Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This paper aims to measure a population’s level of knowledge and active use of certain digital tools that play a primary role in developing their media literacy. To achieve it, an Online Digital Literacy test was designed to measure the knowledge and active usage of 45 different online software packages. This tool works as a reliable indicator to identify a population’s media literacy development in terms of its linguistic and technological dimensions. More than 1,500 subjects of different gender, age and level of studies were tested in different cities within the autonomous community of Castilla and León in Spain, to measure their competence using these tools. The resulting data has enabled the identification of the level differences between age groups and gender and to formulate proposals in respect of digital literacy to enhance the public’s competence in terms of media education. The general results indicate that people’s Online Digital Literacy level is lower than ideal and that there is a level divide in relation to gender and age and that the average user has a social and recreational profile as a consumer of pre-existing content on the Internet rather than as manager, instigator or creator of his or her own content. This paper’s conclusions therefore raise awareness of these deficiencies and encourage academic institutions to design specific digital literacy educational programmes to help citizens become media empowered.

Download the PDF version

1. Digital literacy as linguistic and technological dimensions of media competence

Following many years of debate around terminology it now appears unquestionable that media education should encompass a series of literacies that go beyond the simple acquisition of the long-desired digital competence; but competence in the areas opened up by the digital era still remains, to some extent, one of the fundamental pillars on which educommunication rests in the XXI century. We are surrounded by a plethora of «umbrella concepts» characterised by the diversity of their perspectives and a multitude of definitions (Koltay, 2011). As a result, in this article it has been decided to refer to «education» as the process, «literacy» as the result and «competence» as the set of skills that must be developed to achieve the result. Furthermore, the label «digital» refers to any aspect that relates specifically to the digital environment and «media» refers to the wider field of educommunication. However, as Gutiérrez & Tyner (2012: 37) suggest, «if we concern ourselves more with identifying the differences between «media education» and «digital competence» than attempting to reconcile them we will only dilute our efforts and may even generate greater conflict». To some extent this was the policy adopted by UNESCO in 2011 in an attempt to reconcile traditionally conflicting viewpoints when they opted to use the term «media and information literacy» (MIL).

When placing this current study in context it is impossible not to refer to Ferrés & Piscitelli (2012: 75-82) and their assertion that media competence has six core features: language, technology, production and dissemination processes, reception and interaction processes, ideology and values and the aesthetic dimension.

Although, to some extent, it inhabits every one of these dimensions, digital literacy relates directly to two of them in particular, the linguistic and the technological dimensions; linguistic in terms of everything related to codes, means and languages that comprise the digital information at our disposal and technology in terms of the ability to manipulate the tools (software or hardware) which give us access to this information. According to Dornaletche (2013) we can talk of «off-screen literacy» and «on-screen literacy». At the same time, whatever appears «on screen» can be subdivided between what happens online and offline. Everything relating to the offline use of media is constantly reducing as the tendency is towards a permanent online digital experience. It is therefore these digital tools that enable us to engage with different forms of a «participation culture» such as membership of user communities (Facebook), the generation of new forms of creative expression (mash ups), the development of knowledge through collaboration (Wikipedia) or the diffusion of and access to new information streams (blogging and podcasting) (Jenkins, 2009).

It is important to clarify that this study did not intend to concentrate solely on this online experience, on that part of digital literacy that resides «on screen» and at the same time «on the net». In this article this will be referred to as «online digital literacy», not from a desire to add yet another label to a technological feature that often creates confusion but rather to provide the focus for this study and construct a framework for the array of digital tools mentioned throughout the paper.

Despite its concentration on a particular element of digital literacy, this study tries to avoid the pitfall of reducing the concept of media education to the development of digital competence in its «most technological and instrumental dimension» (Gutiérrez & Tyner, 2012: 38). Instead it aims to explore in depth one fundamental aspect which has a significant effect on two of its dimensions (language and technology) without ignoring the very real importance of the other four dimensions. To this extent the present paper strongly supports the «need for interdisciplinarity in educommunication» (Gozálvez & Contreras, 2014: 13). The authors believe that studies such as the current one, focused on user behaviour around new and constantly evolving digital tools, should be compatible with studies concerned with empowering users based on a more ethical, shared and integral concept of media education. This approach entails more than the development of a series of practical skills or a call for additional creativity (Buckingham, 2010) and emphasises the need to acquire «mental habits, knowledge, skills and competencies required to be successful in the XXI century» (Hobbs 2010: 51). It is acknowledged that some tools included within this study, such as social networks, «do not always guarantee a conscious and enriching use of communication systems and media to promote intelligent exchanges» (García-Matilla, 2010: 167) and we therefore believe that the study of the knowledge and active use of these digital items should not conflict with the «desire for permanent construction and reconstruction of critical thinking» (García-Matilla, 2010: 168) which the educommunication tradition has always followed.

Finally, based on the current state of research into the field of media education, it would be wrong to omit mention of the increasing contributions coming from the field of neuroscience, which indicate how vital it is that «the ability to exploit the instruments is accompanied by an ability to deal with the mind, both one’s own and other peoples» (Ferrés, 2014: 239).

2. Opening the door to users with new profiles

An initial investigation of the issues confirmed how terms such as Google, Facebook, Whatsapp, Instagram, etc., have changed our lives, not only in terms of digital-media but also with regard to classic reading-writing literacy, as hardly a day passes without us reading or using some of the names of the digital products included within this article. «We can now Google» things and we have abbreviations to express ourselves more easily, such as «LOL» (laugh out loud), or «OMG» (Oh my God!). New technologies have also delivered new words such as iPhone, iPad or Droid (De-Abreu, 2010: 1). In the case of Wikipedia it represents «a living book which becomes more intelligent and comprehensive every day, thanks to the informally coordinated actions of millions of human beings across the planet» (Johnson, 2013: 222). No-one talks these days about «message Servers», «instant messaging applications» or «social networks», but only about Gmail, Whatsapp and Facebook. It is therefore essential to create a system of categorisation for this array of constantly evolving digital tools to establish a list of items covering these brand names and specific software products to enable identification of their current usage among the public. «The Internet provides a range of digital tools and information distribution networks which enable people to join together in new forms of collective activity. Communities now exist for the creation and sharing of knowledge (Wikipedia), culture (YouTube, Flickr, the blogosphere), tools (free and open code software), markets (e-Bay, Craigslist), education (Open Educational Resources), journalism (citizens journalism) and political organisations (meetups, netroots activism, smart mobs)» (Rheingold, 2008: 25). Furthermore, but without wishing to focus too greatly on the experiential ground, this paper proposes a way in which this categorisation and list of items can develop in the future to measure digital literacy in new ways without being subject to categories or items fixed in time.

The dimensions of media literacy mentioned above (Ferrés & Piscitelli, 2012: 75-82) are not only there to establish a simple classification of indicators but each of them develops its own content through two areas of participation: the area of «analysis» and the area of «expression». The area of analysis relates to those people that «receive messages and interact with them», whilst the area of expression concerns those that actually «create messages», taking into account that for many years «the creation of content has become easier than ever and a single technology can be used to both send and receive information» (Livingstone, 2004: 8). This reflects the traditional division between users that are just receivers and those that, faced with the opportunities available today, go one step further and could be called «emirecs» (Cloutier, 1973), «prosumers» (Toffler, 1980), «interlocutors» or indeed given some other appropriate label. However, based on the results obtained from the ADO test, it was considered important to analyse further this customary differentiation between media users to ask if these days we can talk about new types of profiles, beyond those of consumers and prosumers, or whether, as a result of the developing processes of interaction with messages, we can establish any new profiles either within the «area of analysis» or the «area of interaction».

