Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Whereas most studies of learning explore intra-institutional experiences, our interest is to track individual learning trajectories across domains. Research on young people’s use of different media outside schools shows how practices of using digital media are different from practices in schools in both form and content. The major challenge today, however, is to find ways of understanding the interconnections and networking between these two lifeworlds as experienced by young people. Important elements here are adapted concepts like context, trajectories and identity related to activity networks. We will present data from the ongoing «learning lives project» in a multicultural community in Oslo. We will especially focus on students of Media and Communication studies at upper secondary school level. Using an ethnographic approach we will focus on how learners’ identities are constructed and negotiated across different kinds of learning relationships. The data will consist of both researcher-generated data (interviews, video-observations, field notes) and informant-generated data (photos, diaries, maps).

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The changing role of media in our societies, and especially the impact of digital technologies since the mid-1990s, has implications for where and how learning might happen, whether situated or distributed online or offline. On one level, being a learner has always meant operating within and across different spaces and places. Traditionally connections between sites have been framed within the hotly debated issue of transfer (Perkins & Salomon, 1992; Beach, 1999), which dominates both popular and academic mindsets. Still, current opportunities to move across «sites of learning» means that understanding how one context for learning relates to another has become a key concern when conceptualizing and investigating learning and knowledge in the 21st century (Edwards, Biesta & Thorpe, 2009, Leander & al., 2010).

Educational research has mainly been focusing on learning activities within the classroom (Sawyer, 2006). During the last decade the influence of digital technologies on classroom activities has become a key area of educational research. This research shows how teachers and students struggle to implement and define fruitful learning practices using digital media in different subjects and on different levels in school (Law, Pelgrum & Plomp, 2008). Furthermore, institutional practices are often described as barriers to school development related to the integrated use of such media. Several critical voices have also been raised about the strategies pushing the implementation and use of digital media in schools (Selwyn, 2011). In contrast, research on young people’s use of different media outside school shows how practices using digital media vary from practices inside school in both form and content. Leisure time activities employing digital media have been described as an alternative route to engagement and learning that are better adapted to 21st century needs than traditional school learning and future employment within the creative industry (Gee, 2007; Ito & al., 2010). These developments imply a need to better understand the connections between different practices, exploring media as an embedded part of everyday activities. Our discussion is informed by the following two research questions:

• How are learning and literacy practices among young people connected between different contexts and over time?

• How can we study connected practices as part of young people’s evolving learning identities?

A major challenge today is to find ways of understanding the interconnections and networking between different life-worlds as experienced by young people. During the last decade there has been a growing interest in the research community across disciplines to better understand how knowledge travels from one setting to another, and how this is experienced by learners in their everyday lives and practices, online and offline. This can be seen in the rethinking of key concepts like «context» (Edwards & al., 2009), «trajectories» (Dreier, 2003) and «identity» (Lemke, 2007; Wortham, 2006). In this article we will present data from an ongoing project in Oslo, Norway. We will concentrate our analysis on one 18-year-old boy and one school project he took part in to exemplify ways of studying learning lives and how practices connect.

2. Connected lives – learning, literacy and identity

In studying connected lives, we need to go beyond issues of access and context-bound use and look more closely at the everyday practices of young people and how digital media create different trajectories of learning for different people. Ito and colleagues (2010) in the US describe this as «media ecologies». In the large scale «Digital Youth» project, they manage to document the broader social and cultural contours, as well as the overall diversity, in youth engagement with digital media. The concept of ecology is used strategically to highlight that: «The everyday practices of youth, existing structural conditions, infrastructures of place, and technologies are all dynamically interrelated; the meanings, uses, functions, flows, and interconnections in young people’s daily lives that are located in specific settings are also situated within young people’s wider media ecologies… Similarly, we see adult’s and children’s cultural worlds as dynamically co-constituted, and likewise, the different locations where youth navigate, such as school, after-school, home, and online places» (Ito & al., 2010: 31).

In their findings, they refer to certain genres of participation, in what they describe as «friendship driven» and «interest driven» categories. Furthermore, they have identified different levels of commitment and intensity in new media practices. These genres of participation are then interpreted as being «intertwined with young people’s practices, learning, and identity formation within these varied and dynamic media ecologies» (ibid.). However, we should be careful when emphasizing differences between online and offline activities. As Nunes (2006) has made explicit, we live in the intersection between the online and offline as part of our everyday practices. In exploring digital youth, it is also important not to get caught up in conceptions that might be too general (Buckingham & Willett, 2006). The level of digital competence and technological interest among young people varies greatly.

Recently, there has been a growing interest in linking learning and identity formation as interrelated practices connected to the capacity to adapt to changing roles within different contexts (Holland, Lachicotte Jr, Skinner & Cain, 1998; Moje & Luke, 2009). Many of these studies have criticised the institutional practices of education, claiming that the resources, identities, and experiences students develop in other settings are not properly recognised or used as an anchor for developing their skills and knowledge in school (Heath, 1983; Kumpulainen & Lipponen, 2011; Wortham, 2009). In the same vein, scholars have started to question the relevance of educational practices for the future workplace and for civil society, suggesting that students are not sufficiently able to re-contextualise the curriculum and make it relevant to managing problems and challenges in practices outside educational institutions (Guile, 2010). In policy, coordinating the skills and knowledge required, and likewise, the dynamic, changing relations in the economy and society, is crucial. A dual focus on learning and identity allows us to analyse how learners move between and interweave different contexts, by looking at their positioning practices over time (see also McLeod & Yates, 2006; Thomson, 2009). Furthermore, we are inspired by Wortham (2006; 2009), who empirically showed how communities and institutions shape young people into specific kinds of learners.

The notion of «trajectory» provides an analytical means for understanding learning activities across time and space. Participation trajectories are closely linked to identity as a «capacity for particular forms of action and hence a capacity to interpret and use environmental affordances to support action» (Edwards & Mackenzie, 2008: 165). We use the notion of trajectory as a way of identifying the pathways that a person, or an object for that matter, follows within and across situations, over time. Edwards and Mackenzie (2005) argued for a detailed analysis of the formation, disruption, reformation and support of trajectories of participation in the opportunities for action provided (p. 287). We ought, then, to explore how participants are not merely situated in time and space, but also how they are actively networking learning resources across space-time (Leander, Phillips & Taylor, 2010: 8). If we merely point out that learning is situated in context, we will be missing the fact that people themselves actively establish contexts of meaningful action (Van Oers, 1998). To analyse how people do this is particularly important in knowledge economies, in which people are regularly faced with new challenges that require an innovative use of knowledge and expertise. Furthermore, new technologies enable faster access to, and distribution of, texts, pictures, or other knowledge resources. When researching these issues, we need to understand how these new phenomena may be adapted to other contexts, e.g. a school essay, or a mash-up video on YouTube (Burgess, Green, Jenkins & Hartley, 2009; Warschauer & Matuchniak, 2010).

In the case of socio-cultural approaches, issues of identity are treated as closely interwoven with learning in order to participate in various kinds of practices (Linell, 2009). To become a proficient member of a practice is also to take on a certain identity – as a gamer, a skateboarder, or a chess player. These identities are made available through practice –as observable action, language use, texts or other types of cultural resources– and newcomers can take on or appropriate these identities as they become more central members of the practice (Gee, 2000). People perform multiple identities and participate in a range of practices. At times, there may be connections, other times there may be tensions, and sometimes, there might be no relation whatsoever (Silseth & Arnseth, 2011). How these connections or tensions are established has consequences for a person’s participation trajectories.

3. Learning lives

«Learning lives» refers to the coherence between learning, identity and agency in the individual, framed by a biographical approach which studies peoples’ learning trajectories over their life course. Personal histories and future orientations are used to create «narratives of self’; these selves are central to productive learning. In a «learning lives» approach, the connection between learning and identity is important because it specifies how different learners engage in learning activities across settings. Learning does not end when one leaves the school grounds at the end of the day.

Challenging our conceptions of «context» is important because it informs us, in an analytical sense, of the way we interpret and understand the interrelationship between people, their learning identities, and the circumstances they are involved in at different times and in different places. Edwards, Biesta and Thorpe (2009) relate the discussion on context to the broader discourse of lifelong learning where context is an outcome of an activity or is itself a set of practices. To emphasize the process of networking between people and environments, they use the term contextualizing rather than context. Practices are not bound by context, but emerge relationally and are polycontextual, i.e. they have the potential to be realized in a range of strata and situations based on participation in multiple settings. Once one looks beyond the context of conventional situations for education and training, allowing learning contexts to be extended to the dimension of relationships between people, artefacts and variously-defined others mediated through a range of social, organizational and technological factors, then the limitations of a large part of conventional pedagogy becomes clear (Edwards & al., 2009: 3). This raises an important point concerning how contextualizing and networking involves different types of learning and different contents, and implies different purposes, which might be variables in the values defined for them.

