Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

The elderly population has increased considerably in recent years and it is estimated that by 2050 32% of the Spanish population will be old people. This group is underrepresented in the media and does not attract much research interest. To put this right, we present an analysis of the representation of older persons in advertisements appearing in magazines aimed directly or indirectly at seniors in Spain. A content analysis estimated the frequency of appearance of the images and words that represent the elderly, and a discourse analysis enabled this study to investigate the presence of stereo types and discourse relations between advertising and theories of ageing. The results show that the older people who appear in the ads are mostly men portrayed as consumers of entertainment products who are at the beginning of their period of old age. A marked gender stereotype is observed. The differentiation between the institutional and commercial advertising discourse is also clear. The study analyses such advertising over three decades, covering the period in which the age distribution of the population has been inverted in Spain. Throughout this period, the frequency of ap pearance has been very low. Old people are clearly an invisible collective in magazine advertising.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction. Old age will define the 21st century (and its form of communication?)

One of the social changes that best describes our context is progressive population ageing. Global life expectancy has increased to 69.8 years of age, while fertility has dropped to 2.6 children per woman (UN, 2007). The population aged 60 and over is expected to triple, and those over 80 to quadruple by 2050 (UN, 2009). A global demographic transition appears to be underway.

The elderly population is three times larger in developed than in developing countries, and these percentages will continue to grow (Giró, 2004: 30). Europe will soon have the largest population in the world in terms of old age. In Spain, life expectancy at birth has grown progressively from 75 years in 1980 to more than 81 in 2011. (UNDP, 2011) and Spain’s National Statistics Institute (INE) estimates that older persons will form at least a third of the population by 2050. By that date, the United Nations projects that Spain will be second only to Japan in the number of old persons (Barrio & Abellán, 2009).

These statistics assume that old age begins at retirement age - 65. Thus, statistical indicators use economic and labor criteria to divide up the age segments. But when old age begins is arbitrary; other criteria (Giró, 2004: 24) put it at 50 or 55, taking into account biological, health economic and social changes, which only goes to show that old age is defined by social conventions: «We know that the problem of old age is not strictly a biological, medical or physical issue but social and cultural; that is to say, old age, its meaning, is a cultural construction» (Giró, 2004: 19). Old age is a social construction (Kehl & Fernández, 2001), a cultural fact (Beauvoir, 1989: 20), a matter of images and attitudes (Iruzubieta, 2004: 77). A specific field of study about the social construction of old age has been the analysis of its images and meanings (Featherstone & Wernick, 1995) and, more specifically, the images transmitted by the media (Santamarina, 2004).

A number of publications have pointed out the importance of the media in this social construction (Kehl & Fernández, 2001: 133) and recently, the analysis of older persons’ representation in the Spanish press has attracted particular interest (Polo, 2006; Becerril, 2011).

At the Second World Assembly on Ageing held in Madrid in 2002, the then UN head Kofi Annan said that, since the previous Assembly in 1982, the world had changed so much that it was unrecognizable (UN, 2003: IV). This United Nations strategy called for governments and civil society to reshape the way older persons are perceived, expressly including the media (article 17: 6) as environment makers.

The analysis of older persons’ representation in advertising is still not an object of specific study in Spanish scientific literature, though it has been researched in the USA since the 70s (Smith, 1976; Swayne & Greco, 1987). The different analyses show a stereotypical picture, often with negative connotations and underrepresentation in advertisements.

2. Research approach

The present study aims to analyse how advertising discourse, with its particular structures and content strategies, has shaped the image or social role of older persons in recent decades. The objectives are the analysis of the visual and verbal representation of older persons in advertising, and the study of discursive divergences between commercial and institutional advertising.

As a working hypothesis, this study considers the remarkable invisibility of older persons in advertising, one of the most numerous social groups in Spain. The aim is to quantify this visibility/invisibility in advertisements to test the hypothesis and then investigate a possible discursive difference between commercial and institutional advertising. An analysis of the main differences in the representation of men and women is also considered, anticipating a possible gender-based stereotyped treatment in advertising. This was done by means of an analysis of images and text.

As a methodological guide to analyze this set of representations and discourses we used content analysis and critical discourse analysis (CDA), considering the definition by Van-Dijk (1999: 22): «Critical discourse analysis is a kind of analytic investigation on discourse that primarily studies the way in which the abuse of social power, domination and inequality are practiced, reproduced and occasionally combated by texts and speech in the social and political context. Critical discourse analysis, with such a particular investigation, explicitly takes sides, expecting to contribute in a more effective way to the resistance against social inequality».

Critical discourse analysis reveals communication acts that promote social inequality. It also reveals the distance in communication between emitter and audiences. In the advertisements analyzed, it is clear that their creators and decision makers are probably not older persons, so the advertisements’ discourse is a speech act about «them» or about «others».

Mass media, including advertising, make it possible to establish a link between plural emitters representing social and economic powers (the state, corporations and economic agents) and the audience who daily build and validate social concepts and self-concepts. Numerical data as well as relationships between advertising’s argumentation of private and public emitters and the models of old age they refer to will be extracted from the application of this mixed modeling.

«Discourses are interpreted as elements with a coherent relationship to the users’ mental models about the events or facts they refer to» (Van-Dijk, 2003: 165).

It is known that discourse structures are related to context structures. Hence the usefulness of analysis categories which enable us to find relationships with social structures. This observation in advertising discourse provides a theoretical framework to study the present discursive production that asserts the present social status of older persons. In this study advertising messages are analyzed at micro level, to relate them to the macro level, in the framework of the theories of social gerontology.

2.1. Sample design

Considering when a discourse becomes historical, this analysis covers an extended period of time (1980-2010) which can be considered a stage in communication history (Timoteo, 2012), a stage of economic study (Sanchís-Marco, 2011) and as a period of diachronic analysis in the recent history of international development1. This period corresponds to a progressive increase in the highest life expectancy rates in history and population ageing. The year 2001 was a turning point in the demographic history of Spain. Since then, the percentage of the population over 65 has exceeded the child population percentage. (Abellán & Ayala, 2012: 6).

This study analyzes advertisements in the non-daily press in Spain. Specific supports aimed at older persons have been selected («Vivir con Júbilo», «Sesenta y más») as well as general supports with a larger readership of older persons (Sunday supplements such as «Blanco y Negro»2, «EPS: El País Semanal») and a magazine from the pharmaceutical sector (Acófar). All the advertisements that visually or verbally represent older persons have been collected. Non-repeated advertisements appearing within the stated period in all editions, in the case of monthly magazines, have been analyzed. In the case of weeklies, one copy per month has been selected. The total number of advertisements analyzed was 1,691.

According to the AIMC (Spanish Association for the Investigation of the Media), people over 55 constitute 33.2% of the readership of supplements and 25% of the total readership of magazines (2011). This segment is a big consumer of general press media and is also a focus for institutional advertising, as pointed out in the 6th report of the Committee for Institutional Advertising and Communication in 2011.

Advertising images and texts provide useful material for analysis as both projector and viewer of these constructions. It could be said that advertising acts as a converter of these ideas into images and representational conventions. These representations revert back to social imagery and can reshape our mental images.

2.2. Analysis model

When the study interest focuses on the analysis of the role of discourse in the reproduction of ideas about social groups, the forms of meaning must be analyzed. This requires a content analysis (Van Dijk, 2003: 149) that identifies the topics, propositions and elements selected. These three aspects have been identified as relevant for advertising discourse analysis regarding the role of older persons in our society. In terms of advertising’s construction of messages, correspondence has been established that includes topics or fields related to information or consumption, thematic proposals, and words or phrases related to old age. Such elements have been filtered in categories for an interpretative analysis of the observed content. Furthermore, images in which older persons are represented have been analyzed, taking into consideration the gender, age segment and appearance, either alone or living with other people. The type of emitter has also been analysed in order to make a comparative study between institutional and commercial advertising.

