Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Cyberbullying is a phenomenon that has been extensively analysed amongst adolescents. However, in Spain, there have been few studies of young adults and particularly of their romantic relationships in the digital context. This study analyses cyberbullying in romantic relationships in mobile and digital exchanges between partners, in a sample comprising 336 students using quantitative methodology. The results show that 57,2% of the sample admit to having been victimised by their partner by mobile phone and 27,4% via the Internet. The percentage of victimised males was higher than that of females. 47,6% affirmed that they had bullied their partner by mobile phone and 14% over the Internet. The percentage of males who did so was higher than that of females. The regression analyses showed correlation between having been victimised by a partner via one of these media and having experienced cyberbulling in other by means of the same technological medium. The effects of this interaction highlight that males victimised through the use of mobile phones or the Internet are involved, to a greater extent than victimised females, as the perpetrators in this phenomenon. The results suggest modernisation in the types of violence that young adults experience in their relationships.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The phenomenon of bullying has had major social repercussions and it is beginning to extend beyond face-to-face bullying through the use of information and communication technologies. This is known as cyberbullying (Avilés, Irurtia, García-Lopez & Caballo, 2011; Ortega, Calmaestra & Mora-Merchán, 2008). Cyberbullying is an extremely important phenomenon with significant risks for the health of victims (Ortega & al., 2008). Existing studies have tended to focus on the adolescent population in the context of school, leaving out other major age groups, such as young adults, and contexts, such as romantic relationships, in which this phenomenon could occur (for a review Garaigordobil, 2011). Young adults are heavy users of new technologies, particularly the Internet (Government delegation for domestic violence, 2013) and mobile phones (Bernal & Angulo, 2013; Cuesta, 2012; Livingstone & Haddon, 2009). This article analyses cyberbullying through the use of mobile phones and the Internet, in which young adults are involved in their romantic relationships. We analysed the incidence in a sample of young university students, looking at the differences and influence of gender and the relationship between having previously been victimised by a partner by means of either of these two technologies and the involvement in cyberbullying as a perpetrator.

1.1 Information and communication technologies, cyberbullying and romantic relationships

The Internet and information and communication technologies (ICT) are very present in people’s lives (Bautista, 2012). Currently, around 52% of the European population uses online spaces (Eurostat, 2014). In the case of young adults, this use is even higher than in the older population (Martínez-Pecino, Delerue Matos & Silva, 2013). Internet use by young Europeans has increased to 75% (Livingstone & Haddon, 2009). Mobile phone use has also increased. For example, in Europe there are 106 telephone lines for every 100 inhabitants (EuroStat, 2014). These data show the presence and importance of these technologies in our society.

Despite the numerous benefits of ICT (Abeele & De Cock, 2012; Livingstone, 2008), its rapid and constant growth has also led to problems (Cabello, 2013; Sahin, 2010), particularly for young adults and minors, due to the new forms of violence caused by the use of these technologies, such as «sexting» (sharing images with sexual or erotic content), «grooming» (sexual abuse of children) or cyberbullying, amongst others (Government delegation for domestic violence, 2013). Cyberbullying is one of the most negative effects associated with misuse of ICT in our society (Burgess-Proctor, Patchin & Hinduja, 2009; Microsoft, 2009; Ortega & al., 2008; Tejedor & Pulido, 2012). It can be defined as a form of intimidation, harassment and abuse by an individual or a group towards another, involving the use of technological media as the channel for this agression (Ortega & al., 2008; Smith & al., 2008). In the same regard, other authors use the term to refer to any form of intimidation or hostility using ICT (Belsey, 2005) or any form of online social abuse (Willard, 2004). The perpetrator may send and share offensive, vulgar or threatening messages, spread rumours about the victim, violate their intimacy or socially exclude or impersonate their victims (Willard, 2005).

Currently, both international studies and those carried out in Spain show the existence of this type of abuse in adolescents (Del Rey, Casas & Ortega, 2012; Félix-Mateo, Soriano-Ferrer, Godoy-Mesas & Sancho-Vicente, 2010; Garaigordobil, 2011; Ortega & al., 2012), which mainly occurs via two channels: mobile phones and the Internet (Buelga, Cava & Musitu, 2010). Therefore, for example, researchers such as Price and Dalgleish (2010) place the involvement of adolescents in cyberbullying as being between 20% and 50%. In Spain, studies such as those by Buelga et al. (2010), Cava, Musitu, and Murgui (2007), Ortega et al. (2008), Calvete, Orue, Estévez, Villardón and Padilla (2010), Bringué and Sádaba (2009), Del Río, Sádaba and Bringué (2010) also show similar percentages of involvement. In this regard, a transnational study carried out in Europe on cyberbullying reported that 29% of adolescents said that they had been a victim of cyberbullying (Microsoft, 2009). This phenomenon began to be studied tentatively in young adults in other countries (Dilmac, 2009), but to our knowledge not in Spain.

One aspect that has received little attention even in studies carried out with samples of young adults in other countries is the analysis of cyberbullying in the sphere of romantic relationships. ICT are an important element in relationships between young adults in general and romantic relationships in particular, which makes them more susceptible to being controlled and abused by their partner (Burke, Wallen, Vail-Smith & Knox, 2011). There are certain studies that evidence this. For example, Spitzberg (2002) highlighted that at least half of all young adults who had suffered cyberbullying identified their partner as the abuser. Alexy, Burgess, Baker and Smoyak (2005) showed that the most frequent young abusers through the use of technology were romantic partners. In the review that was carried out, no studies were found that analyse cyberbullying in romantic relationships between young adults in Spain. As such, in order to expand on the literature in this area, in this study we analysed the incidence of the phenomenon in romantic relationships in a sample of young university students, describing the levels of victimisation and cyberbullying through the use of mobile phones and the Internet. Although cyberbullying could be studied without distinguishing by which means it is carried out, we understand that mobile phones go beyond simply giving access to the Internet. As such, in line with previous studies, we chose to analyse involvement in this phenomenon both through the use of mobile phones and the Internet (Buelga & al., 2010).

Another aspect to bear in mind in the study of cyberbullying are gender differences, since the results in this regard are inconclusive. As such, while some studies do not find a statistical link between cyberbullying and gender (Finn, 2004), others do (Li, 2006), noting that males (compared to females) are usually those who commit more acts of cyberbullying and females (compared to males) are usually the main victims of this type of violence (Burgess-Proctor & al., 2009; Calvete & al., 2010; Estévez & al., 2010; Félix-Mateo & al.,2010; Finn & Banach, 2000). Therefore, the second objective of this study is to analyse gender differences in cyberbullying that takes place in the context of romantic relationships, using a sample of young university students. On the basis of the abovementioned studies on victimisation and cyberbullying in adolescents, we expect to find that a higher percentage of university females than males report having been cybervictimised by their partners in the last year (Hypothesis 1) and that a greater percentage of males than females report having abused their partner through the use of technology in the last year (Hypothesis 2).

Lastly, one of the most researched aspects within the phenomenon in adolescents regards factors related to involvement in cyberbullying (Sticca, Ruggieri, Alsaker & Perren, 2013).Some studies (Elipe, Ortega, Hunter & Del-Rey, 2012; Estévez & al., 2010) have indicated that cybervictimisation is related to involvement in cyberbullying as a perpetrator. Additionally, studies on bullying in traditional contexts have shown the relationship between having been a victim of bullying and undertaking such actions oneself (Avilés & al., 2011; Rodkin & Berger, 2008; Romera, Del-Rey & Ortega, 2011). Given the importance of this variable and the lack of studies on it amongst young people, the third objective of this study is to analyse the relationship between having been victimised by a partner via mobile phones or the Internet and the involvement in cyberbullying as a perpetrator via the same medium. In this regard, and using the previous literature on adolescents as a basis, we expect young adults who have been victimised by their partner by mobile phone to report higher levels of cyberbullying against their partner via this medium than those who were not victimised by their partner (Hypothesis 3). Likewise, young adults victimised over the Internet by their partner will report higher levels of cyberbullying against their partner via this medium than those who were not victimised over the Internet (Hypothesis 4).

