Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Since existing research has failed to consider how primary school pupils use Facebook for informal learning and to enhancing social capital, we attempted to fill this research gap by conducting 60 indepth interviews and thinkaloud sessions with Slovenian primary school pupils. Furthermore, we used content analysis to evaluate their Facebook profiles. The results of the study show that Slovenian pupils regularly use Facebook for informal learning. Pupils are aware that they use Facebook for learning and they use it primarily as social support, which is seen as exchanging practical information, learning about technology, evaluation of their own and other people’s work, emotional support, organising group work and communicating with teachers. In using Facebook, pupils acquire bridging and bonding social capital; they maintain an extensive network of weak ties that are a source of bridging capital, and deeper relationships that provide them with emotional support and a source of bonding capital. Key differences between the participants were found in the expression of emotional support. Female participants are more likely to use Facebook for this purpose, and more explicitly express their emotions. This study also showed that our participants saw a connection between the use of Facebook and the knowledge and skills they believed their teachers valued in school.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Today, learners can learn and be taught in a variety of physical and online spaces. In this learning context, there is an increasing role for online social network sites (Valenzuela & al., 2009; Greenhow, 2011). Many pupils have created their own profile on at least one of the many online social network sites. For example, more than half of Slovenian learners (13-24 years) have created their own profile on social network sites (Slovenia Facebook Statistics, 2012).This is not a Slovenian specificity, as a number of international studies have shown (Bosch, 2009; Rideout & al., 2010) that the use of social network sites is the most common extra-curricular activity of young people. The most visited social network is Facebook (Slovenia Facebook Statistics, 2012).

Online social network sites allow individuals to: a) create a public and semi-public profile within a coherent system; b) develop a list of users they are linked to and; c) review one’s own list of users and lists of other users within the system (Boyd & Ellison, 2008). Existing studies emphasise the advantages of using social network sites (Boase & al., 2011; Ellison & al., 2007; Scearce & al., 2010) such as: an easier, faster and cheaper form of communication and networking between individuals and groups that are geographically remote; easier communication for those young people who have difficulty in establishing and maintaining relationships; providing an overview of the individual’s social network; providing social support in distress; and building communities and mobilising people. On the other hand, other studies stress the disadvantages and risks of their use (Boyd, 2007; Ule, 2009; Scearce & al., 2010) such as: impersonality, which can lead to alienation and lack of personal contact; the social isolation of adolescents; a false sense of anonymity; false identity; lower level of grammar, articulation and writing skills; exposure to online offenders and criminals; problems with processing large amounts of information; and the posting of inappropriate information, which could harm school children. The impact assessments of online social network sites on learning and school success are divided. On the one hand, the popular media predominantly label the use of such sites as extracurricular activities that have a negative impact on academic performance (Hamilton, 2009; Karpinski, 2009), and which are responsible for the drop in literacy standards (Thurlow, 2006; Carr, 2008; Bauerlein, 2009) and a threat to social values ??(Herring, 2007). On the other hand, the number of experts who argue that the use of online social network sites promotes cognitive development is growing (Gladwell, 2005; Shirky, 2010). Recent studies suggest that many learners are increasingly turning to information and communication technologies as learning tools outside of school. Livingstone and Bober (2004) reported that the majority of learners (9-19 years old) regarded the internet as an information gathering tool that could be useful in school work, but appeared «far more excited» by its communication and participation possibilities (Livingstone & Bober, 2004), which they seemed to employ largely outside of school, despite half of students having received little or no formal instruction on how to use the internet (ibid.). Greenhow and Robelia (2009b) studied high school students’ from urban low-income families in the USA and their use of MySpace for identity formation and informal learning. They found that social network sites used outside of school allowed students to formulate and explore various dimensions of their identity; however, students did not perceive a connection between their online activities and learning in classrooms. Students used various socio-technical features, such as photo-sharing, graphic design and multiple communication channels within MySpace to convey who they were at a given moment and to learn about the changing lives of others in the network. While engaging in identity work, students were also gaining technological fluency and beginning to consider their roles and responsibilities as digital citizens. Their study was focused on informal learning, known as occasional learning, which is a spontaneous, experimental, unplanned, disorganised and unpredictable form of learning without set standards, and its results are implicit (Hager, 2001; Jefkins, 2006). No previous studies have focused on the use of Facebook for informal learning among high school students.

Existing studies have examined the available use of online social network sites for learning among undergraduate students or high school students, and have neglected analysis of the use of online social network sites for learning among primary school pupils. Furthermore, existing research into the use of online social network sites for learning (e.g. Schwarzer & Knoll, 2007; Madge & al., 2008, Greenhow & Robelia, 2009a, 2009b; Greenhow, 2011; Teclehaimanot & Hickman, 2011) shows that students use such sites for direct or indirect educational assistance, especially for peer support, maintaining relationships, self-representation and self-expression. Greenhow and Robelia (2009b) emphasised the use of social network sites to deal with learning stresses and the importance of «social capital »as a set of horizontal relationships between people, including social network sites and the associated norms, which have an impact on the productivity and welfare of the community (Putnam, 2000). Research in the field of education and social capital focuses on two types of social capital among young people: bridging capital, which is based on weak alliances, enabling diverse perspectives and new information, and bonding capital, which is based on strong alliances of close friends and family who provide comfort (Putnam, 2000). The presence of social capital in social network sites is associated with numerous educational and psychosocial outcomes (Dike & Singh, 2002). In other words, learners tend to do better and persist in educational settings when they feel a strong sense of social belonging and connectedness. In studying predominantly white, middle-class, college students’ use of Facebook, Ellison & al. (2007) found that intensive use of the site was associated with higher levels of bridging capital and, to a lesser extent, bonding capital and maintained social capital, a concept the researchers developed to describe the ability to mobilise resources from a previously inhabited network, such as one’s high school (Ellison & al., 2007). Using online social network sites can help deepen the relationships that would otherwise remain short and encourages users to enhance latent ties and maintain relationships with old friends. Therefore, using these sites enables people to stay connected even when in the physical world they move from one community to another, for example moving from high school to college (ibid.). Steinfield and colleagues 2008) found that the use of online social network sites allowed students with low self-esteem to gain more bridging capital than students with higher levels of self-esteem. Facebook provides stigmatised learners with low self-esteem more control over their (self-) presentation than direct interpersonal communications (Elison & al., 2007). Since existing studies failed to research how primary school pupils use Facebook for informal learning, we attempted to fill this research gap and answer the research questions of how Slovenian primary school pupils use Facebook for informal learning and what kind of social capital they enhance.

2. Methods

The objective of this study was to establish how pupils use Facebook for informal learning and enhancing bridging and bonding social capital. We published an invitation to participate in the study on all Slovenian primary school (450) internet pages, and 246 pupils responded. We selected the first 60 pupils who meet our requirements in terms of demographic data (age, grades, location, income, use of Facebook and gender). The respondents were aged between 13 and 14 years (i.e. in the last two classes of primary school) and approximately equally distributed based on gender, low and middle income families, rural and urban locations, low and good grades and «active» users of Facebook (use it every day for at least 30 minutes) and «less active» users (use it at least twice a week for at least 30 minutes). All participants had a home computer connected to the internet and had used Facebook for at least a year.

Attempting to understand the nature of pupils’ use of Facebook for informal learning merited a qualitative research design that focused on the data collection process, maintained design flexibility to allow inductive hypothesis generation and considered the validity of the young people’s experiences and narratives (Maxwell, 1996). We triangulated multiple data sources including: 1) semi-structured interviews (Walker, 1998); 2) think-alouds (Clark, 1997); 3) content analyses of informants’ Facebook profiles (Jones & al., 2008). First, we used a very simple form of content analysis, adapted from Jonese & al. (2008).We tried to establish what messages the participants posted on their Facebook profiles and how their messages differed by grades, location, income, use of Facebook and gender. The participants temporarily placed us on their list of friends, but we tried to minimise our impact on informants’ behaviour by never posting, commenting or otherwise indicating our presence as observers.

Second, we used in-depth interviews, which were appropriate for our purposes because they allowed us access to clear and accurate opinions based on personal experiences (Walker, 1988). We tried to discover how pupils use Facebook for informal learning by asking: 1) General questions about Facebook use (e.g. On a typical day, when you login to your Facebook profile, what do you usually do there? Why? Can you give me an example of some of the ways you get your ideas, interests or emotions across on these sites, if at all? Do you see any problems or difficulties with using Facebook? Any benefits to using Facebook?); 2) Questions focusing on learning (e.g. What do you think you are learning, if anything, in using this site as you do?); 3) Individual questions based on the previously conducted content analysis.