3. Results and analysis

The following data have been drawn from the application of the content analysis model designed to facilitate a discourse analysis. These results are then related to the theories of ageing drawn from social gerontology studies, taking into account the remarkably interpretative character of the discourse analysis processes. (Íñiguez, 2006: 121). Several aspects of the context pointed out by Van-Dijk (1996: 30) have been integrated in the analysis model, such as subperiods of age, gender, lexicalization, descriptions of activity, proposition and topics (this last aspect has been incorporated into the present study and applied to advertising as a thematic proposal of the advertisement and area of consumption).

3.1. Invisibilities

A key research finding is the patent invisibility of older persons in advertising, especially if we bear in mind that the supports analyzed are aimed at an elderly audience, in a specific or general way. After reviewing at least 35,000 advertisements, only 1,691 included any representation of older persons.

Invisibility is perhaps the most common exercise of symbolic violence in communication when talking about disadvantaged groups. This is the case with older persons, which is even more unusual if we bear in mind that they are not a minority. In Spain the population pyramid is clearly inverted.

Only 4.8% of the advertisements studied represented older persons3. It is also significant that in magazines exclusively aimed at older persons («Vivir con Júbilo», «Sesenta y Más») this percentage only reaches 27 and 40%, respectively.

But we have to take into consideration that so-called old age covers a wide age range. It seems to include at least two or three intermediate age groups. Some studies make a distinction between old age and very old age (Sánchez Vera, 1996) or between «young old» and older old, an age that would begin at 80 («oldest old», in UN terms). This age range has seen the biggest increase in population terms in Spain. People over 80 represented 29% of the population over 65 in 2009, and it is estimated that they will soon be 36.8% of the total elderly population (Imserso, 2010: 32). In contrast, only 4% of the older persons represented in advertisements belonged to the group of the «oldest old». Most images represented the young old (60%), from 60 to 75 years of age approximately. In their study, Bradley and Longino (2001) related this stereotype of young old to the so-called age mask hypothesis, according to which older persons see themselves as younger than they in fact are. This finding reflects the projective intention of advertising’s images and messages, and is a starting point for the debate on cognitive and biological age. Stephens (1991) talked about the usefulness and potential of the cognitive age concept for the creation of advertising targets. Functionalist theories of old age sociology explain that age classification is a structural element to which several functions are assigned. Advertising takes account of this logic in the framework of the age stratification theory, according to which self-esteem at each stage is conditioned by the roles it plays (Belando, 2007). The thematic proposal of advertising messages is fun, relaxation or hope in the case of the young old, and becomes a proposal for assistance in the oldest age range. Self-esteem and autonomy are persuasive arguments aimed mainly at the young old.

The invisibility of persons in the «oldest old» range in commercial advertising as well as its relation to the idea of dependency is a characteristic of «ageism» (Fernández-Ballesteros, 2011: 138), or discrimination towards that social group.

3.2. Lexical study. Old age: an advertising taboo

Invisibility is also apparent in advertising texts. The work of the copy writer seems to be to avoid mentioning old age explicitly. As a consequence, older persons are not mentioned in advertising, and 56.6% of advertisements whose subject is older persons avoid mentioning any words that identify them as such.

In the cases in which it is lexicalized, they use the word «mayores» (seniors), in 8.9% of cases, or the description of the age: elderly, golden age, a man who has aged well, etc. (3.7%). Neither the words «old age» nor words in the same lexical family appear, not even in advertisements aimed at that age group. In contrast, it is easy to check how the words «old age» and others related to an elderly physical appearance such as wrinkles, white hairs and flaccidity are common in adverts for female cosmetics. Old age has become a term used in the advertising model of consumerism in the context of fear of ageing4. This paradox shows that the representation of images of older persons in advertising is not linked to the use of the term that identifies them, rather, the word «old age» appears next to images denoting youth.

3.3. Older persons and the representation of their dependency / independence

Institutional advertising tends to represent the older person in the company of others, as was the case with 49% of the institutional advertisements analyzed, while only 30% showed the older person alone. The issue of the social creation of dependency in old age has already been discussed5, and this is the idea behind the discourse of institutional advertising. One of the theories of the sociology of gerontology arises from symbolic interactionism and goes by the name of labeling theory. From that perspective, one of the labels assigned to older persons is dependency (in the sense that it is a kind of anomaly).

In contrast, the analysis of advertisements made by private and commercial advertisers revealed that 65% represented an older person alone or in a couple. They are the «young old», independent people, a representation far removed from the stereotype that relates old age to dependency. Such occurrences are broadcast mainly in the form of commercial advertising and tend to exclude very old people.

3.4. Gender stereotypes in the representation of older persons

Despite the fact that the increase in life expectancy brings about the feminization of the elderly population, only 23.6% of the advertisements have a woman as the main character, compared to 44% with a man as the protagonist. This percentage is similar in institutional and commercial advertising, the latter featuring a higher percentage of women as the main character (23.7%) with 20.8% in institutional advertising.

In 1979, Susan Sontag discussed double standards in ageing, a social order that seems to persist in images of old age. In the advertising analyzed, the man appears enjoying leisure activities in company whereas the woman is often alone, in need of health assistance services. The profile of the elderly person is also feminized in advertising. Of the 28 advertisements examined in which a very old person appeared, 26 featured a woman rather than a man.

The range of products and services in adverts for older persons is highly differentiated by gender. Almost all the drinks advertisements feature a man, while most health and beauty products have a woman. In relative terms, women have a greater presence in advertisements for assistance and health products6. Men are more prominent in advertising for leisure products7, culture and even for clothes and accessories. This finding can be easily explained in the context of the current model of consumerism which is generally segmented by gender.

However, there is more equality in institutional advertising in quantitative terms with 43% of institutional advertisements representing a man and a woman together, compared to 28% in commercial adverts).

As typically happens in discourses about otherness, older persons are described only in vague terms. The representations we have analyzed tend to generalize and few of them present the individuality or personality of the old person, and even less so in the case of women. Descriptive images are often file pictures that coldly define the Western type of older person. The representation of celebrities is the only case in which older persons’ identity and personality have not been stolen, and the vast majority of the celebrities represented are men.

3.5. Intertextuality. Discussion on the relations between advertising discourse and theoretical models of old age

The findings of this study reveal a link between the discourse of institutional advertising and the functionalist paradigm of the sociology of old age. In this paradigm, the image of old age is a social problem «resulting from mandatory retirement, structural changes in the family and industrialization and urbanization processes, the emphasis on the individual adjustment to ageing» (Giró, 2004: 20). The institutional discourse presents the «official» program of activities suitable for older persons (IMSERSO trips, club cards, programs to learn new technologies, etc.). It can be linked to the functionalist theory that considers retirement as a stage marked by creative leisure: «the theory of activity is based on a very optimistic and in some ways idealistic view, as it hands the elderly population a solution to their problems which actually depends exclusively on the social, economic and political structures».

Public administration advertising has raised the visibility of the oldest. The image of very old persons, with no recognized activity and represented in company or in need of the help of others, reflects a functionalist idea that is economic in nature when associating old age with retirement or lack of activity. It is related to the discursive perspective that promotes the social creation of dependency in old age (Alan Walker’s thesis). This has economic implications, as retirement is considered to be «a social death, like the denial of the right to work», and it is also believed to promote an economy of social assistance that represents the «environment» and the idea of welfare in public policies on old age:

The «Action Plan» is based on three pillars: the aged and development, promotion of health and welfare in old age and the creation of a suitable environment. It constitutes the benchmark for policy formulation and calls on governments, NGOs and other interested parties to redirect the way in which citizens perceive the aged, interact with them and assist them» (UN International Plan of Action on Ageing, World Assembly, Madrid, 2003: IV),

For its part, commercial advertising seems to promote the postmodern perspective of ageing and the creation of lifestyles that are not based on productivity but on consumption (Giró, 2004: 23). This approach is closer to the idea of a cultural construction of the aged through consumption, contrary to a place that is institutionally assigned.

