Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This paper focuses on the role of the image as an agent for social transformation. The methodology adopted is a case study: the impact of the photograph of Aylan Kurdi, the three-year-old child drowned off Bodrum in an attempt to escape on a raft full of Syrian migrants. This is one of the most widely seen social photojournalism documents in recent times, and it had a huge impact on social media. The study applies an iconographic, iconological and ethical analysis to reveal the constituent parts of an image with the power for social change. In its main conclusions, this paper describes the potential for easy resignification of the digital graphic image as it symbolically transforms reality, and the power it has to generate processes of pronouncement and activism among citizens in digital environments. The results of the case study show that the value of an image for social change is achieved not only by the magnitude of the tragedy itself and the information that it registers, or by its formal aspects (iconographic), but mainly by being able to express a change of logic (iconological aspects) and to promote processes of reappropriation and denunciation. The ethical debate on dissemination shifts the problem from journalistic ethics to citizen responsibility.

Download the PDF version

1. The image and social transformation

There are images that can totally condense and define a tragedy and remain fixed in the memory of a generation, shaking up people worldwide and arousing the inactive masses into action; images that put a place on the map, direct our attention towards a problem, provoke strong emotions of sadness, anger, indignation or rage. Photojournalism has played a particularly significant role in recording political conflicts, wars, tragedies and confrontations. The war photos by Robert Kappa, the image captured by Eddie Adams of the execution of a Vietcong guerrilla in Saigon in 1968, the photo of fleeing Vietnamese children taken by Huynh Cong Út in 1972, and so many others, mean that a particular tragedy is never forgotten. In the words of Valle, these photos act as tattoo-images: «some images can make an impact on the viewer’s sensibility as if leaving an imprint on their memory, like an emotional tattoo that fades in and out (...) they make an impression on us and can remain with us for the rest of our lives» (1978: 47).

Photography is said to have a transformational quality in that it has a «technological power to transform the world into a representation» (Roberts & Webber, 1999: 2). It has been shown that certain actions undertaken by citizens in a specific situation were related to the images they had in mind of that particular event (Fueyo, 2002: 9). Valle (1978: 49) speaks of nucleus-images that can generate more information in a concentric way, and which «are able in themselves to influence states of opinion in a decisive way». Earlier studies concluded that social photography «offers subjects the chance to construct new alternative ways of understanding and making sense of events, reflecting on them and developing the means to confront them by building new meanings and discourses» (Echeverry & Herrera, 2005: 141). In terms of communication, this amounts to a network of emotions and beliefs, a moral response, which activates behaviours of social commitment (Pinazo & Nos-Aldás, 2013). Arroyo and Gómez (2015) have shown that the moral response is more coherent when the audiovisual content shows real people dealing with moral conflicts. The specific influence of social photojournalism on the imagination has been previously emphasized (Novaes, 2015: 3) along with the ethical and educational implications of the representation of suffering via the image (Boltanski, 2000; Sontag, 2003; 2008; Linde, 2005).

In the specific framework of reinterpretation and recreation that the digital image enables, it is important to consider the difference pointed out by Aparici & al. (2009) between «represented reality» and «constructed reality» in cyberspace as a «non-place». Works by Murray (2008) and Chouliaraki (2015) contribute to the debate on new media and citizenry, ethics and the impact of digital images in the processes of remediation, intermediation and transmediation. This study aims to insert the role of images in the setting of communication for social change (as defined by Barranquero, 2012; Chaparro, 2013; Tufte, 2015). Based on a descriptive study of a specific case, the aim of this paper is to arrive at an understanding and definition of the «transformative image» (following the «transformative pedagogy» by Subirana, 2015), one with the power to provoke social change. The value of the image is studied in terms of impact and social mobilization. The study applies an iconographic-iconological method to the image, and it draws out the ethical questions and subjects them to expert interpretation in order to generate a multifaceted reflection on the subject. The image analyzed here consists of a paradigmatic example of the relations between digital communication and the social transformation processes. It is the features of digital communication –cooperation, instantaneousness, feedback, horizontality, decentralization, flexibility, dynamism and interconnection (Sampedro & Sánchez-Duarte, 2011: 238)– which define the process followed by a «transformative» image like the one we shall describe.

2. A case study: the impact of the photograph of Aylan Kurdi

The methodology of case studies is typical of exploratory research and descriptive and explanatory studies (Martínez, 2006: 168). Initially, as Platt explains (1992), the case study was conceived as a sociological method for social work studies although it was later applied more broadly, in such areas as the analysis of media images and the relation between belief systems and decision taking. Studies have shown that decisions can be taken based on the «image» of the situation rather than on its «objective» (Holsti, 1962). Along these lines, this study analyses the case of the photograph of Aylan in order to reflect on the role of the image in provoking reactions of solidarity worldwide. We used Google Analytics to gather data on the impact of the image in digital media. The image was filtered and analysed on several levels: iconography (descriptive), iconology (interpretative) and ethics (implicative). This provided us with a framework for discussion on the power for social transformation of images that provoke a strong «e-motion», in the etymological sense of an «impulse that induces action».

2.1. Analysis of the impact of the photograph

The photograph of Aylan Kurdi, the Syrian boy who was washed up drowned on a beach in Turkey, was taken by the Turkish photographer Nilüfer Demir, for the Dogan agency, and published by Reuters Ankara/DHA on 2 September 2015. The case of Aylan was one of thousands involving Syrians fleeing civil war in their native land. Aylan and his family came from Kobane. He was three years old when he died, in an attempt to reach the Greek island of Kos. According to Reuters, 23 people drowned as they sailed in two rickety boats that capsized after being hit by a strong wave. Five children and one woman died. The bodies were found on the Turkish beach of Bodrum, in the province of Mugla. But it was the photograph of Aylan that caused a media storm. Yet he was not even the youngest of the casualties: they were the Jafer twins aged 18 months. Two thousand people had already crossed the same seas in dinghies in the previous four months but the world would never forget the name of Aylan Kurdi1.

