con bajo coste. A su vez, esta herramienta permite interactuar con el entrevistado, lo que se traduce en menos preguntas incompletas (Díaz, 2012).


Fanjul-Peyro et al 2019a-69580 ov-es032.png

Figura 1. ¿En qué momento del día es en el que juega más frecuentemente?

El cuestionario se confeccionó con un total de 60 preguntas, 54 con respuestas cerradas y 6 con respuesta abierta, y fue contestado por un total de 280 jugadores españoles. El beneficio de este tipo de cuestionario radica en que las preguntas cerradas necesitan menos esfuerzo para el encuestado y, por lo tanto, el tiempo para completarlo es menor, además de que permite codificar y analizar los datos fácilmente. Por otra parte, a través de las preguntas abiertas conseguiremos una información más profunda sobre aquellas cuestiones que más nos interesan. Las 60 preguntas se estructuraron en cinco secciones: una primera sección dirigida a cerciorarse que quien respondía a la encuesta era una persona española y jugador de videojuegos, en específico videojuegos MMO (aquellos que se juegan en los deportes electrónicos); una segunda sección denominada «comportamiento de juego» donde se le pregunta al sujeto sobre su hábito de juego, las horas que invierte, momento del día, aparatos electrónicos que utiliza, dónde juega, etc.; la tercera sección llamada «Internet» versaba sobre preguntas acerca del uso de Internet para consumir videojuegos, de la publicidad en este medio, del uso de plataformas como Twitch, de la compra de artículos anunciados, etc.; la cuarta sección abordaba los deportes electrónicos en cuanto a la manera de consumir las competiciones, la publicidad que se puede ver en ellas, cómo influye el visionado de publicidad o marcas en el comportamiento de compra, la imagen que tiene la audiencia sobre los gamers profesionales, etc.; y, por último, la sección «datos demográficos» para obtener información sobre edad, ingreso mensual, ocupación y también sobre personalidad y algunas últimas preguntas sobre el uso de redes sociales.


Fanjul-Peyro et al 2019a-69580 ov-es033.png

Figura 2. ¿Qué aparato electrónico utiliza para poder jugar?

La encuesta a jugadores coreanos fue exactamente igual que la pasada a los españoles y fue cumplimentada por un total de 293 jugadores.


Fanjul-Peyro et al 2019a-69580 ov-es034.png

Figura 3. ¿Has gastado dinero alguna vez comprando elementos en los videojuegos?

Ambas encuestas fueron supervisadas y pre-testadas para su validación por expertos en metodologías científicas de investigación de la Universidad Jaume I y los resultados fueron volcados y cruzados para su análisis estadístico a través del programa SPSS versión 23.0 para el análisis y validación de los estadísticos básicos.


Fanjul-Peyro et al 2019a-69580 ov-es035.png

Figura 4. ¿Has visto ‘prodcut placement’ en los videojuegos?

3. Análisis y resultados

Las 60 preguntas que se les han hecho a los jugadores españoles analizan el modo en el que estos consumen los videojuegos y las competiciones, cómo la publicidad es recibida por ellos, conocer cómo se está usando actualmente la publicidad y cuáles podrían ser los formatos publicitarios más eficaces. Seguidamente, exponemos y analizamos algunos de los resultados más significativos obtenidos.

Respecto a las preguntas de la primera sección (hábito y tipo de juegos) más del 40% juega a videojuegos todos los días y un 35%, varios días a la semana. Se les preguntó sobre la categoría de videojuegos MMO a la que jugaban más, a lo que más de la mitad respondieron categoría «Shooter» (videojuegos de disparo), un 38% a MOBA (videojuegos de batalla y estrategia colectiva) y un 35% videojuegos de estrategia. Los porcentajes de esta pregunta suman más del 100% ya que era de opción múltiple. En cuanto a la pregunta sobre si habían visto alguna vez una competición de deportes electrónicos, el 53% de ellos contestaron afirmativamente.