2. Material and methods

2.1. Participants

The sample included 336 students in the first year of their Primary Education, Psychology and Journalism degrees at the University of Seville, comprising 180 females and 155 males, aged between 18 and 30 (M=20,67; DT=4,26), where sampling was applied for convenience. All declared that they were heterosexual and had participated voluntarily, without receiving any remuneration for doing so.

2.2. Instruments

We used the inductive-deductive method with a quantitative approach and data processing. As such, a questionnaire was employed, from which we obtained the following information:

• Socio-demographic data (age, sex, sexual orientation, year, degree).

• Frequency of victimisation and cyberbullying in romantic relationships through the use of mobile phones and the Internet in the last year. To collect this information, the following four scales were used:

Cyberbullying scales through the use of mobile phones and Internet. In order to measure cyberbullying towards a partner during the last year through the use of mobile phones and the Internet, we used the Peer victimisation scale, which was shown to have suitable psychometric properties (Buelga & al., 2010; Cava & al., 2007), adjusting the wording for romantic relationships. Both the measurements of cyberbullying against a partner via mobile phone and the Internet had a 4–point response scale with 1 being (never), 2 being (a few times), 3 being (quite a few times) and 4 being (many times). Examples of items in the first scale are: «I have insulted or ridiculed my partner with messages or calls by mobile phone», «I lied or spread false rumours about my partner by mobile phone». Examples of items in the scale of cyberbullying over the Internet: «I insulted or ridiculed my partner over the Internet», «I lied or spread false rumours about my partner over the Internet». The internal consistency for the two scales was satisfactory, with a=0,75 for the scale of cyberbullying by mobile phone, and a=0,75 for the scale of cyberbullying over the Internet.

Scales of victimisation through the use of mobile phones and the Internet. In order to measure cyberbullying experienced both by males and females by their partners in the last year through the use of mobile phones and the Internet, we employed the Peer victimisation scale, which was used and validated in a Spanish context (Buelga & al., 2010; Cava & al., 2007) (a=0,76 and a=0,84, respectively), adjusting the wording for romantic relationships. These items had a 4-point response scale, with 1 being (never), 2 being (a few times), 3 being (quite a few times) and 4 being (many times). Examples of items that evaluate victimisation suffered by mobile phone in romantic relationships are: «my partner insulted or ridiculed me with messages or calls by mobile phone», «my partner lied or spread false rumours about me by mobile phone». Examples of those used to measure the victimisation suffered by a partner over the Internet are: «my partner insulted or ridiculed me over the Internet», «my partner lied or spread false rumours about me over the Internet». The internal consistency for the scale of victimisation by mobile phone was a=0,62, while the internal consistency for the scale of Internet victimisation was a=0,70.

2.3. Design

The research design was non-experimental; specifically, it had a correlational cross-sectional design.

2.4. Procedure

The participants responded to the questionnaire in their classes. They were guaranteed privacy and the anonymity of their responses. They firstly answered sociodemographic questions and they then completed the scales of victimisation and cyberbullying in romantic relationships through the use of mobile phones and the Internet. At the end, they were thanked for their participation and were provided with a summary of the main objectives of the study.

3. Analysis and results

The data was analysed using the SPSS (version 18) statistical software. In order to analyse levels of victimisation and cyberbullying in romantic relationships, that is, those who had received or carried out some of the acts described above in their romantic relationships in the last year, we carried out frequency analyses. We subsequently carried out a comparison of the means between the victimisation and cyberbullying scores by the partner through the use of new technologies, reported in accordance with gender. We then calculated the Pearson correlation coefficient in the variables of interest in this study (victimisation by mobile phone, Internet victimisation, cyberbullying through the use of mobile phones, cyberbullying over the Internet). Finally, we carried out a hierarchical regression analysis in order to find out the influence of victimisation and gender on involvement in cyberbullying against partners via both technologies.

3.1. Frequency of victimisation and cyberbullying in romantic relationships through the use of mobile phones and the Internet

Tables 1 and 2 display the levels of victimisation and cyberbullying reported by the sample. The results obtained highlight that in the last year, 57,2% of the young adults in the sample report having been victimised by their partners by mobile phone and 27,4% over the Internet. With regard to data on cyberbullying against their partner, the results show that 47,6% report that they used a mobile phone in order to abuse their partner, while 14% used the Internet.


Draft Content 115825552-32651-en070.jpg


Draft Content 115825552-32651-en071.jpg

3.2. Gender differences in victimisation and cyberbullying in romantic relationships through the use of mobile phones and the Internet

We found statistically significant differences according to gender, both in the victimisation suffered and in the carrying out of cyberbullying through the use of mobile phones and the Internet (table 3). The results show that males reported greater victimisation by their partners than females, both through the use of mobile phones and the Internet. With regard to differences in accordance with gender in cyberbullying against partners, the results show that males reported greater perpetration of cyberbullying towards their partners than females, both through the use of mobile phones and the Internet.


Draft Content 115825552-32651-en072.jpg

3.3. The relationship between victimisation and cyberbullying in romantic relationships through the use of mobile phones and the Internet

We observed a strong association between being involved in victimisation and cyberbullying in romantic relationships, both through the use of mobile phones (r=.57; p<0,01) and the Internet (r =.47; p<0,01). In order to analyse the influence of victimisation and gender on the involvement in cyberbullying against partners via both technologies, we carried out a hierarchical regression analysis for each type of cyberbullying (cyberbullying by mobile phone and cyberbullying over the Internet). Before the analyses and in line with the indications of Jaccard, Turirsi and Wan (1990), all continuous variables were centred.

The first regression analysis was carried out with the aim of explaining cyberbullying, in the sample of university students, against their partner by mobile phone (table 4). In the first step, we introduced the variables Victimisation by Mobile Phone and Gender, and in the second step, the interaction between these variables. This analysis showed a principal effect of the variable Victimisation by Mobile Phone (ß=0,56, t=12,21, p<0,001). That is, at higher levels of victimisation by mobile phone, levels of cyberbullying against partners by mobile phone were higher. However, this effect must be interpreted bearing in mind the second order interaction that occurred between the variables Victimisation by Mobile Phone and Gender ß=0,24, t=3,46, p<0,001) (figure 1).

Analysing this interaction, we discovered that in the case of individuals who had not been victimised by their partner via mobile telephone, differences were not found between the cyberbullying that males and females carried out by mobile phone against their partner, (ß=-0,15, t=-1,86, p=n.s.). However, with regard to individuals who had been victimised by their partner via mobile phone, males in comparison to females, reported higher levels of cyberbullying against their partners by mobile phone, (ß=0,21, t=3,03, p<0,01).


Draft Content 115825552-32651-en073.jpg


Draft Content 115825552-32651-en074.jpg

Figure 1. Relationship between victimisation by mobile phone and cyberbullying against partners in romantic relationships by mobile phone in accordance with the gender of the participants.

The second regression analysis was carried out on cyberbullying against partners over the Internet (table 5). In the first step, we introduced the variables Internet Victimisation and Gender, and in the second step, the interaction between these variables. This analysis showed a main effect of the variable Internet victimisation, (ß=0,46, t=9,41, p<0,001). That is, with higher levels of Internet victimisation, the levels of cyberbullying against partners over the Internet were higher. However, this main effect must be interpreted bearing in mind the second order interaction that occurred between the variables Victimisation by Internet and Gender (ß=0,38, t=6,02, p< 0,001) (figure 2).

As we can observe in figure 2, upon analysing the interaction, we discovered that in the case of individuals who had not been victims of cyberbullying over the Internet by their partners, there were no differences between levels of cyberbullying that males and females reported having directed against their partners over the Internet, (ß=-0,08, t=-1,15, p=n.s.). However, when participants had been victimised over the Internet by their partner, males reported higher levels of Internet cyberbullying against their partners than females (ß=0,18, t=2,20, p<0,05).


Draft Content 115825552-32651-en075.jpg


Draft Content 115825552-32651-en076.jpg

Figure 2. Relationship between Internet victimisation and cyberbullying against partners in romantic relationships over the Internet in accordance with the gender of participants.

4. Discussion and conclusions

This study analyses victimisation and cyberbullying through the use of mobile phones and the Internet in romantic relationships, using a sample of young university students. Through this study, we have contributed to expanding the existing literature from three perspectives: firstly, the work is focussed on young adults, which complements existing studies which in Spain have focussed mainly on the adolescent population; secondly, it analyses cyberbullying that takes place in young adults who have a romantic relationship, extending the information existing in other studies focussed on peer relationships and in school contexts; lastly, it analyses the role of gender and of the relationship between having previously been victimised by a partner via these technologies and the involvement in cyberbullying as a perpetrator.