Third, participants engaged in a think-aloud, a technique that involves asking them to report thoughts related to performing a task as it is unfolding (Clark, 1997). We asked our participants to talk-aloud as they engaged with their Facebook profile, prompting them with questions about what they were doing, why, how and what next in relation to learning, in an attempt to understand their experiences.

We conducted the study in the first half of 2012 using locations chosen by the participants, most often coffeehouses. The interviews and think-aloud sessions together lasted between 90 and 120 minutes, during which we recorded the information to transcribe later. To check the accuracy of the published data, we compared the results of the content analysis with the in-depth interviews and think-alouds. Finally, because the participants only spoke to us on the condition of their anonymity, their names were changed, and words that could identify them were replaced by X.

3. Results

3.1. Connection between Facebook and school

The majority of participants saw a connection between their use of Facebook and the knowledge and skills they believed their ??teachers valued in school. They expressed that at first sight there is no connection, since the use of Facebook is related to entertainment and school to work, but the connection exists, it is «supportive» and carried out on a daily basis, such as the use of Facebook to support school learning, especially in completing school assignments. This is a typical example: «At a glance Facebook is the opposite of what we are doing in school... from what teachers want from us. It’s true; it’s like night and day. See... Facebook is fun, school is so intense... I have to be serious. However, the connection between the school and Facebook use is that through Facebook use I’m better at school. Of course, I do not use it only for school, but ALSO for school-related issues. And now the answer to your question about how I see the relationship between the school and Facebook: I can say that it is supportive. Facebook basically helps me to do things for the school better. Yes, it helps me every day» (Rok). The participants identified several ways in which they used Facebook to vent about, or get help on, school-related issues or assignments.

3.2. Exchange of practical information

All participants mentioned that the most common support they received from their Facebook «friends» was an exchange of practical information on school-related issues or assignments. This practical support included help in acquiring learning materials such as textbooks, books, notes and other learning materials. The participants regularly share information about these materials and provide learning materials such as notes. This is a typical example: «I have to admit something. Because I’m lazy, but also when I’m sick and I don’t have the text written in school, then I ask classmates for this material... or I ask them where to get the books that we have to read» (Zoki).

The participants are aware of embedded resources in their social structure, i.e. «friends» can be helpful, and they use these resources in purposeful action. In doing so, they also learn solidarity and reciprocity; they help their «friends» because they will help them. This is a typical example: «Sometimes I really do not feel like to scanning my workbooks for my friends, but I am aware that I will also need help. Because of my frequent musical performances I’m often absent from school. And then I always get a copy of what they did in school» (Mira).

Content analysis showed that male participants mainly ask for learning materials and rarely help others in terms of providing materials, while female participants do both. This analysis also showed that at least half of the practical information included information about the work and personal characteristics of individual teachers. Most of the pupils had failed to disclose this information, and they spoke about it after we asked them. Some justified the suppression of this information with emphasizing that this practice rarely used, while others admitted that they did not tell us because they were afraid that we could tell their teachers and cause them problems. This is a typical example:

• Interviewer: You also wrote some information about the teacher?

• Jernej: What do you think? I don’t understand?

• Interviewer: Look, most of you wrote about the teacher–if I understand well–of mathematics? TeacherX?

• Jernej: Yes, indeed, we have written about X, because he is... strange.

• Interviewer: Do you have problems speaking about this?

• Jernej: Well... to tell you the truth, for me it is a little risky, because... you could tell this X.

• Interviewer: We give you anonymity and I will not give your information to X. So, what’s the problem?

• Jernej: Well... I think it’s fair to warn friends of what was happening in mathematics and about X’s crazy mood today and not to go to his class.

The participants do not exchange practical information only by request, but also based on concern for friends’ school assignments. These «friends» are not only classmates as described above, but also other acquaintances and family members. This is a typical example:

• Mateja: I feel very good when my friend sends me some advice or even a solution to my school problem. Because I have a feeling that someone is thinking of me.

• Interviewer: What do you mean?

• Mateja: Let me tell you the last example. I had homework about genetically modified plants and I had not found literature on the cultivation of genetically modified maize in Slovenia. And then Nataša, my distant relative, I think she is my mother’s cousin, sent me a link to the article, in which it is written that Slovenia doesn’t cultivate genetically modified maize. Do you see, I didn’t find the information because it doesn’t exist. She saved me. And so I solved the problem, but I felt... how I can tell you... I felt nice and connected with her and others... I realised that I’m not alone with my problems.

3.3. Learning about technology

Analysis of content and participants’ answers shows that pupils use Facebook to learn about the technology with which they support formal learning. With the help of «friends» they have learned to use programs to complete specific assignments, e.g. create posters, use multimedia programs to design photos and videos, design photos using Photoshop and present their school work using Prezi. This is a typical answer: «My friends taught me about Prezi, which is the best program for presentation work at school. Without this knowledge my presentations would be boring. I would still use traditional PowerPoint» (Ana).

Content analysis showed that the participants use legally purchased programs, but also, and mainly, use illegally distributed programs. Since they argue that all internet programs should be free, because multinational corporations only maximise profits at their expense, the participants do not see the illegal distribution of programs as a problem. This is a typical answer:

• Interviewer: I saw that you all distributed programs illegally.

• Urban: Yeah, so what?

• Interviewer: You do not find it problematic?

• Urban: No, I think everything on the Internet should be free. Now they just make profit at our expense.

• Interviewer: But the use of Facebook is also based on profit.

• Urban: Yes, but this is different, because we do not have to pay.

3.4. Obtaining validation and appreciation of creative work

The participants use Facebook to obtain validation and appreciation of creative work through feedback on their profiles and assess other profiles with commentaries. In doing that, they also learn the social skills of empathy and behaving respectfully towards each other. This is a typical example: «Yes, yesterday my friend Sašo put up a new photo, we criticised it... My opinion is that it is horrible... for me... Of course, I can’t write that, because then he can get to me when I post some new photo... And I think that sucks, if someone is ruined in such a way, because it hurts. And, sooner or later I will need Sašo. So, I tried to explain to him why it is a bad photo» (Urban).

They also obtain validation regarding school assignments. More than half of the participants said that they published their work at least occasionally and asked their friends for their assessment and suggestions regarding continuation and improvement.

• Maša: Sometimes when you do not know, or I’m not sure if I’ve written well, I put something up and ask for comment.

• Interviewer: Please, tell me in detail.

• Maša: Last week I put up an essay for history.

• Interviewer: And what happened?

• Maša: I got three comments, but only one was useful. It was from my school friend, but this has really helped me, because Nina showed me what was missing in my essay.

3.5. Emotional support

Facebook also provides emotional peer support. This is the only form of analysed support where a difference exists between the participants. Namely, only female participants openly described their negative emotional state, such as frustration, anger, helplessness or disappointment, associated with their school assignments. Peers, especially female classmates, responded with supportive messages, which helped improve their emotional state. For example, in the following statement Sarah explains how Facebook use provides her emotional support: «When I’m down then I usually whine a little on Facebook... You know, to decrease my frustration... then I’m better. And sometimes when I get a low score in school, my classmates write to me on Facebook, Sara don’t worry, you’re not alone in your suffering, sustain a just a little bit more and it’s over... Yes, I’m better. Of course, I do the same for my best school friends».

For male participants, emotional support is interaction with «friends» in a various ways. This is a typical example: «When I’m angry, I mean when I’m in a bad mood, for example, when I can no longer learn or do my homework, it helps me that I go on Facebook. Then it depends on who’s up and what’s new. After such a break I feel much better» (Igor).

3.6. Organisation of team work

A third of the participants said that they used Facebook to contact other pupils with the intention of organising group meetings for project work. This is a typical example: «I and my friends often do group project work. Well... in the courses where we can do project work. So far it’s three courses. Usually I ask classmates on Facebook who wants to take part in this project with me or also with others. Then we work with each other on Facebook or at school… I once responded to such call» (Simona).

On Facebook, the participants also assign tasks to individual team members, checking progress and explaining work instructions. This is a typical example: «I find it a good practice when we are on Facebook to coordinate our school work. We can be on Facebook and promptly see how our work is progressing, how my friends are doing and I can comment on ongoing work» (Ariana).

Content analysis revealed that the participants generally coordinate their collective school assignment, before individual participants write their part of it alone and then post it on Facebook. Members of the working groups validate each other’s work. It is at this stage that conflicts usually occur. According to informants, the advantage of organising the work on Facebook compared to face-to-face communication is that rules are written and conflicts are quickly resolved.

• Interviewer: I read about your fight with Niko. What was that?