Siguiendo a la sección de comportamiento de videojuegos, el 46% juega más de 10 horas a la semana, mientras que un 30% juega más de 3 horas diariamente. Casi el 40% de ellos juegan frecuentemente después de cenar, entre las 22:00 horas y la medianoche, y todos ellos juegan en su casa.

El aparato electrónico que utiliza más de la mitad de los jugadores españoles encuestados es el ordenador, seguido por la alternación de móvil y ordenador, y la PlayStation.

Para empezar a introducir el comportamiento de compra en la encuesta, en esta sección también se les preguntó si alguna vez habían comprado elementos en los videojuegos, a lo cual un 25% confesó haber gastado más de 500 euros, y un 23% entre 100 y 500 euros.

La primera pregunta de respuesta larga para poder profundizar más en la mente de esta audiencia fue «¿Por qué empezó a jugar a videojuegos online?» a lo cual surgieron 280 respuestas distintas pero la mayoría de ellas siguiendo dos líneas: por un lado, gran parte de ellos juega a videojuegos online porque lleva toda su vida jugando a videojuegos desde su infancia, y otra gran parte de los encuestados afirma haberse adscrito a esta comunidad porque sus amigos empezaron a jugar.

Por otro lado, más del 60% no paga por consumir estos videojuegos online, y en cuanto a la frecuencia en la que suelen ver las partidas de otros jugadores a través de plataformas de streaming como Twitch, el 60% lo hace de forma diaria o semanal, y un 28% lo ha visto varias veces en su vida, pero no de forma periódica. De ello podemos sacar que todos los encuestados conocen las competiciones de deportes electrónicos.

Adentrándonos más en la publicidad que aparece de forma específica mientras juegan, el 67% de los jugadores niega ver con frecuencia anuncios en la pantalla mientras juega y, por el contrario, el 70% contesta a la siguiente pregunta que sí ha visto «product placement» (menciones o muestra de productos o marcas) dentro de los videojuegos. Podemos afirmar que la publicidad de las marcas actualmente sigue una estrategia enfocada a estar presente dentro del videojuego formando parte de él, que no siendo un elemento exterior al mismo.

La siguiente cuestión es sobre el poder de prescripción de agentes externos, donde se les hacía la pregunta «¿Qué le genera más confianza a la hora de comprar un componente de ordenador para jugar a eGames?», a lo cual el 42% respondió «La recomendación de un jugador profesional». El hecho de que nadie respondiera «Las recomendaciones de la publicidad en los videojuegos» afianza la idea de que son consumidores críticos, que bien se fían de ellos mismos o de profesionales en el terreno, y que la publicidad como banners y derivados no tiene eficacia en ellos.

La siguiente cuestión de respuesta larga en cuanto a si ha visto publicidad de los propios videojuegos en Internet y/o fuera de él, las respuestas han hecho referencia a varias plataformas, pero las más sonantes han sido YouTube y televisión.

La cuarta sección sobre los deportes electrónicos comienza con dónde se suele encontrar al ver una competición de este tipo a lo que responde más del 80% «Dentro de casa». A «¿A través de qué dispositivo suele ver estas competiciones?» más de la mitad responde que a través del ordenador, igual que a la hora de jugar. El 58% de los encuestados ve las competiciones solo. Como pregunta de respuesta larga sobre por qué ven estas competiciones, las respuestas que se repiten describen un factor de entretenimiento y otro de profesionalización, es decir, las ven porque les gusta y porque pueden mejorar su técnica poniendo en práctica las jugadas de otros jugadores más aventajados.

En cuanto a la publicidad de los deportes electrónicos, el 70% dice haber visto publicidad en ellos y el 90%, haber visto «product placement». Al preguntarle si al ver estas marcas publicitadas le incita a la compra, casi el 60% responde negativamente, y el 90% no ha llegado a comprar algún producto por haberlo visto en una competición, por lo que vemos que el tipo de publicidad que se está usando no es eficiente. No obstante, si bien no han comprado, el 50% al ver estas marcas presentes en los torneos le ha hecho tener una buena imagen de ellas.

