Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Whilst various studies have examined participation on the Internet as a key element of a new emergent civic engagement, informally or formally through national and local governments’ online measures, less has been done to measure or suggest ways of overcoming social and technological constraints on online civic participation. Additionally, few studies have looked at the relationship between the actual implementation of such initiatives in classrooms and the messages which are conveyed indirectly as a result of teachers’ own conceptions of classroom strategies, which are perhaps better described as a “hidden curriculum”. This paper reports on these constructions through a set of detailed quantitative and qualitative case studies of the implementation of civic engagement through online activity in several regions of Portugal. The data, obtained through questionnaires, were used to produce novel composite scores reflecting the participatory and media literacy strategies of schools, as well as teachers and students’ media literacy and online civic actions. We present empirical results from a study population consisting of 12 public secondary school principals, 131 teachers, and 1,392 students in grades 11 and 12, suggesting that students’ online civic engagement and media literacy levels are affected by their teachers’ classroom practices and further training and by the implementation of a project-based approach to media education.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Civic participation and electronic government through information and communication technologies (ICT) and the Internet have become a talking-point in many education systems. Potentialities and practices have been studied worldwide (Davies & Pittard, 2009; Harasim, 1995; Korte & Hüsing, 2006; Paige, Hickok, & Patrick, 2004). In line with international guidelines (e.g., World Bank, OECD, UN) advocating for citizen participation in government services and decision-making processes through ICT, governments are taking a growing number of actions online. This, in turn, increases citizens’ requirement to use the Internet to interact with government, through portals, social network websites and, in some countries, to vote electronically, creating a demand for corresponding skills. Whilst participation on the Internet has been exa mined as a key element of a new emergent civic engagement, less has been done to measure or suggest ways of overcoming social and technological constraints on online civic participation. Additionally, few studies have looked at the relationship between the actual implementation of such initiatives in classrooms and the messages that are conveyed indirectly as a result of teachers’ own conceptions of classroom strategies, perhaps better described as a “hidden curriculum”.

The number and user-friendliness of Internet-based tools is increasing, and young people are using smartphones and other mobile devices to achieve various other socially-oriented goals. At the same time, governments have always favoured mediated interactions with citizens. Decision-makers in today’s digital societies take advantage of such online tools to reach a greater audience in a more effective way. However, the literature on online civic participation shows that young people’s levels of interest are low (Albero, Olsson, Bastardas-Boada, & Miegel, 2009; Hasebrink, Livingstone, Haddon, & Ólafsson, 2009) despite their intensive personal Internet use and the continuing ex pansion of e-governance.

In Portugal, although substantial human and financial resources have been invested in ICT for schools (notably computer acquisition and teacher training in digital educational resources and media literacy), these changes have had a limited effect on young people’s civic engagement and participation.

A closer look at school and classroom-level strategies in both media literacy and citizenship education may offer important insights into factors limiting young people’s online participation. In particular, data on teachers’ conceptions and experiences on media literacy and citizenship may offer insights into the “hidden curriculum” and its effects on students’ learning and development.

1.1. The importance of young people’s online civic participation

According to Dahlgren (2000: 338), “for people to see themselves as citizens, and for a civic culture to flourish, involves [...] the mutual interdependence of knowledge and competencies, loyalty to democratic values and procedures, as well as established practices and traditions”. To enable young people to become civically active, they should be involved in decision-making on issues related to their interests. This serves not only to support the development of skills such as debate, negotiation, and prioritization (Lansdown, 2001; Sinclair, 2004) but, far more importantly, to establish and deepen their self-perception as citizens. Conversely, it has been argued that the civic community can benefit from young people’s participation in various ways: improved service delivery, through consultation or direct participation in changing systems and services (Kirby, Lanyon, Cronin, & Sinclair, 2003; Sinclair, 2004); improved decision-making processes, insofar as participation leads to more accurate decisions (Kirby & al., 2003); and expanded democracy, as young people’s participation in their community is strengthened.

Being brought up in participatory environments offers the young more opportunities to internalize concepts of democracy and citizenship, and the related learning processes and positive experiences may play an important role in shaping their understanding and perceptions of citizenship. Early experience participating in community affairs may thus increase the chances that young people will get involved in democratic institutions when they are older (Bragg, 2007; Head, 2011), thereby reducing the gap between youth and adults with respect to democracy and civic engagement. Because young people are heavy media consumers who are able to express their preferences and influence others (Sinclair, 2004), they are often consulted online on goods and services. It has even been suggested that consultation for market growth is the main driver of young people’s online participation across Europe (Barber, 2009; Kirby & al., 2003) and is the main form of participation available to them (Sinclair, 2004). However, this is a reductive conception of participation.

1.2. Exploring media literacy for young people’s online civic engagement

Media literacy education focusing on online citizenship practices may be crucial to increasing young people’s levels of online civic participation. In this context, empowering youth with skills that enable them to take an active role and deal with multimodal media texts and services is a key goal. If we decide to ignore the ongoing changes in literacy requirements, we are marginalizing young citizens in the “global village” (Cas tells, 2001) and failing to preparing them for new labour markets (Reynolds & Caperton, 2011).

Here, the role of schools and teachers is essential. Substantial efforts are thus needed to enable citizens to develop the skills needed to deal with online tools. The alternative is deepening digital inequality, reinforcement of social injustice, and the perpetuation of the divide between those who can and cannot participate and influence/set the political agenda.

Our use of any technology and understanding of its potential is influenced not only by our individual sense of agency, but also by our cultural and social environment. Literacy thus cannot be seen as a purely autonomous individual development, sufficient in and of itself to promote change or to inspire young people to be active in their community (Street, 2003); in fact, it is inherently ideological and contested. Instead, as Cope and Kalantzis (2000) and Buckingham (2003) have argued, a social perspective is needed, stressing the variable nature and form of literacy in differing cultural contexts.

In addition to these social considerations, media literacy requires individual skills. The National Asso ciation for Media Literacy Education (2007) defines media literacy as the ability to encode, decode, analyze, and produce mediated messages. In this context, Potter (2010) emphasizes the need to develop a broad set of skills to deal with different messages and media in order to be literate.

However, the fact that today’s young people have been in contact and interaction with various media from their earliest years does not imply that schools should neglect the development of media literacy. There are strong arguments that teachers should focus on developing children’s critical skills (Burn & Durran, 2007; Parry, Potter, & Bazalgette, 2011).

Moreover, teaching and learning to participate online in a civic sense implies acknowledging that technologies are shaped by the social, and, also, how in turn their affordances shape our social relations (Selwyn, 2010) and influence how we communicate (Blau, 2004). Media education should, therefore, develop not only technical knowledge, but also a critical take on technology neutrality, and awareness of security, privacy, and the digital footprint, equipping young people with skills to interact meaningfully with ICT tools, rather than acting as passive media consumers (Buckingham, 2003).

Moreover, it is important to recognize that each person appropriates technological artefacts differently and that a given technology has different interpretation and usage for different social groups (Bijker & Law, 1992; Pinch & Bijker, 1984). The relevant social groups are likely not to be the initial designers and producers (Selwyn, 2012): each social group reconstructs technology according to their own goals and experiences, producing a different processes of meaning making. For this reason, it is necessary to address the relationship of Internet tools as they are actually appropriated by young people to citizenship issues. And as Bennett (2008: 12) has suggested, “young people themselves can better learn how to use information and media skills in ways that give them stronger and more effective public voices”. However, Fedorov and Levitskaya (2015) showed that less than 10% of experts polled believe that media critics’ texts are used quite often in media literacy education in their countries.

1.3. Citizenship and media literacy education in Portugal

Portugal introduced democratic education into its educational policies in 1986 via the basic law on the education system, which reflects the national environment of the time, immersed in the ideals of the 1974 revolution against the dictatorship. This law established a cross-curricular approach to providing students with a civic and moral education, fostering individual contributions to society.

Since then, the Portuguese school curriculum has undergone a number of substantial changes. In 2001, civic education was integrated into the curriculum as both a cross-curricular approach and a subject in its own right (45 minutes/week) in grades 5-9 (age 10-14), and in 2010 it was introduced in grade 10 (age 15). In 2012 civic education classes were removed from the curriculum and it was returned to the status of cross-curricular approach to all school subjects.