To pursue this issue further, it is possible to address three different focal points: 1) by concentrating on people as they move in and between practices, and examining how they are enabled to sustain their participation; 2) by focusing directly on the tools and signs to determine how they are interpreted, communicated, and made available in a practice; 3) by scrutinizing the structuring of the practice itself, i.e. how is it organised and how is it made learnable for newcomers. In this article, we will focus primarily on persons, as we draw on different data types from a wide range of practices and situations to produce condensed portraits of the selected participants.

4. Methods and context

We will draw on data from a comprehensive study involving ethnographic fieldwork related to three different age cohorts: 5-6-year-olds; 15-16-year-olds; and 18-19-year-olds. We monitored children and teenagers in these cohorts as they went through important transitions in their formal education, and we studied the changes and transitions in and between their institutional and everyday lives. An important aim is to analyse how identities are shaped and developed in different settings over time.

In our project, we have focused on one particular community in Oslo, with a dense multi-ethnic population. Both historically and discursively, this area is representative of the broader changes in Norwegian society over the last three decades. In the 1950s and 1960s, working-class and lower-middle-class families moved to this area, and many people were able to obtain low-interest, government-subsidized loans to purchase their own homes. During the past twenty years, several different immigrant groups have either arrived in Norway and moved directly to apartments in this area, or have moved to the area from other parts of Oslo, looking for the less expensive, more spacious properties here. For this reason, public discourse has always presented this area of Oslo as a challenge, and at the same time, as the image of the new, multi-ethnic Norway. In this regard, the population is culturally and linguistically diverse; such cultural diversity in urban areas is a relatively new phenomenon in Norway. The Municipality of Oslo, supported by large investments from the State, has undertaken to transform the community over the next 10 years, and we felt that we could use the intervention program as a unique opportunity to develop a community-based understanding of the learning lives of young people in and out-of-school, and to frame the analytical perspectives within a particular social and geographical context.

We used an ethnographic approach, based on recorded interviews and other data collection tools, in order to create detailed descriptions of the learning lives and learning contexts of three cohorts of young people. The study consists of interviews, observations and field notes, video recordings of selected episodes and activities, participant-generated materials in the form of diaries and photos, and maps produced together with the participants. At the time of writing, we are starting to sort the data and are in the process of developing analytical categories that will facilitate systematic comparison across the data sets, which will be analysed to produce meaningful studies of learning moments, learning processes, learning contexts, and their interconnections.

Our challenge has been to develop and use methods that enable us to understand how learning occurs across different sites and locations, including: learning across institutional frames, between informal, semi-formal and formal locations; learning on- and off-line; learning through play; and learning across a range of cultural and interest-driven spaces.

While there has been considerable interest in the academic, policymaking, and innovation spheres in learning across contexts as a way to harness the energies of actual learners (Thomas & Brown, 2011), it is still a challenge for researchers to understand and describe how this takes place. As pointed out by Leander et al. (2010), «following» learners across and between sites is complex. Sites are varied and include physical sites, such as home, school, or with peers; virtual spaces, such as online environments, gaming, social networks, and mobile technologies; and conceptual sites (tracing, translation, and re-con?guration of understanding across contexts).

While we can understand a great deal about how people make connections between spaces and experiences, we still face the challenge of gaining knowledge on how these resources actually move between contexts, how people appropriate them in one set of circumstances and are enabled to use them in other contexts. Methodological challenges are practical (how to track and physically follow learners), ethical/legal (how to ensure access and trust across social domains), and conceptual (the circumscription of what might actually constitute evidence of learning) (Bloome, 2005; Edwards & Mackenzie, 2005; Erstad, Gilje, Sefton-Green & Vasbø, 2009; Sinha, 1999; Wortham, 2006).

5. Researcher-generated and participant-generated data

Each student was given specific assignments: to take different kinds of photos, such as pictures of their school route, places they remembered from childhood, and photos of their homes. Altogether, we collected more than 200 digital photos during spring of 2011. As a result of these relatively open-ended assignments, the informants provided us with a large number of very diverse photographs. One of the most interesting aspects was the way in which immigrant children included pictures of their relatives, as well as photos from their journeys and visits back to their countries of origin. As part of the research design, we used these artefacts as a starting point in follow-up interviews. As more than half of the informants in the study would be leaving their local community during summer 2011, we intended to compare those who left the local community to those who chose to stay. Based upon a preliminary analysis of the interviews, several issues have emerged. An important (albeit unsurprising) finding is that most of the pupils in secondary school moved across a very limited local community, close to their homes. When talking about place and movement, many of the participants made it clear that they recognised some invisible border in their local neighbourhood, which they did not cross. The interview data enabled us to understand how they positioned themselves in relation to other socio-economic groups.

In order to attain our objective of tracing movement and flow, we needed a flexible means of data collection and analysis. A possible solution is to combine a detailed analysis of interaction with the analysis of texts, models, or artefacts of any kind, alongside observation of action in and between situations (Baker, Green & Skukauskaite, 2008), thereby alternating between different levels of analysis. On the one hand, an interaction analysis can show detailed instances of emergence, whereas observation and the analysis of photographs, maps and artefacts can provide insight into broader changes and flows. Detailed studies can enable us to problematize some of the broader claims or provide richer and more detailed descriptions of generic patterns. Observations over time can provide us with knowledge that might force us to reconsider the analytical claims resulting from studies conducted over a much shorter time span. By analysing these different kinds of data, we aim to understand the trajectories of young learners during their crucial educational transitions. Bearing in mind that we have just started to analyse our data, we will limit our analysis to providing a telling example of one participant. We are unable to provide a detailed analysis of how participation trajectories are actually negotiated; nonetheless, we shall provide an overview of how some of the youth we have studied managed their learning and identities across practices and over time.

It is not our intention to provide a whole list of the practices and activities in which young people engage, as this would be too complex and demanding. The aim is rather to provide some background to the following analytic example, insofar as this helps us suggest and point to connections and boundaries between practices, which may have an impact on young people’s participation over time. In our analytical perspective, there are multiple trajectories of development and participation. How people become who they are is the result of complex negotiations and cannot be reduced to societal and individual variables.

6. A portrait of a young learner

Mathias lives with his mother in an apartment block. His parents are divorced. He has spent his summer vacation in the mountains ever since he was a young child. He describes these experiences as life-changing moments for him. There are 4 computers in his home, and he has both a laptop (Mac) and a desktop computer in his room. He has always practised sports and currently attends Thai boxing training sessions several times a week. He uses Facebook actively every day, and reads newspapers online. Mathias is not very motivated at school and that was partly why he chose «Media and Communication» studies. From his perspective, this is an easy subject with a lot of freedom, which suits him. In class, he is very sociable, but spends a lot of time on different projects with a friend. He wanted to start higher education in order to become a real estate agent because his career as a musician in the community was not a serious option for future employment and that is why he gave it up on starting upper secondary school. After secondary school, he started military service and was considering the possibility of a military career, which would seem to satisfy his interest in nature and his serious training efforts.

7. Mathias and the «Street Art» project

In one «Media and Communication» class we studied from November 2010 until May 2011, five boys did a project on graffiti in urban spaces in Oslo. It was a school project, in the sense that the whole class had to do a project for a certain length of time. Students were free to choose the theme for their project and their co-workers. The idea for the project had to be approved by the teacher before they began, and the final product was to be evaluated by the teacher.

Two of the five boys in the group knew a couple of local graffiti artists; they invited the other three to join their group. The basic idea was to create a portrait of the two artists. The boys submitted their proposal to their teacher, who approved their idea and also made some suggestions about making the project along the lines of a TV documentary about graffiti in urban spaces in Oslo. At that time, there was a broader discourse in the city among politicians and the general public about the pros and cons of graffiti. The boys agreed that this might make the production more interesting and started to outline their plans for the documentary. They searched for public information and newspaper articles about graffiti in Oslo, and they drew up a list of people they might interview. They also read books about graffiti artists like Banksy, which were available at school or at the local library.

The students spent a couple of weeks reading and writing in preparation for the different sequences of the documentary. They needed to plan how they were going to do things and to determine who should be responsible for what. They also had to make arrangements with the people they wanted to interview. We focused on two of the boys in the group, whom we were also studying in some other projects. Considering that one of the boys was a former rapper in the community and was used to being «on stage», and another had done quite a lot of filming and editing in his leisure time, it was decided that one of them would be the reporter in the documentary and the other the camera operator.