Las siguientes cuestiones están relacionadas con el tema jugador profesional. A la pregunta «¿Le gustaría ser gamer profesional?» el 60% responde afirmativamente, y en la respuesta larga «¿Por qué?», por pasión y, como segunda razón, por dinero. En cuanto a los que respondieron que no, decían que conlleva mucho tiempo y sacrificio que no están dispuestos a asumir.

En cuanto a si ha comprado accesorios de ordenador (periféricos) porque un jugador profesional lo utilice, la respuesta del 72% de los encuestados es «Sí» y el motivo que expresan es por la calidad percibida del producto.

3.1. Comparativa de los resultados entre los jugadores españoles y los surcoreanos

En esta segunda encuesta hemos tomado una muestra similar, 293 encuestados con 60 preguntas por encuesta, examinando al público de la República de Corea del Sur.

En la primera sección, todos los encuestados afirman ser coreanos, con un porcentaje mayor de juego que el español, con un 40% de ellos que juega varios días a la semana, y la mitad de todos ellos juega todos los días, por lo que la frecuencia de juego es mucho mayor en comparación a la española.

Casi todos los encuestados juegan a videojuegos MOBA (batalla en arena), dentro de los cuales se incluyen los videojuegos en red más famosos como «LoL», «War of Warcraft», y las otras categorías son ignoradas, a diferencia de los españoles en los que los encuestados se reparten de manera más equitativa en las categorías. Por último, una gran diferencia es que el 95% de los encuestados han visto alguna vez una competición de deportes electrónicos, con respecto al 53% español. En cuanto a la segunda sección sobre el comportamiento de juego, el jugador coreano presenta una dedicación mucho mayor que el español con casi 80% de los encuestados que dedica más de tres horas al día a videojuegos en contraste al 29% español que dio la misma respuesta. En cuanto al horario, cambia totalmente, el 60% de los coreanos afirma jugar en los descansos en el trabajo/universidad y un 25%, entre las 8 y 12 de la mañana, a diferencia de la preferencia nocturna que se da en el español. El lugar de juego y el dispositivo utilizado es de las mayores diferencias entre ambos públicos, el coreano con un perfil más inclinado a jugar fuera de casa (94% de respuesta) y con el móvil (82%) y el español con un perfil más proclive a jugar dentro de casa (100%) y utilizando el PC (57%).

En el dinero gastado en elementos en los videojuegos, casi la mitad ha gastado entre 124.000 y 615.000 won coreanos (entre 100 y 500 euros) y un 30%, más de 615.000 (500 euros), mientras que el gasto español es más bajo, repartiéndose equitativamente entre las opciones «Nunca» hasta «Más de 500 euros» ya mencionada.

En la pregunta «¿Por qué empezó a jugar a videojuegos?», el sentido de comunidad surge tanto como en el español. La mayoría de los encuestados dice haber comenzado porque sus amigos lo hicieron, y ahora lo siguen haciendo, pero de forma online.

Al preguntar si suelen ver anuncios en la pantalla mientras juegan, el 88% lo niega (más que en España), pero en la siguiente pregunta, el 94% afirma haber visto «product placement» dentro de los videojuegos. Gracias a esto podemos ver una tendencia al alza del «product placement» en plataformas de visionado.

La última pregunta de respuesta corta era sobre dónde habían visto publicidad fuera o dentro de Internet, y aquí nos encontramos que hay que tener en cuenta que, si bien nombran plataformas digitales como YouTube o Facebook, la mayoría de las respuestas son de publicidad exterior, sobre todo publicidad en el metro, cosa que no mencionaban los españoles.

En la siguiente sección «Mundo eSports», volvemos a ver la misma gran diferencia que pasó en cuanto al espacio en el que se encuentra mientras juega, ya que al preguntar si se encuentra dentro o fuera de casa al ver una competición de deportes electrónicos, el 97% lo hace fuera de casa.