The photograph of the young boy acted as a triggering image. It appeared in the majority of international media outlets in a torrent of front pages and leading news stories (Graph 1), and Syria fast began trending on Google searches (Graph 2).These graphs reveal the power of reaction that an image can arouse by causing a mass search for information on the subject. Before reaching the press, this news story had previously appeared and multiplied on social media. This was communication by image. Reuters reported on the sheer viral power of the photo in a headline «Troubling image of drowned boy captivates, horrifies» (Reuters, 2015). The image and its impact was a chronicle in itself for its potential to leave a strong impression on the viewer (to horrify).


Draft Content 499770043-49356-en007.jpg

Graph 1. Evolution of the number of headlines (Google Trends) with terms such as «Syria», «refugees» and «immigrants» in 2015 (09-12-2015) (http://goo.gl/HLPUe4).


Draft Content 499770043-49356-en008.jpg

Graph 2. Evolution of the number of headlines (Google Trends) with images labelled «Syria», «Aylan» and «Refugees» in 2015 (09-21-2015) (http://goo.gl/kzz92I).

Graph 1 shows the power that a single document can wield in order to situate a place on the map, or turn a humanitarian problem into a concern that affects people worldwide. Graph 2 demonstrates how an image quickly came to define Syria and the refugee drama. In fact, the name of Aylan that describes the image places him beyond the concept of refugee. The media treatment of the image raised this person above the category to which he was assigned. The human focus of that image with a name dragged the Syrian exodus out of anonymity.

On 3 September, a deluge of manifestos was posted on Twitter via the hashtag #KiyiyaVuranInsanlik (the humanity that drowns)2. Writers such as Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa and ordinary citizens posted opinions on social media. The event was interpreted and its meaning recast in various forms of creative expression. Citizen actions manifested themselves in representations of the occurrence in the form of protest. Charlie Hebdo dedicated a front-page to satirizing the events surrounding the image that caused a great deal of controversy on Twitter, especially in the Arab world.

The photograph was a determining factor in the taking of immediate decisions. On 3 September, Facebook Spain saw the appearance of «Refugees Welcome» to promote policies of shelter and hospitality (Martínez-Guzmán, 2003) for displaced Syrians, and in less than a month it had acquired almost 10,000 followers. It was just one of many spontaneous initiatives that emerged on or around that date to call for and organize humanitarian aid and recruit volunteers to welcome refugees. On 4 September, the Avaaz platform used Aylan’s image in a campaign to gather signatures in support of a plan to take in refugees. The Egyptian magnate Naguib Sawiris stated that he would buy an island to shelter between 100,000 and 200,000 Syrian refugees and name it Aylan Kurdi: «it was the photo of Aylan that really opened my eyes» (CNN in Spanish, 2015). There were also institutional responses. Angela Merkel announced a programme to take in more than 800,000 refugees. In Canada the event caused a political crisis. Canada’s «The National Post» reported that Aylan Kurdi’s family’s request for asylum had been rejected by the Canadian government in June. The request had been presented by an aunt of Aylan who lives in British Columbia, and the Social Democrat deputy Fin Donnelly had personally handed in the request to the Minister of Immigration at the time, the Conservative Chris Alexander. This occurred in the midst of an election campaign, and the government was heavily criticized for its immigration policy because on 2 September, Alexander had defended government policy on refugees from Syria on state television and attacked the media for largely ignoring the humanitarian crisis (EFE, 2015). A website, www.refugeeswelcome.ca, was created to promote an increase in the number of Syrian refugees that Canada would accept. The Nobody is Illegal organization mobilized its supporters. The image of Aylan exposed the incumbent Prime Minister of Canada during the elections, which his party subsequently lost.

2.2. An iconographic analysis

Here we analyse the most important elements of this image of Aylan to show why it has had such repercussions, and why it has become an icon that has mobilized our consciences. Television news reports provided the complete sequence, with general shots of the victim from a distance, and allowed us to see additional elements of the context within which the body was found, such as images of the police officer who gathered up the corpse on seashore, and other witnesses. However, these images did not reproduce the full emotional impact of the still photograph.

In the foreground, we see the image of the boy’s body, dead and alone, which is what causes the initial impact on us. It is the cadaver of a white boy whose clothes are soaked: his red T-shirt, his short blue trousers and the soles of his shoes still in good condition; he is lying face down in the wet sand on the shore, the sea is calm and the waves barely lap against his face. Although he is face down, we can just about see one side of his face. The boy’s clothes are intact, the warm red of the T-shirt, the new shoes do not conform to the stereotype of a «poor» non-Caucasian boy whose clothes are ripped and torn, with sunken cheeks, the typical image of refugees in newspapers or on TV news. The casual observer might think it is just a little boy sleeping too close to the waves who you could pick up and remove from danger of drowning. The paradox of the image of life despite being one of death. The mind could whitewash reality and perceive it as a doll due to his paleness, like wax, reflected by the fragment of the face shown to the observer.

The photo is a low angle shot that softens the dichotomy from top to bottom and is thus hierarchical. The low angle provides emphasis and subjectivity, but the proximity is not just focal but also angled. The depth of the shot is sufficiently squeezed to allow us to be very close to the victim, an expressive device that heightens our sense of impotence, but the shot is sufficiently broad to incorporate the view of the sea. The photograph confers its look upon us so that the viewer is situated within the image, from above, and drawing us into it. Who are we? Someone on land, residing in that yearned-for destination of Europe. It is a Eurocentric vision that differs from that which a group of refugees would have on reaching European shores. This also creates an inside/outside situation. Such divisions emerge as dichotomy markers, meaning otherness, from a sense of heightened and upright subjectivity of reception. The image was framed using the rhetorical device of suppression, exposing in full detail the shot of the boy but cutting out the police agents at work around him. This focuses and personalizes the tragedy of the Syrian refugees.