• Jan: I was angry, because Niko had not fulfilled his obligations. We did all done what had agreed; only Niko didn’t. And I was right, because it was all written on Niko’s profile. And this is nice because everything was written. So, Niko now has to do the assignment again, as we agreed. I was just pissed off because we lost a week because of Niko (Klemen).

3.7. Better knowledge of teachers

Only quarter of participants responded positively to the question of whether their high school teachers created a profile on Facebook and whether they interacted with them. The majority of them emphasised that teachers can only be asked questions related to school activities. A typical statement came from Sabina: «Only a few teachers have created their own profile on Facebook. Our teacher for computers has her own profile and she allows us to ask her anything about her course». The participants also stated similar arguments already revealed by other researchers (Hewitt & Forte, 2006; Teclehaimanot & Hickman, 2011): pupils would get the opportunity to get to know their teachers better if teachers used Facebook. This is a typical example: «Teachers who have a profile that we can see… I find different and more progressive... I do not know how to tell you. However, I find this good» (Karmina).

Content analysis revealed that among 15 participants who have access to teachers’ profiles only two communicate with them. In both cases, the participants ask the teachers about their assignments. However, not to lose their good image among friends, the participants communicate with teachers only when they get no useful information from their classmates.

• Interviewer: I saw that you wrote a message to your history teacher. Why?

• Peter: Last week I was sick, but no one could tell me what I had to do until Monday, when it was my turn to present a school project. So I didn’t have any other option. I had to ask this teacher.

• Interviewer: And how did the teacher respond to your question?

• Peter: OK. He wrote back to tell me what I needed to do on the same day.

• Interviewer: What do your friends think about your communication with the teacher?

• Peter: Nothing, because they know that I had no other options. A different situation would be if I hadn’t asked them before.

More than half of the participants said that their teachers have created a Facebook profile, but that they do not have access to them. Some participants (11) emphasised that they have access to some teachers’ profiles; they regularly visit them, but do not interact with them because of social pressure from classmates and fear of a negative reaction from teachers. They have a better opinion about those teachers who on their Facebook profile include details of their different leisure activities, especially in the fields of sports, technology and art. For some participants, those teachers are also a role model. This is a typical example: «Look, I visit the profiles of some teachers because I found that they are in fact quite different than in school. For example, the English teacher, who presents herself in the school as very strict, in her leisure time plays the guitar. And she plays it very well as I’ve seen in her video. Yes, she is good and I also try to be good. She inspires me in some way» (Rebeka).

Eleven pupils did not even state whether their teachers have a profile because this does not interest them and they do not want to communicate with them in their spare time.

4. Discussion and conclusion

The results of the study show that Slovenian pupils regularly use Facebook for complementary and supplement to classroom learning, i.e. informal learning. Thus, the use of Facebook serves as support for learning, such as providing emotional support for school-related stress, validation of creative work, peer-alumni support for school-life transitions, and help with school-related tasks. Facebook offers an informal context as support for formal education. Facebook is also part of the «social glue» (Madge & al., 2008) that allows learners to be part of a community that helps them overcome learning difficulties. However, pupils do not use Facebook intentionally for learning, they just try to accomplish their school assignments or/and reduce emotional tension.

By using Facebook, pupils enhance social capital by stimulating resources embedded in their social structure and mobilizing them in purposeful actions. Thus, this study shows that pupils benefit from investment in class network and cultivation of trust, reciprocity and social cohesion (Putnam, 2000). We found out that social capital serves as pupils’ support structures in different ways. By using Facebook, pupils maintain an extensive network of weak ties that are a source of bridging capital, and deeper relationships that provide them with emotional support and a source of bonding capital. All the participants emphasised the importance of the emotional support they receive from friends on Facebook, resulting in the creation of bonding capital. All the participants also stressed the importance of providing pupils with practical information regarding school assignments, obtaining validation and appreciation of creative work through feedback on their profile pages and learning about technology, resulting in the creation of bridging capital. Thus, bonding social capital serves to create a lens through which group members (in our case classmates) affiliate with group members (classmates) inside the group (class) by using Facebook. On the other hand, the bridging social capital serves to create bridges or links by using Facebook that allow pupils to share information regarding school and other resources.

These findings do not support the popular view that Facebook users are isolated and not connected. The study shows that the opposite holds true, a finding that concurs with the recent literature on the effects of informational, social interaction and identity-construction uses of social network sites (Greenhow & Robelia, 2009a, 2009b; Greenhow2011; Valenzuela & al., 2009). Overall, the findings of the study should ease the concerns of those who fear that Facebook has mostly negative effects on primary school pupils’ social capital. However, the participants reported communication with their «weak ties» (Granovetter, 1973) or maintain bridging social capital. This is confirmed by other studies (Steinfield & al., 2008; Stefanone & al.,2012), which discovered that people are using Facebook to maintain large, diffuse networks of friends, with a positive impact on their accumulation of bridging social capital. Facebook networks appear to be a collection of weak ties well-suited to providing new information, and also useful for learning.

Key differences between the participants were found in the expression of emotional support. Female participants are more likely to use Facebook for this purpose, and more explicitly express their emotions. This can be explained by socialisation patterns, in which girls are still raised in a way that means in public they can more freely express emotions in public more than boys (Ule, 2009).

This study also showed that in contrast to the previous study on the use of social network sites for informal learning (Greenhow & Robelia, 2009b), our participants saw a connection between the use of Facebook and the knowledge and skills they believed their ??teachers valued in school. This can be explained by the prolonged use of Facebook, which also penetrates into the area of learning. Since this is the first study in this area, it is limited both in qualitative and quantitative terms. Since our research was limited to six months and we were unable to identify changes in the use of Facebook, in the future a longitudinal study should be carried out. Further study would be necessary to carry out quantitative research to generalise the findings. Since we analysed only Slovenian participants, in the future it would be necessary to carry out international comparative research. The study also shows the need for additional research to reveal how Facebook and other social network sites support learning objectives and, in terms of substance, encourages the development of new forms of learning. Studies in education and the media should encourage the exploration of personal social network sites and pupils to determine the link between online and offline activities. The study also showed that in Slovenian formal education Facebook is not used for education. As pupils regularly and actively use Facebook, schools must help them to use it ethically, responsibly, safely and to take advantage of its benefits. It is therefore necessary to implement media education within the curriculum (Slovenian language, Ethics and society), but this depends on the willingness of individual teachers (Erjavec, 2010).

References

Bauerlein, M. (2009). The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans in Jeopardizes Our Future. New York: Tarcher.

Boase, J. Horrigan, B.J., Whellman, B. & Rainie, L. (2011). The Strength of Internet Ties. (www.pewinternet.org/media/Files/Report/2006/PIP_internet.pdf) (20-10-2012).

Bosch, T.E. (2009). Using Online Social Networking for Teaching and Learning: Facebook Use at the University of Cape Town. Communicatio, 35, 2, 185–200.

Boyd, D. (2007). Why Youth Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life. In D. Buckingham, J.D. Mac Arthur & C.T. Mac Arthur (Eds.), Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning: Youth, Identity and Digital Media. (pp. 119-142). Cambridge: MIT Press.

Boyd, D.M. & Ellison, N.B. (2008). Social Network Sites: Definition, History, in Scholarship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13, 1, 4-22.

Carr, N. (2008). Is Google Making us Stupid? What the Internet is Doing to our Brains. The Atlantic Monthly. (www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-makingus-stupid/6868) (20-10-2012).

Clark, D.A. (1997). Twenty Years of Cognitive Assessment: Current status and future directions. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 65, 4, 996-1000.

Ellison, N.B., Steinfield, C. & Lampe, C. (2007). The Benefits of Facebook ‘friends’: Social Capital in College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12, 4, 1143-1168.

Erjavec, K. (2010). Media Literacy of Schoolgirls and Schoolboys in an Information Society. Sodobna Pedagogika, 61, 1, 156-191.

Gladwell, M. (2005). Brain Ciny: Is Pop Culture Dumping Us Down or Smartening Us Up? The New Yorker, (www.newyorker.com/archive/2005/05/16/050516crbo_books) (20-10-2012).

Granovetter, M.S. (1973). The Strength of Weak Ties. Amerian Economic Review, 78, 6, 1360-1480.

Greenhow, C. & Robelia, E. (2009a). Old Communication, New Illiteracies: Social Network Sites as Social Learning Resources. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14, 4, 1130-1161.

Greenhow, C. & Robelia, E. (2009b). Informal Learning in Identity Formation in Online Social Network Sites. Learning, Media in Technology, 34, 2, 119-140.

Greenhow, C. (2011). Online Social Network Sites and Learning. On The Horizon, 19, 1, 4-12.

Hager, P. (2001). Lifelong Learning and the Contribution of Informal Learning. In D. Aspin, J. Chapman, M. Hatton & Y. Sawano (Eds.), The International Handbook of Lifelong Learning. (pp. 24-37). London: Kluwer Academic Publisher.