With regard to levels of victimisation and cyberbullying, the results obtained show that 57,2% of participants say that they had been victimised by mobile phone and 27,4% over the Internet, while 47,6% state that they had carried out cyberbullying by mobile phone and 14% over the Internet. These results support those of other international studies (Alexy & al., 2005; Burke & al., 2011) who highlight the presence of this type of behaviour towards partners in young university students through new technologies, and they extended the literature existing on cyberbullying by documenting this phenomenon in a sample of young Spanish university students.

With regard to gender differences, in the case of victimisation in relationships, males, in contrast to what was expected in Hypothesis 1, reported higher levels of victimisation by their partners than females, both by mobile phone and over the Internet. By contrast, in the case of cyberbullying, males reported higher levels of cyberbullying against their partner in the last year, both by mobile phone and over the Internet, therefore supporting Hypothesis 2 of this study. These latest results are along the same lines of those reported in recent studies carried out on an adolescent population (Buelga & al., 2010; Calvete & al. 2010; Elipe & al., 2012; Estévez & al., 2010; Féliz-Mateo & al., 2010; Finn & Banach, 2000) which highlight that males carry out more cyberbullying than females, with the existing information being extended upon carrying out this study with an older population sample (young adults) and in a different relationship context (romantic relationships). However, these studies usually place adolescents as the main victims of cyberbullying by adolescents (Burguess-Proctor & al., 2009), while in our study, the males reported greater cybervictimisation, which is along the same lines as some more recent studies carried out on young adults in other countries (Burke & al., 2011).

In terms of the relationship between having been victimised by a partner through the use of mobile phones or the Internet and the involvement in cyberbullying as a perpetrator via the same medium, two main effects were observed that support Hypotheses 3 and 4 of this study, respectively. However, these effects must be interpreted considering the effects of interaction along with the gender of participants. As such, we found that compared with females, males who reported having been victimised by their partners by mobile phone were those who reported having carried out more cyberbullying against their partners by mobile phone. Likewise, cyberbullying against a partner though the Internet is influenced by Internet victimisation in interaction with the gender. Males, compared to females, who had been victimised by their partners over the Internet were those who reported having carried out more cyberbullying against their partners via this medium. The results of this study highlight victimisation suffered by the perpetrator as a relevant variable in the exercising of cyberbullying against their partner, that is, these findings highlight the figure of the victimised perpetrator. The results support studies that suggested this both in the case of cyberbullying (Elipe & al., 2012) and traditional bullying (Avilés & al., 2011; Rodkin & Berger, 2008; Romera & al., 2011; Sticca & al., 2013) and reaffirm the need to consider victimisation as an important variable in studies that analyse the involvement in cyberbullying, since there have been scant references to it in the literature.

These results may indicate the different way in which males and females react to cyberbullying that takes place in romantic relationships and offer interesting questions both for theoretical and applied research. For example, analysing whether in a situation of technological bullying in a romantic relationship males would tend to react to a greater extent than females, involving themselves in cyberbullying, while females would to a greater extent tend to ignore or not respond with this type of behaviour, or whether, by contrast, what this data may be reflecting is the different way in which males and females perceive cyberbullying. That is, are males overestimating their status as victims or are females underestimating it? In any case, responses to these questions will allow a greater understanding of the gender differences in the phenomenon. In this regard, in future research, it would be very useful to include evaluation instruments that allow qualitative information to be gathered, providing a greater explanation of the results obtained.

This study also has some limitations that should be borne in mind in future studies. It analysed cyberbullying in romantic relationships in a sample of young university students, and as such, future research may complement these results by analysing the phenomena of cyberbullying in young adults who are not studying at university. Likewise, other variables not analysed in this study could be taken into account such as the influence on cyberbullying against a partner of cyberbullying itself or traditional bullying suffered by young adults, that was inflicted by individuals other than their partner (for example friends, classmates or unknown individuals).

In short, the study carried out offers new contributions by analysing the phenomenon of cyberbullying in an older group (young adults), which is different to that normally studied in literature (adolescents), also using different relationship context (romantic relationships), and contributing data on these characteristics in a Spanish context. The results suggest a modernisation of the forms of bullying directed at partners, as a result of new technological changes that our society is experiencing. It also identifies factors that contribute to its occurrence, providing information that may be of interest for future research and interventions aimed at reducing its incidence.

References

Abeele, M.V. & De-Cock, R. (2012). Blind Faith in the Web? Internet Use and Empowerment among Visually and Hearing Impaired Adults: A Qualitative Study of Benefits and Barriers. Communications, 37 (2), 129-151. (DOI: 10.1515/commun-2012-0007).

Alexy, E.M., Burgess, A.W., Baker, T. & Smoyak, S.A. (2005). Perceptions of Cyberstalking among College Students. Brief Treatment and Crisis Intervention, 5, 279-289. (DOI: http://doi.org/b2hn7w).

Avilés, J.M., Irurtia, M.J., García-López, L.J. & Caballo, V. E. (2011). El maltrato entre iguales: bullying. Behavioral Psychology/Psicología Conductual, 19, 57-90.

Bautista, L. (2012). Los cambios en la web 2.0: una nueva sociabilidad. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 18, 121-128. (DOI: http://doi.org/vnv).

Belsey, B. (2005). Cyberbullying: An Emerging Threat to the «Always on» Generation. (http://goo.gl/9gyLqV) (10-06-2013).

Bernal, C. & Angulo, F. (2013). Interacciones de los jóvenes andaluces en las redes sociales. Comunicar, 40, 25-30. (DOI: http://doi.org/vnw).

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C.H. (2009). La Generación Interactiva en España. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Resumen ejecutivo. (http://goo.gl/xpzLrS) (20-05-2013).

Buelga, S., Cava, M.J. & Musitu, G. (2010). Cyberbullying: Victimización entre adolescentes a través del teléfono móvil y de Internet. Psicothema, 22, 784-789.

Burgess-Proctor, A., Patchin, J.W. & Hinduja, S. (2009). Cyberbullying and Online Harassment: Reconceptualizing the Victimization of Adolescent Girls. In V. García & J. Clifford (Eds.), Female crime victims: Reality reconsidered (pp. 153-175). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Burke, S. C., Wallen, M., Vail-Smith, K. y Knox, D. (2011). Using Technology to Control Intimate Partners: An Exploratory Study of College Undergraduates. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 1162-1167. (DOI: http://doi.org/fmrxh2).

Cabello, P. (2013). A Qualitative Approach to the Use of ICTs and its Risks among Socially Disadvantaged Early Adolescents and Adolescents in Madrid, Spain. Communications. The European Journal of Communication Research, 38, 61-83. (DOI: http://doi.org/vnx).

Calvete, E., Orue, I., Estévez, A., Villardón, L. & Padilla, P. (2010). Cyberbullying in Adolescents: Modalities and Aggressors' Profile. Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 1128-1135. (DOI: http://doi.org/d74kfs).

Cava, M.J., Musitu, G. & Murgui, S. (2007). Individual and Social Risk Factors Related to Overt Victimization in a Sample of Spanish Adolescents. Psychological Reports, 101, 275-290. (DOI: http://doi.org/cdz4md).

Cuesta, U. (2012). Uso envolvente del móvil en jóvenes: propuesta de un modelo de análisis. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 18, 253-262. (DOI: http://doi.org/vnz).

Del-Rey, R., Casas, J.A. & Ortega, R. (2012). El programa ConRed, una práctica basada en la evidencia. Comunicar, 39, 129-138. (DOI: http://doi.org/vn2).

Del-Río, J., Sábada, C.H. & Bringué, X. (2010). Menores y redes ¿sociales?: de la amistad al cyberbullying. Revista de estudios de juventud, 88, 115-129.

Delegación del Gobierno para la violencia de género (2013). El ciberacoso como forma de ejercer la violencia de género en la juventud: Un riesgo en la sociedad de la información y del conocimiento. (http://goo.gl/RmnBYM) (05-02-2014).