After analysing eleven categories of products or services advertised, two categories appear as the most widely publicized: assistance and help products and/or services (17.7%) and leisure products/services (12.2%). The same happens with the thematic proposal of the messages. Of the five categories analyzed, the vast majority of advertisements include a functional proposal8 such as assistance (29.5%) or a fun or relaxation proposal (29%). This can be summarized as two ideological constructions of old age: one that equates old age with loss of autonomy (increasing dependencies) and the other that associates this age to leisure and relaxation.

Advertising discourse, be it institutional or commercial, actively promotes the idea of assistance for an age range that needs practical, functional support and objects that provide this. Public administrations choose fun and relaxation as a thematic proposal in many of their advertisements (36% of cases). Therefore, the institutional message would connect with the so-called «disengagement» theory that defines retirement as something desirable (Kehl & Fernández, 2001: 147), an idea that was quickly rejected on the theoretical level, but one which makes sense in an idealistic advertising discourse.

4. Conclusions and challenges

The tradition of consumption associated to gender is deeply rooted in advertising aimed at older persons. Hygiene, health and beauty are associated with women, while culture and alcoholic drinks are associated with men. Commercial advertising raises a relational concept of old age and consumption. The advertising idea of old age deepens the gender gap in commercial advertising, following the old age approach pointed out by Sontag (1979).

The relation between the advertising discourse on older persons and the functionalist paradigm is clear, especially in the case of institutional advertising, which is close to the «disengagement» theory. For its part, commercial advertising’s proposal shows a young old consumer, which can be linked to postmodernity theories that blur the limits of old age and lifestyles based on consumption not productivity (Giró, 2004: 23). This theory strongly promotes the possibility of empowering older persons in anticipation of their future social role: «The immediate future, with the unstoppable increase in the number of aged persons, is going to have to deal with structural and perspective changes in the social value of ages, to the point of predicting that social and political power will rest in the hands of mature and aged people».

The old age discourse in advertising is a duality and clearly depends on the type of emitter. Institutional advertising increasingly represents old people in couples. The result is clearly contextual. According to INE data, the majority of older persons are married and the rates of widowhood have significantly decreased. However, the most widespread discourse is the one proposed by the commercial emitter, which offers all kinds of functional products to make up for the loss of physical capacity. This model of consumption is probably based on a subjective definition of old age understood as loss of autonomy. Camps (2003: 268) states that old age is characterized, above all, by the loss of autonomy, a fact that has been used by advertising in its discourse. Discursive strategy is now no longer based on the fear of ageing, but on the fear of losing capacity and autonomy. This is the implicit message of commercial advertising aimed at older persons.

Advertising, defined as persuasive discourse, shows its ability to transfer meanings related to the old persons’ social role. Not for nothing does Van-Dijk (2003: 166) point out that persuasion, in the broad sense, is defined by control over the terms of social representations.

It can be safely said that old age is the great opportunity for advertising communication and marketing. With an inverted population pyramid whose base is progressively diminishing while the top gets ever wider, the big market in quantitative terms will be older persons. There is also greater media consumption at that age. But one of the questions that arises from these findings is: will the advertising machine continue to publicize an image of older persons as a minority? And more important, will it dare to discard the discourse of fear, of loss of autonomy and embrace a constructive discourse that progressively prepares people in each of life’s stages for the arrival and acceptance of old age? The expectation of an old age rich in possibilities for development and personal growth would not only be culturally but also commercially progress. Only through the construction of a more attractive idea of old age that is plural, diverse and positive will it be possible to impart an experience of senior citizenship that can be appreciated. Hiding and stereotyping images of old age only serves to weaken the bases of the new culture that needs to be built in this century of the old age person.

Some communications studies anticipated that the myth of youth widely disseminated by advertising would soon be replaced by «the silver power » (Martínez-Pais, 1999: 73), since the myths spread by the media belong to the economic and sociological market and its various contexts, but this rational prediction has failed to materialize.

Notes

1 There are several reports on socio-economic analysis, trends and development in this period, such as the UNDP report on Human Development or the CEPAL report.

2 The Blanco y Negro supplement has been analyzed up to its final edition in December 2001. «EPS» and «Sesenta y más» have been analyzed since their first editions, in 1981 and 1984 respectively.

3 In Spain, the percentage of older persons ranged from 11.2% in 1980 to 17.9% in 2010. Data from INE (the Spanish National Statistics Institute).

4 For instance, advertising for the product Revitalift by L’Oréal makes the following promise: «Combat 10 signs of ageing» (www.loreal-paris.es/cuidados-de-la-piel/cuidado-facial/revitalift/revitalift-total-repair-10.aspx) (18-02-2013).

5 Walker, A. (1980): The Social Creation of Poverty and Dependency in Old Age. Journal of Social Policy, 9 (1), 49-75, quoted by Giró (2004: 22).

6 11% of the advertisements that represented a woman as the main character advertised health products, compared to 5.4% of the advertisements with a man as the main character. 31% of the advertisements with a woman as the main character promoted assistance products, compared to 19.5% of the advertisements with a man as the main character.

7 91.4% of the advertisements of leisure products presented a man. In the case of advertisements of cultural products there was only one woman as the main character.

8 Hearing aids, residential centres, telecare services, etc.


Draft Content 256443452-27268-en078.jpg


Draft Content 256443452-27268-en079.jpg


Draft Content 256443452-27268-en080.jpg

References

(www.50plus.kro.nl/data/media/db_download/21_b4443a.pdf) (12-01-2013).

Abellán, A. & Ayala, A. (2012). Un perfil de las personas mayores en España. Indicadores estadísticos. Informes Portal Mayores, 131. Madrid: IMSERSO, CSIC, CCHS. (www.-imsersomayores.csic.es/documentos/documentos/pm-indicadoresbasicos12.pdf) (20-01-2013).

AIMC. (2011). Resumen general EGM. Año móvil febrero a diciembre 2010. (www.aimc.es/-Datos-EGM-Resumen-General-.html) (10-12-12).

Barrio, E. del & Abellán, A. (2009). Las personas mayores en España. Indicadores demográficos. Informe 2008. Madrid: CSIC, Fundación IGEMA. (www.imsersoma-yores.csic.es/documentos/estadisticas/informe-mayores/2008/volumen-1/00-informe-personas-mayores-2008-vol-01.pdf) (10-12-12).

Beauvoir, S. de (1989). La vejez. Barcelona: Edhasa. (1ª ed. La Viellesse: Gallimard, 1970).

Becerril, R. (2011). Cuerpo, cultura y envejecimiento. Análisis de la imagen corporal en la publicidad «60 y más» (IMSERSO). Ágora para la educación física y el deporte, 13 (2), 139-164.

Belando, M. (2007). Modelos sociológicos de la vejez y su repercusión en los medios. Reconstruyendo identidades. Una visión desde el ámbito educativo. In L. Álvarez & J. Evans (Eds.), Actas del Foro Internacional Comunicación e Persoas Maiores (pp. 77-94). Santiago de Compostela: Colegio Oficial de Xornalistas de Galicia.

Bradley, D. E. & Longino, C.F. (2001). How Older People Think about Images of Aging in Advertising and the Media. Generations, XXV, 3, 17-21.

Camps, V. (2003). La vejez como problema y como oportunidad. Gerontol, 13 (4), 267-270.

Comisión de publicidad y comunicación institucional (2011). Plan de comunicación y publicidad institucional 2011. Madrid: Ministerio de la Presidencia. (www.lamoncloa.gob.-es/ConsejodeMinistros/Enlaces/210111-enlacepubli.htm) (20-11-2012).

Featherstone, M. & Wernicke, A. (1995). Images of Aging: Cultural Representations of Later Life. New York / London: Routledge.

Fernández-Ballesteros, R. (2011). Limitaciones y posibilidades de la edad. In IMSERSO. Libro Blanco del envejecimiento activo (pp. 113-148). Madrid: Ministerio de Sanidad, Política Social e Igualdad.