Hamilton, A. (2009). What Facebook Users Share: Lower Grades. Time Magazine, (www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,1891111,00.html). (20-10-2012).

Herring, S.C. (2007). Questioning the Generational Divide: Technological Exoticism in Adult Construction of online youth identity. In D. Buckingham (Ed.), Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. (pp. 70-92).Cambridge: MIT Press.

Hewitt, A. & Forte, A. (2006). Crossing Boundaries: Identity Management and Stu-dent/faculty Relationships on the Facebook. (www.cc.gatech.edu/~aforte/Hewitt-ForteCSCWPoster2006.pdf). (20-10-2012).

Jenkins, H. (2006). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century. (www.digitallearning) (20-10-2012).

Jones, S., Millermaier, S., Goya-Martinez, M. & Schuler, J. (2008). Whose Space is MySpace? A Content Analysis of MySpace profiles. First Monday 13, (9) (www.uic.-edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2202/2024) (20-10-2012).

Karpinski, A.C. (2009). A Description of Facebook Use in Academic Performance Among Undergraduate in Graduate Students, Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA, 5-10 May 2009.

Livingstone, S., & Bober, M. (2004). Taking up Online Opportunities? Children’s Uses of the Internet for Education, Communication and Participation. e-Learning 1(3). (www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/validate.asp?j=elea&vol=1&issue=3&year=2004&article=5_Livingstone_ELEA_1_3_web) (20-10-2012).

Madge, C., Meek, J., Wellens, J. & Hooley, T. (2008). Facebook, social integration and informal Learning at university. Learning, Media and Technology, 34, 2, 141-155.

Maxwell, J.A. (1996). Qualitative research design: An interactive approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Putnam, R. (2000). Bowling Alone: The Collapse in Revival of the American Com-munity. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Rideout, V.J., Foehr, U.G. & Roberts, D.F. (2010). Generation M2: media in the lives of 8- to 18-year-olds. (pp. 44-53). Menlo Park, CA.: Kaiser Family Foundation.

Scearce, D., Kasper, G. & Grant, H.M. (2011). Working Wikily, Stanford Social Innovation Review, (www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/working_wikily) (20-10-2012).

Schwarzer, R. & Knoll, N. (2007). Functional Roles of Social Support within the Stress in Coping Process: A Theoretical in Empirical Overview. International Journal of Psychology, 42, 4, 243-52.

Shirky, C. (2010). Cognitive Surplus: Creativity in Generosity in a Connected Age. New York: Penguin Press.

Slovenia Facebook Statistics (www.socialbakers.com/facebook-statistics/slovenia/last-week) (20-10-2012).

Stefanone, M.A., Kwn, K.H. & Lackaff, D. (2012). Exploring the Relationship between Perception of Social Capital and Enacted Support Online. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 17, 2, 451-466.

Steinfield, C., Ellison, N. & Lampe, C. (2008). Social Capital, Self Esteem, in Use of Online Social Network Sites: A Longitudinal Analysis. Journal of Applied Devel-opmental Psychology, 29, 4, 434-45.

Teclehaimanot, B. & Hickman, T. (2011). What Students Find Appropriate. TechTrends, 55, 3, 19-30.

Thurlow, C. (2006). From Statistical Panic to Moral Panic: The Metadiscursive Construction in Popular Exaggeration of New Media Language in the Print Media. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 11, 3, 667-701.

Ule, M. (2008). Za vedno mladi? Socialna psihologija odrašcanja. Ljubljana: Fakulteta za družbene vede.

Valenzuela, S., Park, N. & Kee, K.F. (2009). Is there Social Capital in a Social Network Site? Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14, 4, 875-901.

Walker, R. (1988). Applied Qualitative Research. Vermont: Gower.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Teniendo en cuenta que la investigación ha descuidado el estudio de cómo los alumnos de primaria hacen uso de Facebook para el aprendizaje informal y cómo potencia el capital social, el presente trabajo intenta llenar dicho vacío con sesenta entrevistas en profundidad y el protocolo de pensamientos en voz alta con alumnos de escuelas primarias eslovenas. Para analizar el perfil de Facebook también incluimos un análisis de contenido. Los resultados del estudio demuestran que los alumnos eslovenos con frecuencia utilizan Facebook para el aprendizaje informal. El estudio no solo muestra que los estudiantes son conscientes del uso de Facebook para el aprendizaje y lo utilizan en primer lugar como apoyo social, sino también ofrece muestras de intercambio práctico de información, aprendizaje de tecnología, (auto)evaluación, apoyo emocional, organización de grupo de trabajo y comunicación con los profesores. Con el uso de Facebook, los estudiantes adquieren competencias relacionales y vinculación de capital social, pues mantienen una amplia red de lazos débiles, capaz de generar relaciones más profundas con apoyo emocional y fuentes de unión. Las principales diferencias entre los participantes se refieren a la expresión del apoyo emocional. Las participantes femeninas prefieren Facebook para dichos fines y expresan con más habilidad sus emociones. El estudio muestra además que nuestros participantes perciben una conexión entre el uso de Facebook y el conocimiento y destrezas que ellos pensaban que sus profesores valoraban en la escuela.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Actualmente, los alumnos pueden aprender y educarse en varios espacios físicos y en línea. En este contexto de aprendizaje, aumenta el papel de los sitios de redes sociales en línea (Valenzuela & al., 2009; Greenhow, 2011). Muchos alumnos han creado su propio perfil en al menos uno de los muchos sitios de redes sociales. Por ejemplo: más de la mitad de los alumnos y estudiantes eslovenos (entre 13 y 24 años) han creado su propio perfil en redes sociales (Estadísticas Eslovenas de Facebook, 2012). No se trata de una especificidad eslovena, ya que un gran número de estudios internacionales (Bosch, 2009; Rideout & al., 2010) ha demostrado que el uso de las redes sociales es la actividad extracurricular más común entre los jóvenes. La red social más visitada es Facebook (Estadísticas Eslovenas de Facebook, 2012).

Las redes sociales permiten a los individuos: a) Crear un perfil público o semipúblico dentro de un sistema coherente; b) Desarrollar una lista de usuarios con los que tienen contacto; c) Examinar su propia lista de usuarios y listas de otros usuarios dentro del sistema (Boyd & Ellison, 2008). Los estudios existentes destacan las ventajas del uso de las redes sociales (Boase & al., 2011; Ellison & al., 2007; Scearce & al., 2010): una forma más fácil, más rápida y más barata de comunicación y contacto en red entre los individuos y los grupos geográficamente lejanos; comunicación más fácil para los jóvenes que tienen dificultades en establecer y mantener relaciones; proporcionar una visión de conjunto de la red social del individuo; proporcionar apoyo social en caso de apuro; construir comunidades y movilizar a la gente. Por otro lado, otros estudios acentúan las desventajas y los riesgos de su uso (Boyd, 2007; Ule, 2009; Scearce & al., 2010): impersonalidad que puede llevar a la alienación y a la ausencia del contacto personal; el aislamiento social de los adolescentes; la sensación falsa de anonimato; la falsa identidad; un menor nivel de gramática, expresión y habilidades de escritura; el riesgo de exponerse a los delincuentes y criminales en línea; problemas con procesar grandes cantidades de información; y publicar información inadecuada que puede perjudicar a los colegiales. Los juicios acerca del impacto de las redes sociales sobre el aprendizaje y el éxito escolar están divididos. Por una parte, los medios populares suelen calificar el uso de estos espacios como actividades extracurriculares que tienen un impacto negativo sobre el rendimiento académico (Hamilton, 2009; Karpinski, 2009) y son culpables de la bajada de los estándares de alfabetismo (Thurlow, 2006; Carr, 2008; Bauerlein, 2009) y una amenaza a los valores sociales (Herring, 2007). Por otra parte, aumenta el número de expertos que sostienen que el uso de las redes sociales promueve el desarrollo cognitivo (Gladwell, 2005; Shirky, 2010). Estudios recientes parecen indicar que muchos estudiantes recurren cada vez más a las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación como herramientas de aprendizaje fuera del ámbito escolar. Livingstone y Bober (2004) señalaron en su informe que la mayoría de los estudiantes –entre 9 y 19 años– consideraba Internet una herramienta para reunir aquella información que podía ser útil para los trabajos escolares, pero se mostraban «mucho más entusiasmados con sus posibilidades de comunicación y participación que parecía que utilizaban en su mayoría fuera del ámbito escolar pese a que la mitad de los estudiantes recibieron escasa o nula instrucción formal sobre el uso de Internet» (Bober, 2004). Greenhow y Robelia (2009b) realizaron un estudio sobre el uso de MySpace para la formación de la identidad y el aprendizaje informal de los estudiantes de instituto provenientes de las familias urbanas con bajos ingresos económicos en USA. Averiguaron que los sitios de redes sociales usados fuera del ámbito escolar permitían a los estudiantes formular e investigar diversas dimensiones de su identidad; los estudiantes, sin embargo, no percibieron una conexión entre sus actividades en línea y el aprendizaje en el aula. Los estudiantes usaron diferentes elementos sociotécnicos, como compartir fotos, diseño gráfico y múltiples canales de comunicación dentro de MySpace para comunicar quiénes eran en un momento determinado y para conocer los cambios en la vida de los demás en la red. Ocupados con su trabajo de identidad, los estudiantes adquirían también fluidez tecnológica y empezaban a tomar en cuenta sus papeles y responsabilidades de ciudadanos digitales. Su estudio se centró en el aprendizaje informal, conocido como aprendizaje ocasional, lo cual es una forma de aprendizaje espontáneo, experimental, no planeado, desorganizado e imprevisible, sin estándares asentados, y cuyos resultados son implícitos (Hager, 2001; Jefkins, 2006). Ningún estudio anterior se ha centrado en el uso de Facebook para el aprendizaje informal entre los estudiantes de instituto de enseñanza secundaria.