If digital literacy conforms to a central axis of what we call media education or, in the words of UNESCO, media and information literacy, then significant importance should be given to research that explores the assortment of new digital tools that erupt into the media panorama on a daily basis and which change in an instant our most rooted communication habits and formats.

3. Objectives, hypotheses and methodology

An instrument was designed for this study with the aim of measuring people’s knowledge and their active use of a range of online digital literacy items. The items related to a set of programmes concerned with searching, creating and disseminating digital messages through the Internet. The results of this Online Digital Literacy test (ODL test) were used to develop specific educational proposals with the aim of empowering those sections of the population that need it most to control the digital tools they are least competent with.

The ODL test comprised three modules. The first included the socio-demographic variables; age, gender and highest qualification level, together with the question «Have you ever used the Internet?». The second module contained 45 items relating to the use and knowledge of specific digital tools. Finally, the third module comprised two questions: one about their main reasons for using the Internet (preferred online activities) and the other about the ways they learned how to use the Internet.

Five discussion groups were created to determine the 45 items that would go into the second and third modules of the ODL test. Each discussion group comprised eight students from each of the different year groups on the Advertising and Public Relations Degree courses of the University of Valladolid (Spain) at the María Zambrano Campus in Segovia. The decision to involve students in the groups was based a priori on the fact that they represent one of the segments of society that is most active on the Internet and, consequently, have a higher level of competence in using online digital literacy items. The objective for each group was to determine a range of basic activities for an Internet user with average knowledge of the Internet. The five groups identified 15 categories of activities: browsers (access to Internet), operating systems (a basic tool enabling access to Internet), search engines (for locating information), E-mail (messaging tool), telecommunications (calls and messaging), mobile devices (devices for accessing the Internet), social networks (information sharing, meeting people, promoting events), video (watching, editing and sharing videos online), photos (viewing, editing and sharing images online), music (listening to and sharing music), servers (storing and sharing information), web/blog creation (producing and managing content), downloads (downloading files), online fiction (watching films or TV series for free), and shopping (buying and selling). The third module contained open questions and the responses were codified according to the predominant responses received. The main uses of the Internet were determined as: communicating, keeping up to date with information, accessing entertainment and for learning. In terms of learning how to use Internet the responses were: being self-taught, taking a course or being shown by friends or family. The primary activities undertaken on the Internet were considered to be: social networking, communication, chat, forums, E-mail, work, videogames, specialised information, downloads, watching and listening online, shopping and pornography.

Next, three items or tools were identified for each category in the second module: 1) Search engines were represented by Google, Bing and Altavista, 2) Browsers by Explorer, Chrome and Firefox; 3) Telecommunications by Skype, Viber and Whatsapp; 4) Video by YouTube, Vimeo and Dailymotion; 5) Photos by Flickr, Picassa and Instagram, 6) Servers by Megaupload, Dropbox and Hotfile; 7) Downloads by Taringa, JDownloader and uTorrent; 8) E-mail by Gmail, Hotmail and Yahoo; 9) Creation of web/blogs by Blogger, Wordpress and Wix; 10) Shopping by Ebay, Paypal and Amazon; 11) Music by Spotify, iTunes and Soundcloud; 12) Social networks by Facebook, Twitter and Tuenti; 13) Operating systems by Mac, Windows and Linux; 14) Mobile devices by e-book, iPad and Samsung Galaxy and finally 15) Online Fiction by Cinetube, Peliculasyonkis and Divxonline. The order of the items on the questionnaire was random to prevent any patterns in the responses.

The respondents were asked whether or not they knew of each item and if they actively used it. The responses were categorised using a Likert type scale with three values: 0 if they did not know of it; 1 if they knew of it and what it was used for but did not use it themselves; and 2 if they knew of it and used it themselves. This scale was used to categorise the responses in the simplest way possible so they could be fully exploited. The highest score that any item in each category could score was 6, so, based on the 15 categories, the ODL test had a maximum score of 90 points. The minimum value any item could achieve was 0 (no competence); 1 (low level competence); 2 (low to average competence); 3 (average competence); 4 (average to high competence); 5 (high level competence); and 6 (highest competence). Although it may be a useful guide this ODL test was not intended to produce an absolute value for digital literacy; it aims only to offer a specific and useful indicator of it and, by extension, of media competence in the linguistic and technological dimensions. Having an overarching view of the extent to which key tools are used can help us determine user profiles. Nevertheless, the phrase «ODL level» is used in this paper to refer to the general score of the subjects in the test and to enable the socio-demographic variables to be cross-referenced with the main uses and the way people learned to use the Internet. From 0 to 18 points was classed as a low ODL level, 19 to 36 as low to average, 37 to 54 as average, 55 to 72 as average to high and 73 to 90 as a high ODL level.

Based on the work in the discussion groups five key hypotheses were formulated: 1) the highest scores would be in the categories of messaging, searching and information sharing, using e-mail, Operating systems, Browsers, Social networks and Telecommunications as these represent the tools that have been available to the population for the longest period; 2) the lowest scoring categories would be those relating to managing, storing, and creating content using Servers, Downloads, and Web/blog spaces as they are the ones which a priori require higher levels of knowledge and proactivity on the part of the user; 3) the ODL level would be inversely proportional to the age range of the respondents and there would be significant statistically significant differences between them; 4) the gender variable would not be significant in the ODL level; 5) the year of study of the respondents would be a factor that affected the ODL level.

The survey respondents conformed to a representative sample of the residents of the autonomous community of Castilla and León (Spain) (N=1506), distributed between 4 age ranges (15-29 years N=166 / 30-44 years N=499 / 45-64 years N=459 / 65–99 years N=382), in quotas established in accordance with the population in the various provincial capitals (Ávila N=120, Zamora N=120, Segovia N=120, Burgos N=205, Soria N=120, Palencia N=120, León N=154, Salamanca N=178, Valladolid N= 368) and also proportional to gender. The questionnaires were delivered face to face and randomly on the streets of the provincial capitals by members of the previously established «Communication competence in the digital context in Castilla and León» research team (REF: VA026A10-1), during the 2010-11 academic year. Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient (a=0.961) was applied to assess the reliability of the test. Also, to measure the statistically significant variances between variables, both the average comparison and the ANOVA one-way analysis of variance tests were applied. Statistical significance is assumed when P= 0.05.

4. Results

The overall result of the ODL test for the population was 25 points; average to low. The only age range that scored 50% was 15-29 years with 45 points (an average ODL). They were followed by the 30-44 years range with 41 points (an average ODL level), the 45-64 years range with almost a 100% decrease at 23 points (an average to low ODL level) and finally the 65-90 years range with 2 points out of 90 (a low ODL level). Significant variations in the levels were found between each quota (P=0.001).

If the results for each category are examined in more detail it can be seen that the three items that scored most highly for each age range were E-mail, Browsers and Social Networks, which to some extent supports our initial hypothesis. However, the Telecommunications category (Skype, Whatsapp, Viber) was at the lower end, a long way from being the highest scoring. In last place, as predicted, came the category of Creation of web/blog sites, Servers and Downloads, although it was not expected that Photos and Music would also score so low. As can be seen from Figure 1 the only category in which the second age range scored more highly than the first was in that of Search engines. In contrast, the first age range scored significantly higher than any other age range in the use of Social Networks, Downloads, Servers and accessing Fiction online.