In 2012, independently of the national curriculum, the Autonomous Region of the Azores developed a “non-disciplinary school area” called “Citizenship”, which is implemented between grades 1-9 in Azorean schools. It aims to help students develop as moral individuals and citizens by cultivating cultural, scientific, and technological knowledge to foster an understanding of reality; enabling them to search for, select, and organize information in order to turn it into mobilized knowledge; and to promote the understanding of health issues (Direcção Regional da Educação e For mação, 2010).

Turning to media literacy education, the “Study on the Current Trends and Approaches to Media Lite racy in Europe” (European Commission, 2007) highlighted some references to media studies in the ICT component of the Portuguese curriculum, but these were focused on developing skills for using Microsoft tools in grades 8-10 (age 13-15) .

The focus on developing skills for using Microsoft tools reflects how the education system’s approach to digital education is immersed in private sector interests (Selwyn, 2010). Nevertheless, with its 2005 Tech nological Plan, the Portuguese government committed to making large human and financial investments in technological infrastructure for schools. The stated aim of the programme was to mobilize the “information and knowledge society” and encourage democratic participation through ICT (Ministério da Ciência Tecnologia e Ensino Superior, 2005). Under this programme, schools benefited from broadband Internet, computers and other digital equipment, and teacher training in ICT, regardless of their teaching specialization.

Moreover, in 2011 the Ministry of Education and Sciences published recommendations on education for media literacy (Recommendation of the National Education Council, n. 6/2011), recognizing that media literacy is a matter of citizenship and inclusion, which is needed to avoid or decrease the risk of exclusion from community life. However, the same government gradually withdrew ICT education from the national curriculum until, by 2012, the school curriculum did not include any mandatory ICT classes at any level. An optional ICT school subject may be offered in grades 7 and 8, at the school’s discretion.

The concept of “digital natives” (Prensky, 2001), which casts all younger people as naturally experienced and knowledgeable users of digital spaces and equipment, exerted a strong influence on government’s decision to withdraw ICT as a mandatory subject. Adherence to this concept has prevented some policy-makers from acknowledging that even if some young people are more familiar with technological tools, the Internet, computers, and video-games than older people, they still need support in deepening the development of critical skills in order to become producers rather than passive consumers of online media and services.

2. Material and methods

The study reported on in this paper attempted a detailed exploration of the above issues. It was conducted of a study concluded in 2015, consisting of a set of 12 case studies in Portuguese public schools (mainland and Azores) and municipalities using a mixed methods approach1.

The use of a case-study approach initially suggested itself for two reasons: a) to develop an under standing of a sufficiently deep level to frame a meaningful interpretation of teachers’ hidden and real curricula, and b) to gather a rich dataset providing sufficient detail and depth on a number of questions relating to education for media literacy and citizenship: here, on teachers’ and students’ online civic actions. The data were analyzed in terms of three main dimensions: a) schools’ political goals with regard to media education, b) implemented media literacy and citizenship strategies (school and classroom level); c) students and teachers’ online civic participation.

2.1. Establishing the sample

A cluster sampling process was used (latent class analysis, using Latent Gold 4.5 software package) on the municipalities employing a set of ICT and education indicators, as the general focus of the study was to explore the relationship between online civic participation and e-government strategies. The municipal indicators were grouped into three dimensions: a) ICT affordances, b) services and activities delivered online, and c) education.


Draft Content 297481362-52761-en001.jpg

The education dimension included the number of grade 10-12 students, transition rate/completion of regular secondary education, and the number of computers per student in municipal schools where grades 10-12 are taught). They were chosen to reflect the level of need for services and activities aimed at young people as well as access to computers and the development of media skills in schools (Burn & Durran, 2007; Hobbs, 2011; Jenkins, 2006).

After this process, 12 schools were randomly selected in each participating municipality to be case study schools, with the exceptions of one substitution (for a school which withdrew) and one chosen for convenience as it is the school where one of the au thors is a teacher.

2.2. The study population

The study population consisted of 12 directors of public secondary schools, 131 teachers, and 1,392 students in grades 11 and 12. The choice to focus on students in these grades was related to the voting age in Portugal (18 years) and the age range of the students (15-21 years).

2.3. Procedures and data analysis

The questionnaires were administered directly by the first author in each school. The questions were grouped into the following categories: school media education political goals (school principals); classroom media literacy strategies (school principals and teachers), media literacy and online civic participation (all groups), and perceived opportunities to participate (students).

2.3.1. Composite scores

The data obtained through the questionnaires were used to produce novel composite scores reflecting the schools’ participatory and media literacy strategies, as well as the media literacy and online civic participation of school actors. The composite scores were produced by taking the sum of the items present in the question naires and they were as shown in tables 1-3: In addition, for both the Download and Upload categories, 1 point was scored if was checkedat least one of the items in each of these as it was not expected to check all of the items.


Draft Content 297481362-52761-en002.jpg

2.3.2. Statistical analysis <

The following inferential statistical analysis was conducted: A Mann-Whitney U-Test was conducted on the dataset of all students to compare pairs of independent groups: by voting age (A:<18 years; B:>18 years), school grade (A: 11th grade; B: 12th grade), gender (A: female; B: male), and municipal population class (A: mediumcity; B: small/village)3. Mann-Whit ney U-Tests were also conducted to compare the differences between the groups of teachers by gender in scores for classroom strategies on media literacy and citizenship.

Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients (r) were computed to investigate the strength and direction of relationships between the variables (composite scores, mobile Internet access frequency, age in years, and municipality) on students and teachers’ data. Preliminary analyses were performed to ensure that the assumptions of normality, linearity, and homoscedasticity were not violated. A significance level of a=.05 was used.

Finally, a multiple re gression analysis was conducted to identify possible predictive effects of a range of factors, including: students’ scores, age, school year, whether the school offered media literacy training, school media projects, regularity of mayoral contact with young people, and schools partnering with the municipality in projects. A preliminary analysis was conducted to ensure that the assumptions of normality, linearity, multicollinearity, and homoscedasticity were not violated.

3. Results

3.1. Media literacy strategies: School principals and teachers

The school data reflecting the hidden and real curricula are divided into two subsections: data from school principals, expressing the school’s philosophy, political goals, and decisions in relationship to media literacy and citizenship; and teachers’ data, where the focus was on teachers’ training and classroom strategies.

3.1.1. School principals

None of the schools considered students’ contributions to the school website as a main priority, and the majority considered both students’ participation in school activities and access to information to a greater diversity of stakeholders as main priorities for the configuration of both their website (60%) and social network website profiles (80%). In terms of media literacy training, all schools offered ICT as a subject to students. As for school media literacy projects, none of the schools were involved with “Webin@rsDGE” (webinars developed by the Portuguese Ministry of Education and Sciences), “Digital Safety Seal for Schools” and “GeoRed” (Geography project using geographic information systems on the web). The projects most frequently present were “Seguranet” (Portuguese programme for Internet security learning; 45.5% of schools) and offline school newspaper (54.5%).

3.1.2. Teachers

Turning to teacher training, 80% had further training on digital resources or ICT in the classroom, 50% on media education or multimedia, 60% on using the Internet for educational purposes, and 30% had training in programming languages. Teachers scored low on classroom media literacy strategies (M=16.8, SD=9.3): only 13 teachers obtained a total score above 30 out of 60 points. The strategy most frequently implemented in schools’ classrooms was promoting active questioning and critical thinking about the messages conveyed in the media, traditional and Internet (10 schools), followed by the promotion of the students’ use of the school’s portal or webpage (6 schools). The least implemented were online debates for students on citizenship issues (6 schools) followed by teaching skills associated with developing applications as an alternative to existing models on the Internet (5 schools).

Focusing only on media literacy for citizenship, the majority of teachers presented the use of Facebook, individual blogs, and Google search engine as their main classroom educational resources, while less than 10% presented school-related websites (e.g., astropt. org; cienciahoje.pt, stra.mit.edu/genetics) and institutional websites. The reasons presented for their choices were content diversity of the website (11.3%) and curriculum content (16.2%), while only 4.9% aimed to develop media literacy skills and 2.1% the trust and reliability of the websites.

3.1.3. Effects on media literacy and citizenship strategies

Mann-Whitney U-Tests showed no statistically significant differences between the age ([18; 43] vs. [44; 69]) or gender groups in teachers’ media literacy and citizenship strategies. Classroom media literacy strategies showed a strong positive correlation with classroom citizenship strategies [r(109)=.564, p< .001], and a medium positive correlation with both teachers’ media literacy scores [r(109)=.288, p=.02] and formal online civic participation [r(109)=.333, p<.001]. Another interesting result was the medium positive correlation between teachers’ perception of their students’ online civic participation to be [r(112)= .317, p=.001] and their own formal online civic participation.