2.3. An iconological analysis

A verifiable hypothesis is that social inequality is linked to inequality in iconographic representation and the production and consumption of images. Likewise, a process of transformation and social change requires change in the social discourse. This process involves a semiotization of the ideology (hypothesis posed by Cros, 2009) or the cultural production of socio-ideological signs. Today’s universe of images is a dialectical field where «ideologemas» and «ideosemas» are debated, in the sense attributed to them by Cros (2009), as textual and extra-textual phenomena. The image of Aylan is an ideologema in terms of a concept referring to a representation of an experience as well as a social sentiment. And the idea of sentiment is key in the social image that aims to create solidarity. The ideologema? is one of the main regulators of content in the social conscience, and enables this content to circulate and become transformational communication. The ideosem is the factor that induces evaluation or criticism (Malcuzynski, 1991: 24).

The image of Aylan is endowed with considerable polysemy in terms of meaning. The icon harbours the concept of immigration, the refugee, immigration policies, tragedy, vulnerability and infancy, and contains those three treatments that an image can provide: document, art and sentiment (Aparici et. al, 2009: 214). It presents a view that is different within the universe of the tragedy of the children of immigrants and refugees crossing the Aegean or Mediterranean. We could say that it is a feminine view, not only because the photo was taken by a woman (the masculine and feminine circulate through the two genders) but by someone who has been brought up to care for others rather than explore the world.

We observe how the image shifted the focus of the discourse on the problem. It is the word refugee and not the word immigrant that users type when searching on Google (Graph 1). As the fundeu.es website indicates, it is not appropriate to call refugees migrants or immigrants. Aylan was fleeing with his family but had not yet become «refugeed» (using the past participle of the verb). Yet his image defined the entire tragedy of the Syrian refugees. Immigrant was not the word that people associated to his case, and they did not use it when searching for information online (Bernardo, 2015). The same tragedy occurs incessantly with other migrants but they do not have an image as powerful as Aylan’s, nor a term of salvation like refugee. This distance between the concept of immigrant and refugee not only differentiates meaning but also assumes a political shift in the treatment and understanding of the problem of displaced people because the idea of refugee implies an active institutional approach to sheltering such people. We observe a socio-political and informational shift in favour of the word shelter (which defines an attitude and/or a programme of assistance) as opposed to the word asylum (which defines a right) in the treatment of the subject in the news. The image of Aylan was a turning point for a semantic approach that is vital for a process of social change. Social change involves a transformation in the form of representing, understanding, analysing, thinking about and reacting to problems. This shift towards positive concepts from negative images defines one of the new designs in communication that aims to generate a feeling of solidarity. We could say that it is a way of seeing something negative yet thinking positively about the same issue: seeing the tragedy and at the same time contemplating the solutions.


Draft Content 499770043-49356-en009.jpg

Image 1. Photograph of Aylan Kurdi. Photographer: Nilüfer Demir/ Dogan Agency (Reuters, 2015).

2.4. An ethical analysis

The ethical debate surrounding an image like the one of Aylan draws on the motives for its publication, and ownership of the image; the instrumentalization of the document for profit (sale of newspapers, attracting more readers, etc.) or the possible morbid curiosity of consuming such a dramatic image as well as the treatment of the image of children (Espinosa & al., 2007). It could also examine the dilemma of widespread dissemination and copyright, but what is the real focal point of the ethical dilemma? Here are the opinions of four experts on the debate on the image of Aylan:

The unanimous opinion of these professionals in the field, with years of experience and a clear ethical commitment, such as the 2009 National Photography Prize winner Gervasio Sánchez, was that this image had to be published, and that its impact achieved the required mobilizing effect3. The photograph has become one of the icons of the refugee drama of the second decade of the XXI century; it is a transformative image.

We are not used to seeing images of dead children, drowned children, in our newspapers or on television news. As Sánchez says, what stands out is that «the body is whole» when normally war and natural catastrophe bring us images of mutilated, amputated or shattered bodies. The bodies of the drowned that are normally washed up are severely deteriorated but not in this image. It is a boy who can be clearly identified by anybody in the West as «one of us» (which questions the hypocrisy of a society that needs «mobilizing» images of this nature to provoke a reaction). The reflection by cartoonist El Roto (2015) that «an image is worth more than a thousand drowned people» underlines how we set about confronting the multiple causes of war, and pushes us to look for meaning and to make sense of this situation beyond the image itself. The conclusion is that a fixed image can have a far more mobilizing effect than moving images on TV or hundreds of articles on the subject; but it should make us reflect on the underlying causes of a tragedy that centres on one single «exemplifying» case of the cruel destiny of hundreds of thousands of refugees.

The dilemma highlighted divisions in Europe. Many dailies preferred to ignore the unfolding drama. No national newspaper in Germany or France published the photo (except «Le Monde»). However, the main dailies in the UK («The Guardian», «The Independent», «Daily Mail», «The Sun») all published the image on their front pages. The Italian media was divided («La Repubblica» did not publish it). In Portugal, an editorial in «Público» felt obliged to explain why it had published the photo, and in Spain, «El Mundo» provided a link to a video of a debate among its editors about its publication. In contrast to this «revealing media blurring», the image was disseminated widely and quickly across the social networks, and the deontological debate was rendered irrelevant by the deluge of online diffusion.

The publication of the photograph coincided with the world’s most important photojournalism festival, «Visa Pour l’Image», held in Perpignan (France), where debate initially centered on its authenticity. The image of Aylan routed all scepticism as it was clearly genuine but the manipulation came later when individual citizens began posting it online. This is where an ethical analysis of citizen responsibility concerning these images and their processes of resignification, appropriation and strategic management is most necessary. It should be asked whether it is ethical to manipulate an image or alter its meaning. The image began to undergo digital alteration, and artists were the first to denounce the refugee drama and promote the creative restitution of reality. Their works robbed the image of its iconic power and undermined the dramatic influence of its lyrical tone. They were published under the hashtags mentioned previously. One such illustrated image, by Steve Dennis (Álvarez, 2015), became very popular. It showed the boy in a cot, and this counter-image is interpreted as the art of satisfaction, recreating a world that coincides with our desires. The image was transformed into sand sculptures, graffiti and other protest art manifestations, as a way of symbolically overcoming the trauma caused by such a news event, and which also brought pressure to bear on the political treatment of the issue and helped mobilize citizens.