Draft Content 257553598-26729-en017.jpg

The documentary is approximately ten minutes in length. Our interest lay not so much in the actual documentary, but more in the example it provided of how practices and knowledge are connected in the process of its implementation as a school assignment. The main theme in the film is the contrast between the bottom-up perspective of street artists who paint graffiti, and the top-down perspective of politicians concerned about the costs of cleaning graffiti from public buildings, etc. The film starts with footage from the local community of the students themselves, and then Mathias, who is the reporter, comes on screen explaining that they are going to discuss the question of graffiti from a bottom-up and top-down perspective. Most of the film is comprised of snatches of interviews with the two graffiti artists and the politician, followed by a few sequences of the graffiti artists painting graffiti on a public wall where this is permitted. The film then shows some interviews with students from their school giving their opinions on graffiti. The film was not well-rated by the teacher, mainly because of the poor sound and film quality of most of the sequences, due to the technical problems the students had with the camera. Nonetheless, this project, just like several other projects we followed during this period, is an example of the ways in which students can use the community as a learning space and draw on different «funds of knowledge» from their own experiences of having been brought up in the community where their school is located. The community becomes a resource that they can draw on as part of their school projects. In the case of Mathias, this connection between school activities, i.e. making this film, and his own experiences and practices in the community was expressed in several ways.


Draft Content 257553598-26729-en018.jpg

Mathias plays a lead role in this project because the theme is something he is particularly engaged with. On one level, he sees the issue of graffiti as being important in relation to his having grown up in this community. Graffiti is something that is discussed in the community, and in the city itself, as a controversial issue in the tensions between youth culture and the adult discourse, which considers it a problem. Mathias can see the pros and cons of both positions, but he knows the two graffiti artists in the film personally and therefore has a special involvement in this issue. Urban space is something that plays an important role for Mathias in several ways, and something that the film specifically focuses on. Mathias grew up in this community, and in the interviews and in his own documentation of his learning life, different spaces and places are important to him. This is partly due to his interest in sports and his experiences as a rap artist.

The youth club where the two graffiti artists operate and which is portrayed in the film, is the same club where Mathias used to record and perform his rap music.

While we were there, it was obvious that he knew many of the people at the club, adults and young people alike. He seemed to have a special status as a youngster who had been active in the club, even though he no longer had any relationship with this club. While we were there, Mathias showed us around the recording studio and the club, and told us about when he performed concerts with several hundred young people present, which was obviously very important for him. He talked about this as a way in which he performed himself as a person, changing from a rather shy person to someone who was «on stage» performing in front of others. When discussing this period in his life, which is also part of the «Street Art» film through the different spaces portrayed therein, Mathias explained, as follows, the role it had in his life then, and the impact it has on his learning life now.

– I: When did you start to be interested in rap?

– Jo: I guess I started in 7th grade. I wasn’t very old at the time. After that, it just developed and kept on growing. However, over the past year, it has become less important. I’ve lost interest because I want to put my efforts into other things, like school and things. It is a risky future to be a rapper in Norway. It’s not really a smart choice.

– I: How did you feel about school at that time, in 7th grade?

– Jo: In 8th grade it was worse, and in 10th grade I had to get good grades to get to where I am now. But while I was at upper secondary, I thought more about the future and that is why I became less interested in music. The sensible mind took over. I was probably not the smartest at school, but what I did with music – that was what I could do and there was no one that could do it better than me at that time. I felt like, this is my thing. I feel like I manage school, and also I have trained a lot. I feel that I am still good at music. I know many musicians that are very good, but it is not enough to be good. Everything has to connect.

Being a rapper feels like life-changing moments for Mathias. However, he also talks a lot about being close to nature, in the mountains with his grandfather, as special moments for him as a person. He has two sides to his learning identity. One is connected to being bored with school, and his interest in rap; the other is about sports and body discipline, which is obvious from his interest in Thai boxing and his future orientation towards a military career. After starting military service when he left upper secondary school, he wrote in his diary about his very disciplined life and about the learning trajectories involved therein, where he can draw on his experiences from Thai-boxing.

Mathias and the students in the group used the community as a resource to make their film for a specific school project. The theme is something they were engaged with, and something they had opinions about, thus defining this learning process as more authentic. On a more personal level, it is clear that for Mathias, the main person in the film project, this connects to many sides of both his previous and current learning life in the community. He negotiates learning trajectories that he defines as important for the project; at the same time, he makes connections regarding his life outside school and the importance it has had for his positioning towards learning and school.


Draft Content 257553598-26729-en019.jpg

8. Concluding remarks

Through our illustrations, and especially, through the example of Mathias and one of the projects he was involved in as part of a school assignment, we have attempted to provide examples of connections and boundaries between practices. From kindergarten through primary school, children learn schooling. They learn to engage with objects in certain ways, to behave as students, and to negotiate their identities in relation to subjects and peers. In school, they learn discipline and focused attention, and that it takes work to succeed. Sometimes, they find that the skills and identities developed, or the resources available in the community, are useful and can be re-contextualised and mobilised in school to manage the tasks and problems they encounter. With peers, they may learn that it is important to be skilled at football, or that it is more important to run faster than the others than to be better at maths. In upper secondary school, the same focus and attention is required to succeed and get good grades. If you do not succeed academically, there are certain trajectories that close down in terms of pursuing a more theoretical education. Certain activities, like engaging in volunteer work, sports activities, or political organisations, might be a source of support, as they foster organisation of time, hard work, and discussion. Again, success here might enable you to pursue a career in upper-secondary school, where you have more freedom to choose subjects that interest you. Nonetheless, any such choice also means that certain trajectories are no longer possible. If you pursue more practical subjects in high school, e.g. media production, then skills, experiences, and identities pursued outside formal settings, i.e. having made digital videos of you skateboarding with friends after school, might be very important to succeed.

We have tried to show that activities and practices provide different ways of structuring activities that can make it easier or more difficult to re-contextualise skills and identities developed in other practices. It is the complex negotiation work in and between these practices that determines whether individuals are able to successfully engage in their learning lives.

References

Baker, W.D., Green, J.L. & Skukauskaite, A. (2008). Video-enabled Ethnographic Research: A Micro Ethnographic Perspective. In Walford, G. (Ed.). How do You do Educational Ethnography (pp.76-114). London: Tufnell Press.

Beach, K. (1999). Consequential Transitions: A Sociocultural Expe­dition Beyond Transfer in Education. Review of Research in Education, 24, 101-139.

Bliss, R. Säljö & P. Light (Eds.), Technological resources for learning. (pp. 32-46). Oxford: Pergamon.

Bloome, D. (2005). Discourse Analysis & the Study of Classroom Language & Literacy Events: A Microethnographic Perspective. Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Buckingham, D. & Willett, R. (Eds.) (2006). Digital Gene­ra­tions. Children, Young People, and New Media. Mahwah, NJ: Law­rence Erlbaum.

Burgess, J., Green, J., Jenkins, H. & Hartley, J. (2009). You­Tube: Online Video and Participatory Culture. Cambridge: Polity.

Dreier, O. (2003). Learning in Personal Trajectories of Partici­pation. In N. Stephenson, H.L. Radtke, R.J. Jorna & H.J. Stam (Eds.), Theoretical Psychology. Critical Contributions (pp. 20-29). Concord, Canada: Captus University Publications.

Edwards, A. & Mackenzie, L. (2005). Steps towards Participation: The Social Support of Learning Trajectories. International Journal of Lifelong Education, 24(4), 287-302.

Edwards, A. & Mackenzie, L. (2008). Identity Shifts in Informal Learning Trajectories. In B. van Oers, W. Wardekker, E. Elbers, & R. van der Veer (Eds.), The Transformation of Learning: Ad­vances in Cultural-historical Activity Theory. (pp. 163-181). Cam­bridge: Cambridge University Press,

Edwards, R., Biesta, G. & Thorpe, M. (Eds.) (2009). Rethinking Contexts for Learning and Teaching. Communities, Activities and Networks. London: Routledge.

Erstad, O., Gilje, Ø., Sefton-Green, J. & Vasbø, K. (2009). Ex­ploring’learning Lives’: Community, Identity, Literacy and Meaning. Literacy, 43(2), 100-106.

Gee, J.P. (2000). Identity as an Analytic Lens for Research in Education. Review of Research in Education, 25, 99-125.

Gee, J.P. (2007). What Video Games Have to Teach us about Learning and Literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Guile, D.J. (2010). Learning to Work in the Creative and Cultural Sector: New Spaces, Pedagogies and Expertise. Journal of Education Policy, 25(4), 465-484.

Heath, S. B. (1983). Ways with Words: Language, Life, and Work in Communities and Classrooms. Cambridge: Cambridge Uni­ver­sity Press.

Holland, D., Lachicotte Jr, W., Skinner, D. & Cain, C. (1998). Agency and Identity in Cultural Worlds. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Ito, M., Baumer, S. Bittanti, M., Boyd, D. & al. (2010). Hang­ing out, Messing around, and Geeking out. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Law, N., Pelgrum, W.J. & Plomp, T. (2008). Pedagogy and ICTs Use in Schools around the World. Findings from the IEA SITES 2006 Study. Hong Kong: Springer Comparative Education Research Centre, University of Hong Kong.