Dilmac, B. (2009). Psychological Needs as a Predictor of Cyber Bullying: A Preliminary Report on College Students. Educational Sciences: Theory and Practice 9, 1307-1325.

Elipe, P., Ortega, R., Hunter, S.C. & Del-Rey, R. (2012). Inteligencia emocional percibida e implicación en diversos tipos de acoso escolar. Behavioral Psychology/Psicología Conductual, 20 (1), 169-181.

Estévez, A., Villardón, L., Calvete, E., Padilla, P. & Orue, I. (2010). Adolescentes víctimas de cyberbullying: prevalencia y características. Behavioral Psychology/Psicología Conductual, 18, 73-89.

Eurostat (2014). Information Society Statistics. (http://goo.gl/XPq60r) (10-09-2014).

Félix-Mateo, V., Soriano-Ferrer, M., Godoy-Mesas, C. & Sancho-Vicente, S. (2010). El ciberacoso en la enseñanza obligatoria. Aula Abierta, 38, 47-58. (DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/11162/5058).

Finn, J. & Banach, M. (2000). Victimization Online: The Downside of Seeking Human Services for Women on the Internet. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 3, 785-797.

Finn, J. (2004). A survey of Online Harassment at a University Campus. Journal of Interpersonal Violence 19, 468-483. (DOI: http://doi.org/b5ktpg).

Garaigordobil, M. (2011). Prevalencia y consecuencias del cyberbullying: Una revisión. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 11, 233-254.

Jaccard, J., Turirsi, R. & Wan, C.K. (1990). Interaction Effects in Multiple Regression. London: Sage.

Li, Q. (2006). Cyberbullying in Schools: A Research of Gender Differences. School Psychology International 27, 157-170. (DOI: http://doi.org/ckhnvd).

Livingstone, S. (2008). Taking Risky Opportunities in Youthful Content Creation: Teenagers´use of Social Networking Sites for Intimacy, Privacy and Self-expression. New Media and Society, 10, 393-411. (DOI: http://doi.org/btc7kw).

Livingstone, S. y Haddon, L. (2009). EU Kids Online: Final Report. (http://goo.gl/4FKvPZ) (20-05-2013).

Martínez-Pecino, R., Delerue, A. & Silva, P. (2013). Portuguese Older People and the Internet: Interaction, Uses, Motivations, and Obstacles. Communications. The European Journal of Communication Research, 38 (4), 331-346. (DOI: 10.1515/commun-2013-0020).

Microsoft (2009). 29% of European Teenagers Are Victims of Online Bullying. (http://goo.gl/lYfpOK) (20-05-2013).

Ortega, R., Calmaestra, J. & Mora-Merchán, J.A. (2008). Cyberbullying. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 8, 183-192. (DOI: http://doi.org/c63ptq).

Ortega, R., Elipe, P., Mora-Merchán, J.A., Genta, M.L., Brighi, A., Guarini, A., Smith, P.K. & al. (2012). The Emotional Impact of Bullying and Cyberbullying on Victims: A European Cross-national Study. Aggressive Behavior, 38(5), 342-56. (DOI: 10.1002/ab.21440).

Price, M. & Dalgleish, J. (2010). Cyberbullying. Experiences, Impacts and Coping Strategies as Described by Australian Young People. Youth Studies Australia, 29, 51-59.

Rodkin, P.C. & Berger, C. (2008). Who Bullies Whom? Social Status Asymmetries by Victim Gender. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 32, 473-485. (DOI: http://doi.org/fhsbw6).

Romera, E.M., Del-Rey, R. & Ortega, R. (2011). Factores asociados a la implicación en bullying: Un estudio en Nicaragua. Psychosocial Intervention, 20, 161-170. (DOI: http://doi.org/df7m9g).

Sahin, M. (2010). Teachers' Perceptions of Bullying in High Schools: A Turkish study. Social Behavior and Personality, 38 (1), 127-142. (DOI: http://doi.org/bjpjzd).

Smith, P.K., Mahdavi, J. & al. (2008). Cyberbullying, its Forms and Impact on Secondary School Pupils. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49, 376-385. (DOI: http://doi.org/df2hqf).

Spitzberg, B.H. (2002). The Tactical Topography of Stalking Victimization and Management. Trauma Violence Abuse, 3, 261-288. (DOI: http://doi.org/ckg3sx).

Sticca, F., Ruggieri, S., Alsaker, F. & Perren, S. (2013). Longitudinal Risk Factors for Cyberbullying in Adolescence. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 23, 52-67.

Tejedor, S. & Pulido, C. (2012). Retos y riesgos del uso de Internet por parte de los menores. ¿Cómo empoderarlos? Comunicar, 39, 65-72. (DOI: http://doi.org/tkb).

Willard, N. (2004). I Can’t See You – You Can’t See Me: How the Use of Information and Communication Technologies Can Impact Responsible Behavior. (http://goo.gl/S4daAU) (05-06-2013).

Willard, N. (2005). Educator’s Guide to Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats. (http://goo.gl/x1zjxj) (05-06-2013).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

El ciberacoso es un fenómeno ampliamente analizado entre adolescentes, sin embargo en España ha sido poco estudiado entre jóvenes y particularmente en sus relaciones de noviazgo. Empleando una metodología cuantitativa este estudio analiza el ciberacoso mediante el teléfono móvil e Internet en las relaciones de noviazgo en una muestra compuesta por 336 estudiantes universitarios. El análisis de resultados indica que un 57,2% declara haber sido victimizado por su pareja mediante el teléfono móvil, y un 27,4% a través de Internet. El porcentaje de chicos victimizados fue mayor que el de las chicas. Un 47,6% declara haber acosado a su pareja a través del teléfono móvil, y un 14% a través de Internet. El porcentaje de chicos que lo ejerció fue superior al de las chicas. Los análisis de regresión muestran la relación entre haber sido victimizado por la pareja a través de uno de estos medios y el ejercicio del ciberacoso hacia la pareja mediante el mismo medio tecnológico. Los efectos de interacción ponen de manifiesto que los chicos victimizados a través del teléfono móvil o de Internet se implican, en mayor medida que las chicas victimizadas, como agresores en este fenómeno. Los resultados sugieren una modernización en los tipos de violencia que experimenta la juventud en sus relaciones de pareja.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

El fenómeno del maltrato entre iguales, también conocido como «bullying», ha tenido una importante repercusión social y comienza a extenderse más allá del ámbito presencial a través de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación, siendo denominado «cyberbullying» o ciberacoso (Avilés, Irurtia, GarcíaLopez & Caballo, 2011; Ortega, Calmaestra & MoraMerchán, 2008). El ciberacoso es un fenómeno de gran relevancia y con importantes riesgos para la salud de las víctimas (Ortega & al., 2008). Los trabajos existentes han tendido a centrarse en población adolescente y en contextos escolares dejando al margen otros importantes grupos de edad, como los jóvenes, y contextos, como las relaciones de noviazgo, en los que pudiera acontecer este fenómeno (para una revisión Garaigordobil, 2011). Los jóvenes, son fuertes usuarios de las nuevas tecnologías, especialmente de Internet (Delegación del Gobierno para la Violencia de Género, 2013) y de la telefonía móvil (Bernal & Angulo, 2013; Cuesta, 2012; Livingstone & Haddon, 2009). Este artículo analiza el ciberacoso, a través del teléfono móvil y de Internet, en el que se ven implicados los jóvenes en sus relaciones de noviazgo. Se analizan la incidencia, en una muestra de jóvenes universitarios, las diferencias e influencia del género y la relación entre haber sido victimizado previamente por la pareja a través de alguna de estas dos tecnologías y la implicación en el ciberacoso como agresor.

1.1. Tecnologías de la información y de la comunicación, ciberacoso y relaciones de noviazgo

Internet y las tecnologías de la información y de la comunicación (TIC) están teniendo una gran presencia en la vida de las personas (Bautista, 2012). En la actualidad, cerca del 52% de la población europea hace uso de los espacios online (Eurostat, 2014). En los jóvenes, este uso es aún más elevado que en la población mayor (MartínezPecino, DelerueMatos & Silva, 2013). El uso de Internet por parte de los jóvenes europeos asciende incluso hasta el 75% (Livingstone & Haddon, 2009). Por su parte, el uso de la telefonía móvil también ha incrementado. Por ejemplo, en Europa existen 106 líneas telefónicas por cada 100 habitantes (EuroStat, 2014).