The ethics of the image appropriated by citizens shifts the ethical debate from the news publisher to the news receiver as cyber-publisher, to people who are active in media usage, «mediactive», and who access their resources, «recursive» (Kelty, 2008; Gillmor, 2010; Sampedro, 2015); this is a process that has to be analyzed in terms of political participation and the assumption of ideological power that the citizen desires and is willing to assume in terms of the issues of government that concern them.


Draft Content 499770043-49356-en010.jpg

Table 1. Opinions gathered from telephone interviews with four experts.

3. Discussion and conclusions: «Is an image worth more than a thousand drowned people?»

This study enables us to define a «transformative image» as one that acquires a political dimension, passing from its initial news dimension to one in which it becomes the image on a flag at a demonstration that is both personal and collective. The reading of the image is always historical (Aparici & al., 2009: 210), depending on the previous knowledge of the reader. In this case, the image came to us after years of civil war in Syria, a conflict that has been defined by the European Parliament as the greatest humanitarian tragedy since the Second World War. Here we see how an image with such transformative power becomes a symbol of a serious social problem.

We believe that an image is transformative because it contains a new discourse. An image that quickly arouses solidarity on an issue that is not new; it possesses this power because it can break a rigid stereotype. The case of the image of Aylan breaks the stereotype of war refugees packed into fields where the mass of the population obliterates the individual story of each human being. The new image gives them back their names, tells a story of a life cut short and generates projection and identification.

If an image can push decisions to be taken in the name of social justice, it is because it cancels out the sceptical view and destroys arguments that justify oppression of that social justice. We can say that an image for solidarity is an image that can be appropriated by citizens to enable them to express themselves, to denounce and to recreate. The online digital image is not sessile. It is not defined as static but dynamic due to its potential for alteration and manipulation in many different ways. The image of Aylan initiated a chain of symbolic value and resignification. It is a nodal image in a citizen reaction, like a mental thought that acts on the ethical and political debate, in dialogue with other studies such as those by Chouliaraki and Baagard (2013). They are not images that fit in with the journalistic objective of an ephemeral news chronicle but respond to a logic of processes (Kaplún, 1998) and are evaluated in the dynamic of communication to transform and transformation to communicate (Marí, 2011). Far from the paradigm of news transmission, transformative images bring to the fore a model of solidarity via communication for the persuasion of behaviours that involves strategic thinking. They belong to a model of communication that is «like a network that starts off as a weaving from closeness and proximity and extends to involving others in dynamic actions of solidarity» (Marí, 2014: 155).

It is not only the represented fact that makes an image transformative but its power to symbolize, its explanation of the process; the links and networks in which it is able to move, the critical distillation and formulation of the problem that can condense into easy but diverse decoding, and its capacity to be displaced in order to achieve mass dissemination.

This case study shows the current importance of the processes of image manipulation that can be analysed as exercises in symbolic resolution and citizen participation that generate opinion flows which can exercise political pressure on an issue and as a call to solidarity. The new processes that enable digital media to recreate and republish images means that the power of the image today can be appropriated by citizens as an instrument for communication that transcends the ethical debate on image manipulation. In contrast, this brings up the question of the power for social change achieved by the capacity for dialogue and for achieving an open, reflective, creative, political and responsible intervention on the image.

Notes

1 The Google search of «Aylan Kurdi» yielded 7,730,000 results (2015-09-27). A Wikipedia page was created almost immediately.

2 Google search of the hashtag found 92,100 results in many languages (2015-09-27).

3 Other professionals agree: DevReporter Network (2015). Reflections by photojournalists on the image of Aylan Kurdi. (http://goo.gl/SYaD8T) (2015-12-01).

Support and acknowledgements

CSO 2012-34066 research project of the Ministry of Economy and Competition (http://goo.gl/b0z7Gw) and UJI research Project P1-1B2015-21.

References

Álvarez, R. (2015). 23 homenajes, 23 reflexiones acerca de la muerte del pequeño Aylan. Magnet (http://goo.gl/xtPQ8L) (26-9-2015).

Aparici, R., Fernández-Baena, J., García-Matilla, A., & Osuna, S. (2009). La imagen. Análisis y representación de la realidad. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Arroyo, I., & Gómez, I. (2015). Efectos no deseados por la comunicación digital en la respuesta moral [The Undesired Effects of Digital Communication on Moral Response]. Comunicar, 44(XXII), 149-158. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C44-2015-16.

Barranquero, A. (2012). De la comunicación para el desarrollo a la justicia eco-social y el buen vivir. CIC, 17, 63-78. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5209/rev_CIYC.2012.v17.39258

Bernardo, A. (2015). Cómo la crisis de los refugiados sacudió nuestra conciencia en Red. Hipertextual.com, 3-9-2015 (http://goo.gl/iH0OGb) (18-9-2015).

Boltanski, L. (2000). Lo spettacolo del dolore. Milán: Raffaello Cortina Editore.

Chaparro, M. (2013). La comunicación del desarrollo. Construcción de un imaginario perverso. Telos, 94, 31-42.

Chouliaraki, L. (2015). Digital Witnessing in Conflict Zones: The Politics of Remediation. Information, Communication & Society, 18(11), 1362-1377. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2015.1070890

Chouliaraki, L., & Blaagaard, B.B. (2013). Special Issue: The Ethics of Images. Visual Communication, 12 (3), 253-259. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1470357213483228

CNN en español (2015). Magnate egipcio dice que ya encontró la isla que comprará para los refugiados. CDN (http://goo.gl/tTlywx) (28-09-2015).