También se repite el dispositivo con el que ven las competiciones, con un 53% que utiliza el móvil y un 34%, «móvil+ordenador»; otro gran contraste, el 70% de los coreanos suelen verlos solos, mientras que los españoles la mayoría los ven acompañados. Para resumir, su comportamiento con respecto a los deportes electrónicos en las siguientes preguntas, se caracterizan por haber visto más de 20 competiciones en su vida (51%, muchas más que los españoles), la mayoría ha visto alguna vez una competición en persona (81%, resultado opuesto al español), el horario para ver los certámenes es en los descansos de la universidad o del trabajo (mientras que el español es por la tarde), el 70% las ve a través de la plataforma Twitch.tv (idéntico al español; Twitch.tv es la plataforma por excelencia en ambas culturas y países) y el 71% los suele ver durante más de cinco horas durante el día. A la pregunta con respuesta corta «¿Por qué ve las competiciones eSports?», la mayoría ha contestado, tal y cómo el público español, por un lado, por entretenimiento, y por otro, para aprender de los jugadores profesionales nuevas técnicas para mejorar a la hora de ellos jugar.

Varias preguntas en cuanto a la publicidad y los deportes electrónicos: 70% afirma haber visto anuncios durante el juego y 90% también afirma haber visto «product placement», pero el 57% no ha sentido ganas de comprar por la publicidad que han observado, y más a fondo, el 64% niega haber comprado algo por haberlo visto en los deportes electrónicos. Sin embargo, casi todos los encuestados (91%) ha tenido una buena imagen de las marcas que se han hecho ver durante las competiciones. Preguntado sobre los jugadores profesionales, el 85% querría ser uno de ellos y ante el «¿Por qué?» han sido muchas respuestas, pero las más recurrentes han sido dirigidas al ver este trabajo como un sueño cumplido; trabajar en su pasión.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Tras analizar y comparar las características de los jugadores españoles y coreanos en cuanto a su comportamiento de juego, visionado de publicidad, imagen de marca y comportamiento de compra, exponemos a continuación algunas de las conclusiones más significativas de nuestro estudio.

Gracias al aumento del público jugador de los deportes electrónicos las marcas que se vinculen estratégicamente con los videojuegos podrán beneficiarse de todo el potencial que los videojuegos en red y los deportes electrónicos ofrecen (competición, audiencia masiva, comunidad o fans) (Carcelén & al., 2017). Como hemos visto, la publicidad online convencional no llama la atención a los consumidores jugadores, pero los productos prescritos por los jugadores profesionales son eficientes. Los jugadores aficionados se fían del criterio de los profesionales y, si bien son críticos y saben que tener esos productos no les hará ganar las competiciones, declaran que saben que son productos de calidad. Esto se debe a un componente aspiracional. Por otro lado, el factor competitivo, que se incrementa más aún en los jugadores surcoreanos, y el afán de superación personal hacen que quieran obtener mejores productos para alcanzar a sus «héroes» o modelos a seguir.

Por lo tanto, una de las mejores estrategias en cuanto a publicidad para videojuegos sería la utilización de jugadores profesionales como factor de influencia al utilizar y prescribir productos y marcas. Serían embajadores de marca que generarían reconocimiento hacia la misma. El patrocinio de estos jugadores se basaría en la presencia de marca tanto durante el tiempo de partida como del visionado de competiciones de deportes electrónicos. Este patrocinio sería fundamental durante la retransmisión ya que los espectadores, a la vez que ven las partidas, observan qué elementos usan los jugadores, desde el teclado hasta la bebida que toman (Vilaplana-Aparicio & al., 2018; Clemente & al., 2018).

Asimismo, también se ha evidenciado que el patrocinio de un equipo en los deportes electrónicos es una estrategia eficiente que permite desarrollar acciones de contenido de marca (branded content) vinculadas a los mismos. La mera presencia de la marca en las competiciones también genera reconocimiento mediante el componente aspiracional, y una perfecta manera es creando un equipo de jugadores profesionales. El interés por la carrera y el desarrollo de estos equipos, unido al sentimiento de comunidad y al fenómeno fan que generan estos juegos, facilitan la creación de contenidos de marca vinculados a ofrecer a los seguidores del equipo un valor añadido más allá de la participación o visionado de los deportes electrónicos.