Giró, J. (2004). El significado de la vejez. In J. Giró (Coord.), Envejecimiento y sociedad. Una perspectiva pluridisciplinar. (pp.19-46). Logroño: Universidad de la Rioja.

IMSERSO (2010). Las personas mayores en España. Datos estadísticos estatales y por comunidades autónomas. Observatorio de personas mayores. Instituto de Mayores y Servicios sociales. Madrid: Ministerio de Sanidad, Servicios Sociales e Igualdad.

Iñiguez, L. (2006). El análisis del discurso en las ciencias sociales: variedades, tradiciones y práctica. In L. Íñiguez (Ed.), Análisis del discurso. Manual para las ciencias sociales (pp.89-128). Bar-celona: UOC.

Iruzubieta, F. (2004). Promoción de la salud y prevención de la enfermedad en el anciano. In J. Giró (Coord.), Envejecimiento y sociedad. Una perspectiva pluridisciplinar (pp.77-102). Logroño: Universidad de la Rioja.

Kehl, S. & Fernández, J.M. (2001). La construcción social de la vejez. Cuadernos de Trabajo Social, 14, 125-161.

Martínez-Pais, F. (1999). Mitología de hoy: los medios de comunicación, un reto para los docentes. Comunicar, 12, 71-77.

ONU (2003). Declaración política y plan de acción internacional de Madrid sobre el envejecimiento. Segunda Asamblea Mundial sobre el envejecimiento. Nueva York: Naciones Unidas. (http://social.un.org/ageing-working-group/documents/mipaa-sp.pdf) (06-02-2013).

ONU (2007). Estudio económico y social mundial 2007. El desarrollo en un mundo que envejece. Aportes, XII, 35, 149-168. (http://redalyc.uaemex.mx/pdf/376/37603510.pdf) (10-02-2013).

Polo, M.E. (2006). La representación de los mayores en los periódicos de Castilla y León: (1983-2001). Salamanca: Universidad Pontificia de Salamanca, colección tesis doctorales.

Sánchez Vera, P. (1996). Tercera y cuarta edad en España desde la perspectiva de los hogares. Reis, Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociológicas, 73, 57-79.

Sanchís-Marco, M. (2011). Falacias, dilemas y paradojas: La economía de España: 1980-2010, Valencia: Universitat de València.

Santamarina, C. (2004). La imagen de las personas mayores. In Giró (Coord.), Envejecimiento y sociedad. Una perspectiva pluridisciplinar (pp.47-76). Logroño: Universidad de la Rioja.

Smith, M.C. (1976). Portrayal of the Elderly in Prescription Drug Advertising: A Pilot Study. The Gerontologist, 16 (4), 329-334. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/geront/16.4.329).

Sontag, S. (1979). The Double Standard of Aging. In J. Williams (Ed.), Psychology of Women (pp. 462-478), San Diego: Academic Press.

Stephens, N. (1991). Cognitive Age: A Useful Concept for Advertising? Journal of Advertising, XX, 4, 37-48. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00913367.1991.10673353).

Swayne, L.E. & Greco, A.J. (1987). The portrayal of older Americans in Television Commercials. Journal of Advertising, 47-54 (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00913367.1987.10673060).

Timoteo, J. (2012). Historia y modelos de la comunicación en el siglo XX. Con proyecciones al siglo XXI. Madrid: Universitas.

UN (2009). World Population Prospects: the 2008 Revision. New York: United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs. (www.un.org/esa/population/publications/-wpp2008/wpp2008_highlights.pdf) (01-02-2013).

UNDP (2011). Human Development Report 2011. Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All. New York: United Nations Development Program. (http://hdr.undp.org/en/reports/global/hdr2011) (04-02-2013).

Van-Dijk, T.A. (1996). Análisis del discurso ideológico. Versión. Estudios de Comunicación y Política, 6, 15-43.

Van-Dijk, T.A. (1999). El análisis crítico del discurso. Anthropos, 186, 22-36.

Van-Dijk, T.A. (2003). La multidisciplinaridad del análisis crítico del discurso: un alegato a favor de la diversidad. In R. Wodak & M. Meyer (Eds.), Métodos de análisis crítico del discurso (pp. 143-177). Barcelona: Gedisa.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

La población de personas mayores se ha multiplicado en los últimos años. Se estima que en el año 2050, el 32% de la población española estará constituido por personas mayores. Mientras tanto, es fácil observar la infrarrepresentación de este colectivo en los medios de comunicación, pero la cuestión apenas recibe interés investigador. Se presenta aquí un análisis de la representación de las personas mayores en la publicidad de dominicales y revistas dirigidas directa o indirectamente a las personas mayores en España. A través de un análisis de contenido se calcula la frecuencia con que se recurre a la imagen de los y las mayores en la publicidad. Mediante un análisis del discurso se indaga también en la presencia de estereotipos y en las relaciones discursivas entre los mensajes publicitarios y las teorías de la vejez. Los resultados muestran que las personas mayores que aparecen en los anuncios son mayoritariamente varones, que inician su periodo de vejez y consumidores de productos de ocio. Se encuentra un marcado estereotipo de género y una clara diferenciación discursiva entre los mensajes comerciales y los institucionales. El estudio analiza tres décadas, abarcando el periodo en el que se ha producido la inversión poblacional en la distribución por edades en España. En todo este periodo la frecuencia de aparición ha sido muy baja. Se trata de un colectivo de patente invisibilidad en los anuncios publicitarios.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción. La vejez definirá el siglo XXI (¿y su comunicación?)

Uno de los cambios sociales que más describe nuestro contexto es el progresivo envejecimiento universal de la población. La esperanza de vida mundial ha aumentado a 69,8 años, a la par que la fertilidad se ha reducido a 2,6 hijos por mujer (ONU, 2007). Se estima que la población mayor de 60 años se triplique, y que la población mayor de 80 años se haya cuadriplicado en 2050 (UN, 2009). Se habla de una transición demográfica a nivel planetario.

La población de ancianos es tres veces mayor en los países desarrollados que en los menos desarrollados y los porcentajes seguirán creciendo (Giró, 2004: 30). Europa será pronto la región más envejecida del globo. En España, la esperanza de vida al nacer aumenta progresivamente, de 75 años en el año 1980 a más de 81 años en 2011 (UNDP, 2011) y el INE calcula que las personas mayores serán casi un tercio de la población en 2050. Para esa fecha, las proyecciones de la ONU sitúan a España como el segundo país más envejecido, después de Japón (Barrio y Abellán, 2009).

Estas estadísticas asumen que la vejez se inicia a la edad de jubilación, esto es, los 65 años. Los indicadores estadísticos toman pues un criterio económico y laboral para dividir los segmentos de edad. Pero la edad de inicio de la vejez es arbitraria; otros criterios (Giró, 2004: 24) la sitúan a partir de los 50 o los 55 años, si se toman en cuenta cambios biológicos, de salud, comerciales y sociales. Este solo aspecto ya da cuenta de que la vejez se define con convenciones sociales: «Sabemos que el problema de la vejez no es estrictamente un problema biológico, médico o físico, sino que es, principalmente, un problema social y cultural; es decir, la vejez, su significado, es una construcción social» (Giró, 2004: 19).

La vejez es una construcción social (Kehl & Fernández, 2001), un hecho cultural (Beauvoir, 1989: 20), una cuestión de imágenes y actitudes, tal como ha sido señalado (Iruzubieta, 2004: 77). Un campo de estudio específico sobre la construcción social de la vejez ha sido el análisis de sus imágenes y significados (véase Featherstone & Wernick, 1995) y también, en concreto, las imágenes transmitidas por los medios de comunicación (Santamarina, 2004). Distintos trabajos han señalado la importancia de los medios de comunicación en esta construcción social (Kehl & Fernández, 2001: 133) y recientemente ha cobrado interés el análisis de la representación de las personas mayores en la prensa española (Polo, 2006; Becerril, 2011).