Cros, E. (2009). La sociocrítica. Madrid: Arco Libro.

Echeverry, P.A., & Herrera, Á.M. (2005). La fotografía social como herramienta terapéutica para trabajo social. Trabajo Social, 7, 141-160.

EFE (Ed.) (2015). Canadá rechazó conceder refugio a la familia del niño sirio Aylan Kurdi (http://goo.gl/7c9klX) (03-09-2015).

El Roto (2015). Una imagen vale más que mil ahogados, El País, Viñeta (http://goo.gl/N8SBxc) (04-09-2015).

Espinosa, M.A., García-Matilla, A., García-Matilla, L., & Lara, T. (Dirs.) (2007). ¿Autorregulación?... y más. La protección y defensa de los derechos de la infancia en Internet. Madrid: Unicef, Ministerio de Asuntos Sociales.

Fueyo, A. (2002). De exóticos paraísos y miserias diversas. Publicidad y (re)construcción del imaginario colectivo sobre el sur. Barcelona: Icaria.

Gillmor, D. (2010). Mediactive. (http://goo.gl/VnhAOO) (29-09-2015).

Holsti, O.R. (1962). The Belief System and National Images: A Case Study. The Journal of Conflict Resolution, 3 (VI), 244-252.

Iriarte, D. (2015). Cuando vi a Aylan Kurdi se me heló la sangre. ABC, 03-09-2015.

Kaplún, M. (1998). Procesos educativos y canales de comunicación. Chasqui, 64, 4-8.

Kelty, C. (2008). Two Bits: The Cultural Significance of Free Software. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press. (http://goo.gl/NZeeVs) (29-11-2015).

Linde, A. (2005). Reflexiones sobre los efectos de las imágenes de dolor, muerte y sufrimiento en los espectadores [Effects that Images of Suffering, Violence and Death Have on Viewers and Society]. Comunicar, 25. (http://goo.gl/nLmUon) (28-11-2015).

Malcuzynski, M.P. (1991). Sociocríticas. Prácticas textuales. Cultura de fronteras. Amsterdam: Rodopi.

Marí, V.M. (2011). Comunicar para transformar, transformar para comunicar: tecnologías de la información, organizaciones sociales y comunicación desde una perspectiva de cambio social. Madrid: Popular.

Marí, V.M. (2014). Comunicación y tercer sector audiovisual en la actual transición paradigmática. In M. Chaparro (Ed), Medios de proximidad: participación social y políticas públicas (pp.135-160). Málaga: Imedea.

Martínez, P.C. (2006). El método de estudio de caso. Estrategia metodológica de la investigación científica. Pensamiento & Gestión, 20, 165-193.

Martínez-Guzmán, V. (2003). Políticas para la Diversidad: Hospitalidad contra Extranjería. Convergencia. Revista de Ciencias Sociales, 33 (septiembre-diciembre), 19-44.

Murray S (2008). Digital Images, Photo-sharing, and our Shifting Notions of Everyday Aesthetics. Journal of Visual Culture 7(2), 147-163. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1470412908091935

Novaes, J. (2015). ¿Es posible una narrativa en la fotografía social?, Razón y Palabra, 90, 1-28.

Pinazo, D., & Nos-Aldás, E. (2013). Developing Moral Sensitivity through Protest Scenarios in International NGDOs’ Communication. Communication Research, First Published on June 18, 2013. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0093650213490721.

Platt, J. (1992). «Case Study» in American Methodology Thought. Current Sociology, 40 (17), 17-48. doi:10.1177/001139292040001004.

Reuters (2015). Troubling Image of Drowned Boy Captivates, Horrifies (http://reut.rs/1ExFCO8) (02-09-2015).

Roberts, P., & Webber, J. (1999). Visual Truth in the Digital Age: Towards a Protocol for Image Ethics. Australian Institute of Computer Ethics Conference, July 1999, Lilydale, 1-12. (http://goo.gl/gCLvDq) (20-9-2015).

Sampedro, V. (2015). El cuarto poder en Red. Barcelona: Icaria.

Sampedro, V., & Sánchez-Duarte, J.M. (2011). A modo de epílogo. 15-M: la Red era la plaza. In V. Sampedro (Coord.), Cibercampaña. Cauces y diques para la participación (pp.237-242). Madrid: Complutense.

Sontag, S. (2003). Ante el dolor de los demás, Madrid: Alfaguara.

Sontag, S. (2008). Sobre la fotografía. Barcelona: Random House Mondadori.

Subirana, V. (2015). La pedagogía transformadora. Madrid: Sanz y Torres.

Tufte, T. (2015). Comunicación para el cambio social. La participación y el empoderamiento como base para el desarrollo mundial. Barcelona: Icaria.

Valle, J.M. (1978). Imágenes-tatuaje. Mensaje y Medios, 4, 47-50.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Este trabajo plantea el papel de la imagen como agente de transformación social. La metodología que se emplea es un estudio de caso sobre el impacto de la fotografía de Aylan Kurdi, el niño de tres años ahogado en el intento de huida en una balsa de inmigrantes sirios en Bodrum. Se trata de uno de los documentos recientes de fotoperiodismo social más difundidos transnacionalmente y con gran impacto en redes sociales. El estudio aborda diferentes niveles de análisis (iconográfico, iconológico y ético) para decapar los aspectos constitutivos de una imagen con poder de cambio social. Como principales conclusiones, esta investigación comprueba el poder de la imagen gráfica digital por su carácter de fácil reedición y resignificación en el paso de transformar simbólicamente la realidad y generar procesos de pronunciamiento y activismo en la ciudadanía a partir de entornos digitales. Los resultados del análisis del caso que se delimita muestran cómo el valor de una imagen en el cambio social no viene dado solo por la magnitud de la tragedia o el hecho que registra, ni por sus aspectos formales (iconográficos), sino por ser capaz de expresar un cambio de lógica (aspecto iconológico) y propiciar procesos de reapropiación y denuncia ciudadana. Por último, el debate ético sobre su difusión traslada el problema de la deontología periodística a la responsabilidad ciudadana.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Imagen y transformación social