A pesar de los numerosos beneficios de las TIC (Abeele & DeCock, 2012; Livingstone, 2008) su rápido y constante crecimiento también ha traído consigo perjuicios (Cabello, 2013; Sahin, 2010), especialmente para los jóvenes y menores, derivados de las nuevas formas de violencia que surgen de la utilización de estas tecnologías, como es el caso del «sexting» (difusión de imágenes de contenido sexual o erótico), el «grooming» (acoso sexual a menores) o el ciberacoso, entre otras (Delegación del Gobierno para la violencia de género, 2013). El ciberacoso es uno de los efectos negativos asociado al mal uso de las TIC que más fuerza está tomando en nuestra sociedad (BurgessProctor, Patchin & Hinduja, 2009; Microsoft, 2009; Ortega & al., 2008; Tejedor y Pulido, 2012). Se puede definir como una forma de intimidación, acoso y malos tratos por parte de un individuo o grupo hacia otro, implicando el uso de medios tecnológicos como canal de agresión (Ortega & al., 2008; Smith & al., 2008). En la misma línea, otros autores utilizan el término para referirse a cualquier forma de intimidación u hostilidad a través de las TIC (Belsey, 2005), o a una forma de agresión social online (Willard, 2004). Entre las conductas que puede realizar la persona agresora se encuentran el envío y difusión de mensajes ofensivos o vulgares, el envío de mensajes amenazantes, la difusión de rumores sobre la víctima, la violación de intimidad, la exclusión social, o la suplantación de la identidad (Willard, 2005).

En la actualidad, tanto los estudios internacionales como los llevados a cabo en España, muestran la existencia de este tipo de agresiones en adolescentes (DelRey, Casas & Ortega, 2012; FélixMateo, SorianoFerrer, GodoyMesas & SanchoVicente, 2010; Garaigordobil, 2011; Ortega & al., 2012) y que se produce fundamentalmente a través de dos vías: el teléfono móvil e Internet (Buelga, Cava & Musitu, 2010). Así por ejemplo, investigadores como Price y Dalgleish (2010) cifran la implicación de los adolescentes en ciberacoso entre el 20% y el 50%. En España, trabajos como los de Buelga y otros (2010), Cava, Musitu, y Murgui (2007), Ortega y colaboradores (2008), Calvete, Orue, Estévez, Villardón y Padilla (2010), Bringué y Sádaba (2009), Del Río, Sádaba y Bringué (2010) también reflejan porcentajes similares de implicación. En este sentido, un estudio transnacional realizado en Europa sobre ciberacoso informa de que el 29% de los adolescentes afirma haber sido víctima de ciberacoso (Microsoft, 2009). En los jóvenes, este fenómeno se ha comenzado a estudiar tímidamente en otros países (Dilmac, 2009), quedando al margen en España los estudios en población juvenil.

Un aspecto al que se le ha prestado poca atención incluso en los estudios realizados con muestras de jóvenes en otros países es al análisis del ciberacoso en el ámbito de las relaciones de noviazgo. Las TIC constituyen un elemento importante de las relaciones entre los jóvenes en general, y de las relaciones íntimas en particular, haciéndolos más susceptibles de ser controlados y agredidos por sus parejas (Burke, Wallen, VailSmith & Knox, 2011). Algunos estudios así lo muestran. Por ejemplo, Spitzberg (2002) puso de manifiesto que al menos la mitad de los jóvenes que habían sufrido ciberacoso identificaban a su pareja como la persona acosadora. Alexy, Burgess, Baker y Smoyak (2005) mostraban que entre los jóvenes que con mayor frecuencia solían acosar tecnológicamente a otro destacaba la pareja íntima. En la revisión realizada no se han encontrado estudios que analicen ciberacoso en relaciones de noviazgo de jóvenes en España. Por ello, para ampliar la literatura al respecto en este trabajo analizamos la incidencia del fenómeno en relaciones de noviazgo en una muestra compuesta por jóvenes universitarios, describiendo los niveles de victimización y de ciberacoso a través del teléfono móvil y de Internet. Aunque podría estudiarse el ciberacoso sin distinguir a través de qué medio se realiza, entendemos que la telefonía móvil va más allá del mero acceso a Internet por lo que, siguiendo estudios previos, optamos por analizar la implicación en este fenómeno tanto a través del teléfono móvil como de Internet (Buelga & al., 2010).

Otro aspecto a tener presente en el estudio del ciberacoso son las diferencias de género ya que los resultados al respecto no son concluyentes. Así, mientras que algunos trabajos no encuentran un nexo estadístico entre ciberacoso y género (Finn, 2004), otros si lo encuentran (Li, 2006) y apuntan a que los chicos (en comparación con las chicas) suelen ser los que cometen más actos de ciberacoso, y las chicas (en comparación con los chicos) suelen ser las víctimas mayoritarias de este tipo de violencia (BurgessProctor & al., 2009; Calvete & al., 2010; Estévez & al., 2010; FélixMateo & al., 2010; Finn & Banach, 2000). Por ello, el segundo objetivo de este trabajo es analizar las diferencias de género en el ciberacoso que tiene lugar en el contexto de las relaciones de noviazgo de una muestra compuesta por jóvenes universitarios. A tenor de los estudios mencionados previamente sobre victimización y ciberacoso en adolescentes, se espera encontrar que un mayor porcentaje de chicas que de chicos universitarios informe haber sido cibervictimizadas por sus parejas durante el último año (hipótesis 1) y que un mayor porcentaje de chicos que de chicas informe haber acosado tecnológicamente a su pareja durante el último año (hipótesis 2).

Finalmente, uno de los aspectos que más concentra los esfuerzos investigadores sobre el fenómeno en adolescentes tiene que ver con los factores relacionados con la implicación en el ciberacoso (Sticca, Ruggieri, Alsaker & Perren, 2013). Algunos estudios (Elipe, Ortega, Hunter & DelRey, 2012; Estévez & al., 2010) han señalado que la cibervictimización se relaciona con la implicación en el ciberacoso como agresor. También los estudios sobre bullying en contextos tradicionales han mostrado la relación entre haber sido víctima de bullying y el ejercicio del mismo (Avilés & al., 2011; Rodkin & Berger, 2008; Romera, DelRey & Ortega, 2011). Dada la relevancia de esta variable, y la inexistencia de su estudio en población joven, el tercer objetivo de este estudio es analizar la relación entre haber sido victimizado por la pareja a través del teléfono móvil o de Internet y la implicación en el ciberacoso como agresor a través del mismo medio. En este sentido, y basándonos en la literatura previa sobre adolescentes, esperamos que aquellos y aquellas jóvenes que han sido victimizados a través del teléfono móvil por su pareja informen de mayores niveles de ciberacoso hacia la misma a través de este medio que aquellos/as que no han sido victimizados por su pareja (hipótesis 3). Del mismo modo, aquellos/as jóvenes victimizados a través de Internet por su pareja informarán de mayores niveles de ciberacoso hacia ésta a través de este medio que aquellos/as que no han sido victimizados a través de Internet (hipótesis 4).

2. Material y métodos

2.1. Participantes

La muestra estuvo formada por 336 estudiantes de primer curso de las titulaciones de Educación Primaria, Psicología y Periodismo de la Universidad de Sevilla, 180 mujeres y 155 hombres, de edades comprendidas entre 18 y 30 años (M=20,67; DT=4,26), donde se aplicó un muestreo por conveniencia. Todos manifestaron tener una orientación heterosexual y participaron voluntariamente sin recibir ninguna contraprestación por ello.

2.2. Instrumentos

Se empleó el método inductivodeductivo con un tratamiento de los datos y un enfoque cuantitativo. Se aplicó un cuestionario que recogía la siguiente información:

Datos sociodemográficos (edad, sexo, orientación sexual, curso, titulación).