Teachers’ media literacy scores were low (M= 7.9; SD=3.5) and showed a medium positive correlation with their perceptions of students’ media literacy levels [r(114)=.336, p<.001], and their own formal online civic participation [r(112)=.362, p<.001]. Teachers’ ICT training showed no statistically significant correlations, apart from a weak positive correlation with teachers’ media literacy scores [r(114)= .207, p=.026].


Draft Content 297481362-52761-en003.jpg

3.2. Students’ media literacy and civic online participation3.2.1. Effects on students’ media literacy

Students’ media literacy scores were low (M=8.5; SD=3.5). No significant effect of gender, voting age or school grade was found. Students’ media literacy scores were positively correlated with their formal online civic participation [r(1134)=.178, p<.001] and with their informal online civic participation [r(1182) =.169, p<.001].

The multiple regression analysis on students’ media literacy showed that their formal online civic participation (ß=.139, p<.001), informal online civic participation (ß=.134, p<.001), schools implementing projects such as SeguraNet (ß=–.246, p< .001), Internet-based radio & TV (ß=–.082, p=.012), and school newspapers (ß=–.215, p<.001) predicted students’ media literacy, explaining 10.4% of variance (R2=.104, F(5)=23.69, p=<.001).

3.2.2. Effects on students’ civic online participation

Students’ civic online participation scores were low (M=1.5; SD=1.8) and showed statistically significant effects of school grade on students’ formal online civic participation (U= 144197, Z=–3.33, p=.001, r=–.003), with the mean rank of grades 11 and 12 being 540.2 and 601.4, respectively.

A significant difference was also found be tween the voting age groups (<18 years, >18 years) in formal online civic participation (U=75763, Z=-3.23, p=.025, r=–.002). The mean rank of the non-voting age and voting-age groups was 560.3 and 617.1, respectively. Moreover, students’ formal online participation was positively correlated with their media literacy scores (ß=.139, p<.001), their informal online civic participation [r(1135)=.343, p<.001], their perceived opportunities to participate [r(1136)=.114, p<.001], their mobile Internet access [r(912)=.073, p=.028], and their age [r(1135) =.089, p=.003].

The multiple regression analysis on students’ formal online civic participation showed that it was predicted by students’ media literacy (ß=.123, p<.001), students’ informal online civic participation (ß= .320, p<.001), students’ perceived opportunities to participate (ß=.110, p<.001), and regular mayoral meetings with young people (ß=–.070, p=.035). Toge ther these factors explained 14.5% of the variance in this score (R2=.145, F(4)=38.22, p<.0010).

4. Discussion and conclusion

The results on students’ online civic participation data suggest that students perceive civic participation as an adult responsibility, and therefore believe that they need to be of legal voting age to do it. Allied with students’ low level of perceived opportunities to participate, this suggests that students in this age range may think more in terms of becoming citizens later, rather than already being young citizens. In addition, the mean rank difference between school grades indicated that grade 12 students participate more online. However, it was not possible to fully verify this point, as the questionnaires did not directly ask whether students had citizenship as a school subject (some probably had). Finally, the correlation of students’ mobile Internet access with their formal online civic participation confirms the arguments of authors such as Hobbs (2011) and Jenkins (2006) suggesting that wider access to Internet devices makes a significant difference to meaningful online interactions and media empowerment.

The non-correlation between media literacy data and school grade observed here reflects the failure of the formal media literacy education curriculum in Portugal, where the development of students’ media literacy skills is minimized (European Commission, 2007). It is also consistent with growing emphasis among young users on their role as consumers (Barber, 2009; Kirby & al., 2003).

A number of results support our argument for further research on teachers’ conceptions, and experiences related to media literacy and citizenship as a key effect on students’ learning and development. These include, notably, the positive correlations between teachers’ media literacy strategies and their formal online civic participation, and between their perception of their students’ formal online civic participation and their own formal online civic participation. The importance of the “hidden curriculum” is also suggested by the positive correlations of teachers’ media literacy scores with their perceptions of students’ media literacy levels, and their own formal online civic participation. This influence is partly explained by the “Pyg malion (Rosenthal) effect” (Rosenthal & Jacob son, 1968), whereby teachers’ actions in the classroom are constrained by their expectations about students’ knowledge and skills.

While the results from teachers showed that a high percentage had further training in digital education resources, or media education, they also showed low scores on classroom strategies for fostering media literacy, which involves developing skills that can help students deal with any type of message, in any type of medium (Potter, 2010). Teachers also showed low scores on media literacy strategies, a measure of their use of pedagogy aiming to develop the interdisciplinary ability to synthesize, analyze, and produce mediated messages, consisting with Fedorov and Levitskaya’s (2015) results on the use of media critics’ texts in the classroom. No correlation was found between training in ICT, media literacy, and citizenship education, on the one hand, and teaching strategies, on the other hand, suggesting that existing teacher training models may emphasize a simple form of knowledge transmission, rather than promoting the effective development of a complete range of media and participatory skills.

Schools also had no clear plans for using available technology and its affordances to empower young people for civic engagement. None of the schools aimed at promoting student contributions to the school website; instead, they focused on using their website and online social networks to motivate students to participate in school activities and access information. However, the implementation of media literacy projects such as “SeguraNet”, online radio and TV, and school newspapers, were found to predict higher student media literacy scores. These apparently represent more effective ways to develop media literacy skills, by enabling students to interact meaningfully with media objects. Moreover, the significant relationships between students’ media literacy and their formal and informal online civic participation suggest that online civic involvement and media literacy are co-dependent and mutually reinforcing.

Future research in this area should also include socio-demographic variables, school subjects, training content, and service time as a teacher to better understand teachers’ educational choices and decisions on media literacy and citizenship education.

Notes

1 The study reported on in this paper is “e-Literacy, schools and municipalities towards a common goal: e-citizenship” (Dias-Fon seca, 2015).

2 School principals were included as teachers in this analysis. They are members of the teaching staff who are chosen in triennial elections.

3 The municipal population class categories used: Small: less than or equal to 20,000 inhabitants; Medium: between 20,001 and 100,000 inhabitants; Large: more than 100,000 inhabitants.

References

Albero, M., Olsson, T., Bastardas-Boada, A., & Miegel, F. (2009). D16 Report: A Qualitative Analysis of European Web-based Civic Participation among Young People Young People, the Internet and Civic Participation (CIVIC WEB). London: Institute of Education, University of London.

Barber, T. (2009). Participation, Citizenship, and Well-being Engaging with Young People, Making a Difference. Young, 17(1), 25-40. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/110330880801700103

Bennett, W. (2008). Changing Citizenship in the Digital Age. In W.L. Bennett (Ed.), Civic Life On-line: Learning How Digital Media Can Engage Youth (pp. 1-24). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Bijker, W., & Law, J. (1992). Shaping Technology/building Society: Studies in Sociotechnical Change. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Blau, A. (2004). Deep Focus: A Report on the Future of Independent Media. San Francisco: National Alliance for Media Arts and Culture.

Bragg, S. (2007). Consulting Young People: A Review of the Literature. (https://goo.gl/ytRl8x) (2016-06-01).

Buckingham, D. (2003). Media Education: Litreracy, Learning and Contemporary Culture. Cambridge: Polity.

Burn, A., & Durran, J. (2007). Media Literacy in Schools: Practice, Production and Progression. London: Paul Chapman Publishing.

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2000). Designs for Social Futures. In B. Cope, & M. Kalantzis (Eds.), Multiliteracies: Literacy Learning and the Design of Social Futures. London: Routledge.

Dahlgren, P. (2000). The Internet and the Democratization of Civic Culture. Political Communication, 17(4), 335-340.

Davies, S., & Pittard, V. (2009). Harnessing Technology Review 2009. The Role of Technology in Education and Skills: British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (BECTA).

Dias-Fonseca, T. (2015). e-Literacy, Schools and Municipalities towards a Common Goal: e-Citizenship. PhD, Universidade de Lisboa, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Universidade de Aveiro Lisbon. (http://hdl.handle.net/10451/19925) (2016-06-01).