Hay imágenes que son capaces de definir y condensar toda una tragedia y quedar retenidas en la memoria de una generación así como de conmocionar a nivel mundial y de hacer reaccionar a masas de poblaciones inactivas; instantáneas que hacen encontrar un punto en el mapa, dirigir la atención a un problema, provocar una fuerte emoción de tristeza, rabia, ira o indignación. La fotografía periodística ha jugado un papel especialmente importante en el registro de la historia de conflictos políticos, guerras, tragedias y confrontaciones. Las fotografías de guerra de Robert Capa; el plano de Eddie Adams sobre la ejecución en Saigón de un guerrillero del Vietcong en 1968; la fotografía de niños vietnamitas huyendo, tomada por Huynh Cong Út en 1972, y tantas otras instantáneas, consiguieron que una tragedia nunca fuera olvidada. En palabras de Valle, estas fotografías actúan como imágenes-tatuaje: «algunas imágenes pueden impactar la sensibilidad del espectador de tal manera que se imprimen en su memoria como una especie de tatuaje emocional de persistencia variable (...) nos impresionan a tal punto que pueden acompañarnos durante el resto de nuestra vida» (1978: 47).

Se ha dicho que toda fotografía es trasformadora en tanto que demuestra un «poder tecnológico para transformar el mundo en representación» (Roberts & Webber, 1999: 2). Se ha corroborado que las acciones de la ciudadanía frente a determinados problemas están relacionadas con las imágenes que tienen sobre los mismos (Fueyo, 2002: 9). Valle (1978: 49) hablaba de imágenes-núcleo capaces de generar concéntricamente más información y que se muestran «capaces en sí mismas de influir decisivamente en la creación de estados de opinión». Estudios anteriores han concluido que la fotografía social «ofrece a los sujetos la posibilidad de construir de forma alternativa nuevas vías para comprender y dar sentido a los sucesos, reflexionar acerca de ellos y emprender rutas de afrontamiento a través de la construcción de nuevos significados y discursos» (Echeverry & Herrera, 2005: 141). Desde una perspectiva comunicativa, será una red de emociones y creencias, una respuesta moral, la que active comportamientos de compromiso social (Pinazo & Nos-Aldás, 2013). En este sentido, Arroyo y Gómez (2015) han demostrado que la respuesta moral es más coherente cuando en los contenidos audiovisuales aparecen personas reales transmitiendo los conflictos morales. Se ha subrayado la influencia específica que el fotoperiodismo social ejerce en el imaginario (Novaes, 2015: 3) y se han trabajado a fondo las implicaciones éticas y educativas de la representación del sufrimiento a través de la imagen (Boltanski, 2000; Sontag, 2003; 2008; Linde, 2005).

En el ámbito específico de la reinterpretación y recreación que permite la imagen digital es preciso tener en cuenta la distinción de Aparici y otros (2009) entre «realidad representada» y «realidad construida» en el ciberespacio como «no lugar». Se abre aquí con Murray (2008) y Chouliaraki (2015) el debate sobre nuevos medios y ciudadanía, y ética e impacto de las imágenes digitales en los procesos de remediación, intermediación y transmediación. Este estudio pretende insertar el papel de las imágenes en el ámbito de la comunicación para el cambio social (según la definen Barranquero, 2012; Chaparro, 2013; Tufte, 2015). A partir del estudio descriptivo de un caso, se plantea como objetivo llegar a una comprensión y definición de lo que puede denominarse «imagen transformadora» (basándonos en la «pedagogía transformadora» de Subirana, 2015) o con poder de provocar un cambio social. Se estudia el valor de la imagen en términos de impacto y movilización social. Se aplica el método dual iconográfico-iconológico y se detectan cuestiones éticas, sometidas a interpretación de expertos para generar una reflexión plural. La imagen que aquí se analiza constituye un ejemplo paradigmático de las relaciones entre comunicación digital y procesos de transformación social. Son los rasgos de la comunicación digital –cooperación, instantaneidad, realimentación, horizontalidad, descentralización, flexibilidad, dinamismo o interconexión (Sampedro & Sánchez-Duarte, 2011: 238)– los que definen el proceso seguido por una imagen «transformadora» como la que más adelante describimos.

2. Estudio de caso: el impacto de la fotografía de Aylan Kurdi

La metodología del estudio de casos es propia de investigaciones exploratorias, estudios descriptivos y explicativos (Martínez, 2006: 168). Inicialmente, como explica Platt (1992), el estudio de caso se ideó como método sociológico apropiado a estudios de trabajo social, aunque luego fue ampliando sus ámbitos de aplicación. Uno de ellos ha sido el análisis de imágenes mediáticas y de la relación entre el sistema de creencias y la toma de decisiones. De esos estudios se sabe que la toma de decisiones actúa sobre la «imagen» de la situación más que sobre la realidad «objetiva» (Holsti, 1962). En esa línea, este estudio aborda el caso de la fotografía de Aylan para generar un cuerpo de reflexión en torno al papel de la imagen en la provocación de reacciones solidarias a escala internacional. Mediante las herramientas analíticas de Google se recogen datos del impacto de la imagen en medios digitales. La imagen es filtrada en un decapado de análisis: iconográfico (descriptivo), iconológico (interpretativo) y ético (implicativo). Todo ello para aportar un marco de discusión sobre el poder de transformación social de las imágenes provocadoras de una fuerte «e-moción», en el sentido etimológico de «impulso que induce a una acción».