Los estudios han investigado el uso disponible de las redes sociales para el aprendizaje entre los estudiantes universitarios no licenciados o estudiantes de institutos, y han omitido un análisis del uso de estas redes sociales en línea para el aprendizaje entre los alumnos de enseñanza primaria. Además, las investigaciones existentes sobre el uso de las redes sociales para el aprendizaje (Schwarzer & Knoll, 2007; Madge & al., 2008, Greenhow & Robelia, 2009a, b; Greenhow, 2011; Teclehaimanot & Hickman, 2011) muestran que los estudiantes usan estos sitios para la asistencia instructiva directa o indirecta, sobre todo para el apoyo de iguales, para mantener relaciones, para su autorrepresentación y autoexpresión. Greenhow y Robelia (2009b) destacaron el uso de los sitios de redes sociales para el enfrentamiento con el estrés de aprendizaje y la importancia del «capital social» como conjunto de relaciones horizontales entre la gente, inclusive las redes sociales y las normas asociadas que influyen sobre la productividad y el bienestar de la comunidad (Putnam, 2000). Las investigaciones en el ámbito educativo y en el del capital social se centran en dos tipos de capital social entre los jóvenes: en el capital puente, que se basa en alianzas débiles, permitiendo diversas perspectivas e información nueva, y en el capital vínculo, que se basa en alianzas fuertes de amigos cercanos y familia, quienes proporcionan comodidad (Putnam, 2000). La presencia del capital social en las redes sociales está relacionada con numerosas consecuencias educativas y psicosociales (Dike & Singh, 2002). En otros términos, los estudiantes tienden a hacer mejor y persistir en el marco educativo cuando tienen una sensación fuerte de pertenencia social y vinculación. Al estudiar el uso de Facebook de los estudiantes universitarios blancos de clase media, Ellison y otros (2007) averiguaron que el uso intensivo del sitio de red era relativo a niveles más altos del capital puente y, en menor grado, al capital vínculo y al capital social mantenido, concepto que los investigadores desarrollaron para describir la habilidad para movilizar recursos desde una red previamente habitada, como la del instituto de enseñanza secundaria (Ellison & al., 2007). El uso de las redes sociales puede ayudar a ahondar en las relaciones que, en otras circunstancias, podrían haber sido breves, y anima a los usuarios a mejorar lazos latentes y mantener relaciones con viejos amigos. Por lo tanto, el uso de estos sitios posibilita que las personas sigan relacionándose incluso cuando, en el mundo físico, pasan de una comunidad a otra, por ejemplo, al pasar del instituto a la universidad. Steinfield y otros (2008) averiguaron que el uso de las redes sociales permite a los estudiantes con baja autoestima ganar más capital puente que los estudiantes con niveles más altos de autoestima. Facebook proporciona a los estudiantes estigmatizados con baja autoestima más control de su propia (auto)presentación en comparación con las comunicaciones interpersonales directas (Elison & al., 2007). Como los estudios existentes no lograron investigar la forma del uso de Facebook para el aprendizaje informal entre los alumnos de enseñanza primaria, hemos intentado llenar este hueco en la investigación y responder a las preguntas en nuestra investigación de cómo usan Facebook para el aprendizaje informal los alumnos eslovenos y qué tipo de capital social acrecientan.

2. Métodos

El objetivo de este estudio ha sido determinar cómo usan Facebook los alumnos para el aprendizaje informal y para mejorar su capital social. Publicamos una invitación para participar en el estudio en las páginas web de Internet de todos los colegios eslovenos (450), y 246 alumnos respondieron. Seleccionamos a los primeros 60 alumnos que cumplían nuestros requisitos en términos de datos demográficos (edad, notas, ubicación, ingresos, uso de Facebook y sexo). Los que rellenaron el cuestionario tenían una edad entre 13 y 14 años (es decir, los alumnos de los últimos dos cursos del colegio), y una distribución homogénea, basada en sexo, familias de ingresos bajos y medios, ubicación rural y urbana, notas bajas y buenas, y además eran usuarios «activos» de Facebook (lo usan cada día durante 30 minutos por lo menos) y usuarios «menos activos» (lo usan al menos dos veces por semana durante 30 minutos por lo menos). Todos los participantes tenían un ordenador en casa conectado a Internet y llevaban usando Facebook por lo menos un año.

El intento de comprender la naturaleza del uso de Facebook por parte de los alumnos para el aprendizaje informal se mereció un proyecto de investigación cualitativo, enfocado en el proceso de reunir los datos, mantuvo la flexibilidad del proyecto para permitir una generación de hipótesis inductiva, y tomó en cuenta la validez de las experiencias y los comentarios de los jóvenes (Maxwell, 1996). Triangulamos las fuentes de múltiples datos, incluyendo: 1) Las entrevistas semiestructuradas (Walker, 1998); 2) Los pensamientos en voz alta (Clark, 1997); 3) Los análisis del contenido de los perfiles de Facebook de los informantes (Jones & al., 2008). En primer lugar usamos una forma muy sencilla de análisis del contenido, adaptada de Jones y otros (2008). Tratamos de establecer qué mensajes enviaban los participantes en sus perfiles de Facebook y cómo se distinguían sus mensajes conforme a sus notas, ubicación, ingresos, uso de Facebook y sexo. Los participantes nos incluyeron temporalmente en su lista de amigos, pero tratamos de reducir al mínimo nuestra influencia sobre la conducta de los informantes y nunca enviamos ni comentamos ni indicamos de ninguna manera nuestra presencia de observadores.

En segundo lugar, usamos las entrevistas en profundidad, válidas para nuestros propósitos, porque nos permitían acceder a opiniones claras y exactas, basadas en experiencias personales (Walker, 1988). Intentamos averiguar cómo usan los alumnos Facebook para el aprendizaje informal, formulando: 1) Preguntas generales sobre el uso de esta red social. Por ejemplo: «En un día típico, cuando entras en tu perfil de Facebook, ¿qué sueles hacer allí?, ¿por qué?, ¿puedes darme un ejemplo de cómo comunicas tus ideas, intereses o emociones a través de estos sitios, si los comunicas? ¿Ves algunos problemas o dificultades en el uso de Facebook?, ¿algunas ventajas del uso de Facebook?»; 2) Preguntas, enfocadas en el aprendizaje. Por ejemplo: «¿Qué crees que aprendes, si crees que lo haces, cuando usas este sitio tal como lo usas?»; 3) Preguntas individuales basadas en el análisis previo del contenido.

En tercer lugar, a los participantes que tomaron parte en la técnica de pensar en voz alta se les pidió que informaran sobre los pensamientos relativos a la realización de una tarea mientras estaba desarrollándose (Clark, 1997). Pedimos a nuestros participantes que hablasen en voz alta, mientras estaban ocupados con su perfil de Facebook, apuntándoles con las preguntas sobre qué estaban haciendo, por qué, cómo y cómo iban a proceder en relación con el aprendizaje, intentando comprender sus experiencias.

El estudio se llevó a cabo en el primer semestre de 2012, usamos las ubicaciones elegidas por los participantes, cibercafés en su mayoría. Las entrevistas y las sesiones de pensamiento en voz alta duraron en conjunto entre 90 y 120 minutos, en los que grabamos la información para transcribirla más tarde. Para comprobar la exactitud de los datos publicados, comparamos los resultados del análisis del contenido con las entrevistas a fondo y con los pensamientos en voz alta. Por último, como los participantes hablaron con nosotros a condición de mantenerse en el anonimato, cambiamos sus nombres, y las palabras que pudiesen identificarlos se sustituyeron por una X.