En la segunda Asamblea Mundial sobre el Envejecimiento, celebrada en Madrid, Kofi A. Annan expresó que, desde la anterior Asamblea de 1982, el mundo había cambiado tanto que resultaba irreconocible (ONU, 2003: IV). Esta estrategia de la ONU instaba a los gobiernos y a la sociedad civil a reorientar la manera en que se percibe a las personas mayores, incluyendo expresamente a los medios de comunicación (artículo 17: 6), en tanto creadores de entorno.

El análisis de la representación de las personas mayores en la publicidad no constituye aún una temática de estudio específico en la literatura científica española, si bien genera estudios en Norteamérica desde los años setenta (Smith, 1976; Swayne & Greco, 1987). Los distintos análisis constatan un retrato estereotipado, a menudo con connotaciones negativas y con infrarrepresentación en los anuncios.

2. Planteamiento investigador

Este estudio tiene el propósito de analizar cómo el discurso publicitario, con sus particulares estructuras y estrategias de contenido, está orientando la imagen o el papel social de las personas mayores en las últimas décadas. Los objetivos abordados son el análisis de la representación icónica y verbal de las personas mayores en la publicidad, así como el estudio de divergencias discursivas entre la publicidad de emisores comerciales y la de emisores institucionales.

Como hipótesis de este estudio se parte de una notable invisibilidad publicitaria del colectivo de las personas mayores, uno de los grupos sociales más numerosos en España. Se pretende cuantificar esa visibilidad/invisibilidad en los anuncios, para comprobar la hipótesis e indagar después en una posible diferencia discursiva en la publicidad de emisores institucionales y en la publicidad de emisores comerciales. Se aborda también el análisis de las principales diferencias en la representación de hombres y mujeres al anticipar un posible tratamiento estereotipador del género en la publicidad. Para ello se analizan tanto imágenes como textos.

Para analizar este marco de representaciones y discursos se ha tomado como orientación metodológica tanto el análisis de contenido como el análisis crítico del discurso (ACD) en la perspectiva de la definición aportada por Van-Dijk (1999: 22): «El análisis crítico del discurso es un tipo de investigación analítica sobre el discurso que estudia primariamente el modo en que el abuso del poder social, el dominio y la desigualdad son practicados, reproducidos, y ocasionalmente combatidos, por los textos y el habla en el contexto social y político. El análisis crítico del discurso, con tan peculiar investigación, toma explícitamente partido, y espera contribuir de manera efectiva a la resistencia contra la desigualdad social».

El análisis crítico del discurso sirve para desvelar actos de comunicación que promueven la desigualdad social. Desvela la distancia propia de la comunicación entre emisor y público. En el caso de la publicidad analizada, es evidente que sus creadores y decisores no han sido probablemente personas de la tercera edad, por lo que el discurso de los anuncios constituye un acto de habla sobre «ellos» o sobre «otros».

A través de los medios de comunicación, también de la publicidad, se establece un nexo entre los emisores plurales que representan a los poderes sociales y económicos (el Estado, las corporaciones, los agentes económicos) y el público que construye y valida diariamente conceptos y autoconceptos sociales. De la aplicación de esta modelización mixta se extraerán tanto datos cuantitativos como relaciones entre la argumentación publicitaria de los emisores públicos y privados y los modelos de ancianidad con los que se corresponden.

«Los discursos son interpretados como elementos que guardan una relación coherente con los modelos mentales que los usuarios tienen sobre los acontecimientos o los hechos a que se hace referencia» (Van- Dijk, 2003:165).

Se sabe que las estructuras del discurso están relacionadas con las estructuras del contexto. De ahí la utilidad de las categorías del análisis al permitir encontrar relaciones con estructuras sociales. Esta observación en el discurso publicitario aporta un marco teorético para el estudio de la producción discursiva actual que está afirmando la actual condición social de las personas mayores. En este estudio se analiza el nivel micro de los mensajes publicitarios para ponerlo en relación con el nivel macro, de los marcos de las teorías de la gerontología social.

2.1. Diseño muestral

Siendo histórico todo discurso, este análisis abarca un amplio periodo (1980-2010) considerado como una etapa en la historia de la comunicación (Timoteo, 2012), una fase de estudio económico (Sanchís-Marco, 2011) y como periodo de análisis diacrónico en la historia reciente del desarrollo a nivel internacional1. Este intervalo coincide con un progresivo alcance de los más altos índices de esperanza de vida en la historia, y de envejecimiento poblacional. El año 2001 fue el punto de inflexión en la historia demográfica de España; desde entonces, el porcentaje de población infantil es superado por el de las personas mayores de 65 años (Abellán & Ayala: 2012: 6).

Se han analizado anuncios gráficos de la prensa no diaria en España. Se han seleccionado soportes que se dirigen de manera específica a las personas mayores («Vivir con Júbilo», «Sesenta y más») así como soportes generalistas de amplia audiencia entre el colectivo de mayor edad (los dominicales «Blanco y Negro»2, «EPS: El País Semanal») así como una revista del sector farmacéutico (Acófar). Se recogieron todos los anuncios que representaran visual y/o verbalmente a las personas mayores. Se analizaron los anuncios no repetidos encontrados en el periodo fijado en todos los números editados en el caso de las publicaciones mensuales, seleccionando un ejemplar al mes en el caso de las semanales. El total de anuncios analizados fue de 1.691.

Según los datos de la AIMC (2011), las personas mayores de 55 años suman el 33,2% de la audiencia de los suplementos y el 25% de la audiencia total de revistas. Se trata de un segmento de audiencia muy afín al medio prensa en general. También es un medio prioritario para la publicidad institucional, como se apunta en el Plan de Publicidad y Comunicación Institucional 2011 (Comisión de Publicidad y Comunicación Institucional, 2011, VI).

Las imágenes y textos publicitarios constituyen un valioso material para el análisis, al actuar como proyector y visor de estos constructos. Podría decirse que la publicidad actúa como conversor de estas ideas en imágenes y convenciones de representación. Pero estas representaciones a la vez regresan al imaginario social y perfilarían nuestras imágenes mentales.

2.2. Modelo de análisis

Cuando el interés de estudio es el análisis del papel del discurso en la reproducción de ideas sobre grupos sociales, han de analizarse las formas de significado. Esto pasa por un análisis de contenido, según orienta Van DijK (2003: 149), que identifique la elección de temas, proposiciones y elementos léxicos. Estos tres elementos son los que han sido tomados como relevantes para el análisis del discurso publicitario en torno al papel de las personas mayores en nuestra sociedad. En términos de la construcción publicitara de mensajes, se ha hecho una correspondencia con: temas o ámbitos de información o consumo, propuesta argumental, y palabras o expresiones relativas a la vejez. Tales elementos han sido filtrados en categorías de un análisis interpretativo del contenido observado. Además se han analizado las imágenes con las que son representados los mayores, analizando el sexo, segmento de edad, y la aparición en soledad o en convivencia con otras personas. Se analizó también el tipo de emisor para conseguir un estudio comparativo entre la publicidad de emisores institucionales y emisores comerciales.

3. Resultados y análisis

Se presentan a continuación datos extraídos de la aplicación del modelo de análisis de contenido, diseñado para propiciar un análisis del discurso. Estos resultados se irán poniendo en relación con las teorías de la vejez aportadas por los estudios de la gerontología social, teniendo en cuenta el carácter marcadamente interpretativo de los procesos de análisis del discurso (Íñiguez, 2006: 121). Diversos aspectos del contexto señalados por Van-Dijk (1996: 30) han sido integrados en el modelo de análisis, tales como subperíodos de edad, género, lexicalización, descripciones de actividad, proposición y temas (éstos últimos traducidos en este estudio aplicado a la publicidad como propuesta argumental del anuncio y ámbito de consumo).

3.1. Invisibilidades

El principal dato que arroja este estudio es la patente invisibilidad de las personas mayores en los anuncios. Más aún si tenemos en cuenta que los soportes analizados se dirigen, de forma específica o general, a los mayores como público. Revisados casi 35.000 anuncios, sólo se encontraron 1.691 en los que se representara a personas mayores. La invisibilidad es quizá el ejercicio más común de violencia simbólica en la comunicación cuando se habla de grupos desfavorecidos. Eso ocurre con las personas mayores, más aún teniendo en cuenta que las personas mayores no son una minoría. En España la pirámide poblacional está claramente invertida.