Draft Content 208326604-32653-en082.jpg

Figure 1. Categories of knowledge and use by age range.

The cross-referencing of data from the categories of use and knowledge with the gender variable showed significant differences in the scores of males (N=745) and females (N=761) within the overall scores of the population, as per Figure 2. If further cross-referenced against the age variable, contrary to what might be expected, further significant differences were found in the two initial age ranges (15-29; P=0.001; 30-44; P=0.001). However, for the third and fourth age ranges the responses by gender were more homogeneous (45-64 P=0.321; 65-99 P= 0.081). Much greater differences were found in the categories of Mobile devices, Downloads and Servers.

The level of studies completed by the respondents was found to be a variable that affected online digital literacy. Those with no or only primary studies completed (N=392) got the lowest ODL score. They were followed by those with secondary education or equivalent professional training (N=470). Finally, those respondents with a university degree (N=643) had the highest digital literacy. The most revealing result, though, was that having a university degree did not guarantee an average ODL level, as the graduates scored no higher than 34 points out of 90, as can be seen in figure 3.


Draft Content 208326604-32653-en083.jpg

Figure 2. Categories of knowledge and use by gender.

With regard to the main purpose for respondents’ use of the Internet the data showed that 31% used the Internet primarily to access information, 18% for entertainment, 16% to access training or education, whilst 36% responded that they used it for communicating. Cross-referencing the main use of the Internet with the age variable showed that age significantly affected the primary use (P=0.045). As seen in Figure 4, the first age range (N=165) were those that used the Internet most for games (30%) and communication (38%). The second age range (N=484) were those that most used it to access training and education (21%). In the third age range (N=338) there were significant increases in use for accessing information/news (37%) and communication (35%) at the expense of entertainment (13%). The same happened in the final age range (N=81) as in the third age range but in a more dramatic way. The primary use for training/education fell to 4% and for entertainment to 8%. There was no significant variation between male respondents (N=554) and female respondents (N=514) in terms of the primary use they made of the Internet but there were differences in the way they learnt how to use the Internet (P=0.001). Males tended to be more self-taught (77%), and females more likely to take a course or be taught by family members or friends (55%). Likewise, significant variances can be seen between the age range and the way they learnt to use the Internet (P=0.001). Not only did 80% of respondents between 15 and 29 years of age consider themselves to be self-taught, they scarcely contemplated the notion of learning from a member of their family (1%).


Draft Content 208326604-32653-en084.jpg

Figure 3. Level of ODL by level of completed studies.

When analysing the primary activity on the Internet of the study population it can be seen that there were significant differences between the age ranges of the study subjects (P=0.042). The first age range (15-29) was found to spend more time on social networks (34.5%) and less on E-mail (5.5%). A total of 32.8% of activity related to searching for information and 12% to watching/listening online and playing videogames. Working/studying (4.8%), Shopping (4.8%) and Downloads (5.2%) appeared to be secondary uses. For the second age range (30-44) E-mail 19.2%) was a higher priority than Social media (11.4%). Respondents in this age range dedicated the highest proportion of their time to searching for specialised information (27.9%) and accessing the communication media (16.1%). Strangely, they spent less on shopping on the Internet (2.6%) despite being the group with the greatest purchasing power. A clear increase in the use of E-mail (27.5%) at the expense of Social networking (1.5%) was found in the third age range (45-64). Together with the second age range this was also the group that used the Internet the most for seeking specialised information (30.5%) and for work (12.7%). Among respondents in the final age range (65-99) the range of activities decreased to just five. Their main interests were in accessing communication media (39.5%), searching for specialised information (19.7%) and using E-mail (34.2%). Although not statistically significant, several subjects mentioned video-conferencing as a primary use of the Internet (5.3%).


Draft Content 208326604-32653-en085.jpg

Figure 4. Primary use of the Internet by age range.

5. Discussion

Although it might seem unsurprising that the results of the study identified a digital gap between the generations they also indicated clear weaknesses in digital competence even among members of the earliest age ranges. This is worrying as it suggests a scenario in which young people are not fully exploiting the opportunities for personal growth and learning that the Internet offers and that opting for a self-taught approach, as suggested by the results, is not working well enough. Neither is having a higher level of education any guarantee of achieving an average level of Online Digital Literacy.

Of no less concern is the fact that the category of creation of own content using blogs was relegated to last place. Confirmation of the second hypothesis means that only a very small percentage of the population understands and actively uses the content management tools on the Internet. In other words, within the study population practically no content generators were found.

In terms of understanding the profile of the average Internet user within Castilla and León the data suggest they have a passive profile, focused on interacting, communicating, searching and downloading. The youngest use the Internet mainly to communicate with other users. Their main focus are the social networks; there they share their experiences and state of mind, recommend things to their community and follow the recommendations of others. It could be said they have a «social and recreational profile» (socializer). Subjects within the second age range focused more on searching for specific information, on their own training/education and on keeping informed and were not interested in social networks or particular websites or special interest forums and only resorted to downloading when they needed to resolve a particular issue (searcher/downloader).

Although these two groups’ profiles are proactive and they both understand and use new technologies a lot they are certainly not empowered in the areas of expression and creation. In this sense, among the study subjects surveyed, none displayed the type of profile of an individual that regularly generates and shares information. Those people with a more creative profile (uploader) tend to have accounts with Instagram or Vine where they share their artistic photos and with Vimeo or YouTube to share their videos. An uploader will have their own blog, forum, website or portfolio where they exhibit their work. An uploader creates content that may initiate a trend of become a «trending topic» and constantly updates their knowledge of and competence with the technology. An uploader has a high ODL level and also shares the characteristics of the other profiles (downloading, searching and interacting). Individuals with this profile are equally empowered as consumers of information and therefore in creating and expressing it as well. In contrast, the average user identified within this survey is far from being an uploader, someone who is empowered from both an expressive and technological point of view.

The average user identified from the survey in Castilla and León not only lacked creativity but, in line with other recent similar studies (Literat, 2014), significant differences were found in the level of ODL between males and females. These differences in the ODL levels between the genders occured mainly in the two earliest age ranges, which is of concern as it indicates gender stereotypes which need to be addressed. There were no significant differences in the knowledge and use of particular categories however. No tools were used predominantly by males or by females. The results were more general, as in every category males scored higher than females to a statistically significant degree.

6. Conclusions

The results of this survey suggest that educational institutions and bodies should design specific programmes to address the deficiencies in Online Digital Literacy that have been uncovered. This proposal is based on some of the disturbing data captured by the study, such as the confirmation that: (1) the average subject surveyed did not meet the anticipated level of knowledge and competence to achieve Online Digital Literacy, (2) even having a university education did not guarantee achieving the proposed average level, (3) the average Internet user has a passive profile and (4) females are less empowered than males in this area. Educational institutions should therefore consider ways to reduce the digital divide between the generations, increase the empowerment of females at a technological level from a young age and strengthen the range of expressive, creative and constructive content on the Internet through providing courses for the whole population.

This survey provided further evidence (Aguaded et al., 2011; Ferrés & al., 2011) of a lack of media literacy among the general population, in this case in relation to a lack of competence in the use of particular digital tools which are increasingly common and widespread and without which it is becoming ever more difficult to operate in the hypermedia context that surrounds us. An up-to-date and constantly-developing proficiency with these tools will never equate to acquiring full digital literacy but it will significantly support the empowerment of the population and the development of the competences that result in media literacy.