Direcção Regional da Educação e Formação. (2010). Referencial Área de Formação Pessoal e Social, Área Curricular não Disciplinar de Cidadania. Angra do Heroísmo: Direcção Regional da Educação e Formação.

European Commission. (2007) Study on the Current Trends and Approaches to Media Literacy in Europe. Brussels: European Commission.

Fedorov, A., & Levitskaya, A. (2015). The Framework of Media Education and Media Criticism in the Contemporary World: The Opinion of International Experts. Media Education Research Journal, Comunicar, 45. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C45-2015-11

Harasim, L.M. (1995). Learning Networks: A Field Guide to Teaching and Learning On-line. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Hasebrink, U., Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., & Ólafsson, K. (2009). Comparing Children’s On-line Opportunities and Risks across Europe: Cross-national Comparisons for EU Kids On-line. (http://goo.gl/lkbDvw) (2016-06-01).

Head, B. (2011). Why not Ask Them? Mapping and Promoting youth Participation. Children and Youth Services Review, 33(4), 541-547. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2010.05.015

Hobbs, R. (2011). Digital and Media Literacy: Connecting Culture and Classroom. California: Corwin.

Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press.

Kirby, P., Lanyon, C., Cronin, K., & Sinclair, R. (2003). Building a Culture of Participation Involving Children and Young People in Policy, Service Planning, Delivery and Evaluation. London: Department for Education and Skills.

Korte, W.B., & Hüsing, T. (2006). Benchmarking Access and Use of ICT in European Schools 2006: Results from Head Teacher and A Classroom Teacher Surveys in 27 European Countries. Empirica. (http://goo.gl/LklVES) (2016-06-01).

Lansdown, G. (2001). Promoting Children's Participation in Democratic Decision-making. Florence, Italy: Innocenti Reseacrh Centre.

Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología y Enseñanza Superior (2005). Plano Tecnológico. Uma estratégia de Crescimento com Base no Conhecimento, Tecnologia e Inovação. Lisboa: MCTES.

National Association for Media Literacy Education. (2007). Core Principles of Media Literacy Education in the United States. (http://goo.gl/aH49Ba) (2016-06-01).

Paige, R., Hickok, E., & Patrick, S. (2004). Toward a New Golden Age in American Education: How the Internet, the Law, and Today’s Students are Revolutionizing Expectations. Washington DC: US Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology. (http://goo.gl/xAqwc1) (2016-06-01).

Parry, R., Potter, J., & Bazalgette, C. (2011). Creative, Cultural and Critical: Media Literacy Theory in the Primary Classroom. 7th Global Conference, Creative Engagements: Thinking with Children, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Pinch, T., & Bijker, W. (1984). The Social Construction of Facts and Artefacts: Or How the Sociology of Science and the Sociology of Technology might Benefit Each Other. Social Studies of Science, 14(3), 399-441. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/030631284014003004

Potter, W.J. (2010). The State of Media Literacy. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 54(4), 675-696. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08838151.2011.521462

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/10748120110424816

Reynolds, R., & Caperton, I.H. (2011). Contrasts in Student Engagement, Meaning-making, Dislikes, and Challenges in a Discovery-based Program of Game Design Learning. Educational Technology Research and Development, 59(2), 267-289. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11423-011-9191-8

Rosenthal, R., & Jacobson, L. (1968). Pygmalion in the Classroom. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

Selwyn, N. (2010). Schools and Schooling in the Digital Age: A Critical Analysis. London: Routledge.

Selwyn, N. (2012). Making Sense of Young People, Education and Digital Technology: The Role of Sociological Theory. Oxford Review of Education, 38(1), 81-96. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03054985.2011.577949

Sinclair, R. (2004). Participation in Practice: Making it Meaningful, Effective and Sustainable. Children & Society, 18(2), 106-118. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/chi.817

Street, B. (2003). What’s 'new' in New Literacy Studies? Critical Approaches to Literacy in Theory and Practice. Current Issues in Comparative Education, 5(2), 77-91. (http://goo.gl/t28kc2) (2016-06-01).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Mientras que numerosos estudios han examinado la participación en internet como elemento clave de una nueva involucración cívica emergente, informal o formal, a través de medidas gubernamentales locales o nacionales on-line, el esfuerzo ha sido menor para medir o sugerir formas de superar las restricciones sociales y tecnológicas de la participación cívica on-line. Pocos estudios se han centrado en la relación entre la implementación de las iniciativas en las aulas y los mensajes expresados indirectamente como resultado de las concepciones personales de los docentes en las estrategias didácticas que probablemente pueden ser descritas como «currículo oculto». Nos basamos en un análisis cuantitativo y cualitativo de un conjunto de estudios de casos sobre la implementación del compromiso cívico a través de actividades en línea en varias regiones de Portugal. Los datos obtenidos a través de cuestionarios fueron usados para crear un sistema de puntuación capaz de reflejar las estrategias escolares sobre la participación y la alfabetización mediática, así como, la acción cívica on-line de docentes y alumnos. Presentamos los resultados empíricos con una población que comprende 12 directores de escuelas públicas secundarias, 131 docentes y 1.392 alumnos de los cursos 11º y 12º. Los resultados sugieren que los niveles mediáticos de los estudiantes y sus niveles de compromiso cívico on-line están influenciados por las prácticas de sus profesores, su formación y por la implantación de proyectos de alfabetización mediática.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La participación cívica y el gobierno electrónico a través de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC) e Internet se han convertido en un te ma de discusión en muchos sistemas educativos. Sus potencialidades y prácticas han sido estudiadas mundialmente (Davies & Pittard, 2009; Harasim, 1995; Korte & Hüsing, 2006; Paige, Hickok, & Patrick, 2004). En consonancia con las directrices internacionales (Banco Mundial, OCDE, ONU) recomendadas para la participación ciudadana en los servicios gubernamentales y en los procesos de toma de decisiones a través de las TIC, los gobiernos están extendiendo el número de acciones on-line. A su vez, esto aumenta la necesidad de los ciudadanos de usar internet para interaccionar con el gobierno, a través de portales, redes sociales y, en algunos países, para votar electrónicamente, estableciendo así una demanda de las competencias correspondientes. Mientras la participación on-line ha sido examinada como un elemento clave de una nueva involucración cívica emergente, se ha trabajado menos para medir o para sugerir medios de superación de los constreñimientos sociales y tecnológicos de la participación cívica on-line. Adicionalmen te, pocos estudios han analizado la relación entre la actual implementación de estas iniciativas en las aulas y los mensajes expresados indirectamente como resultado de las concepciones personales de los docentes en las estrategias didácticas, que pueden ser descritas como «currículo oculto».

El número y la facilidad de utilización de las herramientas basadas en Internet ha aumentado y cada vez más los jóvenes usan sus teléfonos inteligentes y otros dispositivos móviles para lograr distintos objetivos de orientación social. Al mismo tiempo, los gobiernos siempre favorecieron las interacciones mediadas con los ciudadanos. Los decisores políticos en las actuales sociedades digitales se sirven de las herramientas me diáticas para alcanzar un mayor público, de una forma más efectiva. Sin embargo, los estudios sobre la participación cívica on-line muestran que los niveles de interés de los jóvenes son bajos (Albero, Olsson, Bas tardas-Boada, & Miegel, 2009; Hasebrink, Living sto ne, Haddon, & Ólafsson, 2009), a pesar del amplio uso personal de Internet y la continua ampliación del gobierno electrónico.

En Portugal, aunque se ha invertido en recursos humanos y financieros para implementar las TIC en las escuelas –hay una notable adquisición de ordenadores y formación del profesorado en educación digital y alfabetización mediática–, esos cambios produjeron un efecto limitado en el compromiso y participación cívica de los jóvenes. Analizar con más detalle las estrategias a nivel de escuela y de aula, tanto en la alfabetización mediática como en la educación para la ciudadanía, puede ofrecer conocimientos importantes so bre los factores que limitan la participación on-line de los jóvenes. En particular, los datos sobre las concepciones y experiencias en alfabetización mediática y ciudadana de los docentes permitirán conocer mejor el «currículo oculto» y sus efectos en el desarrollo y aprendizaje de los alumnos.