Leander, K., Phillips, N. & Taylor, K.H. (2010). The Changing Social Spaces of Learning: Mapping New Mobilities. Review of Research in Education, 34, 329-394.

Lemke, J. (2007). Identity, Development, and Desire: Critical Dis­courses and Contested Identities. In C.R. Caldas-Coulthard & R. Iedema (Eds.), Identity Trouble: Critical Discourse and Contested Identities (pp. 17-42). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Linell, P. (2009). Rethinking Language, Mind, and World Dia­logically: Interactional and Contextual Theories of Human Sense-making. Charlotte, N.C.: Information Age Publ.

McLeod, J. & Yates, L. (2006). Making Modern Lives: Subjec­tivity, Schooling, and Social Change. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press.

Moje, E. & Luke, A. (2009). Review of Research: Literacy and Identity: Examining the Metaphors in History and Contemporary Research. Reading Research Quarterly, 44(4), 415-437.

Nunes, M. (2006). Cyberspaces of Everyday Life. Minneapolis: Uni­versity of Minnesota Press.

Perkins, D. & Salomon, G. (1992). Transfer of Learning. In Inter­national Encyclopaedia of Education. Oxford: Pergamon Press.

Sawyer, R.K. (Ed.). (2006). The Cambridge Handbook of the Learning Sciences. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

Selwyn, N. (2011). Schools and Schooling in the Digital Age. A Critical Analysis. London: Routledge.

Silseth, K. & Arnseth, H.C. (2011). Learning and Identity Cons­truction across Sites: A Dialogical Approach to Analysing the Cons­truction of Learning Selves. Culture & Psychology, 17(1), 65-80.

Sinha, C. (1999). Situated Selves: Learning to be a Learner. In J.

Thomas, D. & Brown, J.S. (2011). A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change: CreateSpace. Lexington, KY: Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown.

Thomson, R. (2009). Unfolding Lives: Youth, Gender and Chan­ge. Bristol: England: The Policy Press.

Van Oers, B. (1998). From Context to Contextualizing. Learning and Instruction, 8(6), 473-488.

Warschauer, M. & Matuchniak, T. (2010). New Technology and Digital Worlds: Analyzing Evidence of Equity in Access, Use, and Outcomes. Review of Research in Education, 34(1), 179-225.

Wortham, S. (2006). Learning Identity: The Joint Emergence of Social Identification and Academic Learning. Cambridge Univer­sity Press New York.

Wortham, S. (2009). The Objectification of Identity across Events. Linguistics and Education, 19(3), 294-311.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Aunque la mayoría de los estudios sobre el aprendizaje hablan de las experiencias intra-institucionales, nuestro interés se centra en el seguimiento de las trayectorias de aprendizaje individuales a través de distintos dominios. Las investigaciones sobre el uso de los diferentes medios por los jóvenes en el entorno extraescolar muestran cómo las prácticas aplicadas en el uso de medios digitales difieren de las prácticas en el entorno escolar, tanto en forma como en contenido. El reto principal actualmente consiste en encontrar formas de entender las interconexiones y la creación de redes entre estos dos mundos de la vida, tal y como las experimentan los jóvenes. Aquí los elementos importantes son los conceptos adaptados como contexto, trayectorias e identidad, relacionados con las redes de actividades. Presentamos datos del «proyecto sobre vidas de aprendizaje» actualmente en curso en una comunidad multicultural de Oslo. Nos centraremos especialmente en los alumnos de educación secundaria post obligatoria que cursan estudios de Medios y Comunicación. Con un enfoque etnográfico, nos centraremos en la forma en que se construyen y se negocian las identidades del alumno en distintos tipos de relaciones de aprendizaje. Los datos incluyen datos generados por los investigadores (entrevistas, observaciones a través de vídeos, anotaciones de campo) y datos generados por los participantes (fotografías, diarios, mapas).

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

El papel cambiante de los medios de comunicación en nuestras sociedades y sobre todo, el impacto de las tecnologías digitales a partir de mediados de los 1990, sobre todo, tienen implicaciones para el cuándo y el cómo del aprendizaje, tanto virtual, real o distribuido. Por una parte, ser estudiante siempre ha supuesto operar dentro y a través de distintos espacios y lugares. Tradicionalmente, las conexiones entre los sitios han estado enmarcadas en el concepto tan debatido de la transferencia (Perkins & Salomon, 1992; Beach, 1999) que predomina igualmente en la mentalidad popular como en la académica. De todos modos, dadas las oportunidades actuales para moverse por distintos «sitios de aprendizaje», entender cómo un contexto de aprendizaje se relaciona con otro se ha convertido en una cuestión clave para la conceptualización e investigación del aprendizaje y el conocimiento en el siglo XXI (Edwards, Biesta & Thorpe, 2009, Leander & al., 2010).

La investigación educativa se ha centrado principalmente en las actividades de aprendizaje dentro de las aulas (Sawyer, 2006). Durante la última década, la influencia de las tecnologías digitales en las actividades escolares se ha convertido en un campo clave para la investigación educativa. Este estudio muestra la forma en que el profesorado y el alumnado luchan para aplicar y definir prácticas de aprendizaje provechosas mediante la utilización de medios digitales para diversas asignaturas y a distintos niveles escolares (Law, Pelgrum & Plomp, 2008). Además, las prácticas institucionales se describen frecuentemente como barreras para el desarrollo escolar relacionado con el uso integrado de dichos medios. También se han oído algunas voces críticas sobre las estrategias que impulsan la aplicación y uso de medios digitales en las escuelas (Selwyn, 2011). Por otra parte, la investigación sobre el uso por los jóvenes de distintos medios fuera de las escuelas muestra que las prácticas con medios digitales difieren de las prácticas en las escuelas, tanto en las formas como en el contenido. Las actividades recreativas que utilizan medios digitales han sido descritas como ruta alternativa para la participación y el aprendizaje mejor adaptado a las necesidades del siglo XXI y al empleo futuro dentro del sector creativo, que el aprendizaje escolar tradicional (Gee, 2007; Ito & al., 2010). Estos acontecimientos implican la necesidad de entender mejor las conexiones entre las distintas prácticas a través del estudio de los medios como parte integrada de las actividades cotidianas. Nuestro debate se basa en las siguientes dos preguntas de investigación:

• ¿De qué forma están conectadas las prácticas de aprendizaje y de alfabetización de los jóvenes entre los distintos contextos y en el tiempo?

• ¿De qué manera podemos estudiar las prácticas conectadas como parte del desarrollo de identidades de aprendizaje por los jóvenes?

Uno de los principales retos actuales consiste en encontrar formas de comprender las interconexiones y la formación de redes entre los distintos mundos de la vida, tal y como las viven los jóvenes. Durante la última década, ha existido un interés creciente entre la comunidad investigadora de muchas disciplinas para entender mejor la forma en el que el conocimiento se traslada de un entorno a otro, y sobre cómo lo experimentan los alumnos en sus prácticas y vidas cotidianas, tanto en el espacio virtual como en el espacio físico; esto se puede ver en las formas de replantear conceptos clave como «contexto» (Edwards & al., 2009), «trayectorias» (Dreier, 2003) e «identidad» (Lemke, 2007; Wortham, 2006). En este artículo presentamos datos de un proyecto actualmente en curso en Oslo, Noruega. Con el fin de ilustrar formas de estudiar las vidas de aprendizaje y la manera en que se conectan las prácticas, nuestro estudio se centra en un joven de 18 años de edad y el proyecto escolar en el que este participó.

2. Vidas conectadas: aprendizaje, alfabetización e identidad

Para realizar un estudio sobre vidas conectadas, necesitamos ir más allá de las cuestiones relacionadas con el acceso y los usos limitados por el contexto, y estudiar más detenidamente las prácticas cotidianas de los jóvenes y la forma en que los medios digitales generan distintas trayectorias de aprendizaje para distintas personas. Mimi Ito y sus colaboradores en los EEUU (Ito & al., 2010) describen esto como «ecologías de los medios». Dentro del proyecto a gran escala «Digital Youth», logran documentar los contornos sociales y culturales más amplios, así como la diversidad global, respecto de la participación de los jóvenes en los medios digitales. El concepto de ecología se emplea de forma estratégica para destacar que: «Las prácticas cotidianas de los jóvenes, las condiciones estructurales existentes, infraestructuras de lugar y tecnologías están todas interrelacionadas dinámicamente; los significados, usos, flujos e interconexiones en las vidas cotidianas de los jóvenes localizados en entornos concretos también están situados dentro de las ecologías mediáticas más amplias de los jóvenes… De modo similar, vemos los mundos culturales de los adultos y de los niños como co-constituidos dinámicamente, igual que los distintos lugares por los que navegan los jóvenes, como la escuela, el entorno extraescolar, la casa y sitios en Internet» (Ito & al., 2010: 31).