Una cuestión que nos ha llamado la atención ha sido la información obtenida en la pregunta sobre dónde suelen ver más publicidad de videojuegos (no de marcas que se publicitan en ellos). Aquí, los españoles mencionaron plataformas online como Facebook o YouTube, y los surcoreanos, en su gran mayoría, hacen referencia a la publicidad exterior en lugares como el metro. El metro es un transporte público que en una gran capital como Seúl o Madrid es muy utilizado por los «millennials», jóvenes a la vanguardia de la tecnología, muchos de ellos jugadores. Por consiguiente, es posible pensar en la implantación que podría hacerse en el presente utilizando un soporte de publicidad exterior y vanguardista, como es el nuevo soporte de publicidad dinámica led que ya se ha puesto en marcha en el metro de Madrid, pero que ya se utiliza desde hace años en la capital de la República de Corea del Sur, Seúl. Este soporte crea una ilusión de imagen en movimiento por fuera de los vagones del tren que llamaría la atención de los transeúntes y casaría perfectamente con la vanguardia de los videojuegos en red.

Finalmente, para concluir este artículo, indicar que somos conscientes que esta investigación no es un estudio categórico ni conclusivo sobre el tema, sino una aproximación a la realidad y la evolución de las estrategias publicitarias dentro del mercado de los videojuegos en red. Sería necesaria una observación continuada y una investigación más profunda que analizara la eficacia de las acciones publicitarias en juegos y competiciones, así como la evolución del comportamiento de los jugadores a raíz de las mismas.

Apoyos

Este artículo se ha realizado con ayuda del proyecto de investigación titulado «El negocio publicitario en la sociedad digital: estructura de agencia, perfiles profesionales y nuevas tendencias creativas». Plan de Promoción a la Investigación de la Universidad Jaume I de Castellón. Código del proyecto P1-1B2015-27.

Referencias

Carcelén, S., Alameda, D., & Pintado, T. (2017). Prácticas, competencias y tendencias de la comunicación publicitaria digital: una visión desde la perspectiva de los anunciantes españoles. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 72, 1648-1669. https://doi

Cavusgil, S.T., Knight, G., & Riesenberger, J. (2017). International business. The new realities. Boston: Pearson.

Çinar, N. (2018). An evaluation of source effects in consumer generated ads. Comunicación y Sociedad, 31(1), 147-167. https://doi.org/10.15581/003.31.1.147-167

Clemente, J., & Sebastián, A. (2018). New discourses in Brand communication in Spain: Adaptation vs. Renewal of target audience. Comunicación y Sociedad, 31(2), 25-38. https://doi.org/10.15581/003.31.2.25-38

Costa-Sánchez, C. (2017). Estrategias de videomarketing online. Tipología por sectores de negocio. Comunicación y Sociedad, 30(1), 17-38. https://doi.org/10.15581/003.30.1.17-38

DEV (2016). Libro Blanco del desarrollo español de videojuegos 2016. Asociación española de empresas productoras y desarrolladoras de videojuegos y software de entretenimiento. https://bit.ly/2mWmLaG

Díaz-de-Rada, V. (2012). Ventajas e inconvenientes de la encuesta por Internet. Papers, 91, 193-223. https://doi.org/10.5565/rev/papers/v97n1.71

Gutiérrez, R. (2017). ESL y Facebook se alían para emitir eSports en directo. The Gamer eSports. Azarplus, 1, 1. https://bit.ly/2r8PVXv

Hernández, R., Fernández, C., & Baptista, L. (2013). Metodología de la investigación. México: McGraw-Hill.