3. Resultados

3.1. Relación entre Facebook y colegio

La mayoría de los participantes vio la relación entre su uso de Facebook y el conocimiento y habilidades que creyeron que sus profesores evaluaban en el colegio. Afirmaron que a primera vista no había relación, dado que el uso de Facebook está relacionado con el entretenimiento y el colegio con el trabajo, pero la relación existe, es «de apoyo» y se realiza a diario, como el uso de Facebook que sirve de apoyo en el aprendizaje escolar, sobre todo a la hora de realizar las tareas escolares. El típico ejemplo es el siguiente: «De un vistazo, Facebook es lo contrario de lo que hacemos en el colegio… de lo que los profesores exigen de nosotros. Como la noche y el día, la verdad. Sabe… Facebook es divertido, el colegio es tan intenso... Tengo que estar serio. Sin embargo, la relación entre la escuela y el uso de Facebook es que usando Facebook soy mejor en el colegio. No lo uso solo para el colegio, claro, pero también para los asuntos relacionados con el colegio. Y ahora mi respuesta a su pregunta de cómo veo la relación entre la escuela y Facebook: Puedo decir que me sirve de apoyo. Facebook me ayuda sobre todo a hacer mejor las cosas de la escuela. Sí, me ayuda cada día» (Rok). Los participantes identificaron varias formas en las que usaban Facebook para desahogarse u obtener ayuda con respecto a los asuntos o las tareas relacionados con la escuela.

3.2. Intercambio de información práctica

Todos los participantes mencionaron que el apoyo más corriente que recibieron de sus «amigos» de Facebook era el intercambio de información práctica sobre los asuntos o las tareas relacionados con la escuela. Este apoyo práctico incluía ayuda para conseguir material escolar como libros de texto, libros, apuntes y otro material de aprendizaje. Los participantes comparten con regularidad la información sobre estos materiales y se proporcionan materiales de aprendizaje, por ejemplo los apuntes. El ejemplo típico es el siguiente: «Tengo que reconocer algo. Como soy vago, pero también cuando estoy enfermo y no tengo apuntes que escriben en el colegio, pido a mis compañeros que me los pasen... o les pregunto dónde puedo conseguir los libros que tenemos que leer» (Zoki).

Los participantes son conscientes de estos recursos incorporados en su estructura social, es decir, «los amigos» pueden ser útiles, y usan estos recursos para una acción específica. Al hacerlo, aprenden a ser solidarios y estar a la recíproca; ayudan a sus «amigos» porque éstos les ayudarán. El ejemplo típico es el siguiente: «A veces realmente no me apetece escanear mis libros de ejercicio para mis amigos, pero me doy cuenta de que yo también necesitaré ayuda. A causa de mis frecuentes actividades musicales, falto mucho a clase. Y entonces siempre obtengo copias de lo que han hecho en clase» (Mira).

El análisis del contenido ha mostrado que los participantes masculinos principalmente piden el material de aprendizaje, pero en raras ocasiones ayudan a otros proporcionándoles el material, mientras que las participantes hacen ambas cosas. El análisis ha mostrado también que al menos la mitad de la información práctica incluía la información sobre el trabajo y las características personales de los profesores concretos. La mayoría de los alumnos no reveló esta información, pero hablaron sobre ello cuando se lo preguntamos. Algunos justificaron la omisión de esta información subrayando que se trataba de una práctica poco frecuente, mientras que otros reconocieron que no nos lo habían mencionado porque temían que nosotros pudiésemos comentárselo a sus profesores y causarles problemas. El ejemplo típico es el siguiente:

• Entrevistador: ¿Escribiste también alguna información sobre el profesor?

• Jernej: ¿A qué se refiere? No entiendo.

• Entrevistador: Mira, ¿la mayoría de vosotros escribe cosas sobre el profesor –si he entendido bien– de matemáticas? ¿El profesor X?

• Jernej: Sí, es verdad, hemos escrito cosas sobre X porque es... extraño.

• Entrevistador: ¿Te resulta difícil hablar de ello?

• Jernej: Bueno... la verdad es que me resulta un poco arriesgado para mí porque... usted puede contarlo todo a este X.

• Entrevistador: Te prometemos mantener el anonimato y yo no pasaré tu información a X. Entonces, ¿cuál es el problema?

• Jernej: Bueno... Creo que es justo avisar a los amigos de lo que pasaba con las matemáticas y de la actual locura de X y que no vayan a su clase.

Los participantes no intercambian información práctica solo a petición, sino también por preocupación por las tareas escolares de sus amigos. Estos «amigos» no son solo sus compañeros de clase, como se ha descrito arriba, sino también conocidos y miembros de su familia. El ejemplo típico es el siguiente:

• Matea: Me siento muy bien cuando un amigo me envía algún consejo o incluso una solución a mi problema escolar. Porque siento que alguien piensa en mí.

• Entrevistador: ¿Qué quieres decir?

• Matea: Puedo contarle el último ejemplo. Tenía que hacer los deberes sobre las plantas genéticamente modificadas, y no encontré bibliografía sobre el cultivo de maíz genéticamente modificado en Eslovenia. Y, después, Nataša, una pariente lejana, creo que es la prima de mi madre, me envió el enlace a un artículo en el que pone que Eslovenia no cultiva maíz genéticamente modificado. ¿Lo ve?, no había podido encontrar la información porque no existía. Ella me salvó. Y así resolví el problema, pero me sentí... ¿cómo explicarlo? Me sentí bien y relacionada con ella y con los demás... Me di cuenta de que no estaba sola con mis problemas.

3.3. Aprendiendo la tecnología

El análisis del contenido y las respuestas de los participantes muestran que los alumnos usan Facebook para aprender la tecnología con la que apoyan el aprendizaje formal. Con la ayuda de los «amigos» han aprendido a usar los programas para realizar tareas específicas; por ejemplo, crear pósters, usar programas multimedia para diseñar fotos y vídeos, diseñar fotos usando Photoshop y presentar sus trabajos escolares usando Prezi. La respuesta típica es la siguiente: «Mi amiga me enseñó a usar Prezi, que es el mejor programa para el trabajo de presentación en clase. Sin este conocimiento, mis presentaciones serían aburridas. Aún usaría PowerPoint tradicional» (Ana).

El análisis del contenido muestra que los participantes usan programas legales, pero también, y en su mayoría, usan programas distribuidos ilegalmente. Como sostienen que todos los programas de Internet tendrían que ser gratuitos porque las corporaciones multinacionales solo potencian sus beneficios a su costa, los participantes no ven la distribución ilegal de los programas como un problema. La respuesta típica es la siguiente:

• Entrevistador: He visto que todos distribuíais los programas ilegalmente.

• Urban: Sí, ¿y qué?

• Entrevistador: ¿No te parece problemático?

• Urban: No, creo que todo lo que hay en Internet debería ser gratuito. Ahora solo sacan beneficio a nuestra costa.

• Entrevistador: Pero el uso de Facebook también se basa en el beneficio.

• Urban: Sí, pero es diferente porque a nosotros no nos hace falta pagar.

3.4. Consiguiendo la confirmación y el aprecio por el trabajo creativo

Los participantes usan Facebook para conseguir la confirmación y el aprecio de su trabajo creativo con la opinión de sus perfiles y para evaluar otros perfiles con sus comentarios. Al hacerlo, también aprenden habilidades sociales de empatía y comportamiento respetuoso a la hora de establecer relaciones. El ejemplo típico es el siguiente: «Sí, ayer mi amigo Sašo puso una foto nueva, la criticamos... En mi opinión es horrible... para mí... Pero no puedo escribirlo, claro, porque puede vengarse cuando yo ponga una foto nueva... Y creo que es una mierda si te pones feo con alguien, porque duele. Y, antes o después, necesitaré a Sašo. Así que intenté explicarle por qué la foto es mala» (Urban).

Consiguen también la aprobación con respecto a sus tareas escolares. Más de la mitad de los participantes dijo que publicaban sus trabajos al menos de vez en cuando y preguntaban a sus amigos por su juicio y sugerencias en cuanto a la continuación y la mejora.

• Maša: A veces cuando no sabes, o no estoy segura de que lo he escrito bien, presento algo y pido comentarios.

• Entrevistador: Cuéntamelo detalladamente, por favor.

• Maša: La semana pasada presenté un ensayo para Historia.

• Entrevistador: ¿Y qué pasó?