1.1. La importancia de la participación cívica on-line de los jóvenes

Según Dahlgren (2000: 338), «para que las personas se vean como ciudadanos, y para que una cultura cívica florezca, son necesarios […] la interdependencia mutua del conocimiento y competencias, la lealtad con los valores democráticos y procedimientos, así como las prácticas y tradiciones establecidas». Para que los jóvenes sean más activos cívicamente, deben ser incluidos en las toma de decisiones relacionadas con sus propios intereses. Esto servirá no solo para soportar el desarrollo de las aptitudes de debate, negociación y jerarquización (Lansdown, 2001; Sinclair, 2004) si no y aún más importante, para establecer e interiorizar su autopercepción como ciudadano. Por otro lado, se ha defendido que la comunidad civil puede beneficiarse de la participación de los jóvenes de diversas maneras: mejorar la prestación de servicios, a través de la consulta o participación directa cambiando los sistemas y servicios (Kirby, Lanyon, Cronin, & Sinclair, 2003; Sinclair, 2004); mejorar los procesos de toma de decisiones, en la medida en que la participación lleva a decisiones más precisas (Kirby & al., 2003); expandir la democracia, ya que la participación juvenil en su comunidad resulta fortalecida.

Crecer en ambientes participativos ofrece a los jóvenes más oportunidades para asimilar los conceptos de democracia y ciudadanía, así como los procesos de enseñanza relacionados, y las experiencias positivas que pueden ser determinantes en la construcción de su entendimiento y percepción de la ciudadanía. La experiencia temprana de participación en los asuntos comunitarios puede conducir al aumento de las hipótesis de, en la edad adulta, involucrarse en las instituciones democráticas (Bragg, 2007; Head, 2011), re duciendo la diferencia entre el involucramiento de mocrático y cívico de los jóvenes y adultos. Siendo los jóvenes fuertes consumidores de los medios, que ex presan sus preferencias e influencian a los demás (Sin clair, 2004), con frecuencia son consultados en la Red sobre productos y servicios. Se sugiere que esa consulta para el crecimiento del mercado es la principal impulsora de la participación juvenil on-line en Europa (Barber, 2009; Kirby & al., 2003) y es la principal for ma de participación disponible para ellos (Sinclair, 2004). Sin embargo, es una concepción re ductora de su participación.

1.2. Explorar la alfabetización mediática en el compromiso cívico on-line de los jóvenes

La alfabetización mediática centrada en la práctica de la ciudadanía on-line puede ser decisiva para aumentar el nivel de participación cívica de los jóvenes on-line. En este contexto, potenciar las competencias de los jóvenes que les permitan asumir un papel activo y trabajar con textos multimodales y servicios mediáticos es un objetivo clave. Si decidimos ignorar los cambios en curso en los requisitos de la al fabetización estaremos marginalizando a los jóvenes en la «aldea global» (Castells, 2001) y fracasando a la hora de prepararlos para los mercados laborales (Reynolds & Ca perton, 2011).

Así, el papel de las escuelas y de los profesores es fundamental. Son necesarios esfuerzos sustanciales para habilitar a los ciudadanos con las competencias necesarias para tratar con las herramientas on-line. La alternativa es agravar las desigualdades digitales, reforzar la injusticia social y perpetuar la división entre los que pueden y los que no pueden participar e influenciar la agenda política.

El uso que hacemos de cualquiera tecnología y el entendimiento de su potencial es influenciado no solo por nuestro sentido individual de autonomía, sino también por el entorno cultural y social. La alfabetización no puede ser vista como un desarrollo puramente au tónomo e individual, suficiente por si sola para promocionar o para inspirar a los jóvenes a ser activos en sus comunidades (Street, 2003); de hecho, es intrínsecamente ideológica y disputada. En cambio, como Cope y Kalantzis (2000) y Buckingham (2003) han afirmado, es necesaria una perspectiva social, destacando el carácter variable y la forma de alfabetización en distintos contextos culturales.

Además de esas consideraciones sociales, la alfabetización mediática requiere competencias individuales. La Asociación Nacional para la Alfabetización Mediática (2007) define la alfabetización mediática como la capacidad para codificar, descodificar, analizar y producir mensajes mediáticos. En este contexto, Potter (2010) acentúa la necesidad de desarrollar un conjunto de competencias para tratar con los distintos mensajes y medios para que se considere alfabetizado.

Sin embargo, el hecho de que los jóvenes tengan desde muy temprano contacto e interacciones con los diversos medios no implica que la escuela deba descuidar el desarrollo de la alfabetización mediática.

Hay fuertes argumentos que defienden que los profesores deben enfatizar en el desarrollo de las habilidades críticas de los niños (Burn & Durran, 2007; Parry, Potter, & Bazalgette, 2011).

Por otra parte, enseñar y aprender a participar en la Red de forma cívica implica conocer que la tecnología está condicionada por factores sociales, pero también, a su vez, identificar cómo su funcionamiento condiciona nuestras relaciones sociales (Selwyn, 2010) e influencia la forma en la que nos comunicamos (Blau, 2004). Por consiguiente, la educación mediática debe desarrollar no solo el conocimiento técnico, sino también una actitud crítica de la tecnología, de sensibilización con los problemas de seguridad, privacidad y la huella digital, preparando a los jóvenes para interaccionar con las herramientas tecnológicas positivamente, en lugar de actuar como consumidores pasivos de los medios (Buckingham, 2003).

Además, es importante reconocer que cada persona hace su propia apropiación de los dispositivos tecnológicos y que cada tecnología tiene distintas interpretaciones y usos de acuerdo con los diferentes grupos sociales (Bijker & Law, 1992; Pinch & Bijker, 1984). Los grupos sociales relevantes probablemente no serán los productores y diseñadores iniciales (Sel wyn, 2012); cada grupo reconstruye la tecnología según sus objetivos y experiencias, elaborando diferentes procedimientos. Por esta razón, es necesario adaptar la actual relación de los jóvenes con las herramientas de Internet a los temas de participación ciudadana. Como sugirió Bennett (2008: 12), «Los jóvenes pueden aprender por sí mismos cómo usar las informaciones y competencias mediáticas de forma que los convierta en voces públicas más fuertes y efectivas». No obstante, Fedorov y Levitskaya (2015) mostraron que menos de 10% de los expertos encuestados acreditaban que los textos críticos mediáticos eran a menudo usados en la alfabetización mediática en su país.

1.3. Ciudadanía y alfabetización mediática en Portugal

La enseñanza democrática se introdujo en Por t ugal en 1986 a través de la Ley fundamental del sistema educativo, lo que refleja el contexto nacional de la época, inmerso en los ideales revolucionarios de 1974 contra la dictadura. Esta ley estableció un enfoque transversal que proporcionó a los alumnos una educación cívica y moral, promoviendo las contribuciones individuales a la sociedad.

Desde entonces, el currículo escolar portugués ha sufrido un gran número de cambios. En 2001, la educación cívica se integró en el currículo como una materia transversal, al mismo tiempo que como una asignatura especifica (45 minutos a la semana), para los cursos 5º a 9º (10-14 años), y en 2010 se introdujo también en el curso 10º (15 años). En 2012 la educación cívica desapareció del currículo como asignatura específica y volvió a la condición de materia transversal.

En 2012, aparte del currículo nacional, la Región Autónoma de Azores desarrolló una asignatura integrada en el área de los estudios curriculares, llamada «Ciudadanía», que fue implementada entre los cursos 1º a 9º en las escuelas de Azores. Su objetivo es ayudar a formar a los alumnos como ciudadanos e individuos morales a través del conocimiento cultural, científico y tecnológico que va más allá de la realidad cotidiana; permitiéndoles buscar, seleccionar y organizar la información pertinente y promocionar un entendimiento de las cuestiones sanitarias y de salud (Direc ción Regional de Educación y Formación, 2010).

Volviendo a la alfabetización mediática, el documento «Tendencias actuales y enfoques de la alfabetización mediática en Europa» (European Comission, 2007) resalta algunas medidas para los estudios mediáticos y las TIC en el currículo portugués, pero que estaban centradas en el desarrollo de las competencias para trabajar con las herramientas de Microsoft en los cursos 8º a 10º (13-15 años). Este enfoque en el desarrollo de las competencias para uso de las herramientas de Microsoft refleja el modo como el sistema educativo está inmerso por los intereses del sector privado (Selwyn, 2010). Sin embargo, con el Plan Tecnoló gico de 2005, el gobierno portugués ha investido mu cho en recursos humanos y financieros en infraestructuras tecnológicas en las escuelas. El objetivo del programa fue movilizar la «sociedad de la información y el conocimiento» y fomentar la participación democrática a través de las TIC (Ministerio de Cien cia y Tec nología y Enseñanza Superior, 2005). Bajo este programa, las escuelas beneficiaron del acceso a conexión de banda ancha a Internet, ordenadores y otros materiales digitales y formación del profesorado en las TIC, aparte de su especialización inicial.