Support and acknowledgements

Survey undertaken under the Convocatoria de Proyectos de Investigación de la Junta de Castilla y León con clave: REF: VA026A10-1, titulado «La competencia en comunicación en Castilla y León en el contexto digital» and the Convocatoria de Proyectos I+D del Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad con clave: EDU2010-21395-C03-02, titulado: «Los profesionales de la comunicación ante la competencia en comunicación audiovisual en un entorno digital».

Notes

1 Members of the research team «Communication competence in the digital context in Castilla and León»: Agustín García-Matilla, Eva Navarro-Martínez, Marta Pacheco-Rueda, Pilar San-Pablo-Moreno, Coral Morera-Hernández, Jon Dornaleteche-Ruiz, Luisa Moreno-Cardenal, Manuel Canga-Sosa, Tecla González-Hortigüela y Alejandro Buitrago-Alonso.

References

Aguaded, J. & al. (2011). El grado de competencia mediática en la ciudadanía andaluza. Huelva: Grupo Comunicar Ediciones, Universidad de Huelva.

Buckingham, D. (2010). Do we Really Need Media Education 2.0? Teaching Media in the Age of Participatory Culture. In Drotner, K. & Schrøder, K. (Eds.), Digital Content Creation. (pp. 287-304). New York: Peter Lang.

Cloutier, J. (1973). La communication audio-scripto-visuelle à l’heure des self-media, ou l’ère d’Emerec. Montreal: Presse de l’Université de Montreal.

De-Abreu, B. (2010). Media Literacy, Social Networking, and the Web 2.0 Environment for the K-12 Educator. New York: Peter Lang.

Dornaleteche, J. (2013). Alfabetización digital, un mashup con fines educativos. (http://goo.gl/Tx94UD) (01-04-2014).

Ferrés, J. & Piscitelli, A. (2012). La competencia mediática: propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indicadores. Comunicar, 38; 75-82. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/tj9).

Ferrés, J. (2014). Las pantallas y el cerebro emocional. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Ferrés, J., Aguaded, I., García-Matilla, A & al. (2011). Competencia mediática. Investigación sobre el grado de competencia de la ciudadanía en España. Madrid. Ministerio de Educación.

García-Matilla, A. & al. (2011). Memoria final del Proyecto de Investigación: La competencia en comunicación en el contexto digital de Castilla y León (REF: VA026A10-1). Valladolid: Junta de Castilla y León.

García-Matilla, A. (2010). Publicitar la educomunicación en la universidad del siglo XXI. In R. Aparici (Coord.), Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. (pp. 151-168). Barcelona: Gedisa.

Gozálvez, V. & Contreras, P. (2014). Empoderar a la ciudadanía mediática desde la educomunicación. Comunicar, 42, 129-136. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/tkc).

Gutiérrez, A. & Tyner, K. (2012). Educación para los medios, alfabetización mediática y competencia digital. Comunicar, 38, 31-39. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/tkd).

Jenkins, H. (2009). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture. Media Education for the 21st century. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.

Johnson, S. (2013). Futuro perfecto: sobre el progreso en la era de las redes. Madrid: Turner.

Koltay, T. (2011). The Media and the Literacies: Media Literacy, Information Literacy, Digital Literacy. Media, Culture & Society, 33(2), 211-221. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/b4smqw).

Literat, I. (2014). Measuring New Media Literacies: Towards the Development of a Comprehensive Assessment Tool. The Journal of Media Literacy Education, 6(1), 15-27.

Livingstone, S. (2004). Media Literacy and the Challenge of New Information and Communication Technologies. Communication Review, 7(1), 3-14. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/db96bn).

Toffler, A. (1980). The Third Wave: The Classic Study of Tomorrow. New York: Bantam.

Wilson, C., Grizzle, A. & al. (2011). Media and Information Curriculum for Teachers. Paris (France): UNESCO.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La presente investigación nace con el objetivo de medir el grado de dominio por parte de la población de una serie de herramientas digitales que juegan un papel clave en el desarrollo de la competencia mediática. Con ese fin, se ha elaborado una categorización que intenta abarcar todas las funcionalidades que la Web 2.0 brinda al usuario. Posteriormente, se ha delimitado cada una de ellas a través de tres ítems digitales concretos de uso extendido en la sociedad mediática. La selección realizada conforma un test de alfabetización digital on-line (test ADO) que mide el grado de conocimiento y uso activo de dichas herramientas, y que, por tanto, compone un indicador significativo de la competencia mediática en sus dimensiones lingüística y tecnológica. El test ha sido administrado a una muestra de más de 1.500 sujetos de diferente edad y nivel de estudios con el fin de obtener datos que ayuden a establecer objetivos en el panorama de la alfabetización digital y contribuyan hacia el empoderamiento ciudadano en materia de educación mediática. Los resultados y conclusiones generales indican que el nivel de alfabetización digital on-line del ciudadano medio no es el deseado, que existe una brecha digital generacional y de género, y que el perfil medio del usuario de Internet es más social, recreativo y consumidor de contenidos existentes, que proactivo, gestor y creador de contenidos propios.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. La alfabetización digital en las dimensiones lingüística y tecnológica de la competencia mediática

Después de años de discusión terminológica parece ya casi incuestionable que la educación mediática engloba una serie de alfabetizaciones que van más allá de la adquisición de la tan ansiada competencia digital; pero que, de alguna manera, el dominio del campo abierto por la era digital sigue siendo uno de los pilares fundamentales sobre los que se asienta la educomunicación del siglo XXI. Nos movemos en un terreno de «conceptos paraguas», caracterizados por su diversidad de perspectivas y multitud de definiciones (Koltay, 2011). Es por ello que en nuestro caso optamos por entender «educación» como proceso, «alfabetización» como resultado y «competencia» como el conjunto de capacidades que se han de desarrollar para alcanzar ese resultado. A partir de ahí, decidimos agregarle a cada uno de los tres términos la etiqueta de «digital» si nos referimos a todo aquello que afecta únicamente al terreno digital, y «mediática» si nos referimos al campo educomunicativo en todo su amplio espectro. En cualquier caso, y como ya advertían Gutiérrez y Tyner (2012: 37), «si nos preocupamos más en fijar las diferencias entre «educación mediática» y «competencia digital» que en procurar su convergencia, terminaremos dividiendo esfuerzos e incluso generando enfrentamientos». Es de alguna manera la política que decidió seguir la UNESCO en 2011 (Wilson, Grizzle & al, 2011) al conciliar posturas tradicionalmente enfrentadas optando por el término media and information literacy (MIL), traducido como «alfabetización mediática e informacional» en su currículum MIL para profesores.

A la hora de situar nuestro estudio, resulta imprescindible recurrir a Ferrés y Piscitelli (2012: 7582) cuando afirman que la competencia mediática viene abordada desde seis grandes dimensiones: los lenguajes, la tecnología, los procesos de producción y difusión, los procesos de recepción e interacción, la ideología y los valores, y la dimensión estética.