• Maša: Obtuve tres comentarios, pero solo uno fue útil. Fue de mi compañera de clase, pero me ayudó de verdad, porque Nina me indicó qué le faltaba a mi ensayo.

3.5. Apoyo emocional

Facebook proporciona también apoyo emocional entre iguales. Esta es la única forma del apoyo analizado donde hay una diferencia entre los participantes. A saber, solo las participantes describieron abiertamente su estado emocional negativo, como la frustración, el enfado, la impotencia o la decepción en relación con sus tareas escolares. Sus iguales, sobre todo sus compañeras de clase, respondieron con mensajes de apoyo que ayudaron a mejorar su estado emocional. Por ejemplo, en la declaración siguiente, Sara explica cómo el uso de Facebook le proporciona apoyo emocional: «Cuando me siento deprimida, suelo quejarme un poco en Facebook... Para disminuir mi frustración, sabe... Después me siento mejor. Y, a veces, cuando obtengo una nota baja en el colegio, mis compañeros me escriben en Facebook. Sara, no te preocupes, no estás sola en tu sufrimiento, aguanta un poco más y pasará... Sí, estoy mejor. Yo hago lo mismo por mis mejores amigos del colegio, por supuesto».

Para los participantes masculinos el apoyo emocional es una interacción con los «amigos» en varios sentidos. El ejemplo típico es el siguiente: «Cuando estoy enfadado, quiero decir cuando estoy de mal humor, por ejemplo, cuando ya no puedo estudiar o hacer más deberes, me ayuda meterme en Facebook. Después depende de quién está allí y qué novedades hay. Después de un descanso así me siento mucho mejor» (Igor).

3.6. Organización del trabajo en equipo

Una tercera parte de los participantes dijo que usaba Facebook para contactar con otros alumnos a efectos de organizar reuniones del grupo para trabajar. El ejemplo típico es el siguiente: «Mis amigos y yo hacemos proyectos en grupo muchas veces. Bueno... en las asignaturas donde podemos hacerlo. Hasta ahora son tres. Normalmente pregunto a mis compañeros de clase en Facebook quién quiere participar en el proyecto conmigo o también con otros. Después trabajamos juntos en Facebook o en el colegio... Una vez respondí a una invitación así» (Simona).

En Facebook, los participantes también asignan tareas a los miembros individuales del equipo para controlar el avance y explicar las instrucciones de trabajo. El ejemplo típico es el siguiente: «Me parece buena costumbre el que estemos en Facebook para coordinar nuestro trabajo escolar. Podemos estar en Facebook y ver inmediatamente cómo avanza nuestro trabajo, cómo trabajan mis amigos y puedo comentar el trabajo en curso» (Ariana).

El análisis del contenido muestra que los participantes, generalmente, coordinan sus tareas escolares colectivas antes de que los participantes individuales escriban solos la parte del proyecto que les corresponde y la pongan en Facebook. Los miembros del grupo de trabajo evalúan sus trabajos de manera recíproca. En este punto, por lo general, se producen conflictos entre ellos. Según los informantes, la ventaja de la organización del trabajo en Facebook comparada con la comunicación cara a cara reside en que las reglas están escritas y los conflictos se resuelven rápido.

• Entrevistador: Leí sobre tu discusión con Niko. ¿Qué pasó?

• Jan: Me enfadé porque Niko no había cumplido con sus obligaciones. Todos los demás habíamos hecho lo que habíamos acordado; solo Niko no. Y tuve razón, porque todo estaba escrito en el perfil de Niko. Y esto está bien porque todo estaba escrito. Así que ahora Niko tiene que hacer la tarea otra vez, en eso hemos quedado. Es que estaba cabreado porque perdimos una semana por culpa de Niko (Klemen).

3.7. Mejor conocimiento de los profesores

Solo una cuarta parte de los participantes respondió afirmativamente a la pregunta de si sus profesores del instituto habían creado sus perfiles en Facebook y si se relacionaban con ellos. La mayoría de ellos subrayó que las preguntas destinadas a los profesores solo podían ser las que se refieren a las actividades escolares. Sabina formuló una afirmación típica: «Solo unos pocos profesores han creado su propio perfil en Facebook. Nuestra profesora de informática tiene su propio perfil y nos permite hacerle cualquier pregunta sobre su curso». Los participantes formularon argumentos parecidos a los que habían revelado otros investigadores (Hewitt & Forte, 2006; Teclehaimanot & Hickman, 2011): los alumnos podrían tener la oportunidad de conocer mejor a sus profesores si los profesores usaran Facebook. El ejemplo típico es el siguiente: «Los profesores que tienen perfil que podemos ver... Lo veo diferente y más progresista... No sé cómo decirlo. Lo veo bien, de todas maneras» (Karmina).

El análisis del contenido puso de manifiesto que entre 15 participantes que tienen acceso a los perfiles de sus profesores solo dos comunican con ellos. En ambos casos, los participantes preguntan a los profesores sobre sus tareas. De todas formas, para no perder su imagen ante sus amigos, los participantes se comunican con los profesores solo cuando no obtienen información útil de sus compañeros de clase.

• Entrevistador: He visto que le escribiste un mensaje a tu profesor de Historia. ¿Por qué?

• Peter: La semana pasada estuve enfermo y nadie pudo decirme qué tenía que hacer para el lunes, cuando me tocaba presentar un proyecto escolar. Así que no tenía otra opción. Tenía que preguntárselo al profesor.

• Entrevistador: ¿Y cómo respondió el profesor a tu pregunta?

• Peter: Muy bien. Me escribió la respuesta el mismo día para decirme lo que tenía que hacer.

• Entrevistador: ¿Qué opinan tus amigos sobre tu comunicación con el profesor?

• Peter: Nada, porque saben que no tenía otra opción. Sería diferente si no se lo hubiera preguntado antes a ellos.

Más de la mitad de los participantes dijo que sus profesores habían creado un perfil en Facebook, al que ellos, sin embargo, no tenían acceso. Algunos participantes (11) subrayaron que ellos tenían acceso a algunos perfiles de los profesores; los visitan regularmente, pero no se relacionan con ellos a causa de la presión social de sus compañeros de clase y porque temen una reacción negativa de sus profesores. Tienen una opinión mejor sobre los profesores en cuyo perfil de Facebook incluyen detalles de sus pasatiempos, sobre todo en el ámbito de deportes, tecnología y artes. Para algunos participantes, esos profesores son también un modelo a seguir. El ejemplo típico es el siguiente: «Mire, yo visito los perfiles de algunos profesores porque me doy cuenta de que son, en realidad, bastante diferentes que en el colegio. Por ejemplo, la profesora de inglés, que en el colegio es muy severa, toca la guitarra en sus ratos libres. Y la toca muy bien, como he podido ver en un vídeo. Sí, lo hace bien y yo también intento hacerlo bien. Me inspira, de alguna forma» (Rebeka).

Once alumnos ni siquiera escribieron si sus profesores tenían perfil porque no les interesaba y no querían comunicarse con ellos en sus ratos libres.

4. Discusión y conclusión

Los resultados del estudio muestran que los alumnos eslovenos usan Facebook a menudo para complementar y suplementar el aprendizaje en clase, es decir como aprendizaje informal. Luego, el uso de Facebook sirve de apoyo para el aprendizaje, proporcionando el apoyo emocional para el estrés relacionado con la escuela, la confirmación del trabajo creativo, el apoyo entre iguales para los periodos de transición en el colegio y la ayuda con las tareas escolares. Facebook ofrece un contexto informal como apoyo para la educación formal. Facebook también forma parte del «pegamento social» (Madge & al., 2008) que permite a los estudiantes tomar parte en la comunidad que les ayuda a vencer las dificultades de aprendizaje. De todas maneras, los alumnos no usan Facebook con la intención de aprender, solo intentan cumplir con sus tareas escolares y/o reducir tensiones emocionales.

Usando Facebook los alumnos aumentan el capital social, estimulando los recursos incorporados en su estructura social y movilizándolos para acciones específicas. De esta manera el estudio muestra que los alumnos se benefician invirtiendo en las redes y en el cultivo de confianza, reciprocidad y cohesión social (Putnam, 2000). Hemos averiguado que el capital social sirve de estructura de apoyo a los alumnos de varias maneras. Usando Facebook los alumnos mantienen una red extensa de lazos débiles que son una fuente del capital puente y las relaciones más profundas que les proporcionan apoyo emocional y son una fuente del capital vínculo. Todos los participantes destacaron la importancia del apoyo emocional que reciben de sus amigos en Facebook y con el que así se crea el capital vínculo. Todos los participantes subrayaron también la importancia de proporcionar a los alumnos información práctica con respecto a las tareas escolares, de obtener la aprobación y el aprecio de su trabajo creativo a través de las opiniones en las páginas de su perfil y de aprender la tecnología, lo cual acarrea la creación del capital puente. De esta manera, el capital social vínculo sirve para crear un objetivo a través del que los miembros de un grupo (en nuestro caso compañeros de clase) se afilian a los miembros de un grupo (compañero de clase) dentro de un grupo (clase) usando Facebook. Por otro lado, el capital social puente sirve para crear, con el uso de Facebook, puentes o lazos que permiten a los alumnos compartir la información relativa al colegio y otros recursos.