De acuerdo con sus resultados, estos autores definen ciertos géneros de participación que describen como categorías «basadas en la amistad» y «basadas en las aficiones». Asimismo, han identificado diversos niveles de compromiso e intensidad en las prácticas con los nuevos medios. Estos géneros de participación se interpretan como «entrelazados con las prácticas, aprendizaje y formación de la identidad de los jóvenes dentro de estas ecologías mediáticas variadas y dinámicas» (ibid.). No obstante, debemos ser cautelosos a la hora de subrayar las diferencias entre las actividades en línea y las fuera de línea. Como muestra explícitamente Mark Nunes (2006), vivimos en la intersección entre lo virtual y lo presencial como parte de nuestras prácticas diarias. Cuando se estudia a los jóvenes digitales, es importante no enredarse con concepciones demasiado generalizadas (Buckingham & Willett, 2006). Existe una gran variación en el grado de competencia digital y de interés tecnológico entre los jóvenes.

Últimamente, se ha observado un interés creciente para vincular el aprendizaje y la formación de la identidad como prácticas interrelacionadas conectadas a la capacidad para adaptarse a papeles cambiantes dentro de contextos diferentes (Holland, Lachicotte Jr, Skinner & Cain, 1998; Moje & Luke, 2009). Muchos de los estudios al respecto han criticado las prácticas educativas institucionales, aseverando que los recursos, identidades y experiencias que los alumnos desarrollan en otros entornos no son reconocidos ni utilizados correctamente como apoyo para desarrollar sus competencias y conocimientos en las escuelas (Heath, 1983; Wortham, 2009). En esta misma línea, los académicos han empezado a cuestionar la importancia de las prácticas educativas para el entorno laboral futuro y para la sociedad cívica; dicho de otra forma, los alumnos no son suficientemente capaces de recontextualizar el plan de estudios y hacerlo relevante a la gestión de problemas y retos en sus prácticas fuera de las instituciones educativas (Guile, 2010). Por norma, es imprescindible alinear las competencias y conocimientos necesarios con las relaciones cambiantes y dinámicas en la economía y la sociedad. Un doble enfoque sobre el aprendizaje y la identidad permite analizar cómo los estudiantes atraviesan y entrelazan distintos contextos, y esto se manifiesta a través de sus prácticas de posicionamiento a lo largo del tiempo (véase también McLeod & Yates, 2006; Thomson, 2009). Además, nos inspiramos en Wortham (2006; 2009), quien demostró empíricamente cómo las comunidades e instituciones clasifican a los jóvenes como tipos específicos de estudiantes.

La noción de «trayectoria» aporta un instrumento analítico para entender las actividades del aprendizaje en el tiempo y el espacio. Las trayectorias de participación están vinculadas estrechamente con la identidad como «capacidad para formas de acción concretas y por tanto, capacidad para interpretar y utilizar potencialidades del entorno para apoyar la acción» (Edwards & Mackenzie, 2008: 165). Utilizamos la noción de trayectoria como forma de identificar las rutas por las que pasa una persona, o incluso un objeto, dentro de, y a través de, situaciones a lo largo del tiempo. Edwards y Mackenzie (2005) abogaron por un estudio detallado sobre la formación, interrupción, reestructuración y apoyo de las trayectorias de participación en las oportunidades proporcionadas para la acción (p. 287). Así, deberíamos estudiar el hecho de que los participantes no solamente están situados en el tiempo y en el espacio, sino que también están formando activamente redes de recursos de aprendizaje a través del espacio-tiempo (Leander, Phillips & Taylor, 2010: 8). Si nos limitamos a indicar que el aprendizaje se sitúa en el contexto, nos estaríamos olvidando de lo esencial, porque estaríamos obviando la forma en que las personas mismas establecen activamente contextos de acción significativa (Van Oers, 1998). Es especialmente importante analizar la forma en que las personas logran esto en economías basadas en el conocimiento, en las que se tienen que enfrentar habitualmente a nuevos retos que requieren un uso innovador del conocimiento y la experiencia. Además, las tecnologías nuevas permiten mayor rapidez de acceso a, y diseminación de textos, imágenes u otros recursos de conocimientos. Cuando estudiamos estas cuestiones, tenemos que entender la forma en que estos nuevos fenómenos pueden ser adaptados a los nuevos contextos, por ejemplo, una redacción escolar o un vídeo de recopilación mash-up en YouTube (Burgess, Green, Jenkins & Hartley, 2009; Warschauer & Matuchniak, 2010).

Con los enfoques socioculturales, las cuestiones de identidad se consideran estrechamente entrelazados con el aprendizaje para participar en diversas clases de prácticas (Linell, 2009). Llegar a ser un miembro muy competente de una práctica también conlleva asumir una identidad específica, por ejemplo, jugador de videojuegos, monopatinador o ajedrecista. Estas identidades se consiguen a través de la práctica –en forma de acción observable, uso de lenguaje, textos u otro tipo de recursos culturales– y los recién incorporados pueden asumir o apropiarse de estas identidades a medida que se convierten en miembros más destacados de la práctica (Gee, 2000). Las personas representan muchas identidades y participan en una diversidad de prácticas. Pueden existir a veces conexiones, a veces tensiones, e incluso ninguna relación entre ellas (Silseth & Arnseth, 2011). La forma en que se establecen estas conexiones o tensiones tiene consecuencias para las trayectorias de participación de la persona.

3. Vidas de aprendizaje

«Vidas de aprendizaje» hace referencia a la coherencia entre el aprendizaje, la identidad y la actuación de una persona, enmarcados por un enfoque biográfico que estudia las trayectorias de aprendizaje de las personas durante el transcurso de su vida. Las historias personales y las orientaciones futuras se utilizan para crear «narrativas del yo»; estos yoes son fundamentales para el aprendizaje productivo. Con respecto al enfoque basado en «vidas de aprendizaje», la conexión entre el aprendizaje y la identidad es importante porque define la forma en que los distintos estudiantes participan en actividades de aprendizaje en todos sus entornos. El aprendizaje no acaba cuando el alumno sale por la puerta del colegio al final del día.

Es importante cuestionar nuestras concepciones de «contexto» porque nos informan en sentido analítico de la manera en que interpretamos y entendemos la interrelación entre las personas, sus identidades de aprendizaje y las circunstancias que les afectan en momentos distintos y en lugares diferentes. Edwards, Biesta y Thorpe (2009) relacionan el debate sobre contexto con el discurso más amplio del aprendizaje de por vida, donde el contexto es el resultado de la actividad o es un conjunto de prácticas en sí. Al destacar el proceso de formación de redes entre las personas y los entornos, utilizan el término contextualización más que contexto. Las prácticas no están limitadas por el contexto, ya que son multicontextuales y surgen más bien de manera relacional, es decir, tienen el potencial de realizarse a diversos niveles y en situaciones distintas, basándose en la participación en muchos entornos. Las limitaciones de la pedagogía convencional solo se ven claramente cuando se mira más allá del contexto de las situaciones convencionales para la educación y la formación, y se permite que los contextos de aprendizaje se extiendan hacia la dimensión de las relaciones entre las personas, artefactos y otros, mediadas por un abanico de factores sociales, organizativos y tecnológicos (Edwards & al., 2009: 3). Esto plantea una cuestión importante referente a la forma en que la contextualización y la participación en redes implican formas de aprendizaje distintas y contenidos diferentes; asimismo, implican fines diferentes que pueden ser variables de los valores definidos al respecto.

Para ahondar más en esta cuestión, se puede abordar desde tres puntos de enfoque diferentes: se podría 1) centrarse en las personas durante sus movimientos dentro y entre las prácticas e indagar cómo llegan a poder mantener su participación; 2) estudiar directamente los instrumentos y signos para examinar cómo se interpretan, se comunican y llegan a estar disponibles en una práctica; o se podría 3) examinar la forma en que se estructura la práctica como tal, es decir, cómo se organiza, y cómo se hace aprendible para los recién incorporados. En este artículo, vamos a centrarnos principalmente en las personas y recurriremos a distintos tipos de datos obtenidos de una gran diversidad de prácticas y situaciones para confeccionar retratos condensados de los participantes seleccionados.

4. Métodos y contexto

Los datos que presentamos fueron obtenidos de un estudio comprensivo basado en un trabajo de campo etnográfico relacionado con tres cohortes de edades diferentes: de 5 a 6 años; de 15 a 16 años; y de 18 a 19 años. Hicimos un seguimiento de los niños y adolescentes de estas cohortes en su paso por transiciones importantes en su educación formal, e investigamos los cambios y transiciones en y entre sus vidas institucionales y cotidianas. Un objetivo importante es analizar cómo se conforman y se desarrollan las identidades en entornos diferentes a lo largo del tiempo.