Frecuencia de victimización y ciberacoso en las relaciones de noviazgo a través del teléfono móvil e Internet durante el último año. Para recabar esta información se emplearon las cuatro siguientes escalas:

Escalas de ciberacoso a través del teléfono móvil y de Internet. Para medir el ciberacoso hacia la pareja durante el último año a través de la telefonía móvil e Internet nos basamos en la escala de victimización entre iguales que ha demostrado tener adecuadas propiedades psicométricas (Buelga & al., 2010; Cava & al., 2007), ajustando la redacción a las relaciones de noviazgo. Tanto la medida de ciberacoso hacia la pareja a través del teléfono móvil, como la de ciberacoso a través de Internet, presentaban una escala de respuesta de cuatro puntos, siendo 1 (nunca), 2 (algunas veces), 3 (bastantes veces) y 4 (muchas veces). Ejemplos de ítems de la primera escala son: «He insultado o ridiculizado con mensajes o llamadas a través del teléfono móvil a mi pareja», «He contado mentiras o rumores falsos sobre mi pareja a través del teléfono móvil». Ejemplos de ítems de la escala de ciberacoso a través de Internet son: «He insultado o ridiculizado a través de Internet a mi pareja», «He contado mentiras o rumores falsos sobre mi pareja a través de Internet». La consistencia interna para ambas escala fue satisfactoria, siendo a=0,75 para la escala de ciberacoso a través del teléfono móvil, y a=0,75 para la escala de ciberacoso a través de Internet.

Escalas de victimización a través del teléfono móvil y de Internet. Para medir el ciberacoso experimentado, tanto por hombres como por mujeres, por parte de sus parejas durante el último año a través del teléfono móvil y de Internet nos basamos en la «Escala de victimización entre iguales, utilizada y validada en contexto español (Buelga & al., 2010; Cava & al., 2007) (a= 0.76 y a=0.84, respectivamente), ajustando la redacción a las relaciones de noviazgo. Estos ítems presentaban una escala de respuesta de cuatro puntos, siendo 1 (nunca), 2 (algunas veces), 3 (bastantes veces) y 4 (muchas veces). Ejemplos de ítems que evalúan la victimización sufrida a través del teléfono móvil en las relaciones de noviazgo son: «mi pareja me ha insultado o ridiculizado con mensajes o llamadas a través del teléfono móvil», «mi pareja ha contado mentiras o rumores falsos sobre mí a través del teléfono móvil». Ejemplos de ítems que miden la victimización sufrida por parte de la pareja a través de Internet son: «mi pareja me ha insultado o ridiculizado a través de Internet», «mi pareja ha contado mentiras o rumores falsos sobre mí a través de Internet». La consistencia interna para la escala de victimización a través del teléfono móvil fue de a=0,62, mientras que la consistencia interna para la escala de victimización a través de Internet fue de a=0,70.

2.3. Diseño

El diseño de la investigación fue de tipo no experimental, en concreto se trata de un diseño de tipo transversal correlacional.

2.4. Procedimiento

Los participantes contestaron el cuestionario en sus clases, garantizándoles su privacidad y el anonimato de las respuestas. En primer lugar contestaron las cuestiones sociodemográficas, seguidamente las escalas de victimización y ciberacoso en las relaciones de noviazgo y, al finalizar, recibían un resumen acerca de los principales objetivos del estudio.

3. Análisis y resultados

Los datos se analizaron con el paquete estadístico SPSS (versión 18). Para analizar los niveles de victimización y de ciberacoso, es decir quiénes habían recibido o emitido algunas de las conductas descritas anteriormente en su relación de noviazgo durante el último año a través del teléfono móvil y de Internet, se realizaron análisis de frecuencias. Posteriormente, se realizó una comparación de medias entre las puntuaciones de victimización y ciberacoso por parte de la pareja a través de las nuevas tecnologías, en función del género. A continuación, se calculó el coeficiente de correlación de Pearson en las variables objeto de interés en este estudio (victimización a través del teléfono móvil, victimización a través de Internet, ciberacoso a través del teléfono móvil, ciberacoso a través de Internet). Finalmente, se llevaron a cabo análisis de regresión jerárquica con objeto de conocer la influencia de la victimización y del género en la implicación en el ciberacoso hacia la pareja a través de ambas tecnologías.

3.1. Frecuencia de victimización y ciberacoso en las relaciones de noviazgo a través del teléfono móvil e Internet

En las tablas 1 y 2 se presentan los niveles de victimización y ciberacoso informados por la muestra. Los resultados muestran que, durante el último año, el 57,2% de la muestra informan haber sido victimizados por sus parejas a través del teléfono móvil y el 27,4% mediante Internet. En lo relativo a los datos de ciberacoso hacia la pareja, los resultados muestran que el 47,6% informa haber utilizado el teléfono móvil para acosar a su pareja, mientras que el 14% utilizó Internet.


Draft Content 115825552-32651 ov-es070.jpg


Draft Content 115825552-32651 ov-es071.jpg

3.2. Diferencias de género en victimización y ciberacoso en las relaciones de noviazgo a través del teléfono móvil e Internet

Se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas en función del género, tanto en la victimización sufrida como en el ejercicio del ciberacoso a través del teléfono móvil e Internet (tabla 3). Los resultados muestran que los hombres informaron de una mayor victimización que las mujeres por parte de sus parejas, tanto a través del teléfono móvil como a través de Internet. Respecto a las diferencias en función del género en las conductas de ciberacoso, los hombres informaron de una mayor perpetración de ciberacoso que las mujeres hacia sus parejas, tanto a través del teléfono móvil como de Internet.


Draft Content 115825552-32651 ov-es072.jpg

3.3. Relación entre victimización y ciberacoso en las relaciones de noviazgo a través del teléfono móvil y de Internet

Se observó una alta asociación entre estar involucrado en conductas de victimización y ciberacoso en las relaciones de noviazgo, tanto a través del teléfono móvil (r=.57; p<0,01) como de Internet (r =.47; p<0,01). Para analizar la influencia de la victimización y del género en la implicación en el ciberacoso hacia la pareja a través de ambas tecnologías se realizó un análisis de regresión jerárquica para cada tipo de ciberacoso (ciberacoso a través del teléfono móvil y ciberacoso a través de Internet). Previamente a los análisis, y siguiendo las indicaciones de Jaccard, Turirsi y Wan (1990), todas las variables continuas fueron centradas.

El primer análisis de regresión se realizó con objeto de explicar las conductas de ciberacoso de la muestra de universitarios hacia la pareja a través del teléfono móvil (tabla 4). En el primer paso se introdujeron las variables Victimización por Móvil y Género, y en el segundo paso, la interacción entre estas variables. Este análisis mostró un efecto principal de la variable Victimización por Móvil, (ß=0,56, t=12,21, p<0,001). A mayores niveles de victimización a través del teléfono móvil, mayores niveles de ciberacoso hacia la pareja a través del teléfono móvil. Este efecto debe ser interpretado teniendo en cuenta la interacción de segundo orden que se produjo entre las variables Victimización por Móvil y Género (ß=0,24, t=3,46, p< 0,001) (figura 1).

Analizando esta interacción obtenemos que, en el caso de aquellas personas que no habían sido victimizadas por su pareja a través del teléfono móvil, no se encontraron diferencias entre el ciberacoso que hombres y mujeres perpetraron a través del teléfono móvil a su pareja, (ß=0,15, t=1,86, p=n.s.). Sin embargo, cuando se trataba de personas que habían sido victimizadas por su pareja a través del teléfono móvil, los hombres en comparación con las mujeres, informaron de mayores niveles de ciberacoso hacia sus parejas a través del teléfono móvil (ß=0,21, t=3,03, p<0,01).


Draft Content 115825552-32651 ov-es073.jpg


Draft Content 115825552-32651 ov-es074.jpg

Figura 1. Relación entre la victimización a través del teléfono móvil y el ciberacoso hacia la pareja en las relaciones de noviazgo a través del teléfono móvil en función del género de los participantes.

El segundo análisis de regresión se llevó a cabo sobre las conductas de ciberacoso hacia la pareja a través de Internet (tabla 5). En el primer paso se introdujeron las variables Victimización por Internet y Género, y en el segundo paso, la interacción entre estas variables. Este análisis mostró un efecto principal de la variable Victimización por Internet, (ß=0,46, t=9,41, p<0,001). A mayores niveles de victimización a través de Internet, mayores niveles de ciberacoso dirigidos hacia la pareja a través de Internet. Este efecto debe ser interpretado teniendo en cuenta la interacción de segundo orden que se produjo entre las variables Victimización por Internet y Género (ß= 0,38, t=6,02, p<0,001) (figura2).