Sólo el 4,8% de los anuncios encontrados representaban a personas mayores3. Es significativo además, que en revistas dirigidas de forma exclusiva a personas mayores («Vivir con Júbilo», «Sesenta y Más»), este porcentaje sólo alcanzaba el 27 o el 40%, respectivamente.

Pero es necesario tener en cuenta que la llamada tercera edad abarca muchos años de vida. Al menos incluiría dos o tres franjas de edad intermedia. Algunos trabajos distinguían entre la tercera edad y una cuarta edad (Sánchez-Vera, 1996) o entre los «viejos jóvenes» y los viejos más viejos, edad que se iniciaría a partir de los ochenta años (denominados «oldest old», en términos ONU). Esta franja de edad ha sido la que más ha aumentado en España. Los mayores de 80 representaban en 2009 el 29% de la población mayor de 65 años y se estima que serán pronto el 36,8% del total de la población mayor (IMSERSO, 2010: 32). En contraste, sólo el 4% de las personas mayores representadas en los anuncios pertenecía al grupo de los muy mayores (oldest old o ancianos). La mayoría de las imágenes representaba a un joven mayor (60%), de entre unos 60 a 75 años aproximadamente. En su estudio, Bradley y Longino (2001) relacionaban este estereotipo de joven mayor con la llamada hipótesis de la máscara de la edad, según la cual las personas mayores se ven a sí mismas más jóvenes de lo que son. El dato es reflejo de la intención proyectiva de los mensajes e imágenes de la publicidad y ha provocado la discusión sobre la edad cognitiva y la edad biológica. Stephens (1991) planteó la utilidad y potencial del concepto de edad cognitiva para la conformación de targets publicitarios.

Las teorías funcionalistas de la sociología de la vejez explicaron que la clasificación de edades es un elemento estructural con el que se asignan distintas funciones. La publicidad incide en esta lógica, propia de la teoría de la estratificación por edades, según la cual la autoestima de cada etapa está condicionada a los roles que desempeña (Belando, 2007). La propuesta argumental de los mensajes publicitarios es la diversión, el descanso o la ilusión en el caso del joven mayor y pasa a ser una propuesta asistencial en el estrato de mayor edad. La autoestima y la autonomía son argumentos persuasivos que se dirigen principalmente al joven mayor.

La invisibilidad de las personas pertenecientes a la franja de muy mayores en la publicidad comercial, así como su asociación a la idea de dependencia, dan como indicio cierto «edadismo» (Fernández-Ballesteros, 2011: 138), o discriminación que se realiza de ese grupo social.

3.2. Estudio léxico. Vejez: un tabú de la publicidad

La invisibilidad también se hace presente en las palabras de los textos publicitarios. La labor del «copy writer» parece esforzarse en eludir la mención explícita de la vejez. Las personas mayores no son, pues, nombradas en la publicidad. Se extrae el dato de que el 56,6% de los anuncios sobre personas mayores eluden incluir alguna palabra que los identifique como tales.

En los casos en que se lexicaliza, se recurre al adjetivo mayores (8,9%) o a la descripción de la edad: tercera edad, edad de oro, hombre de edad, etc. (3,7%). No aparece la palabra vejez ni las palabras derivadas de su raíz, ni siquiera en la publicidad encontrada en la prensa dirigida a ese grupo de edad. Por el contrario, es fácil comprobar cómo la palabra vejez y otras palabras asociadas a su aspecto físico como arrugas, canas, flacidez, son léxico común en la cosmética femenina. La vejez ha pasado a ser un término utilizado en el modelo publicitario del consumismo por el miedo a la vejez4. En esta paradoja, la representación de imágenes de personas mayores en la publicidad no va ligada al uso del término que los identifica. Por el contrario, la palabra vejez aparece junto a imágenes que denotan juventud.

3.3. Las personas mayores y la representación de su independencia/dependencia

La publicidad institucional representa a la persona mayor en compañía de otras personas. El 49% de los anuncios institucionales analizados presentaban a la persona mayor en convivencia, mientras sólo en el 30% de los casos la persona mayor aparece sola. Se ha hablado ya de la creación social de la dependencia de las personas ancianas5, idea que parece fomentar el discurso de la publicidad institucional. Una de las teorías de la sociología de la gerontología se lanzó desde el interaccionismo simbólico, con el nombre de teoría del etiquetado. Según esta perspectiva, una de las etiquetas adscritas a las personas mayores era la de dependientes (entendiendo la dependencia como cierta desviación).

En cambio, en la publicidad analizada de anunciantes privados y comerciales, el 65% de los anuncios representaba a una persona mayor sola o en pareja. Se trata de «jóvenes mayores», independientes, una presentación alejada del estereotipo que asocia vejez a dependencia y que está difundiendo principalmente la publicidad comercial, excluyente, por otra parte, con las personas muy mayores.

3.4. Estereotipos de género en la representación de las personas mayores

A pesar de que el aumento de la esperanza de vida conlleva la feminización de la ancianidad, se observa que sólo el 23,6% de los anuncios son protagonizados por una mujer, frente al 44% de los casos que toman como protagonista a un varón. Esta ratio es equivalente en la publicidad institucional y comercial, siendo la publicidad comercial la que presenta un porcentaje mayor de mujeres protagonistas (23,7% frente al 20,8% de los anuncios institucionales).

En 1979, Susan Sontag habló del doble estándar del envejecimiento, un orden social que parece seguir reflejándose en las imágenes de la vejez. En la publicidad analizada, el varón se asocia a situaciones de ocio que disfruta en compañía. La mujer mayor aparece con mucha más frecuencia sola y demandando productos asistenciales. El perfil de persona anciana está también feminizado en la publicidad. De los 28 anuncios encontrados en los que aparecía una persona muy mayor, 26 presentaban la imagen de una mujer.

La oferta de productos y servicios para personas mayores está muy diferenciada por sexo en la publicidad: la práctica totalidad de los anuncios de bebidas representa a un varón, mientras que la mayoría de los productos de higiene y belleza representa a una mujer. En términos relativos, la mujer aparece representada con una presencia notablemente mayor en los anuncios de productos asistenciales y de salud6. El varón aparece notablemente más representado cuando lo que se anuncian son productos de ocio7, de cultura, incluso de ropa y complementos. Este es un dato fácilmente explicable por el modelo de consumo actual, muy segmentado por sexo en términos generales.

Ahora bien, la publicidad institucional presenta mayor cantidad de anuncios igualitarios, en términos cuantitativos, en el que aparecen representadas una figura masculina y una femenina (43% de los anuncios institucionales, frente al 28% de los comerciales).

Como suele ocurrir con los discursos de la otredad, las personas mayores reciben una vaga descripción. Las representaciones analizadas tienden a generalizar y muy pocas expresan la individualidad o personalidad, menos aún en el caso de las mujeres representadas. Las imágenes descriptivas en ocasiones son imágenes de archivo que definen fríamente a mayores occidentales. La representación de personas famosas es el caso encontrado en que los mayores no son vaciados de personalidad identitaria. Se da la circunstancia de que la gran mayoría de las personas famosas representadas son varones.

3.5. Intertextualidad. Discusión sobre las relaciones entre discurso publicitario y modelos teóricos de la vejez

Los datos que arroja este estudio conducen a la afirmación de que existe una vinculación entre el discurso publicitario institucional y el paradigma funcionalista de la sociología de la vejez. En este paradigma, la imagen de la vejez es un problema social «que resulta de la jubilación obligatoria, los cambios estructurales en la familia y los procesos de industrialización y urbanización, así como el énfasis puesto en el ajuste individual al envejecimiento» (Giró, 2004: 20). El discurso institucional presenta el programa «oficial» de la actividad de las personas mayores (viajes IMSERSO, tarjetas de club, programas formativos en nuevas tecnologías, etc.), lo que se relaciona con la teoría funcionalista que considera la jubilación como una etapa marcada por el ocio creativo: «La teoría de la actividad se asienta sobre grandes dosis de optimismo y un cierto grado de idealismo, pues extiende a la voluntad del conjunto de la población mayor, una solución a sus problemas que en realidad depende exclusivamente de las estructuras sociales, económicas y políticas».