En nuestro proyecto nos hemos centrado en una comunidad específica de Oslo que tiene una población numerosa y multiétnica. Tanto en términos históricos como discursivos, este barrio es un ejemplo de los cambios más extensivos que han ocurrido en la sociedad noruega durante las últimas tres décadas. En los años 50 y 60 del siglo pasado, familias de clase trabajadora y de clase media-baja fueron a vivir allí y compraron sus propias viviendas en este barrio gracias a los bajos intereses de préstamos parcialmente subvencionados por el gobierno. Durante las últimas dos décadas, han llegado a Noruega diversos grupos de inmigrantes de distintas procedencias que se han trasladado directamente a viviendas en este barrio o incluso desde otros distritos de Oslo para vivir en las viviendas más espaciosas y más económicas que se encuentran allí. Por esta razón, el discurso público presenta a este barrio de Oslo como un reto, y a la vez, como la imagen de la nueva Noruega multiétnica. En este sentido, la población es culturalmente y lingüísticamente diversa; esta diversidad cultural dentro de las zonas urbanas es un fenómeno relativamente nuevo en Noruega. El Municipio de Oslo, apoyado por grandes inversiones del Estado, se ha comprometido a transformar la comunidad a lo largo de la próxima década. Nosotros vimos la oportunidad de aprovechar este programa de intervención como una oportunidad singular para desarrollar el conocimiento participativo de las vidas de aprendizaje de los jóvenes en entornos escolares y extraescolares, y para enmarcar las perspectivas analíticas dentro de un contexto social y geográfico concreto.

Adoptamos en enfoque etnográfico, basado en entrevistas grabadas y otros instrumentos de recopilación de datos, con el fin de crear descripciones detalladas de las vidas de aprendizaje y los contextos de aprendizaje de tres cohortes de jóvenes. En el estudio se han utilizado entrevistas, observaciones y anotaciones de campo, grabaciones en vídeo de episodios y actividades seleccionados, materiales creados por los participantes en forma de diarios y fotografías, y mapas confeccionados conjuntamente con los participantes. Se están empezando a clasificar los datos y creando categorías analíticas para facilitar la comparación sistemática de todas las series de datos. Se analizarán las series de datos para realizar estudios significativos de los momentos, procesos y contextos de aprendizaje, y de las interconexiones entre ellos.

Nuestro reto fue desarrollar y utilizar métodos que nos permitiesen comprender cómo los estudiantes pueden aprender en distintos sitios y lugares, incluyendo: el aprendizaje en distintos marcos institucionales, entre sitios informales, semiformales y formales; aprendizaje en el espacio virtual y en el espacio físico; aprendizaje basado en actividades lúdicas; y el aprendizaje en una diversidad de espacios culturales y espacios orientados a intereses específicos.

A pesar del gran interés por parte de académicos, responsables políticos e innovadores en el aprendizaje a través de los contextos como forma de canalizar las energías de los mismos estudiantes (Thomas & Brown, 2011), entender y describir cómo esto transcurre sigue siendo un reto para los investigadores. Tal y como describen Leander y otros (2010), «seguir» a los alumnos por y entre los sitios es complejo. Los sitios son diversos e incluyen sitios físicos, como la casa, la escuela o sitios con compañeros, espacios virtuales, como los entornos virtuales, jugando a videojuegos o en redes sociales, así como tecnologías móviles y sitios conceptuales (localizando, interpretando y reconfigurando el conocimiento a través de los contextos).

Aunque posiblemente comprendamos bastante sobre cómo las personas forman conexiones entre espacios y experiencias, seguimos enfrentándonos al reto de conocer la forma en que estos recursos realmente se transfieren entre contextos, y asimismo, la forma en que las personas se apropien de ellos en determinadas circunstancias y sean capaces de utilizarlos en contextos nuevos. Los retos metodológicos son de carácter práctico (cómo localizar y seguir físicamente a los alumnos), ético-jurídico (cómo garantizar el acceso y la confianza en todos los dominios sociales) y conceptual (la determinación de lo que pudiese constituir una prueba de aprendizaje) (Bloome, 2005; Edwards & Mackenzie, 2005; Erstad, Gilje, Sefton-Green & Vasbø, 2009; Sinha, 1999; Wortham, 2006).

5. Datos generados por los investigadores y datos generados por los participantes

Se le asignaron a cada alumno unas tareas específicas consistentes en la toma de distintos tipos de fotografías, por ejemplo, del camino al colegio, de lugares que recordaban de su infancia y fotografías de sus casas. Recogimos un total de más de 200 fotografías digitales durante la primavera de 2011. A través de estas tareas relativamente indefinidas, los participantes nos aportaron una selección amplia de fotografías muy diversas. Uno de los aspectos más interesantes en este caso fue, por ejemplo, las formas en que los jóvenes inmigrantes incluyeran imágenes de sus familiares, además de fotografías de sus viajes y visitas a sus países de origen. En el diseño del estudio, utilizamos estos artefactos como punto de partida para las entrevistas de seguimiento. Teniendo en cuenta que más de la mitad de los participantes en el estudio iban a dejar su comunidad local durante el verano del 2011, teníamos previsto hacer una comparación entre los que se marcharon de la comunidad local y los que optaron por quedarse. Basándonos en el análisis inicial de las entrevistas, surgieron varias cuestiones. Un hallazgo importante (aunque posiblemente no sorprendente) es que la mayoría de los alumnos de educación secundaria se movían en una comunidad local muy delimitada, cerca de sus casas. Cuando hablaban de lugares y movimientos, muchos de los participantes dijeron claramente que para ellos existía una frontera invisible en su barrio que nunca cruzaban. Los datos obtenidos de las entrevistas nos permitieron comprender la forma en que se posicionan con respecto a otros grupos socioeconómicos.

Con el fin de cumplir nuestro objetivo de seguir el movimiento y el flujo, necesitábamos un método flexible de recopilación y análisis de datos. Un método posible es mediante la combinación del análisis detallado de interacción, el análisis de textos, modelos o artefactos de cualquier tipo, conjuntamente con la observación de las acciones en y entre las distintas situaciones (Baker, Green & Skukauskaite, 2008). Esta solución aporta la alternancia entre distintos niveles de análisis. Por una parte, el análisis de interacciones puede demostrar instancias detalladas de emergencia, y por otra, la observación y análisis de fotografías, mapas y artefactos pueden aportar un conocimiento mejor de los cambios y flujos más amplios. Los estudios detallados nos permiten problematizar algunas de las afirmaciones más generales o aportar descripciones más completas y detalladas de patrones genéricos. Las observaciones a lo largo del tiempo nos pueden aportar datos que nos obliguen a replantear las pretensiones analíticas resultantes de estudios realizados en un plazo de tiempo mucho más corto. Mediante el análisis de estos distintos tipos de datos, nuestro objetivo es conocer las trayectorias de los jóvenes durante sus transiciones educativas cruciales. Teniendo en cuenta que acabamos de iniciar el análisis de nuestros datos, vamos a limitar el presente análisis al ejemplo ilustrativo de uno de los participantes. No podemos aportar un análisis detallado de cómo se negocian realmente las trayectorias de participación sino una primera aproximación a la forma en que algunos de los jóvenes objeto de nuestro estudio gestionan su aprendizaje y sus identidades a través de las prácticas y a lo largo del tiempo.

Nuestro propósito no es ofrecer una lista completa de las prácticas y actividades en las que los jóvenes participan, ya que sería demasiado complejo y laborioso. Más bien lo que pretendemos es aportar algo de contexto al ejemplo analítico que se presenta a continuación, por lo que nos pueda ayudar a sugerir y apuntar conexiones y límites entre prácticas que tengan consecuencias para la participación de los jóvenes a lo largo del tiempo. En nuestra perspectiva analítica, hay muchas trayectorias de desarrollo y participación. La forma en que las personas llegan a ser lo que son es el resultado de negociaciones complejas y no puede reducirse a variables sociales e individuales.

6. Retrato de un estudiante joven

Mathias vivía con su madre en un bloque de apartamentos. Sus padres estaban divorciados. Desde que era pequeño, había pasado todas sus vacaciones en la montaña. Describía estas experiencias como momentos que cambiaban su vida. En su casa, había cuatro ordenadores y él tenía un portátil (Mac), además de un ordenador de sobremesa en su habitación. Había practicado mucho deporte y en aquel momento se entrenaba para el boxeo tailandés varias veces a la semana. Utilizaba Facebook de forma activa todos los días y leía la prensa en Internet. Mathias no estaba muy motivado para el colegio y en parte esa fue la razón por la que optara por estudiar «Medios y Comunicación». Opinaba que era una asignatura fácil con mucha libertad, algo que le convenía. En clase, era muy sociable pero dedicaba mucho tiempo a distintos proyectos con un amigo. Quería pasar a la enseñanza secundaria post obligatoria para llegar a ser agente inmobiliario, porque su carrera como músico en la comunidad no era algo que se podía tomar en serio como trabajo del futuro, por lo que lo dejó cuando empezó la enseñanza secundaria post obligatoria. Después del instituto, empezó el servicio militar y actualmente está contemplando la posibilidad de una carrera militar. Ahora parece que puede conjugar su afición por la naturaleza con el entrenamiento en serio.