Además, en 2011, el Ministerio de la Educación y de las Ciencias publicó recomendaciones para la alfabetización mediática (Recommendation of the National Education Council, nº 6/2011), reconociendo tratarse de un asunto de ciudadanía e inclusión, que es fundamental para evitar o disminuir el riesgo de exclusión social. No obstante, el mismo gobierno gradualmente retiró la enseñanza de las TIC del currículo nacional hasta 2012, en que el currículo escolar no incluyó ninguna asignatura de TIC en ningún curso. La opción de integrar o no la asignatura de TIC, en los cursos 7º y 8º es la responsabilidad y criterio de las escuelas.

El concepto de «nativos digitales» (Prensky, 2001), que considera que todos los jóvenes son usuarios naturalmente expertos y conocedores de los espacios y equipamientos digitales, tuvo una fuerte influencia en las decisión del gobierno para retirar las TIC como asignatura obligatoria del currículo. La convicción ex presada por este concepto no ha permitido que algunos políticos entendieran que aunque muchos de los jóvenes estén familiarizados con las herramientas tecnológicas, Internet, ordenadores y videojuegos, ellos siguen necesitando el soporte para profundizar en el desarrollo de competencias críticas que les permitan ser productores en lugar de consumidores pasivos de los servicios y los medios on-line.

2. Material y métodos

En este artículo se presenta un estudio que ha in tentado una exploración detallada de las cuestiones mencionadas anteriormente. Forma parte de un estudio, concluido en 2015, que consiste en el estudio de 12 casos tomados en escuelas públicas portuguesas (continente y Azores) y en los municipios usando un enfoque de un método mixto1.

El uso del estudio de caso fue propuesto por dos razones: a) desarrollar un entendimiento más concreto y profundo de la interpretación que los profesores hacen del currículo oculto o real; b) recoger un conjunto significativo y detallado de datos sobre varias cuestiones relacionadas con la educación para la alfabetización mediática y ciudadanía: en las acciones cívicas de los profesores y alumnos on-line.

Los datos se analizaron de acuerdo con estas tres dimensiones: a) las políticas de las escuelas en relación a la educación mediática, b) las estrategias de alfabetización mediática y ciudadanía implementadas (en la escuela y en clase), y c) la participación cívica on-line de los alumnos y profesores.

2.1. Selección de la muestra

Se usó un procedimiento de muestreo por conglomerados (un análisis de clases latente, usando el programa software Latent Gold 4.5) en los municipios, recogiendo un conjunto de indicadores sobre TIC y educación, con un enfoque centrado en la exploración de las relaciones entre participación cívica on-line y estrategias de go bierno electrónico. Los indicadores mu nicipales se agruparon según tres di mensiones: a) posibilidades de las TIC, b) servicios y actividades de sarrolladas on-line; c) educación.


Draft Content 297481362-52761 ov-es001.jpg

En la dimensión de la educación se incluyeron el número de alumnos de 10º a 12º curso, que co rresponden a la transición/conclusión de la Enseñanza Secun daria, y el número de ordenadores por es tudiante en las es cuelas municipales donde se imparten esos cursos. Fueron escogidos por reflejar el nivel de necesidad de servicios y actividades destinados a los jóvenes así como el acceso a los ordenadores y el desarrollo de las competencias mediáticas en las escuelas (Burn & Durran, 2007; Hobbs, 2011; Jen kins, 2006).

Después de este procedimiento, doce escuelas de cada municipio fueron seleccionadas aleatoriamente para integrar el caso de estudio, con excepción para una sustitución (para una escuela que se retiró) y otra que se eligió por conveniencia (es la escuela de uno de los autores).

2.2. Población de estudio

La población de estudio comprende 12 directores de escuelas secundarias públicas, 131 profesores y 1.392 alumnos de los 11º y 12º curso. La selección de los alumnos de estos cursos está relacionada con la edad de voto en Portugal (18 años) y el rango de edad de los estudiantes (15-21 años).

2.3. Procedimientos y análisis de los datos

Los cuestionarios se aplicaron directamente en cada escuela por el primer autor. Las preguntas se agruparon en las siguientes categorías: objetivos políticos de la educación mediática de la escuela (directores de escuela); estrategias de alfabetización mediática en clase (directores de escuela y profesores), alfabetización mediática y participación cívica on-line (to dos los grupos) y oportunidades de participación.

2.3.1. Puntuación compuesta

Los datos obtenidos a través de los cuestionarios se utilizaron para producir nuevas puntuaciones compuestas reflejando la participación de las escuelas y las estrategias de alfabetización me diática on-line, así como la alfabetización mediática y participación cívica on-line de los actores escolares. Los resultados de las puntuaciones compuestas se produjeron sumando los ítems presentes en los cuestionados y mostrados en las tablas 1-3 (página anterior, ac tual y siguiente). Además, en las categorías Descar gar y Cargar, se consideró un punto cuando se verificó al menos uno de los ítems de esas categorías una vez que no se esperaría que se verificasen todos los ítems.


Draft Content 297481362-52761 ov-es002.jpg

2.3.2. Análisis estadístico <

El análisis estadístico de inferencia se realizó para comparar pares de grupos independientes a través de la prueba U de Mann-Whitney por edad de voto (A:<18 años; B:>18 años), por curso (A: 11º curso; B: 12º curso), por género (A: femenino; B: masculino) y por población municipal (A: mediana/ciudad; B: pequeña/ pueblo)3. Las pruebas U de Mann-Whitney fueran también usadas para la comparación de los da tos de los profesores por género (A: femenino; B: masculino) y edad (A: [18; 43], B: [44; 69]) en los resultados de las estrategias de alfabetización mediática y ciudadanía en clase.

Los coeficientes de correlación de Pearson (r) se calcularon para investigar la fuerza y direcciones de las relaciones entre variables (puntuación compuesta, frecuencia de acceso a Internet móvil, edad y municipalidad) en los datos de profesores y alumnos. Se aplicaron los análisis preliminares para garantizar que los supuestos de normalidad, linealidad y homocedasticidad serían cumplidos. Se usó un nivel de confianza de a=0.05.

Por último, el análisis de regresión múltiple permitió identificar los posibles efectos predictivos de un conjunto de factores: la puntuación obtenida por los alumnos, edad, curso escolar, oferta de formación en alfabetización mediática de la escuela, proyectos me diáticos de la escuela, la regularidad de los contactos con los jóvenes, y los proyectos de asociación escuela-municipio. Un análisis preliminar garantizó que los su puestos de normalidad, linealidad, multicolinearidad y homocedasticidad serían cumplidos.

3. Resultados

3.1. Estrategias de alfabetización mediática: directores de escuela y profesores

Los datos escolares que reflejan el currículo oculto y real se dividieron en dos subsecciones: los datos de los directores de escuela, que expresan la filosofía, objetivos políticos y decisiones relacionadas con la alfabetización mediática y ciudadanía; los datos de los profesores, centrados en la formación y las estrategias didácticas.

3.1.1. Directores de escuela

En ninguna de las escuelas se consideró prioritaria la contribución de los alumnos en su página web, y la mayoría consideró que la participación de los alumnos en las actividades escolares y el acceso a la información a un público diversificado son las prioridades en la configuración de su web (60%) y los perfiles en las redes sociales (80%). Por lo que respecta a la formación en alfabetización mediática, todas las escuelas ofrecen TIC como asignatura. En lo que concierne a proyectos de alfabetización mediática ninguna de las escuelas participan en el «Webin@rsDGE» (seminarios web desarrollados por el Ministerio Portugués de la Educación y Ciencia), «Diploma de Seguridad Digi tal Escolar» y «GeoRed» (proyecto de Geografía que usa sistemas de información geográfica on-line). Los proyectos más frecuentes son «Seguranet» (Programa portugués para el aprendizaje de la seguridad en Inter net: 45,5% de las escuelas) y los periódicos escolares offline (54,5%).