De este modo, y aunque impregnaría en cierto sentido las seis dimensiones, la alfabetización digital afectaría directamente a dos de ellas: la dimensión lingüística y la tecnológica. A la lingüística en todo lo relacionado con los códigos, medios y lenguajes que conforman la información digital a nuestro alcance, y a la tecnológica en función de la destreza en el manejo de las herramientas (ya sean de software o hardware) que nos permiten acceder a esa información. En palabras de Dornaleteche (2013), hablaríamos de alfabetización «fuera de la pantalla» y «dentro de la pantalla». A su vez, lo que acontece «dentro de la pantalla» podría subdividirse en lo que ocurre en línea (online) y fuera de línea (offline). Cada día queda más alejado todo lo relacionado con el uso offline de los medios y se tiende hacia una experiencia digital permanentemente online. De este modo, son precisamente las herramientas digitales las que nos permiten acceder a diversas formas de «cultura de participación», como pueden ser la afiliación a comunidades de usuarios (Facebook), la creación de nuevas formas de expresión creativa (mashups), el desarrollo de conocimiento a nivel colaborativo (Wikipedia), o la circulación y acceso a nuevos flujos de información (blogging and podcasting) (Jenkins, 2009).

Por lo tanto, pretendemos dejar claro que en nuestra investigación nos hemos querido centrar únicamente en esa experiencia en línea, en esa parte de la alfabetización digital que ocurre «dentro de la pantalla» y, a su vez, «dentro de la red». Es lo que se ha optado por denominar «alfabetización digital online» (ADO), no por añadir una nueva etiqueta a un conglomerado terminológico que muchas veces cae en lo confuso, sino por concretar nuestro objeto de estudio y acotar el campo de herramientas digitales al que nos referimos a lo largo del artículo.

Con todo, y a pesar de estar centrado en una parte concreta de la alfabetización digital, este estudio no pretende caer en el error de reducir la educación mediática al desarrollo de la competencia digital en su «dimensión más tecnológica e instrumental» (Gutiérrez & Tyner, 2012: 38), sino que pretende ahondar en un eje vertebrador que afecta eminentemente a dos de sus dimensiones (lingüística y tecnológica), sin olvidar la importancia radical de las otras cuatro. En este sentido, somos también firmes defensores de «la necesidad de la interdisciplinariedad en educomunicación» (Gozálvez & Contreras, 2014: 13), y por ello creemos que deben ser compatibles investigaciones como ésta, más centradas en el estudio del comportamiento ciudadano alrededor de las nuevas herramientas digitales en constante evolución, con aquellas que incidan en el empoderamiento de la ciudadanía desde la concepción más ética, solidaria e íntegra de la educación mediática. Un enfoque que va más allá del desarrollo de una de serie de habilidades prácticas o de la apelación a la creatividad (Buckingham, 2010) y que incide en la necesidad de adoptar «los hábitos mentales, conocimientos, habilidades y competencias necesarias para tener éxito en el siglo XXI» (Hobbs, 2010: 51). Somos conscientes de que algunas herramientas que integran nuestro estudio, como las redes sociales, «no siempre aseguran un uso consciente y enriquecedor de sistemas y medios de comunicación para promover intercambios inteligentes» (GarcíaMatilla, 2010: 167), y por ello creemos que el estudio del conocimiento y uso activo de estos ítems digitales no debe estar reñido con el «afán de construcción y reconstrucción permanente del pensamiento crítico» (GarcíaMatilla, 2010: 168), que siempre ha perseguido la tradición educomunicativa.

Por último, en el momento actual de la investigación en materia de educación mediática, resulta ineludible hacer mención a las crecientes aportaciones provenientes del terreno de la neurociencia, las cuales nos señalan lo imprescindible de que «la habilidad en el manejo de los instrumentos vaya acompañada de la habilidad en la gestión de las mentes, la propia y las ajenas» (Ferrés, 2014: 239).

2. Una puerta abierta a nuevos perfiles de usuarios

Al entrar en materia percibimos que términos como Google, Facebook, Whatsapp, Instagram, etc., han cambiado nuestro modo de vida no solo a un nivel digitalmediático, sino también en lo que respecta a la alfabetización clásica lectoescrita, pues apenas hay día que concluya sin que hayamos leído o pronunciado algunos de los nombres de productos digitales que engrosan este artículo. «Ahora podemos «googlear» y tenemos abreviaturas para expresarnos con mayor facilidad como «LOL» (laugh out loud: reírse a carjacadas) o «OMG» (oh my God: oh Dios mío). También las nuevas tecnologías han traído nuevas palabras como iPhone, iPad o Droid (DeAbreu, 2010: 1). O en el caso de la Wikipedia, «un libro vivo, que se vuelve más inteligente y más completo día a día, gracias a las acciones, informalmente coordinadas, de millones de seres humanos en todo el planeta» (Johnson, 2013: 222). A pie de calle no se habla de «servidores de correo», «aplicaciones de mensajería instantánea» o «redes sociales», se habla de Gmail, Whatsapp y Facebook. Es por ello que se ha querido crear una categorización dentro de esa maraña de herramientas digitales, en constante evolución, que nos permita establecer una lista de ítems a partir de esas marcas y productos concretos de software y comprobar su presencia real en la ciudadanía hoy en día. «Internet proporciona una serie de herramientas digitales y de redes de distribución de información que permiten a la gente movilizarse en nuevas formas de acción colectiva. Comunidades de producción y compartición de conocimiento (Wikipedia), cultura (Youtube, Flickr, la bloguesfera), herramientas (software libre y de código abierto), mercados, (eBay, Craiglist), educación (Open Educational Resources), periodismo (periodismo ciudadano) y organización política (meetups, netroots activism, smart mobs)» (Rheingold, 2008: 25). Asimismo, y deseando no detenernos en el terreno experimental, se propone el modo en el que esa categorización y lista de ítems pueden evolucionar de cara al futuro para medir de nuevo esa alfabetización digital online de forma renovada y sin estar sometidos a categorías o ítems anquilosados en el tiempo.

Las antes mencionadas dimensiones de la competencia mediática (Ferrés & Piscitelli, 2012: 7582) no se limitan a establecer una mera clasificación de indicadores, sino que cada una de ellas desarrolla su contenido a través de dos ámbitos de participación: el ámbito del «análisis» y el de la «expresión». El ámbito del análisis haría mención a las personas «que reciben mensajes e interaccionan con ellos», mientras que el ámbito de la expresión se referiría a las personas que directamente «producen mensajes», teniendo en cuenta que ya desde hace años «la creación de contenido es más fácil que nunca y que una misma tecnología se puede utilizar para mandar y recibir información» (Livingstone, 2004: 8). Sería la ya tradicional división entre usuarios meramente receptores y aquellos que ante las posibilidades de hoy en día deciden dar un paso más, llámense «emirecs» (Cloutier, 1973), «prosumidores» (Toffler, 1980), «interlocutores» o empleando la etiqueta que se desee. Sin embargo, a raíz de los resultados obtenidos en el test ADO se ha querido profundizar en dicha conocida diferenciación entre usuarios mediáticos y preguntarnos si hoy en día podemos hablar de nuevos perfiles más allá del consumer y el prosumer, o si, gracias a los diferentes procesos de interacción con los mensajes, podemos establecer diferentes perfiles tanto dentro del «ámbito del análisis» como del «ámbito de la interacción».

Por todo ello consideramos que si la alfabetización digital conforma un eje vertebrador de lo que denominamos educación mediática o, en palabras de la UNESCO, alfabetización mediática e informacional, deben continuar teniendo una importancia sustancial aquellas investigaciones que ahonden en el maremagnum de las nuevas herramientas digitales que cada día irrumpen en el panorama mediático y modifican en un breve espacio de tiempo nuestros más arraigados usos y hábitos comunicativos.