Analizando la interacción obtenemos que en el caso de las personas que no habían sido víctimas de ciberacoso a través de Internet por parte de sus parejas, no existían diferencias entre los niveles de ciberacoso que hombres y mujeres informaban haber dirigido hacia sus parejas a través de Internet, (ß=0,08, t=1,15, p=n.s.). Sin embargo, cuando los participantes habían sido victimizados a través de Internet por su pareja, los hombres informaban mayores niveles de ciberacoso a sus parejas a través de Internet que las mujeres (ß= 0,18, t=2,20, p<0,05).


Draft Content 115825552-32651 ov-es075.jpg


Draft Content 115825552-32651 ov-es076.jpg

Figura 2. Relación entre la victimización a través de Internet y el ciberacoso hacia la pareja en las relaciones de noviazgo a través de Internet en función del género de los participantes.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Este trabajo analiza las conductas de victimización y ciberacoso a través del teléfono móvil y de Internet en las relaciones de noviazgo de una muestra compuesta por jóvenes universitarios. Con ello, se ha contribuido a la ampliación de la literatura existente desde una triple perspectiva: en primer lugar el trabajo se centra en los jóvenes, lo que complementa los estudios existentes, que en España se han centrado principalmente en la población adolescente; en segundo lugar, analiza el ciberacoso entre jóvenes que mantienen una relación de noviazgo, ampliando la información existente en otros trabajos centrados en relaciones entre iguales y en contextos escolares; por último, analiza el rol del género y de la relación entre haber sido victimizado previamente por la pareja a través de estas tecnologías y la implicación en el ciberacoso como agresor.

Respecto a los niveles de victimización y ciberacoso, los resultados obtenidos muestran que un 57,2% de los participantes manifiesta haber sido victimizado por el móvil y un 27,4% a través de Internet, mientras que un 47,6% manifiesta haber ejercido ciberacoso a través del móvil y un 14% a través de Internet. Estos resultados suponen un apoyo a los de otros estudios internacionales (Alexy & al., 2005; Burke & al., 2011), que ponen de manifiesto la presencia de este tipo de comportamientos hacia la pareja en jóvenes universitarios a través de las nuevas tecnologías, y amplían la literatura existente sobre ciberacoso al documentar este fenómeno en una muestra compuesta por jóvenes universitarios españoles.

Por lo que respecta a las diferencias de género, en las conductas de victimización en las relaciones de noviazgo los chicos, en contra de lo esperado en la Hipótesis 1, informaron de mayores niveles de victimización por parte de sus parejas que las chicas, tanto a través del teléfono móvil como de Internet. Por el contrario, en el caso de las conductas de ciberacoso, los chicos informaron de mayores niveles de ciberacoso hacia su pareja durante el último año, tanto a través del teléfono móvil como de Internet, apoyando así la hipótesis 2 de este trabajo. Estos últimos resultados irían en la línea de los informados por recientes estudios con población adolescente (Buelga & al., 2010; Calvete & al. 2010; Elipe & al., 2012; Estévez & al., 2010; FélizMateo & al., 2010; Finn & Banach, 2000), que ponen de manifiesto que los chicos realizan más conductas de ciberacoso que las chicas, ampliando la información existente al realizarse este trabajo con una muestra de población de más edad (jóvenes) y en un contexto relacional diferente (relaciones de noviazgo). No obstante, estos estudios también suelen situar a las adolescentes como las víctimas mayoritarias de las conductas de ciberacoso por parte de los adolescentes (BurguessProctor & al., 2009), mientras que en nuestro estudio son los chicos los que informaron de una mayor cibervictimización, lo que se muestra en la misma dirección de algunos trabajos más recientes realizados con jóvenes en otros países (Burke & al., 2011).

En cuanto a la relación entre haber sido victimizado por la pareja a través del teléfono móvil o de Internet y la implicación en el ciberacoso como agresor a través del mismo medio, se observan dos efectos principales que muestran apoyo a las hipótesis 3 y 4 de este estudio, respectivamente. Sin embargo, estos efectos deben ser interpretados considerando los efectos de interacción junto al género de los participantes. Se encontró que en comparación con las chicas, los chicos que manifestaban haber sido victimizados a través del teléfono móvil por sus parejas eran los que informaban haber dirigido más conductas de ciberacoso hacia sus parejas a través del teléfono móvil. De manera similar, el ciberacoso hacia la pareja a través de Internet se veía influido por la victimización a través de Internet en interacción con el género. Los chicos, en comparación con las chicas, que habían sido victimizados por sus parejas a través de Internet eran los que informaban haber dirigido mayores niveles de acoso hacia sus parejas a través de este medio. Los resultados de este trabajo señalan la victimización sufrida por el miembro agresor como una variable relevante en el ejercicio del ciberacoso hacia la pareja, es decir, estos hallazgos resaltan la figura del agresor victimizado. Los resultados suponen un apoyo a aquellos estudios que así lo han sugerido tanto en el caso del ciberacoso (Elipe & al., 2012), como del bullying tradicional (Avilés & al., 2011; Rodkin & Berger, 2008; Romera & al., 2011; Sticca & al., 2013) y reafirman la necesidad de considerar la victimización como una variable importante en estudios que analicen la implicación en el ciberacoso.

Estos resultados podrían estar indicando una forma diferente de reaccionar entre chicos y chicas a las conductas de ciberacoso que tienen lugar en las relaciones de noviazgo, y abren interesantes preguntas tanto para la investigación teórica como aplicada. Por ejemplo, analizar si ante una situación de acoso tecnológico en el noviazgo, los chicos tenderían a reaccionar en mayor medida que las chicas implicándose en conductas de ciberacoso, mientras que las chicas tenderían en mayor medida a ignorar o a no responder con este tipo de conductas, o si por el contrario lo que puede estar reflejando este dato es un modo distinto de percibir las conductas de ciberacoso por parte de chicos y chicas. Es decir, ¿están sobreestimando los chicos su estatus de víctima o son las chicas las que lo subestiman? En cualquier caso las respuestas a estos interrogantes permitirán una mayor comprensión de las diferencias de género en el fenómeno. En este sentido, sería de gran utilidad incluir en investigaciones futuras instrumentos de evaluación que permitan una recogida de información cualitativa que aporte un mayor nivel de explicación sobre los resultados obtenidos.

Este estudio presenta algunas limitaciones. El estudio ha analizado el ciberacoso en relaciones de noviazgo en una muestra de jóvenes universitarios, por lo que futuras investigaciones podrían complementar estos resultados analizando el fenómeno en jóvenes sin estudios universitarios. Además se podrían tener en cuenta otras variables no analizadas como la influencia en el ciberacoso hacia la pareja del ciberacoso o del bullying tradicional sufrido por los jóvenes por parte de otras personas como amigos, compañeros o desconocidos.

En definitiva, este estudio ofrece aportaciones novedosas al aproximarse al análisis del ciberacoso en un grupo de mayor edad (jóvenes) al considerado habitualmente en la literatura (adolescentes), en un contexto relacional diferente (relaciones de noviazgo) y aportando datos de estas características en contexto español. Los resultados sugieren una modernización en las formas de acoso hacia la pareja de la mano de los nuevos cambios tecnológicos que está experimentando nuestra sociedad. Además identifica factores que contribuyen a su ocurrencia, aportando información que puede ser de interés para futuras investigaciones e intervenciones orientadas a reducir su incidencia.

Referencias

Abeele, M.V. & De-Cock, R. (2012). Blind Faith in the Web? Internet Use and Empowerment among Visually and Hearing Impaired Adults: A Qualitative Study of Benefits and Barriers. Communications, 37 (2), 129-151. (DOI: 10.1515/commun-2012-0007).

Alexy, E.M., Burgess, A.W., Baker, T. & Smoyak, S.A. (2005). Perceptions of Cyberstalking among College Students. Brief Treatment and Crisis Intervention, 5, 279-289. (DOI: http://doi.org/b2hn7w).

Avilés, J.M., Irurtia, M.J., García-López, L.J. & Caballo, V. E. (2011). El maltrato entre iguales: bullying. Behavioral Psychology/Psicología Conductual, 19, 57-90.