2.1. Análisis del impacto de la fotografía

La fotografía de Aylan Kurdi, el niño sirio que apareció ahogado en una playa de Turquía, fue tomada por la fotógrafa turca Nilüfer Demir de la agencia Dogan. La difundió la agencia Reuters Ankara/DHA el 2 de septiembre de 2015. El caso de Aylan era uno entre miles de personas sirias que huían de su país en guerra. Aylan y su familia huían de Kobane. Tenía tres años cuando murió en aguas turcas, en el intento de alcanzar la isla griega de Kos. Según la agencia Reuters, naufragaron 23 personas que viajaban en dos botes que volcaron por un golpe de agua. Murieron cinco niños y una mujer. Los cadáveres se encontraron en una playa turca de Bodrum, provincia de Mugla. Fue el caso de Aylan el que provocó el aluvión mediático de la tragedia. Ni siquiera era el más pequeño: viajaban también los gemelos Jafer, que tenían año y medio. Dos mil personas habían atravesado en botes de goma las mismas aguas en las anteriores cuatro semanas. Pero el mundo conoció a Aylan Kurdi con nombre y apellidos1.

Su fotografía funcionó como una imagen desencadenante. Apareció en la mayoría de los principales medios de comunicación del mundo en un aluvión de portadas y noticias (gráfico 1) y provocó que Siria fuera tendencia en las búsquedas de Google (gráfico 2). Estos gráficos dan muestra del poder reactivo de una imagen al provocar una actitud masiva de búsqueda de información. Antes de que apareciera en los periódicos, la noticia había empezado a replicarse en las redes sociales. Se comunicaba con la imagen. Reuters recogió como noticia el propio poder de «viralización» de la fotografía, vinculando en redes el mensaje en inglés «Inquietante imagen de niño ahogado atrapa la mirada, horroriza» (Reuters, 2015). La imagen y su impacto era crónica en sí misma, por su capacidad de impresionar (horrorizar).


Draft Content 499770043-49356 ov-es007.jpg

Gráfico 1. Evolución del número de titulares (Google Trends) sobre los términos «Siria», «refugiados» e «inmigrantes» (en inglés) en 2015 (12-09-2015) (http://goo.gl/HLPUe4).


Draft Content 499770043-49356 ov-es008.jpg

Gráfico 2. Evolución del número de titulares (Google Trends) sobre imágenes etiquetadas como «Siria», «Aylan» y «refugiados» (en inglés) en 2015 (21-09-2015) (http://goo.gl/kzz92I).

El gráfico 1 muestra la fuerza que puede tener un solo documento para situar un lugar del mapa o un problema humanitario en la preocupación global. El gráfico 2 muestra cómo una imagen consigue de pronto definir Siria y el drama de los refugiados. Más aún, muestra cómo el nombre de Aylan describía esa imagen, por encima del concepto de refugiado. La imagen consiguió un tratamiento de la noticia que elevaba a la persona por encima de la categoría. El enfoque humano de esa imagen con nombre sacaba del anonimato al éxodo sirio.

El día 3 de septiembre explotaba en Twitter un aluvión de manifiestos a través del hashtag #KiyiyaVuranInsanlik (la humanidad que naufraga)2. Escritores, como el Nobel Vargas Llosa, y ciudadanos publicaron artículos de opinión en los diarios durante semanas. La imagen comenzó a ser replicada, editada y manipulada por la ciudadanía en los medios sociales. Fue interpretada y resignificada en ejercicios expresivos y artísticos. Diversas acciones ciudadanas hicieron representaciones sobre la escena como protesta. Charlie Hebdo dedicó portada a una sátira en torno a la imagen que provocó una gran polémica en twitter, especialmente desde el entorno árabe.

La fotografía fue un factor determinante en la toma de decisiones de forma inmediata. Ese mismo día 3 de septiembre nació en Facebook España «Refugiados Bienvenidos» para promover políticas de hospitalidad (Martínez-Guzmán, 2003) y en menos de un mes sumaba casi diez mil seguidores. Fue una de tantas iniciativas espontáneas que surgieron a partir de esa fecha para reivindicar y organizar la ayuda humanitaria y de acogimiento voluntario para recibir refugiados. El día 4, la plataforma Avaaz utilizaba la imagen de Aylan en la campaña de solicitud de firmas para urgir un plan de acogida. El magnate egipcio Naguib Sawiri expresó que compraría una isla donde poder refugiar entre 100.000 y 200.000 personas sirias, a la que pondría el nombre de Aylan Kurdi: «es la fotografía de Aylan lo que me despertó» (CNN en español, 2015). Se sumaron concentraciones con la pancarta «Refugiados Bienvenidos» (en la mayoría de lugares, en inglés). Se sucedieron las iniciativas institucionales. Angela Merkel anunció su programa de acogida para 800.000 refugiados. En Canadá causó una crisis política. «The National Post» hizo público el 3 de septiembre que la familia de Aylan Kurdi había pedido asilo al Gobierno de Canadá, que lo denegó en junio. La solicitud había sido presentada por una tía de Aylan que vive en la Columbia Británica y el diputado socialdemócrata Fin Donnelly dijo habérsela entregado personalmente al ministro de inmigración, el conservador Chris Alexander. En plena campaña electoral, el gobierno canadiense se enfrentaba a una dura crítica de su política de inmigración, ya que el mismo día 2 de septiembre, Chris Alexander había defendido en la televisión pública la política con los refugiados sirios, criticando a los medios de comunicación por no ocuparse de la crisis humanitaria (EFE, 2015). Se creó la web www.refugeeswelcome.ca para promover la aceptación en Canadá de refugiados sirios. La organización «Nadie es ilegal» presionaba con movilizaciones. La imagen de Aylan ponía en pies de barro la reelección del Primer Ministro.

2.2. Análisis iconográfico

Analizamos los elementos más destacados para aportar razones concluyentes de por qué esa imagen ha llegado con tanta fuerza hasta nosotros y por qué se ha convertido en un icono movilizador de nuestras conciencias. Los informativos de televisión facilitaron la secuencia completa en planos generales mucho más alejados de la víctima y nos dejaron ver más elementos del contexto en el que se halló el cadáver, imágenes del policía que retiró el cuerpo del niño de las aguas y de otros testigos. Sin embargo, esas imágenes no consiguieron el impacto emocional de la imagen fija.