Estas conclusiones no apoyan la visión generalizada de que los usuarios de Facebook son aislados y no se relacionan. El estudio muestra lo contrario, una conclusión que concuerda con la bibliografía reciente sobre los efectos de la interacción social informativa y los usos de los sitios de redes sociales que construyen la identidad (Greenhow & Robelia, 2009a, 2009b; Greenhow 2011; Valenzuela & al., 2009). En términos generales, las conclusiones del estudio deberían aliviar las preocupaciones de los que temen que Facebook tiene principalmente efectos negativos sobre el capital social de los alumnos de enseñanza primaria. De todas formas, los participantes informaron sobre la comunicación con sus «lazos débiles» (Granovetter, 1973) o mantienen su capital social puente. Este dato queda confirmado por otros estudios (Steinfield & al., 2008; Stefanone & al., 2012) que averiguaron que la gente usa Facebook para mantener redes extensas y prolijas de amigos, lo cual supone un impacto positivo en su acumulación del capital social puente. Las redes de Facebook parecen ser una colección de lazos débiles muy apropiada para proporcionar nueva información y también útil para el aprendizaje.

Las principales diferencias entre los participantes se encontraron en la expresión del apoyo emocional. Es más probable que las participantes usen Facebook con esta finalidad y que expresen sus emociones de modo más explícito. Este hecho puede explicarse con los modelos de socialización en base a los que las muchachas aún se crían de una forma que les permite expresar sus emociones de un modo más abierto que a los muchachos (Ule, 2009).

Este estudio muestra también que, contrastado con el estudio previo sobre el uso de los sitios de redes sociales para el aprendizaje informal (Greenhow & Robelia, 2009b), nuestros participantes eran conscientes de la relación entre el uso de Fac

Referencias

Bauerlein, M. (2009). The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans in Jeopardizes Our Future. New York: Tarcher.

Boase, J. Horrigan, B.J., Whellman, B. & Rainie, L. (2011). The Strength of Internet Ties. (www.pewinternet.org/media/Files/Report/2006/PIP_internet.pdf) (20-10-2012).

Bosch, T.E. (2009). Using Online Social Networking for Teaching and Learning: Facebook Use at the University of Cape Town. Communicatio, 35, 2, 185–200.

Boyd, D. (2007). Why Youth Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life. In D. Buckingham, J.D. Mac Arthur & C.T. Mac Arthur (Eds.), Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning: Youth, Identity and Digital Media. (pp. 119-142). Cambridge: MIT Press.

Boyd, D.M. & Ellison, N.B. (2008). Social Network Sites: Definition, History, in Scholarship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13, 1, 4-22.

Carr, N. (2008). Is Google Making us Stupid? What the Internet is Doing to our Brains. The Atlantic Monthly. (www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-makingus-stupid/6868) (20-10-2012).

Clark, D.A. (1997). Twenty Years of Cognitive Assessment: Current status and future directions. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 65, 4, 996-1000.

Ellison, N.B., Steinfield, C. & Lampe, C. (2007). The Benefits of Facebook ‘friends’: Social Capital in College Students’ Use of Online Social Network Sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12, 4, 1143-1168.

Erjavec, K. (2010). Media Literacy of Schoolgirls and Schoolboys in an Information Society. Sodobna Pedagogika, 61, 1, 156-191.

Gladwell, M. (2005). Brain Ciny: Is Pop Culture Dumping Us Down or Smartening Us Up? The New Yorker, (www.newyorker.com/archive/2005/05/16/050516crbo_books) (20-10-2012).

Granovetter, M.S. (1973). The Strength of Weak Ties. Amerian Economic Review, 78, 6, 1360-1480.

Greenhow, C. & Robelia, E. (2009a). Old Communication, New Illiteracies: Social Network Sites as Social Learning Resources. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14, 4, 1130-1161.

Greenhow, C. & Robelia, E. (2009b). Informal Learning in Identity Formation in Online Social Network Sites. Learning, Media in Technology, 34, 2, 119-140.

Greenhow, C. (2011). Online Social Network Sites and Learning. On The Horizon, 19, 1, 4-12.

Hager, P. (2001). Lifelong Learning and the Contribution of Informal Learning. In D. Aspin, J. Chapman, M. Hatton & Y. Sawano (Eds.), The International Handbook of Lifelong Learning. (pp. 24-37). London: Kluwer Academic Publisher.

Hamilton, A. (2009). What Facebook Users Share: Lower Grades. Time Magazine, (www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,1891111,00.html). (20-10-2012).

Herring, S.C. (2007). Questioning the Generational Divide: Technological Exoticism in Adult Construction of online youth identity. In D. Buckingham (Ed.), Youth, Identity, and Digital Media. (pp. 70-92).Cambridge: MIT Press.

Hewitt, A. & Forte, A. (2006). Crossing Boundaries: Identity Management and Stu-dent/faculty Relationships on the Facebook. (www.cc.gatech.edu/~aforte/Hewitt-ForteCSCWPoster2006.pdf). (20-10-2012).

Jenkins, H. (2006). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century. (www.digitallearning) (20-10-2012).

Jones, S., Millermaier, S., Goya-Martinez, M. & Schuler, J. (2008). Whose Space is MySpace? A Content Analysis of MySpace profiles. First Monday 13, (9) (www.uic.-edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2202/2024) (20-10-2012).

Karpinski, A.C. (2009). A Description of Facebook Use in Academic Performance Among Undergraduate in Graduate Students, Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA, 5-10 May 2009.

Livingstone, S., & Bober, M. (2004). Taking up Online Opportunities? Children’s Uses of the Internet for Education, Communication and Participation. e-Learning 1(3). (www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/validate.asp?j=elea&vol=1&issue=3&year=2004&article=5_Livingstone_ELEA_1_3_web) (20-10-2012).

Madge, C., Meek, J., Wellens, J. & Hooley, T. (2008). Facebook, social integration and informal Learning at university. Learning, Media and Technology, 34, 2, 141-155.

Maxwell, J.A. (1996). Qualitative research design: An interactive approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Putnam, R. (2000). Bowling Alone: The Collapse in Revival of the American Com-munity. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Rideout, V.J., Foehr, U.G. & Roberts, D.F. (2010). Generation M2: media in the lives of 8- to 18-year-olds. (pp. 44-53). Menlo Park, CA.: Kaiser Family Foundation.

Scearce, D., Kasper, G. & Grant, H.M. (2011). Working Wikily, Stanford Social Innovation Review, (www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/working_wikily) (20-10-2012).

Schwarzer, R. & Knoll, N. (2007). Functional Roles of Social Support within the Stress in Coping Process: A Theoretical in Empirical Overview. International Journal of Psychology, 42, 4, 243-52.

Shirky, C. (2010). Cognitive Surplus: Creativity in Generosity in a Connected Age. New York: Penguin Press.

Slovenia Facebook Statistics (www.socialbakers.com/facebook-statistics/slovenia/last-week) (20-10-2012).

Stefanone, M.A., Kwn, K.H. & Lackaff, D. (2012). Exploring the Relationship between Perception of Social Capital and Enacted Support Online. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 17, 2, 451-466.

Steinfield, C., Ellison, N. & Lampe, C. (2008). Social Capital, Self Esteem, in Use of Online Social Network Sites: A Longitudinal Analysis. Journal of Applied Devel-opmental Psychology, 29, 4, 434-45.

Teclehaimanot, B. & Hickman, T. (2011). What Students Find Appropriate. TechTrends, 55, 3, 19-30.

Thurlow, C. (2006). From Statistical Panic to Moral Panic: The Metadiscursive Construction in Popular Exaggeration of New Media Language in the Print Media. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 11, 3, 667-701.

Ule, M. (2008). Za vedno mladi? Socialna psihologija odrašcanja. Ljubljana: Fakulteta za družbene vede.

Valenzuela, S., Park, N. & Kee, K.F. (2009). Is there Social Capital in a Social Network Site? Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14, 4, 875-901.

Walker, R. (1988). Applied Qualitative Research. Vermont: Gower.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/05/13
Accepted on 31/05/13
Submitted on 31/05/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C41-2013-11
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 11
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?