3.1.2. Profesores

En cuanto a la formación del profesorado, el 80% obtuvo formación en recursos digitales o uso de las TIC en las aulas, el 50% en educación mediática o multimedia, el 60% en uso de Internet para objetivos educativos y el 30% en lenguajes de programación. La puntuación obtenida por los profesores en las estrategias de alfabetización mediática fue baja (M=16,8; SD=9,3): solo 13 profesores obtuvieron 30 de un má ximo de 60 puntos. La estrategia más frecuentemente utilizada en el aula es el pensamiento crítico sobre los mensajes expresados en los medios, tradicionales e Internet (10 escuelas), seguidos por la promoción del uso del portal o página web de la escuela por los alumnos (6 escuelas). Los debates on-line sobre temas de ciudadanía es la estrategia menos implementada (6 es cuelas), seguida por la enseñanza de competencias para desarrollar aplicaciones que sean alternativas a las disponibles en Internet (5 escuelas).

Centrándonos en la alfabetización mediática para la ciudadanía, la mayoría de los profesores presentó el uso de Facebook, de los blogs individuales y del motor de búsqueda Google como los recursos más frecuentes en clase, y menos de 10% presentó páginas web escolares, como astropt.org; cienciahoje.pt, o stra.mit. edu/genetics; y otras páginas institucionales. Estas elecciones se justifican por la diversidad de contenido de los sitios web (11,3%) y el contenido del currículo (16,2%), aunque solo el 4,9% tiene por objetivo desarrollar las competencias de alfabetización mediática y el 2,1% confía en la fiabilidad y veracidad de las páginas web.

3.1.3. Efectos de las estrategias de alfabetización mediática y ciudadanía

Las pruebas U de Mann-Whitney demostraron no existir diferencia significativa entre la edad ([18; 43] y [44; 69]) o el género del grupo en las estrategias de alfabetización mediática y ciudadanía. Las estrategias de alfabetización mediática en el aula mostraron una correlación positiva fuerte con las estrategias de ciudadanía en el aula [r(109 =.564, p<.001], y una correlación positiva mediana con los resultados de la alfabetización mediática de los profesores [r(109)=.288, p=.02] y la participación cívica formal on-line [r(109)=.333, p<.001]. Otro resultado interesante fue la correlación positiva entre la percepción de los profesores de la participación cívica on-line de los alumnos [r(112)=.317, p=.001] y su propia participación cívica formal on-line.

Los resultados de la alfabetización mediática de los profesores fueron bajos (M=7.9; SD=3.5) y demostraron una correlación positiva mediana entre su percepción de los niveles de alfabetización mediática de los alumnos [r(114)=.336, p<.001], y su participación cívica formal on-line [r(112)=.362, p<.001]. La formación de los profesores en TIC no mostraron una correlación estadísticamente significativa, excepto una correlación positiva menor con los resultados de la alfabetización mediática de los profesores [r(114)= .207, p=.026].


Draft Content 297481362-52761 ov-es003.jpg

3.2. Alfabetización mediática y participación cívica on-line de los alumnos3.2.1. Efectos en la alfabetización mediática de los alumnos

Los resultados de la alfabetización mediática de los alumnos fueron bajos (M=8,5; SD=3,5). No se en contraron efectos significativos en el género, edad de voto o curso escolar. Los resultados de la alfabetización mediática están positivamente correlacionados con su participación cívica formal on-line [r(1134) =.178, p<.001] y con su participación cívica informal on-line [r(1182)=.169, p<.001].

El análisis de regresión múltiple en la alfabetización mediática de los alumnos mostró que su participación cívica formal on-line (ß=.139, p<.001), su participación cívica informal on-line (ß=.134, p<.001), la implantación de proyectos de escuela como Segu raNet (ß=–.246, p<.001), televisión y radio en Inter net (ß=–.082, p=.012) y los periódicos escolares (ß=–.215, p<.001), previeron la alfabetización mediática de los alumnos, explicando la variación del 10,4% (R2=.104, F(5)=23.69, p=<.001).

3.2.2. Efectos de la participación cívica on-line de los alumnos

Los resultados de la participación cívica en línea de los alumnos fueron bajos (M=1,5; SD=1,8) y de mos traron efectos estadísticos significativos en el curso escolar para la participación cívica formal on-line de los alumnos (U=144197, Z=–3.33, p=.001, r=–.003), con el rango promedio para los 11º y 12º cursos de 540,2 y 601,4, respectivamente.

Se verificó también una diferencia significativa entre los grupos con edad de voto (<18 años, >18 años) en la participación cívica informal on-line (U=75763, Z=-3.23, p=.025, r=–.002). El rango promedio de los grupos no votantes y votantes fue de 560,3 y 617,1, respectivamente. Además, la participación formal on-line de los alumnos está positivamente correlacionada con sus resultados de la alfabetización mediática (ß=.139, p<.001), su participación cívica informal on-line [r(1135)=.343, p<.001], su entendimiento de las oportunidades de participación [r(1136) =.114, p< .001], su acceso móvil a Internet [r(912) =.073, p=.028], y la edad [r(1135)=.089, p=.003].

<

Los resultados del análisis de regresión múltiple mostraron que la alfabetización mediática de los alumnos, (ß=.123, p<.001), su participación cívica informal on-line (ß=.320, p<.001), la comprensión de las oportunidades de participación de los alumnos (ß= .110, p<.001), y contactos regulares de los alcaldes con jóvenes (ß=–.070, p=.035), prevén la participación formal on-line de los alumnos. Todos estos factores explican la variación del 14,5% en los resultados (R2=.145, F(4)=38.22, p<.0010).

4. Discusión y conclusión

Los resultados de los datos de la participación cívica on-line de los alumnos sugieren que ellos entienden la participación cívica como una responsabilidad adulta, y por tanto acreditan que es necesario obtener la edad legal de voto para participar. El bajo nivel de comprensión de oportunidades de participación, su giere que los alumnos de estas edades pueden pensar que se convertirán en ciudadanos más tarde, en lugar de ser ya jóvenes ciudadanos. Además, las diferencias en los resultados relativos al curso escolar indican que los alumnos de 12º curso son los que más participan on-line. Sin embargo, no es posible verificarlo con exactitud puesto que los cuestionarios no preguntaban directamente si los alumnos habían tenido ciudadanía como asignatura (algunos probablemente sí). Por último, la correlación entre el acceso móvil a Internet y la participación cívica formal on-line de los alumnos confirma las afirmaciones de autores como Hobbs (2011) y Jenkins (2006) que sugieren que cuanto más amplio es el acceso a los dispositivos móviles para Internet, más significativas serán las interacciones on-line y la potenciación de los medios de comunicación.

La no-correlación entre alfabetización mediática y cursos escolares observados reflejan el fracaso del cu rrículo portugués en la educación formal para la alfabetización mediática, en lo cual el desarrollo de las competencias de alfabetización mediática de los alumnos es mínimo (European Commission, 2007). Es también consistente con el creciente énfasis entre los jóvenes de su papel en cuanto consumidores (Barber, 2009; Kirby & al., 2003).

Los resultados confirman, para futuras investigaciones, nuestras concepciones sobre los profesores y sus experiencias en ciudadanía y alfabetización mediática, como eje clave para la enseñanza y el desarrollo del alumnado. Esto incluye notablemente las correlaciones positivas entre las estrategias de alfabetización mediática de los profesores y su participación cívica formal on-line, y entre su precepción de la participación cívica formal de sus alumnos y su propia participación cívica formal on-line. La importancia del «currículo oculto» es también sugerida por las correlaciones positivas de los resultados de la alfabetización mediática de los profesores y sus percepciones de los niveles de alfabetización mediática de los alumnos y su propia participación cívica formal on-line. Esta influencia es parcialmente explicada por el «efecto Pigmalión (Ro senthal)» (Rosenthal & Jacobson, 1968), según el cual las acciones de los docentes en clase están condicionadas por sus expectativas con relación a los conocimientos y aptitudes de los alumnos.