7. Mathias y el proyecto «Arte Callejero»

En un grupo de «Medios y Comunicación» que estudiamos entre noviembre 2010 y mayo 2011, cinco jóvenes trabajaron en un proyecto sobre grafitis en los espacios urbanos de Oslo. Se trataba de un proyecto escolar, teniendo en cuenta que toda la clase tenía que trabajar en un proyecto durante un período determinado de tiempo, pero podían elegir libremente el tema y las personas con las que querían trabajar. La idea del proyecto tenía que ser aprobada por el profesor antes de iniciarlo y los resultados finales serían evaluados por el profesor.

En el grupo de los cinco chicos, dos de ellos conocían a un par de grafiteros locales; ellos invitaron a los otros chicos a participar y estos aceptaron. La idea básica consistía en hacer un retrato de los dos grafiteros. Presentaron su propuesta, que fue aceptada por el profesor, quien les aportó algunas ideas sobre la forma de hacer el proyecto en líneas similares a un documental televisivo sobre grafitis en los espacios urbanos de Oslo. En aquellos momentos había un discurso más amplio en la ciudad, entre los políticos y el público en general, sobre los aspectos positivos y negativos del grafiti. Los jóvenes estaban de acuerdo en que esto podría aportar cierto interés a su producción y continuaron con la planificación del esquema del documental. Buscaban información pública y artículos de prensa sobre los grafitis en Oslo. Confeccionaron una lista de las personas a las que podían entrevistar y leyeron libros sobre artistas grafiteros, como Banksy, que estaban disponibles en la biblioteca local o en el colegio.

Los alumnos dedicaron unas dos semanas a leer y escribir con el fin de preparar las distintas secuencias del documental. Necesitaban planear la forma de hacerlo y designar a los responsables de las distintas tareas. También tenían que concertar citas con las personas que querían entrevistar. Nosotros nos centramos en dos de los jóvenes componentes del grupo, que también eran objeto de estudio por nosotros en otros proyectos. Se decidió que uno de ellos sería el reportero del documental y el otro el cámara, basándonos en sus aficiones principales: uno había sido músico rapero en la comunidad y estaba acostumbrado a estar «delante del público»; y el otro se aficionaba a la grabación y edición de películas, a la que dedicaba bastante de su tiempo libre.


Draft Content 257553598-26729 ov-es017.jpg

El documental tiene una duración de aproximadamente 10 minutos. Nuestro interés no se centraba tanto en el documental en sí, sino en el ejemplo que nos aportaba respecto de la forma en que las prácticas y el conocimiento están conectados en el proceso cuando este se realiza como tarea escolar. El tema principal de la película es el contraste entre la perspectiva ascendente de los artistas callejeros autores de los grafitis y la perspectiva descendente de los políticos preocupados por el coste de la limpieza de los grafitis en los edificios públicos, etc. El documental empieza con imágenes de los mismos estudiantes en la comunidad local; a continuación, Mathias sale en la pantalla como reportero para explicar que van a examinar la cuestión de los grafitis desde las perspectivas ascendente y descendente. La mayor parte de la película corresponde a trozos de entrevistas con los dos artistas grafiteros y con un político. Hay unas secuencias en las que los grafiteros fueron grabados mientras pintaban grafitis en una pared pública donde los grafitis están permitidos. A continuación, hay entrevistas con alumnos de su instituto para obtener sus opiniones sobre los grafitis. La película no tuvo una buena evaluación por parte del profesor, principalmente por la falta de calidad del sonido y de la imagen, debido a los problemas técnicos que los alumnos tuvieron con la cámara. No obstante, este proyecto, igual que varios otros que seguimos durante este período, es un ejemplo de las formas en que los alumnos aprovechan la comunidad como espacio de aprendizaje y de la manera en que recurren a distintos «fondos de conocimiento» basados en sus propias experiencias, al haber crecido en la comunidad donde está ubicada la escuela. La comunidad se convierte en recurso que pueden aprovechar como parte de sus proyectos escolares. En el caso de Mathias, se expresó de diversas maneras esta conexión entre las actividades escolares –en este caso la grabación de la película– y sus propias experiencias y prácticas en la comunidad.


Draft Content 257553598-26729 ov-es018.jpg

Mathias tiene un papel primordial en este proyecto porque el tema es algo con el que se siente especialmente comprometido. Por una parte, considera que la cuestión de los grafitis es importante en relación al hecho de haber crecido en esta comunidad. Los grafitis son algo de que se habla en la comunidad y en la ciudad misma, como tema controvertido que forma parte de la tensión entre la cultura de los jóvenes y el discurso de los adultos que consideran que los estos son un problema. Mathias puede ver los argumentos de las dos partes a favor y en contra, pero él conoce personalmente a los dos artistas grafiteros que salen en la película y por tanto, se siente especialmente comprometido con el tema. El espacio urbano es algo que tiene un papel importante para Mathias por varias razones, y algo en que la película se centra específicamente. Mathias ha crecido en esta comunidad y en las entrevistas y en la propia documentación de su vida de aprendizaje, los diferentes espacios y lugares son importantes para él. Esto se debe en parte a su afición por los deportes y a sus experiencias como rapero.

El centro juvenil que se representa en la película y donde operan los dos grafiteros es el mismo centro en el que Mathias grababa y tocaba su música rapera.

Cuando estuve allí, era obvio que Mathias conocía a mucha de la gente del centro, tanto adultos como jóvenes. Parecía gozar de un prestigio especial como joven que había sido activo en el centro, a pesar de que él ya no se relacionaba con este centro. Durante nuestra visita, Mathias nos enseñó el estudio de música y el resto del centro, y nos contó sobre cuando dio conciertos ante varios cientos de jóvenes, algo que claramente significaba mucho para él. Hablaba de esto como de una forma en la que él se representaba como persona, pasando de ser una persona bastante tímida a una persona subida «en el escenario» que actuaba delante de otras personas. Con respecto a esta etapa de su vida que aparece en la película «Arte Callejero», y también a través de los diferentes espacios representados en la película, Mathias nos explicó en el siguiente diálogo la importancia que tuvo en su vida y el impacto que tiene actualmente sobre su vida de aprendizaje:

– P: ¿Cuándo empezaste a interesarte por la música rapera?

– R: Supongo que empecé en 7º. No era muy mayor en aquel momento. Después, fue algo que iba creciendo cada vez más. De todos modos, durante este último año ha sido menos importante para mí; he perdido el interés porque quiero dedicarme a otras cosas, al colegio y todo eso. Es un futuro arriesgado ser rapero en Noruega no es algo muy acertado.

– P: ¿Qué pensabas sobre el colegio en aquella época, estando en 7º?

– R: En 8º fue peor y en 10º tuve que conseguir buenas notas para llegar a donde estoy ahora, pero cuando estaba en educación secundaria post-obligatoria pensaba más en el futuro y por esa razón perdí un poco el interés por la música. Me hice más sensato. Probablemente no fuera el más listo del colegio pero lo que hacía con la música era algo que sabía hacer y no había nadie que lo hiciera mejor que yo en ese momento. Yo me sentía como si hubiera nacido para eso. Creo que afronto bien lo del colegio y además he entrenado mucho. Creo que sigo haciendo bien lo de la música, pero conozco a muchos músicos que son buenos… pero no es suficiente ser bueno. Todo tiene que estar conectado.

Para Mathias, ser rapero representa momentos que le transforman la vida. No obstante, también habla de los momentos en que estar entre la naturaleza, en las montañas con su abuela, como especiales para él como persona. Su identidad de aprendizaje tiene dos facetas: una está relacionada con sentirse aburrido en la escuela y con su afición por la música rapera; la otra está relacionada con el deporte y la disciplina corporal, y queda manifiesta en su afición por el boxeo tailandés y su futura orientación hacia una carrera militar. Una vez empezado el servicio militar, después de la educación secundaria post-obligatoria, escribe en su diario sobre una vida muy disciplinada y también escribe mucho sobre las trayectorias de aprendizaje en las que participa y en las que puede recurrir a sus experiencias con el boxeo tailandés.