Bautista, L. (2012). Los cambios en la web 2.0: una nueva sociabilidad. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 18, 121-128. (DOI: http://doi.org/vnv).

Belsey, B. (2005). Cyberbullying: An Emerging Threat to the «Always on» Generation. (http://goo.gl/9gyLqV) (10-06-2013).

Bernal, C. & Angulo, F. (2013). Interacciones de los jóvenes andaluces en las redes sociales. Comunicar, 40, 25-30. (DOI: http://doi.org/vnw).

Bringué, X. & Sádaba, C.H. (2009). La Generación Interactiva en España. Niños y adolescentes ante las pantallas. Resumen ejecutivo. (http://goo.gl/xpzLrS) (20-05-2013).

Buelga, S., Cava, M.J. & Musitu, G. (2010). Cyberbullying: Victimización entre adolescentes a través del teléfono móvil y de Internet. Psicothema, 22, 784-789.

Burgess-Proctor, A., Patchin, J.W. & Hinduja, S. (2009). Cyberbullying and Online Harassment: Reconceptualizing the Victimization of Adolescent Girls. In V. García & J. Clifford (Eds.), Female crime victims: Reality reconsidered (pp. 153-175). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Burke, S. C., Wallen, M., Vail-Smith, K. y Knox, D. (2011). Using Technology to Control Intimate Partners: An Exploratory Study of College Undergraduates. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 1162-1167. (DOI: http://doi.org/fmrxh2).

Cabello, P. (2013). A Qualitative Approach to the Use of ICTs and its Risks among Socially Disadvantaged Early Adolescents and Adolescents in Madrid, Spain. Communications. The European Journal of Communication Research, 38, 61-83. (DOI: http://doi.org/vnx).

Calvete, E., Orue, I., Estévez, A., Villardón, L. & Padilla, P. (2010). Cyberbullying in Adolescents: Modalities and Aggressors' Profile. Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 1128-1135. (DOI: http://doi.org/d74kfs).

Cava, M.J., Musitu, G. & Murgui, S. (2007). Individual and Social Risk Factors Related to Overt Victimization in a Sample of Spanish Adolescents. Psychological Reports, 101, 275-290. (DOI: http://doi.org/cdz4md).

Cuesta, U. (2012). Uso envolvente del móvil en jóvenes: propuesta de un modelo de análisis. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 18, 253-262. (DOI: http://doi.org/vnz).

Del-Rey, R., Casas, J.A. & Ortega, R. (2012). El programa ConRed, una práctica basada en la evidencia. Comunicar, 39, 129-138. (DOI: http://doi.org/vn2).

Del-Río, J., Sábada, C.H. & Bringué, X. (2010). Menores y redes ¿sociales?: de la amistad al cyberbullying. Revista de estudios de juventud, 88, 115-129.

Delegación del Gobierno para la violencia de género (2013). El ciberacoso como forma de ejercer la violencia de género en la juventud: Un riesgo en la sociedad de la información y del conocimiento. (http://goo.gl/RmnBYM) (05-02-2014).

Dilmac, B. (2009). Psychological Needs as a Predictor of Cyber Bullying: A Preliminary Report on College Students. Educational Sciences: Theory and Practice 9, 1307-1325.

Elipe, P., Ortega, R., Hunter, S.C. & Del-Rey, R. (2012). Inteligencia emocional percibida e implicación en diversos tipos de acoso escolar. Behavioral Psychology/Psicología Conductual, 20 (1), 169-181.

Estévez, A., Villardón, L., Calvete, E., Padilla, P. & Orue, I. (2010). Adolescentes víctimas de cyberbullying: prevalencia y características. Behavioral Psychology/Psicología Conductual, 18, 73-89.

Eurostat (2014). Information Society Statistics. (http://goo.gl/XPq60r) (10-09-2014).

Félix-Mateo, V., Soriano-Ferrer, M., Godoy-Mesas, C. & Sancho-Vicente, S. (2010). El ciberacoso en la enseñanza obligatoria. Aula Abierta, 38, 47-58. (DOI: http://hdl.handle.net/11162/5058).

Finn, J. & Banach, M. (2000). Victimization Online: The Downside of Seeking Human Services for Women on the Internet. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 3, 785-797.

Finn, J. (2004). A survey of Online Harassment at a University Campus. Journal of Interpersonal Violence 19, 468-483. (DOI: http://doi.org/b5ktpg).

Garaigordobil, M. (2011). Prevalencia y consecuencias del cyberbullying: Una revisión. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 11, 233-254.

Jaccard, J., Turirsi, R. & Wan, C.K. (1990). Interaction Effects in Multiple Regression. London: Sage.

Li, Q. (2006). Cyberbullying in Schools: A Research of Gender Differences. School Psychology International 27, 157-170. (DOI: http://doi.org/ckhnvd).

Livingstone, S. (2008). Taking Risky Opportunities in Youthful Content Creation: Teenagers´use of Social Networking Sites for Intimacy, Privacy and Self-expression. New Media and Society, 10, 393-411. (DOI: http://doi.org/btc7kw).

Livingstone, S. y Haddon, L. (2009). EU Kids Online: Final Report. (http://goo.gl/4FKvPZ) (20-05-2013).

Martínez-Pecino, R., Delerue, A. & Silva, P. (2013). Portuguese Older People and the Internet: Interaction, Uses, Motivations, and Obstacles. Communications. The European Journal of Communication Research, 38 (4), 331-346. (DOI: 10.1515/commun-2013-0020).

Microsoft (2009). 29% of European Teenagers Are Victims of Online Bullying. (http://goo.gl/lYfpOK) (20-05-2013).

Ortega, R., Calmaestra, J. & Mora-Merchán, J.A. (2008). Cyberbullying. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 8, 183-192. (DOI: http://doi.org/c63ptq).

Ortega, R., Elipe, P., Mora-Merchán, J.A., Genta, M.L., Brighi, A., Guarini, A., Smith, P.K. & al. (2012). The Emotional Impact of Bullying and Cyberbullying on Victims: A European Cross-national Study. Aggressive Behavior, 38(5), 342-56. (DOI: 10.1002/ab.21440).

Price, M. & Dalgleish, J. (2010). Cyberbullying. Experiences, Impacts and Coping Strategies as Described by Australian Young People. Youth Studies Australia, 29, 51-59.

Rodkin, P.C. & Berger, C. (2008). Who Bullies Whom? Social Status Asymmetries by Victim Gender. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 32, 473-485. (DOI: http://doi.org/fhsbw6).

Romera, E.M., Del-Rey, R. & Ortega, R. (2011). Factores asociados a la implicación en bullying: Un estudio en Nicaragua. Psychosocial Intervention, 20, 161-170. (DOI: http://doi.org/df7m9g).

Sahin, M. (2010). Teachers' Perceptions of Bullying in High Schools: A Turkish study. Social Behavior and Personality, 38 (1), 127-142. (DOI: http://doi.org/bjpjzd).

Smith, P.K., Mahdavi, J. & al. (2008). Cyberbullying, its Forms and Impact on Secondary School Pupils. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49, 376-385. (DOI: http://doi.org/df2hqf).

Spitzberg, B.H. (2002). The Tactical Topography of Stalking Victimization and Management. Trauma Violence Abuse, 3, 261-288. (DOI: http://doi.org/ckg3sx).

Sticca, F., Ruggieri, S., Alsaker, F. & Perren, S. (2013). Longitudinal Risk Factors for Cyberbullying in Adolescence. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 23, 52-67.

Tejedor, S. & Pulido, C. (2012). Retos y riesgos del uso de Internet por parte de los menores. ¿Cómo empoderarlos? Comunicar, 39, 65-72. (DOI: http://doi.org/tkb).

Willard, N. (2004). I Can’t See You – You Can’t See Me: How the Use of Information and Communication Technologies Can Impact Responsible Behavior. (http://goo.gl/S4daAU) (05-06-2013).

Willard, N. (2005). Educator’s Guide to Cyberbullying and Cyberthreats. (http://goo.gl/x1zjxj) (05-06-2013).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/14
Accepted on 31/12/14
Submitted on 31/12/14

Volume 23, Issue 1, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C44-2015-17
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 23
Views 3
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?