Los anuncios publicitarios de las administraciones públicas son los que han abierto un espacio de visibilidad de los más ancianos. La imagen de personas muy mayores, sin actividad definida y presentados con personas de compañía o apoyo, refleja la idea funcionalista también de corte económico al asociar ancianidad a retiro o ausencia de actividad social. Se relaciona con la postura discursiva que fomenta la creación social de la dependencia en las personas ancianas (tesis de Alan Walker). Aspecto éste de implicaciones económicas, en tanto se considera el retiro «como una muerte social, como la negación del derecho al trabajo», y a su vez, como el fomento de una economía de la asistencia social, que representa el «entorno» y la idea de bienestar de las políticas públicas de la ancianidad:

«El Plan de Acción se centra en tres ámbitos prioritarios: las personas de edad y el desarrollo, el fomento de la salud y el bienestar en la vejez y la creación de un entorno propicio favorable, sirve de base para la formulación de políticas y apunta a los gobiernos, a las organizaciones no gubernamentales y a otras partes interesadas las posibilidades de reorientar la manera en que sus sociedades perciben a los ciudadanos de edad, se relacionan con ellos y los atienden» (ONU, Plan de acción de la Asamblea de Madrid, 2003: IV),

Por su parte, la publicidad comercial parece participar de la perspectiva postmoderna del envejecimiento y la creación de estilos de vida que no están basados en la productividad sino en el consumo (Giró, 2004: 23). Este enfoque participa más de la posibilidad de una construcción cultural propia de las personas de edad, a través del consumo, frente a un lugar asignado institucionalmente.

Analizadas once categorías de producto o servicio anunciado en los anuncios, dos categorías emergen entre las más anunciadas: productos y/o servicios de apoyo y ayuda (17,7% del total) y productos/servicios de ocio (12,2%). Igualmente ocurre con la propuesta argumental de los mensajes. Sobre cinco categorías analizadas, la mayor cantidad de anuncios registra una propuesta asistencial, funcional8 (29,5%) o una propuesta de diversión o relax (29%). Esto se resume en dos construcciones ideológicas de la vejez: la que equipara vejez a pérdida de autonomía (crecientes dependencias) y la que asocia esta edad al ocio y relax.

El discurso publicitario, tanto el institucional como el comercial, fomenta especialmente la idea asistencial de una edad que necesita apoyos y objetos prácticos, funcionales. Las administraciones públicas en particular eligen en muchos de sus anuncios la diversión y el relax, como propuesta argumental (36% de los casos). El mensaje institucional conectaría así con la llamada teoría del «desenganche», que plantea el retiro como algo deseable (Kehl & Fernández, 2001: 147), supuesto que fue pronto rechazado a nivel teórico, pero que parece adquirir expresión en un idealista discurso publicitario.

4. Conclusiones y retos

La tradición de consumos asociados a sexos está muy arraigada en la publicidad dirigida a mayores. La higiene, salud y belleza se asocia a la mujer, mientras que cultura y bebida alcohólica se asocia al varón. La publicidad comercial plantea así un concepto relacional de vejez y consumo. La idea publicitaria de vejez distancia a los sexos en la publicidad comercial, en línea con el doble patrón de vejez señalado por Sontag (1979).

Se descubre la relación entre el discurso publicitario sobre las personas mayores y el paradigma funcionalista, especialmente en el caso de la publicidad institucional, próxima a la llamada teoría del desenganche. Por su parte, la propuesta de la publicidad comercial muestra a un joven mayor consumidor, lo que enlaza con teorías de la posmodernidad, que encuentran límites difusos en la vejez y unos estilos de vida no basados en la productividad sino en el consumo (Giró, 2004: 23). Es esta teoría la que más alberga la posibilidad de dar poder a las personas mayores, algo que anticiparía su rol social venidero: «El futuro inmediato, con el aumento imparable de las personas de edad, va a protagonizar cambios estructurales y de perspectiva acerca del valor social de las edades, hasta el punto de vaticinar que el poder político y social estará en manos de personas maduras y ancianas».

El discurso de la ancianidad es dual en la publicidad y depende claramente del tipo de emisor. La publicidad institucional apuesta de manera progresiva por la representación en pareja. Este resultado es claramente contextual. Según los datos del INE, la mayoría de las personas mayores están casadas y los índices de viudedad han disminuido muy notablemente. No obstante, el discurso mayoritario es del emisor comercial, que ofrece todo tipo de productos y servicios funcionales que suplen la pérdida de capacidades. Este modelo de consumo se basa probablemente en una definición subjetiva de la vejez, entendida como pérdida de autonomía. Camps (2003: 268) afirma que lo que caracteriza la ancianidad es, por encima de todo, la falta de autonomía, criterio que la publicidad ha tomado en su discurso. La estrategia discursiva no sería ya el miedo a la vejez, sino el miedo a la pérdida de capacidades y autonomía. Ese sería el mensaje implícito de la publicidad comercial dirigida a las personas mayores.

La publicidad, definida en su esencia como discurso persuasivo, demuestra su capacidad para transferir significados que se relacionan con el rol social de las personas mayores. No en vano, Van-Dijk (2003: 166) apuntaba que la persuasión, en un sentido amplio, se define en términos de control de las representaciones sociales.

Podría asegurarse sin demasiado riesgo de error que la vejez es la gran oportunidad de la comunicación publicitaria y el marketing. Con una pirámide poblacional invertida que progresivamente adelgaza su base y engrosa su cúspide, el gran mercado, en términos cuantitativos, será el público de mayores. A ello se le suma el mayor consumo mediático que se realiza a esa edad. Pero una de las preguntas que surgen a partir de estos resultados es si la máquina publicitaria seguirá ofreciendo resistencia por mucho tiempo a difundir la imagen de las personas mayores de forma no minoritaria. Y lo que sería más importante, si se atreverá a relevar al discurso del miedo a la pérdida de autonomía, por un discurso constructivo, que prepare progresivamente y en las distintas etapas de la vida, a esperar y aceptar la vejez. Una expectativa de vejez rica en posibilidades de desarrollo y crecimiento personal no sólo sería un avance cultural, sino seguramente también comercial. Sólo construyendo una mejor idea de la vejez, plural, diversa y positiva, se educaría para una experiencia apreciada de la misma. Ocultando y estereotipando sus imágenes sólo se logra adelgazar los puntos de apoyo de la nueva cultura que es necesaria construir en el siglo de la vejez.

Algún estudio comunicacional anticipó que el mito de la juventud, propagado ampliamente por la publicidad, sería pronto sustituido por «el poder de la plata» (Martínez-Pais, 1999: 73), pues los mitos que difunden los medios de comunicación responden al mercado económico y sociológico de cada contexto. Este vaticinio, formulado desde una gran racionalidad, se resiste a ser cumplido.

Notas

1 Diversos informes de análisis socioeconómico, tendencias y desarrollo abarcan ese periodo, como el Informe UNDP sobre Desarrollo Humano, o el informe CEPAL.

2 El dominical Blanco y Negro ha sido analizado hasta su cierre de edición en diciembre de 2001. «EPS» y «Sesenta y más» se han analizado desde su inicio de edición, en 1981 y 1984 respectivamente.

3 En España, el porcentaje de población de personas mayores entre 1980 y 2010 osciló entre el 11,2% y el 17,9%. Datos INE: INEBASE. Cifras de población.

4 Como ejemplo, la publicidad del producto Revitalift de L’Oréal ofrece la siguiente promesa: «Combate 10 signos del envejecimiento» (www.loreal-paris.es/cuidados-de-la-piel/cuidado-facial/revitalift/revitalift-total-repair-10.aspx) (18-02-2013).