Mathias y los estudiantes de este grupo utilizaron la comunidad como recurso para hacer esta película para un proyecto escolar específico. El tema es algo con que se identifican y sobre el que tienen sus opiniones, así definiendo este proceso de aprendizaje como más auténtico. A un nivel más personal, está claro que para Mathias –el personaje principal del proyecto cinematográfico– esto conecta con muchos aspectos de su vida de aprendizaje en la comunidad, tanto anteriormente como actualmente. Negocia trayectorias de aprendizaje que él define como importantes para el proyecto y al mismo tiempo, establece conexiones relacionadas con su vida extraescolar y la importancia que ha tenido para su posicionamiento respecto del aprendizaje y la escuela.


Draft Content 257553598-26729 ov-es019.jpg

8. Comentarios finales

A través de los ejemplos presentados, especialmente el de Mathias y uno de los proyectos en el que participó como parte de una tarea escolar, hemos intentado aportar ejemplos de las conexiones y límites entre prácticas. Desde los jardines de infancia hasta la escuela primaria, los niños aprenden a escolarizarse. Aprenden a relacionarse de manera determinada con objetos, a comportarse como alumnos y a negociar sus identidades con respecto a compañeros. En la escuela, aprenden disciplina y a centrar la atención; aprenden que para tener éxito, hace falta trabajar. En ocasiones, se encuentran con que las competencias e identidades que han desarrollado, o los recursos disponibles en la comunidad, son útiles y pueden adaptarse y movilizarse en la escuela para resolver las tareas y problemas que allí encuentran. Con los compañeros, pueden aprender que es importante tener habilidades para el fútbol o que es más importante correr más rápido que los demás que destacar en matemáticas. En la educación secundaria post-obligatoria, se requieren el mismo enfoque y atención para tener éxito y obtener buenas notas. Si no se logra el éxito académico, hay ciertas trayectorias que se cierran, impidiendo la continuidad de una educación más teórica. Algunas actividades, como la participación en trabajos de voluntariado, actividades deportivas u organizaciones políticas pueden servir de apoyo, ya que fomentan la organización del tiempo, el trabajo duro y el debate. Posiblemente el éxito en este terreno pueda permitir al estudiante seguir estudios de educación secundaria post-obligatoria, donde hay mayor libertad a la hora de elegir las asignaturas que más le interesan. No obstante, una elección de este tipo también implica que ciertas trayectorias ya no son posibles. Si se estudian asignaturas más prácticas en el instituto, como la producción mediática, en ese caso, las habilidades, competencias e identidades adquiridas fuera de los entornos formales, por ejemplo, haber grabado vídeos digitales practicando monopatín con los amigos en horario extraescolar, pueden ser importantes para tener éxito.

Hemos intentado mostrar que las actividades y prácticas proporcionan diversas formas de estructurar las actividades, haciéndolo más fácil o más difícil adaptar las habilidades e identidades desarrolladas en otras prácticas a un nuevo contexto. Es el trabajo complejo de negociación en estas prácticas y entre ellas lo que determina si las personas son capaces de participar con éxito en sus vidas de aprendizaje.

Referencias

Baker, W.D., Green, J.L. & Skukauskaite, A. (2008). Video-enabled Ethnographic Research: A Micro Ethnographic Perspective. In Walford, G. (Ed.). How do You do Educational Ethnography (pp.76-114). London: Tufnell Press.

Beach, K. (1999). Consequential Transitions: A Sociocultural Expe­dition Beyond Transfer in Education. Review of Research in Education, 24, 101-139.

Bliss, R. Säljö & P. Light (Eds.), Technological resources for learning. (pp. 32-46). Oxford: Pergamon.

Bloome, D. (2005). Discourse Analysis & the Study of Classroom Language & Literacy Events: A Microethnographic Perspective. Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Buckingham, D. & Willett, R. (Eds.) (2006). Digital Gene­ra­tions. Children, Young People, and New Media. Mahwah, NJ: Law­rence Erlbaum.

Burgess, J., Green, J., Jenkins, H. & Hartley, J. (2009). You­Tube: Online Video and Participatory Culture. Cambridge: Polity.

Dreier, O. (2003). Learning in Personal Trajectories of Partici­pation. In N. Stephenson, H.L. Radtke, R.J. Jorna & H.J. Stam (Eds.), Theoretical Psychology. Critical Contributions (pp. 20-29). Concord, Canada: Captus University Publications.

Edwards, A. & Mackenzie, L. (2005). Steps towards Participation: The Social Support of Learning Trajectories. International Journal of Lifelong Education, 24(4), 287-302.

Edwards, A. & Mackenzie, L. (2008). Identity Shifts in Informal Learning Trajectories. In B. van Oers, W. Wardekker, E. Elbers, & R. van der Veer (Eds.), The Transformation of Learning: Ad­vances in Cultural-historical Activity Theory. (pp. 163-181). Cam­bridge: Cambridge University Press,

Edwards, R., Biesta, G. & Thorpe, M. (Eds.) (2009). Rethinking Contexts for Learning and Teaching. Communities, Activities and Networks. London: Routledge.

Erstad, O., Gilje, Ø., Sefton-Green, J. & Vasbø, K. (2009). Ex­ploring’learning Lives’: Community, Identity, Literacy and Meaning. Literacy, 43(2), 100-106.

Gee, J.P. (2000). Identity as an Analytic Lens for Research in Education. Review of Research in Education, 25, 99-125.

Gee, J.P. (2007). What Video Games Have to Teach us about Learning and Literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Guile, D.J. (2010). Learning to Work in the Creative and Cultural Sector: New Spaces, Pedagogies and Expertise. Journal of Education Policy, 25(4), 465-484.

Heath, S. B. (1983). Ways with Words: Language, Life, and Work in Communities and Classrooms. Cambridge: Cambridge Uni­ver­sity Press.

Holland, D., Lachicotte Jr, W., Skinner, D. & Cain, C. (1998). Agency and Identity in Cultural Worlds. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Ito, M., Baumer, S. Bittanti, M., Boyd, D. & al. (2010). Hang­ing out, Messing around, and Geeking out. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Law, N., Pelgrum, W.J. & Plomp, T. (2008). Pedagogy and ICTs Use in Schools around the World. Findings from the IEA SITES 2006 Study. Hong Kong: Springer Comparative Education Research Centre, University of Hong Kong.

Leander, K., Phillips, N. & Taylor, K.H. (2010). The Changing Social Spaces of Learning: Mapping New Mobilities. Review of Research in Education, 34, 329-394.

Lemke, J. (2007). Identity, Development, and Desire: Critical Dis­courses and Contested Identities. In C.R. Caldas-Coulthard & R. Iedema (Eds.), Identity Trouble: Critical Discourse and Contested Identities (pp. 17-42). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Linell, P. (2009). Rethinking Language, Mind, and World Dia­logically: Interactional and Contextual Theories of Human Sense-making. Charlotte, N.C.: Information Age Publ.

McLeod, J. & Yates, L. (2006). Making Modern Lives: Subjec­tivity, Schooling, and Social Change. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press.

Moje, E. & Luke, A. (2009). Review of Research: Literacy and Identity: Examining the Metaphors in History and Contemporary Research. Reading Research Quarterly, 44(4), 415-437.

Nunes, M. (2006). Cyberspaces of Everyday Life. Minneapolis: Uni­versity of Minnesota Press.

Perkins, D. & Salomon, G. (1992). Transfer of Learning. In Inter­national Encyclopaedia of Education. Oxford: Pergamon Press.

Sawyer, R.K. (Ed.). (2006). The Cambridge Handbook of the Learning Sciences. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

Selwyn, N. (2011). Schools and Schooling in the Digital Age. A Critical Analysis. London: Routledge.

Silseth, K. & Arnseth, H.C. (2011). Learning and Identity Cons­truction across Sites: A Dialogical Approach to Analysing the Cons­truction of Learning Selves. Culture & Psychology, 17(1), 65-80.

Sinha, C. (1999). Situated Selves: Learning to be a Learner. In J.

Thomas, D. & Brown, J.S. (2011). A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change: CreateSpace. Lexington, KY: Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown.

Thomson, R. (2009). Unfolding Lives: Youth, Gender and Chan­ge. Bristol: England: The Policy Press.

Van Oers, B. (1998). From Context to Contextualizing. Learning and Instruction, 8(6), 473-488.

Warschauer, M. & Matuchniak, T. (2010). New Technology and Digital Worlds: Analyzing Evidence of Equity in Access, Use, and Outcomes. Review of Research in Education, 34(1), 179-225.

Wortham, S. (2006). Learning Identity: The Joint Emergence of Social Identification and Academic Learning. Cambridge Univer­sity Press New York.

Wortham, S. (2009). The Objectification of Identity across Events. Linguistics and Education, 19(3), 294-311.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 28/02/13
Accepted on 28/02/13
Submitted on 28/02/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C40-2013-02-09
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 17
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?