3. Objetivos, hipótesis y metodología

En esta investigación se ha desarrollado un instrumento con el fin de medir el conocimiento y uso activo de una serie de ítems de alfabetización digital online por parte de la población. Estos hacen referencia a un conjunto de programas focalizados en la fase de búsqueda, creación y difusión de mensajes digitales a través de Internet. Los resultados del test de alfabetización digital online (test ADO) pretenden servir para diseñar propuestas educativas específicas con el objeto de empoderar a los sectores de la población más necesitados en el uso de las herramientas digitales que menos dominen.

El test ADO está compuesto por tres módulos. El primero consta de las variables sociodemográficas: edad, sexo, estudios y de la pregunta «¿se ha conectado alguna vez a Internet?». El segundo módulo está compuesto por 45 ítems sobre el uso y conocimiento de determinadas herramientas digitales. Y finalmente, el tercer módulo lo componen dos preguntas: una sobre el uso prioritario de Internet (actividades preferentes en la red) y otra sobre las formas de aprender a usar Internet.

Se crearon cinco grupos de discusión con el fin de seleccionar los 45 ítems que componen el segundo y tercer módulo del test. Cada uno de ellos integrado por ocho estudiantes de cada uno de los cursos de la titulación en Publicidad y Relaciones Públicas de la Universidad de Valladolid (Campus María Zambrano de Segovia). La decisión de recurrir a estudiantes universitarios para la composición de los grupos se tomó partiendo de que se trata, a priori, de uno de los segmentos sociales más activo en Internet y, por ende, con un nivel muy elevado en el dominio de los ítems de alfabetización digital online. La premisa en los grupos fue dar con un compendio de actividades básicas de un usuario con conocimientos medios en Internet. De los cinco grupos resultaron 15 categorías de actividades: navegadores (acceso a Internet), sistemas operativos (herramientas básica para poder acceder a Internet), buscadores (búsqueda de información), correo electrónico (herramientas de mensajería), telecomunicación (llamadas y mensajería), dispositivos móviles (dispositivos de acceso a Internet), redes sociales (compartir información, conocer gente, promover eventos), vídeo (ver, editar y compartir vídeos online), foto (ver, editar y compartir imágenes online), música (escuchar y compartir música), Servidores (almacenar y compartir información), creación web/blog (generar y gestionar contenidos), descargas (descargar archivos), ficción online (ver cine y series de forma gratuita) y compras (comprar y vender). Las preguntas del tercer módulo eran de respuesta abierta y posteriormente se codificaron en las siguientes respuestas predominantes. En el uso prioritario de Internet se establecieron: para comunicarse, para estar informado de actualidad, como entretenimiento y para formarse. En el modo de aprender a usar Internet las respuestas fueron: autodidacta, por cursos y con la ayuda de familiares y amigos. En las actividades prioritarias en la Red se contemplaron: redes sociales, medios de comunicación, chat, foros, correo electrónico, trabajo, videojuegos, información especializada, descargas, ver y escuchar online, comprar y pornografía.

Después se escogieron tres ítems o herramientas por cada categoría del segundo módulo: 1) Buscadores estaría compuesto por Google, Bing y Altavista, 2) Navegadores por Explorer, Chrome, Firefox; 3) Telecomunicación por Skype, Viber y Whatsapp; 4) Vídeo por YouTube, Vimeo y Dailymotion; 5) Foto por Flickr, Picassa e Instagram, 6) Servidores por Megaupload, Dropbox y Hotfile; 7) Descargas por Taringa, JDownloader y uTorrent; 8) Correo electrónico por Gmail, Hotmail y Yahoo; 9) Creación de espacios Web/blog por Blogger, Wordpress y Wix; 10) Compras por Ebay, Paypal y Amazon; 11) Música por Spotify, iTunes y Soundcloud; 12) Redes sociales por Facebook, Twitter y Tuenti; 13) Sistemas operativos Mac, Windows y Linux; 14) Dispositivos móviles por ebook, iPad y Samsung Galaxy y 15) Ficción online por Cinetube, Peliculasyonkis y Divxonline. El orden de los ítems en el cuestionario se estableció de forma aleatoria para evitar patrones de respuesta.

A los encuestados se les preguntó si conocían o no cada ítem y si lo usaban activamente o no. Las respuestas se codificaron con una escala Likert de tres valores: si no lo conocían puntuaban 0, si lo conocían y sabían para qué sirve pero no lo utilizaban 1, y si lo conocían y lo utilizaban activamente un 2. Con esta escala se buscó crear una codificación de respuesta lo más sencilla posible para dinamizar las contestaciones. La puntuación máxima que un sujeto podía conseguir por cada categoría era un 6; por un total de 15 categorías, el test ADO contaba con un máximo de 90 puntos. El valor mínimo que un sujeto podía obtener en una categoría es 0 (sin competencia); 1 (competencia baja); 2 (competencia mediabaja); 3 (competencia media); 4 (competencia mediaalta); 5 (competencia alta) y 6 (máxima competencia). Aunque pueda ser orientativo, no pretendemos aseverar que el test ADO proporciona un valor absoluto de alfabetización digital; sino que configura un indicador específico y significativo de ella y, por ende, de la competencia mediática en sus dimensiones lingüística y tecnológica. Conocer de forma panorámica el mayor o menor uso de según qué herramientas nos puede ayudar a definir perfiles de usuarios. No obstante, hablaremos del «nivel ADO» para referirnos a la puntuación general de los sujetos en el test y poder cruzarla con las variables sociodemográficas y con las del uso prioritario y aprendizaje. De 0 a 18 puntos se considerará un nivel ADO bajo, de 19 a 36 un nivel mediobajo, de 37 a 54 un nivel medio, de 55 a 72 un nivel medio alto y de 73 a 90 un nivel ADO alto.

A partir del trabajo en los grupos de discusión también se barajaron 5 hipótesis principales: 1) La puntuación más alta se reflejará en las categorías de mensajería, búsqueda y compartición de información como correo electrónico, sistema operativo, navegadores, redes sociales y telecomunicaciones dado que son las que incluyen las herramientas que llevan más tiempo extendidas entre la población; 2) Las categorías menos puntuadas serán las relacionadas con la gestión, almacenamiento y creación de contenidos como servidores, descargas y creación de espacios web/blog debido a incluir las herramientas que exigen, a priori, más conocimientos informáticos y más proactividad por parte del usuario; 3) El nivel ADO será inversamente proporcional a la franja de edad y habrá diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre ellas; 4) El sexo no es una variable que influya significativamente en el nivel ADO; 5) los estudios cursados sí configuran una variable que influye en el nivel ADO.

Los sujetos encuestados se conformaron a partir de una muestra representativa de la población residente en Castilla y León (N=1.506) distribuidos en cuatro franjas de edad (1529 N=166 / 3044 N=499 / 4564 N=459 / 6599 N=382), en cuotas diseñadas según la población de las diferentes capitales de provincia (Ávila N=120, Zamora N=120, Segovia N=120, Burgos N=205, Soria N=120, Palencia N=120, León N=154, Salamanca N=178, Valladolid N=368) y de forma proporcional según sexo. Las encuestas se hicieron cara a cara y de manera aleatoria en la calle de las capitales de provincia por los miembros del grupo de investigación «La competencia en comunicación en el contexto digital de Castilla y León» (REF: VA026A101) durante el curso lectivo 20102011 . Con el fin de comprobar la fiabilidad del test se ha utilizado el coeficiente Alfa de Cronbach (a=0.961). Para medir diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre variables se han utilizado comparación de medias y el test ANOVA de una vía. Se considera que hay significación estadística cuando P=0.05.