En cuanto a los resultados de los docentes, mostraron un alto porcentaje en su formación en educación digital o educación mediática; también mostraron que los resultados de las estrategias para la alfabetización mediática, que permiten desarrollar competencias a los alumnos para tratar con cualquier tipo de mensaje, en cualquier medio (Potter, 2010), son bajos. Los docentes también revelaron resultados bajos en relación a las estrategias para la alfabetización mediática, en el uso de la pedagogía para desarrollar la capacidad transversal de sintetizar, analizar y producir mensajes mediáticos, confirmando los resultados de Fedorov y Levitskaya (2015) en el uso de los textos críticos de los media en el aula. No se halló una correlación entre la formación en TIC, alfabetización mediática y educación para la ciudadanía, por un lado, y las estrategias de enseñanza, por el otro, que sugiera que la existencia de un modelo de formación para docentes pueda originar una simple transmisión de conocimientos, en lugar de promocionar un desarrollo efectivo y completo de las competencias mediáticas y de participación.

Las escuelas tampoco presentan planos claros para el uso de las tecnologías y sus potencialidades para fomentar el compromiso cívico de los jóvenes. Ninguna de las escuelas promocionó las contribuciones de los alumnos en la página web de la escuela, en cambio, se concentraron en el uso de la página y redes sociales on-line para motivar a los alumnos a participar en las actividades de la escuela y acceder a la información. Sin embargo, la implementación de proyectos de alfabetización mediática, tales como «SeguraNet», ra dio y televisión on-line, periódicos escolares, determinaron los resultados más altos de la alfabetización me diática de los alumnos. Estos representan aparentemente las formas más efectivas de desarrollar las competencias de alfabetización mediática, permitiendo a los alumnos interaccionar significativamente con los objetos mediáticos. Además, las relaciones significativas entre la alfabetización mediática de los alumnos y su participación cívica formal o informal sugieren que el compromiso cívico on-line y la alfabetización mediática son interdependientes y se refuerzan recíprocamente.

Las investigaciones futuras en este área deben in cluir las variables sociodemográficas, asignaturas escolares, contenido de la formación y experiencia docente para entender las opciones educativas de los profesores y sus decisiones en cuanto a la alfabetización mediática y educación para la ciudadanía.

Notas

1 El estudio presentado en este artículo es «e-Literacy, schools and municipalities towards a common goal: e-citizenship» (Dias-Fonse ca, 2015).

2 Los directores de escuelas fueron tratados como profesores en este análisis. Pertenecen a la clase docente elegida en elecciones trienales.

3 Las categorías de la población municipal usadas: pequeña (menos o igual a 20.000 habitantes); mediana (entre 20.001 y 100.000 ha bitantes); grande (más que 100.000 habitantes).

Referencias

Albero, M., Olsson, T., Bastardas-Boada, A., & Miegel, F. (2009). D16 Report: A Qualitative Analysis of European Web-based Civic Participation among Young People Young People, the Internet and Civic Participation (CIVIC WEB). London: Institute of Education, University of London.

Barber, T. (2009). Participation, Citizenship, and Well-being Engaging with Young People, Making a Difference. Young, 17(1), 25-40. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/110330880801700103

Bennett, W. (2008). Changing Citizenship in the Digital Age. In W.L. Bennett (Ed.), Civic Life On-line: Learning How Digital Media Can Engage Youth (pp. 1-24). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Bijker, W., & Law, J. (1992). Shaping Technology/building Society: Studies in Sociotechnical Change. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Blau, A. (2004). Deep Focus: A Report on the Future of Independent Media. San Francisco: National Alliance for Media Arts and Culture.

Bragg, S. (2007). Consulting Young People: A Review of the Literature. (https://goo.gl/ytRl8x) (2016-06-01).

Buckingham, D. (2003). Media Education: Litreracy, Learning and Contemporary Culture. Cambridge: Polity.

Burn, A., & Durran, J. (2007). Media Literacy in Schools: Practice, Production and Progression. London: Paul Chapman Publishing.

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2000). Designs for Social Futures. In B. Cope, & M. Kalantzis (Eds.), Multiliteracies: Literacy Learning and the Design of Social Futures. London: Routledge.

Dahlgren, P. (2000). The Internet and the Democratization of Civic Culture. Political Communication, 17(4), 335-340.

Davies, S., & Pittard, V. (2009). Harnessing Technology Review 2009. The Role of Technology in Education and Skills: British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (BECTA).

Dias-Fonseca, T. (2015). e-Literacy, Schools and Municipalities towards a Common Goal: e-Citizenship. PhD, Universidade de Lisboa, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Universidade de Aveiro Lisbon. (http://hdl.handle.net/10451/19925) (2016-06-01).

Direcção Regional da Educação e Formação. (2010). Referencial Área de Formação Pessoal e Social, Área Curricular não Disciplinar de Cidadania. Angra do Heroísmo: Direcção Regional da Educação e Formação.

European Commission. (2007) Study on the Current Trends and Approaches to Media Literacy in Europe. Brussels: European Commission.

Fedorov, A., & Levitskaya, A. (2015). The Framework of Media Education and Media Criticism in the Contemporary World: The Opinion of International Experts. Media Education Research Journal, Comunicar, 45. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C45-2015-11

Harasim, L.M. (1995). Learning Networks: A Field Guide to Teaching and Learning On-line. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Hasebrink, U., Livingstone, S., Haddon, L., & Ólafsson, K. (2009). Comparing Children’s On-line Opportunities and Risks across Europe: Cross-national Comparisons for EU Kids On-line. (http://goo.gl/lkbDvw) (2016-06-01).

Head, B. (2011). Why not Ask Them? Mapping and Promoting youth Participation. Children and Youth Services Review, 33(4), 541-547. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2010.05.015

Hobbs, R. (2011). Digital and Media Literacy: Connecting Culture and Classroom. California: Corwin.

Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York University Press.

Kirby, P., Lanyon, C., Cronin, K., & Sinclair, R. (2003). Building a Culture of Participation Involving Children and Young People in Policy, Service Planning, Delivery and Evaluation. London: Department for Education and Skills.

Korte, W.B., & Hüsing, T. (2006). Benchmarking Access and Use of ICT in European Schools 2006: Results from Head Teacher and A Classroom Teacher Surveys in 27 European Countries. Empirica. (http://goo.gl/LklVES) (2016-06-01).

Lansdown, G. (2001). Promoting Children's Participation in Democratic Decision-making. Florence, Italy: Innocenti Reseacrh Centre.

Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología y Enseñanza Superior (2005). Plano Tecnológico. Uma estratégia de Crescimento com Base no Conhecimento, Tecnologia e Inovação. Lisboa: MCTES.

National Association for Media Literacy Education. (2007). Core Principles of Media Literacy Education in the United States. (http://goo.gl/aH49Ba) (2016-06-01).

Paige, R., Hickok, E., & Patrick, S. (2004). Toward a New Golden Age in American Education: How the Internet, the Law, and Today’s Students are Revolutionizing Expectations. Washington DC: US Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology. (http://goo.gl/xAqwc1) (2016-06-01).

Parry, R., Potter, J., & Bazalgette, C. (2011). Creative, Cultural and Critical: Media Literacy Theory in the Primary Classroom. 7th Global Conference, Creative Engagements: Thinking with Children, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Pinch, T., & Bijker, W. (1984). The Social Construction of Facts and Artefacts: Or How the Sociology of Science and the Sociology of Technology might Benefit Each Other. Social Studies of Science, 14(3), 399-441. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/030631284014003004

Potter, W.J. (2010). The State of Media Literacy. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 54(4), 675-696. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08838151.2011.521462

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/10748120110424816

Reynolds, R., & Caperton, I.H. (2011). Contrasts in Student Engagement, Meaning-making, Dislikes, and Challenges in a Discovery-based Program of Game Design Learning. Educational Technology Research and Development, 59(2), 267-289. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11423-011-9191-8

Rosenthal, R., & Jacobson, L. (1968). Pygmalion in the Classroom. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

Selwyn, N. (2010). Schools and Schooling in the Digital Age: A Critical Analysis. London: Routledge.

Selwyn, N. (2012). Making Sense of Young People, Education and Digital Technology: The Role of Sociological Theory. Oxford Review of Education, 38(1), 81-96. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03054985.2011.577949

Sinclair, R. (2004). Participation in Practice: Making it Meaningful, Effective and Sustainable. Children & Society, 18(2), 106-118. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/chi.817

Street, B. (2003). What’s 'new' in New Literacy Studies? Critical Approaches to Literacy in Theory and Practice. Current Issues in Comparative Education, 5(2), 77-91. (http://goo.gl/t28kc2) (2016-06-01).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/16
Accepted on 30/09/16
Submitted on 30/09/16

Volume 24, Issue 2, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C49-2016-01
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 4
Views 2
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?