Leiva, R., Benavides, C., & Wilkinson, K.T. (2017). Young hispanics’ motivations to use smartphones: A three-country comparative study. Comunicación y Sociedad, 30(4), 13-26. https://doi.org/10.15581/003.30.3.13-26

León, A. (2017). Documentales de eSports que tienes que ver. Redbull. https://win.gs/2w6sXkA

Márquez, R. (2017). Las universidades americanas ya ofrecen becas deportivas a jugadores. eSports. Xataka Esports, 1, 1. https://bit.ly/2wjej93

Martín, E. (2010). Videojuegos y publicidad. Cómo alcanzar a las audiencias que escapan de los medios tradicionales. Telos, 82, 78-87. https://bit.ly/2PsGqvc

Muros, B., Aragón, Y., & Bustos, A. (2013). Youth’s usage of leisure time with video games and social networks. [La ocupación del tiempo libre de jóvenes en el uso de videojuegos y redes]. Comunicar, 40, 31-39. https://doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-02-03

Newzoo (2016a). Global Games Market Report. Newzoo, empresa de datos e inteligencia de mercado de videojuegos, dispositivos móviles y deportes electrónicos. https://bit.ly/2w4gptY

Newzoo (2016b). Game revenues of top 25 public companies up 14% in 2015. Newzoo, empresa de datos e inteligencia de mercado de videojuegos, dispositivos móviles y deportes electrónicos. https://bit.ly/2w86nIC

Newzoo (2017). Global Esports Market Report. Newzoo, empresa de datos e inteligencia de mercado de videojuegos, dispositivos móviles y deportes electrónicos. https://bit.ly/2o3bjtT

Osorio, V.M. (2016). ¿Cuál es la realidad de los eSports en el mundo y en España? Expansión.com. https://bit.ly/2BFLbim

Parra, D. (2009). Hábitos de uso de los videojuegos en España entre los mayores de 35 años. Revista Latina de Comunicación Social, 64, 694-707. https://doi.org/10.4185/RLCS-64-2009-854-694-707

Pérez-Latorre, O. (2012). From chess to StarCraft. A comparative analysis of traditional games and videogames. [Del ajedrez a StarCraft. Análisis comparativo de juegos tradicionales y videojuegos]. Comunicar, 38, 121-129. https://doi.org/10.3916/c38-2012

Rodríguez, J.A. (2016). Blizzard y Facebook unen fuerzas. IGN España. https://bit.ly/2P2JJsb

Sánchez, V.S. (2017). Ariana Grande ficha por ‘Final Fantasy’. El Periódico. https://bit.ly/2MNFnHU

Scalvinoni, L.O. (2012). Social gaming ¿Un fenómeno de moda o revolución marketiniana? PuroMarketing. https://bit.ly/2MLLvAp

Sedeño, A. (2010). Videogames as cultural devices: Development of spatial skills and application in learning [Videojuegos como dispositivos culturales: Las competencias espaciales en educación]. Comunicar, 34, 183-189. https://doi.org/10.3916/C34-2010-03

Selva, D. (2009). El videojuego como herramienta de comunicación publicitaria: una aproximación al concepto de ‘advergaming’. Comunicación, 7(1), 141-166. https://bit.ly/1kYfrBn

Selva-Ruiz, D., & Caro-Castaño, L. (2016). Use of data in advertising creativity: The case of Google’s Art, Copy & Code. [Uso de datos en la creatividad publicitaria: El caso de Art, Copy & Code de Google]. El Profesional de la Información, 25, 4, 642-651

Sempere, P. (2016). La publicidad, a la conquista definitiva de los eSports. Cinco Días. https://bit.ly/2MJhqRW

Valderas, M. (2016). Blizzard lanza un documental centrado en los eSports universitarios. El Desmarque. https://bit.ly/2w82bbT

Vilaplana-Aparicio, M.J., Iglesias-García, M., & Martín-Llaguno, M. (2018). Communication of innovation through online media. [Comunicación de la innovación a través de los medios online]. El Profesional de la Información, 27, 4, 840-848. https://doi.org

Vivian, J. (2017). The media of mass communication. Boston, MA: Pearson Education Inc.

Yuste, A.G. (2016). eSports: Documentales sobre eSports. Marca.com. https://bit.ly/2wkTeLy

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/18
Accepted on 31/12/18
Submitted on 31/12/18

Volume 27, Issue 1, 2019
DOI: 10.3916/C58-2019-10
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Views 3
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?