4. Resultados

El resultado absoluto del test ADO en la población general fue mediobajo: 25 puntos sobre 90. La única franja de edad que consiguió llegar al 50% fue la de 1529 años con 45 puntos (nivel ADO medio), le siguieron la segunda franja de edad con 41 puntos (nivel ADO medio), la tercera con un descenso prácticamente del 100% con 23 puntos (nivel ADO mediobajo) y finalmente la cuarta con dos puntos sobre 90 (nivel ADO bajo). Vemos diferencias significativas de nivel entre cada cuota (P=0.001).

Si nos adentramos a analizar los resultados dentro de cada categoría observamos que las tres más puntuadas en todas las franjas de edad fueron el correo electrónico, los navegadores y las redes sociales, lo que apoya parcialmente nuestra primera hipótesis. No obstante, la categoría de telecomunicación (Skype, Whatsapp, Viber) lejos de ser una de las más puntuadas se situó en la zaga. En último lugar, se encontró la categoría de creación de espacios web/blog, servidores y descargas, aunque no contábamos con foto y música. Como podemos apreciar en la figura 1, la única categoría en la que destacó la segunda franja de edad sobre la primera fue en la categoría de buscadores mientras que la primera destacó especialmente del resto en el uso de redes sociales, descargas, servidores y consumo de ficción online.


Draft Content 208326604-32653 ov-es082.jpg

Figura 1. Categorías de conocimiento y uso por franjas de edad.

Al cruzar los datos de las categorías de uso y conocimiento con la variable sexo encontramos diferencias significativas de puntuación entre hombres (N=745) y mujeres (N=761) en el cómputo global de la población como se ve en la figura 2. Si cruzamos también la variable de edad y, contrariamente a lo que se pueda pensar, encontramos más diferencias significativas en las dos primeras franjas (1529; P=0.001; 3044 P=0.001). Sin embargo, en la tercera y la cuarta las respuestas entre sexo fueron más homogéneas (4564 P=0.321; 6599 P=0.081). Se aprecian diferencias más pronunciadas en las categorías de dispositivos móviles, descargas y servidores.

En lo referente al nivel de estudio de los sujetos observamos que es una variable que influye en la alfabetización digital online. Las personas con estudios primarios o sin estudios (N=392) obtuvieron un nivel ADO más bajo. Les siguieron las personas con bachillerato o formación profesional (N=470). Por último, las personas con estudios universitarios (N=643) fueron las más alfabetizadas. No obstante, el dato revelador es que ser universitario no resultó ser garantía de tener un nivel ADO medio, puesto que apenas llegan a los 34 puntos sobre 90 como se puede apreciar en el gráfico 3 (página siguiente).


Draft Content 208326604-32653 ov-es083.jpg

Figura 2. Categorías de conocimiento y uso por sexo.

En lo relativo a las variables que conciernen al uso prioritario que los sujetos hacen de Internet los datos nos dicen que el 31% de los sujetos afirmó usar Internet para informarse, el 18% para entretenerse, el 16% para formarse, mientras que el 36% indicó hacerlo para comunicarse. Si cruzamos el uso prioritario de Internet con la variable edad vemos que se ve significativamente influido por ella (P=0.045). Como se aprecia en el gráfico 4, el primer grupo de edad (N=165) fue el que más utilizó Internet con fines lúdicos (30%) y comunicativos (38%). La segunda franja de edad (N=484) fue la que más empleó Internet para formarse con un 21%. En la tercera franja de edad (N=338) aumentó significativamente el uso de la Información/actualidad (37%) y de la comunicación (35%) en detrimento del entretenimiento (13%). En el cuarto grupo de edad (N=81) ocurrió lo mismo que en el tercero pero de forma más drástica. La formación quedó reducida al 4% y el entretenimiento al 8%. No existen diferencias significativas entre el valor que otorgaron hombres (N=554) y mujeres (N=514) al uso prioritario en Internet pero sí en la forma que aprendieron a hacer uso de la Red (P=0.001). Los hombres tendieron a ser más autodidactas (77%) y las mujeres a aprovechar más cursos y el consejo de amigos y familiares (55%).


Draft Content 208326604-32653 ov-es084.jpg

Figura 3. Nivel ADO por nivel de estudios.

Del mismo modo, se aprecian diferencias significativas entre las franjas de edad y la forma de aprender a utilizar Internet (P=0.001). No solo el 80% de los jóvenes entre 15 y 29 años se consideró autodidacta sino que apenas contempló la posibilidad de aprender a través de un familiar (1%). Cuando preguntamos a la población por las actividades prioritarias en Internet observamos que también existen diferencias significativas entre las cuotas de edad de los sujetos (P=0.042). La primera franja de edad (1529) se caracterizó por pasar más tiempo en redes sociales (34,5%) y menos en el correo electrónico (5,5,%). Un 32,8% de la actividad se dedicó a la búsqueda de información y un 12% a ver/escuchar online y a jugar a videojuegos. Trabajar/estudiar (4,8%), comprar (4,8%) y las descargas (5,2%) aparecieron como actividades secundarias. El segundo grupo de edad (3044) priorizó más el correo electrónico (19,2%) que las redes sociales (11,4%). A lo que más tiempo dedicaron los encuestados de este sector fue a buscar información especializada (27,9%) y a consumir medios de comunicación (16,1%). Curiosamente compraron menos a través de Internet a pesar de ser un segmento de edad con más poder adquisitivo (2,6%). Donde se vio un claro aumento del correo electrónico (27,5%) en detrimento de las redes sociales (1,5%) fue en la tercera franja de edad (4564). También fue el grupo que más utilizó Internet para buscar información especializada (30,5%) y para el trabajo (12,7%) junto con la segunda franja. En la población de los 65 a los 99 años, la diversidad de actividades disminuyó; quedando reducida a cinco. Especial interés tuvieron los medios de comunicación (39,5%) y la búsqueda de información especializada (19,7%) así como el correo electrónico (34,2%). Aunque no sea significativo, varios sujetos mencionaron la vídeoconferencia como la actividad prioritaria en Internet (5,3%).


Draft Content 208326604-32653 ov-es085.jpg

Figura 4. Uso prioritario de Internet por franja de edad.

5. Discusión

Si bien resulta obvio el hecho de que se vea reflejada la brecha digital que separa las diferentes generaciones, los resultados reflejan un vacío de competencias digitales incluso en las franjas de edad más tempranas. Esto es preocupante puesto que ofrece un panorama en el que los jóvenes no explotan al máximo las posibilidades de crecimiento personal y aprendizaje que otorga Internet al tiempo que optan por una estrategia autodidacta que, viendo los resultados, resulta insuficiente. Además, tener estudios superiores no resulta una garantía para alcanzar un nivel ADO medio.

No menos preocupante es el hecho de que categorías de creación de contenidos propios como Web/blog haya sido relegada al último puesto. Confirmar la segunda hipótesis significa que un porcentaje mínimo de la población conoce y usa activamente herramientas de gestión de contenidos en Internet (Content Management Systems). Dicho de otro modo, en la población investigada, apenas encontramos generadores de contenidos. Entonces, ¿qué perfil tiene el usuario medio de Castilla y León?

Los datos indican que tiene un perfil pasivo, centrado en la interacción, la comunicación, la búsqueda y la descarga. Los más jóvenes utilizan Internet fundamentalmente para comunicarse con otros usuarios. Su especialidad son las redes sociales; ahí comparten sus experiencias y estados de ánimo, recomiendan a su comunidad y se dejan recomendar por ella. Se puede decir que tienen un «perfil social y recreativo» (socializer). Los sujetos de la segunda franja de edad se centran más en la búsqueda de información específica, en su formación y en estar informados, no les interesan tanto las redes sociales como sitios web concretos o foros temáticos y hacen búsquedas depuradas cuando tienen que resolver un problema concreto (searcher/downloader).