5 Walker, A. (1980): The Social Creation of Poverty and Dependency in Old Age. Journal of Social Policy, 9 (1), 49-75, citado en Giró (2004: 22).

6 El 11% de los anuncios que representaban a una mujer protagonista anunciaban productos de salud, frente al 5,4% de los anuncios con un varón como figura principal. El 31 % de los anuncios con una mujer protagonista ofrecían productos de asistencia, frente al 19,5% de los anuncios con un varón como figura principal.

7 El 91,4% de los anuncios de productos de ocio presentaba a un varón. En el caso de los anuncios de productos culturales sólo un anuncio registraba a una mujer como figura principal.

8 Audífonos, centros residenciales, servicios de teleasistencia, etc.


Draft Content 256443452-27268 ov-es078.jpg


Draft Content 256443452-27268 ov-es079.jpg


Draft Content 256443452-27268 ov-es080.jpg

Referencias

(www.50plus.kro.nl/data/media/db_download/21_b4443a.pdf) (12-01-2013).

Abellán, A. & Ayala, A. (2012). Un perfil de las personas mayores en España. Indicadores estadísticos. Informes Portal Mayores, 131. Madrid: IMSERSO, CSIC, CCHS. (www.-imsersomayores.csic.es/documentos/documentos/pm-indicadoresbasicos12.pdf) (20-01-2013).

AIMC. (2011). Resumen general EGM. Año móvil febrero a diciembre 2010. (www.aimc.es/-Datos-EGM-Resumen-General-.html) (10-12-12).

Barrio, E. del & Abellán, A. (2009). Las personas mayores en España. Indicadores demográficos. Informe 2008. Madrid: CSIC, Fundación IGEMA. (www.imsersoma-yores.csic.es/documentos/estadisticas/informe-mayores/2008/volumen-1/00-informe-personas-mayores-2008-vol-01.pdf) (10-12-12).

Beauvoir, S. de (1989). La vejez. Barcelona: Edhasa. (1ª ed. La Viellesse: Gallimard, 1970).

Becerril, R. (2011). Cuerpo, cultura y envejecimiento. Análisis de la imagen corporal en la publicidad «60 y más» (IMSERSO). Ágora para la educación física y el deporte, 13 (2), 139-164.

Belando, M. (2007). Modelos sociológicos de la vejez y su repercusión en los medios. Reconstruyendo identidades. Una visión desde el ámbito educativo. In L. Álvarez & J. Evans (Eds.), Actas del Foro Internacional Comunicación e Persoas Maiores (pp. 77-94). Santiago de Compostela: Colegio Oficial de Xornalistas de Galicia.

Bradley, D. E. & Longino, C.F. (2001). How Older People Think about Images of Aging in Advertising and the Media. Generations, XXV, 3, 17-21.

Camps, V. (2003). La vejez como problema y como oportunidad. Gerontol, 13 (4), 267-270.

Comisión de publicidad y comunicación institucional (2011). Plan de comunicación y publicidad institucional 2011. Madrid: Ministerio de la Presidencia. (www.lamoncloa.gob.-es/ConsejodeMinistros/Enlaces/210111-enlacepubli.htm) (20-11-2012).

Featherstone, M. & Wernicke, A. (1995). Images of Aging: Cultural Representations of Later Life. New York / London: Routledge.

Fernández-Ballesteros, R. (2011). Limitaciones y posibilidades de la edad. In IMSERSO. Libro Blanco del envejecimiento activo (pp. 113-148). Madrid: Ministerio de Sanidad, Política Social e Igualdad.

Giró, J. (2004). El significado de la vejez. In J. Giró (Coord.), Envejecimiento y sociedad. Una perspectiva pluridisciplinar. (pp.19-46). Logroño: Universidad de la Rioja.

IMSERSO (2010). Las personas mayores en España. Datos estadísticos estatales y por comunidades autónomas. Observatorio de personas mayores. Instituto de Mayores y Servicios sociales. Madrid: Ministerio de Sanidad, Servicios Sociales e Igualdad.

Iñiguez, L. (2006). El análisis del discurso en las ciencias sociales: variedades, tradiciones y práctica. In L. Íñiguez (Ed.), Análisis del discurso. Manual para las ciencias sociales (pp.89-128). Bar-celona: UOC.

Iruzubieta, F. (2004). Promoción de la salud y prevención de la enfermedad en el anciano. In J. Giró (Coord.), Envejecimiento y sociedad. Una perspectiva pluridisciplinar (pp.77-102). Logroño: Universidad de la Rioja.

Kehl, S. & Fernández, J.M. (2001). La construcción social de la vejez. Cuadernos de Trabajo Social, 14, 125-161.

Martínez-Pais, F. (1999). Mitología de hoy: los medios de comunicación, un reto para los docentes. Comunicar, 12, 71-77.

ONU (2003). Declaración política y plan de acción internacional de Madrid sobre el envejecimiento. Segunda Asamblea Mundial sobre el envejecimiento. Nueva York: Naciones Unidas. (http://social.un.org/ageing-working-group/documents/mipaa-sp.pdf) (06-02-2013).

ONU (2007). Estudio económico y social mundial 2007. El desarrollo en un mundo que envejece. Aportes, XII, 35, 149-168. (http://redalyc.uaemex.mx/pdf/376/37603510.pdf) (10-02-2013).

Polo, M.E. (2006). La representación de los mayores en los periódicos de Castilla y León: (1983-2001). Salamanca: Universidad Pontificia de Salamanca, colección tesis doctorales.

Sánchez Vera, P. (1996). Tercera y cuarta edad en España desde la perspectiva de los hogares. Reis, Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociológicas, 73, 57-79.

Sanchís-Marco, M. (2011). Falacias, dilemas y paradojas: La economía de España: 1980-2010, Valencia: Universitat de València.

Santamarina, C. (2004). La imagen de las personas mayores. In Giró (Coord.), Envejecimiento y sociedad. Una perspectiva pluridisciplinar (pp.47-76). Logroño: Universidad de la Rioja.

Smith, M.C. (1976). Portrayal of the Elderly in Prescription Drug Advertising: A Pilot Study. The Gerontologist, 16 (4), 329-334. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/geront/16.4.329).

Sontag, S. (1979). The Double Standard of Aging. In J. Williams (Ed.), Psychology of Women (pp. 462-478), San Diego: Academic Press.

Stephens, N. (1991). Cognitive Age: A Useful Concept for Advertising? Journal of Advertising, XX, 4, 37-48. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00913367.1991.10673353).

Swayne, L.E. & Greco, A.J. (1987). The portrayal of older Americans in Television Commercials. Journal of Advertising, 47-54 (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00913367.1987.10673060).

Timoteo, J. (2012). Historia y modelos de la comunicación en el siglo XX. Con proyecciones al siglo XXI. Madrid: Universitas.

UN (2009). World Population Prospects: the 2008 Revision. New York: United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs. (www.un.org/esa/population/publications/-wpp2008/wpp2008_highlights.pdf) (01-02-2013).

UNDP (2011). Human Development Report 2011. Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All. New York: United Nations Development Program. (http://hdr.undp.org/en/reports/global/hdr2011) (04-02-2013).

Van-Dijk, T.A. (1996). Análisis del discurso ideológico. Versión. Estudios de Comunicación y Política, 6, 15-43.

Van-Dijk, T.A. (1999). El análisis crítico del discurso. Anthropos, 186, 22-36.

Van-Dijk, T.A. (2003). La multidisciplinaridad del análisis crítico del discurso: un alegato a favor de la diversidad. In R. Wodak & M. Meyer (Eds.), Métodos de análisis crítico del discurso (pp. 143-177). Barcelona: Gedisa.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/12/13
Accepted on 31/12/13
Submitted on 31/12/13

Volume 22, Issue 1, 2014
DOI: 10.3916/C42-2014-19
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 2
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?