Aunque ambos perfiles son proactivos y conocen y utilizan bastantes de estas nuevas tecnologías digitales no están del todo empoderados en el plano de la expresión y la creación. En este sentido, entre los sujetos encuestados no destaca el perfil de usuario que, de forma usual, genera información y la comparte. Las personas con perfil creativo (uploader) suelen tener una cuenta en Instagram o en Vine donde comparten sus fotos artísticas y sus vídeos en Vimeo o en YouTube. Un uploader tiene su blog, su foro, su página web o el portfolio donde expone su trabajo. Un uploader crea contenidos que pueden marcar tendencias o ser «trending topic» y está en constante renovación de sus conocimientos y competencias tecnológicas. El uploader es el perfil con un nivel ADO mayor. Al uploader también se le atribuyen características de los otros perfiles (descargas, búsquedas e interacción). Es un perfil igualmente empoderado en el plano del consumo de información y, por tanto, de la creación y expresión de la misma. En cambio, el usuario de Internet encuestado dista de ser ese uploader, ese tipo de sujeto empoderado desde un punto de vista expresivo y tecnológico.

No solo el usuario medio encuestado en Castilla y León no es creativo, sino que, al igual que en experiencias recientes con cierta similitud (Literat, 2014), encontramos diferencias significativas en los niveles de alfabetización digital online entre hombres y mujeres. Hallamos estas diferencias de nivel ADO entre sexos principalmente en las dos primeras franjas de edad, un dato todavía más preocupante pues confirma estereotipos de género que deberían estar superados. No existen diferencias significativas en el uso y conocimiento de determinadas categorías, es decir; no hay herramientas más típicas de hombres o de mujeres. Los resultados son más generales, pues en todas las categorías los hombres superan a las mujeres con una diferencia estadísticamente significativa.

6. Conclusiones

Partiendo de los datos más alarmantes que refleja este estudio como la verificación de que: 1) El ciudadano medio encuestado no supera la prueba planteada de conocimiento y manejo de ítems de alfabetización digital online;?2) Ni siquiera tener estudios universitarios garantiza llegar al nivel medio; 3) El perfil de usuario Internet es pasivo;?4) Las mujeres están menos empoderadas que los hombres en este ámbito, les toca ahora a las instituciones y organismos educativos diseñar programas específicos para paliar estas carencias. El objetivo sería idear propuestas para reducir la brecha digital entre generaciones, incidir en el empoderamiento de las mujeres a nivel tecnológico desde edades muy tempranas y en potenciar la vertiente expresiva, creativa y generadora de contenidos en Internet a través de cursos específicos para toda la población.

Estamos, en ese sentido, ante una nueva muestra (Aguaded & al., 2011; Ferrés & al., 2011) de las carencias en alfabetización mediática de la población, pero en este caso concretadas a través de la falta de aptitud en el uso de unas herramientas digitales específicas, cada vez más extendidas y generalizadas, sin las cuales resulta complicado desenvolverse en el contexto hipermedia que nos rodea. Un dominio actualizado (y en constante renovación) de esas herramientas no se podrá equiparar nunca a la adquisición de la competencia digital plena, pero sí que colaborará de manera muy significativa al empoderamiento ciudadano y al desarrollo del conjunto de competencias que configuran la alfabetización mediática.

Apoyos y agradecimientos

Estudio enmarcado en la Convocatoria de Proyectos de Investigación de la Junta de Castilla y León con clave: REF: VA026A101, titulado «La competencia en comunicación en Castilla y León en el contexto digital» y en la Convocatoria de Proyectos I+D del Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad con clave: EDU201021395C0302, titulado: «Los profesionales de la comunicación ante la competencia en comunicación audiovisual en un entorno digital».

Notas

1 Miembros del equipo de investigación «La competencia en comunicación en Castilla y León en el contexto digital»: Agustín GarcíaMatilla, Eva NavarroMartínez, Marta PachecoRueda, Pilar SanPabloMoreno, Coral MoreraHernández, Jon DornaletecheRuiz, Luisa MorenoCardenal, Manuel CangaSosa, Tecla GonzálezHortigüela y Alejandro BuitragoAlonso.

Referencias

Aguaded, J. & al. (2011). El grado de competencia mediática en la ciudadanía andaluza. Huelva: Grupo Comunicar Ediciones, Universidad de Huelva.

Buckingham, D. (2010). Do we Really Need Media Education 2.0? Teaching Media in the Age of Participatory Culture. In Drotner, K. & Schrøder, K. (Eds.), Digital Content Creation. (pp. 287-304). New York: Peter Lang.

Cloutier, J. (1973). La communication audio-scripto-visuelle à l’heure des self-media, ou l’ère d’Emerec. Montreal: Presse de l’Université de Montreal.

De-Abreu, B. (2010). Media Literacy, Social Networking, and the Web 2.0 Environment for the K-12 Educator. New York: Peter Lang.

Dornaleteche, J. (2013). Alfabetización digital, un mashup con fines educativos. (http://goo.gl/Tx94UD) (01-04-2014).

Ferrés, J. & Piscitelli, A. (2012). La competencia mediática: propuesta articulada de dimensiones e indicadores. Comunicar, 38; 75-82. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/tj9).

Ferrés, J. (2014). Las pantallas y el cerebro emocional. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Ferrés, J., Aguaded, I., García-Matilla, A & al. (2011). Competencia mediática. Investigación sobre el grado de competencia de la ciudadanía en España. Madrid. Ministerio de Educación.

García-Matilla, A. & al. (2011). Memoria final del Proyecto de Investigación: La competencia en comunicación en el contexto digital de Castilla y León (REF: VA026A10-1). Valladolid: Junta de Castilla y León.

García-Matilla, A. (2010). Publicitar la educomunicación en la universidad del siglo XXI. In R. Aparici (Coord.), Educomunicación: más allá del 2.0. (pp. 151-168). Barcelona: Gedisa.

Gozálvez, V. & Contreras, P. (2014). Empoderar a la ciudadanía mediática desde la educomunicación. Comunicar, 42, 129-136. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/tkc).

Gutiérrez, A. & Tyner, K. (2012). Educación para los medios, alfabetización mediática y competencia digital. Comunicar, 38, 31-39. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/tkd).

Jenkins, H. (2009). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture. Media Education for the 21st century. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.

Johnson, S. (2013). Futuro perfecto: sobre el progreso en la era de las redes. Madrid: Turner.

Koltay, T. (2011). The Media and the Literacies: Media Literacy, Information Literacy, Digital Literacy. Media, Culture & Society, 33(2), 211-221. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/b4smqw).

Literat, I. (2014). Measuring New Media Literacies: Towards the Development of a Comprehensive Assessment Tool. The Journal of Media Literacy Education, 6(1), 15-27.

Livingstone, S. (2004). Media Literacy and the Challenge of New Information and Communication Technologies. Communication Review, 7(1), 3-14. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/db96bn).

Toffler, A. (1980). The Third Wave: The Classic Study of Tomorrow. New York: Bantam.

Wilson, C., Grizzle, A. & al. (2011). Media and Information Curriculum for Teachers. Paris (France): UNESCO.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/14
Accepted on 31/12/14
Submitted on 31/12/14

Volume 23, Issue 1, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C44-2015-19
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 11
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?