En un primer plano descriptivo, nos hallamos ante la imagen del cuerpo de un niño. Un niño muerto y solo. Precisamente esa es la primera razón por la que la imagen nos impresiona. Nos encontramos ante el cuerpo de un niño blanco, con la ropa mojada: su camisa roja, sus pantalones cortos azules y las suelas de calzado sin apenas deterioro; tendido boca abajo en la arena mojada de la playa, las olas de un mar en calma apenas rozan su rostro, el cual percibimos a pesar de que la imagen de su cara solo se ve parcialmente. En este caso las ropas intactas del niño, el color vivo y cálido de la camiseta, el calzado nuevo, nos alejan del estereotipo del niño «pobre», no caucásico, con las ropas deterioradas y los pómulos hundidos que se repite en las portadas de los diarios o en las piezas de los informativos de televisión. En esta imagen cualquier observador sentiría que se trata de un niño dormido al que se podría retirar de la orilla evitando así el peligro de ahogarse. La paradoja de la imagen de vida a pesar de su muerte. La mente humana puede tratar de encubrir la realidad y percibir que se tratara de un muñeco, por esa palidez, como de cera, que refleja el fragmento del rostro que se le muestra al observador.

En relación al punto de vista, la imagen fue tomada en un ángulo ligeramente picado, suavizando la dicotomía arriba y abajo y por tanto el ejercicio de jerarquía. El picado siempre enfatiza y subjetiviza, pero la proximidad no es solo focal, también lo es de ángulo. La profundidad de campo es lo suficientemente reducida para estar muy próximos a la víctima, recurso expresivo que agrava nuestra impotencia, pero lo suficientemente amplia para dotar de perspectiva al mar, diferenciando un lejos/cerca. La fotógrafa nos confiere su mirada, por lo que el público se sitúa en su lugar, desde arriba, llegando, acercándose. ¿Quién somos?: alguien en tierra firme, en el destino anhelado de Europa. Se trata de una visión eurocéntrica, diferente a la que tendría un grupo de refugiados alcanzando la orilla. En esa situación, se construye también un dentro/fuera. Tales divisiones emergen como «dicotomías-baliza», significando otredad, desde una subjetividad elevada, erguida, de recepción. La imagen fue encuadrada siguiendo el recurso retórico de la supresión. Anotando el plano detalle del niño y dejando fuera de campo a los agentes que trabajaban en la zona. Ese ejercicio singularizaba y personalizaba de forma muy concreta la tragedia de los refugiados sirios.

2.3. Análisis iconológico

Es una hipótesis verificable que la desigualdad social va ligada a una desigualdad en la representación iconográfica y en la producción y consumo de imágenes. También lo es que un proceso de transformación y cambio social necesita un cambio en el discurso social. Este proceso implica una «semiotización» de la ideología (hipótesis de Cros, 2009) o la producción cultural de signos ideológico-sociales. El universo de imágenes constituye hoy un campo dialéctico donde se debaten «ideologemas» e «ideosemas», en el sentido de Cros (2009), como fenómeno extratextual uno y textual el otro. En la imagen de Aylan hablamos de ideologema, en tanto concepto que refiere una representación tanto de una experiencia como de un sentimiento social. Y la idea de sentimiento es clave en la imagen social y con fines solidarios. El ideologema es un principio regulador de contenidos de la conciencia social, que posibilita su circulación, su comunicación transformadora. El ideosema, por su parte, es el factor que induce la evaluación, cuando no la crítica (Malcuzynski, 1991: 24).

En el plano del significado, la imagen de Aylan contaba con gran polisemia. El icono albergaba el concepto de inmigración, refugiado, política de inmigración, tragedia, vulnerabilidad, infancia y contenía tres tratamientos que pueden darse en una imagen: documento, arte y sentimiento (Aparici &. al, 2009: 214). Introducía una mirada diferente en el universo de la tragedia infantil de refugiados e inmigrantes que atraviesan el Egeo o el Mediterráneo. Podría decirse que es una mirada femenina, no ya por haberse tomado por una mujer (lo femenino y lo masculino transitan los diferentes sexos), sino por alguien que ha sido educado para cuidar, más que para explorar el mundo.

Se observa que la imagen planteaba un giro en el enfoque discursivo del problema. Es la palabra refugiado y no la palabra inmigrante la que provocaba búsquedas en Google (gráfico1). Como se indica en la web fundeu.es, es impropio llamar in/migrantes a los refugiados. Aylan huía con su familia, pero no había llegado a ser «refugiado» (en participio). En cambio, su imagen fue capaz de definir toda la tragedia de los refugiados sirios. La palabra inmigrante no es la que las personas asociaron a su caso, y no la eligieron como clave de búsqueda (Bernardo, 2015). La misma tragedia se repite de manera incesante en el caso de otros migrantes, pero tal vez no cuentan con una imagen como la de Aylan, ni con una palabra salvadora como la de refugiado. Esa distancia entre el concepto de inmigrante y refugiado no solo marca un diferente significado; también supone un giro político en el tratamiento y comprensión del problema de las personas desplazadas, ya que refugiado implica un planteamiento institucional activo de acogida. Se observa un desplazamiento sociopolítico e informativo en la preferencia de la palabra acogida (que define una actitud y/o un programa) frente a la palabra asilo (que define el derecho) en el tratamiento informativo. La imagen de Aylan se situaba en el punto de inflexión de un enfoque semántico que necesita todo proceso de cambio social. El cambio social implica una transformación en la manera de representar, entender, pensar, analizar y reaccionar ante los problemas. Este giro hacia conceptos positivos e imágenes negativas define uno de los nuevos trazados en la comunicación con fines solidarios. Ver lo negativo y pensar en positivo, podría decirse. O ver la tragedia y pensar en soluciones.


Draft Content 499770043-49356 ov-es009.jpg

Imagen 1. Fotografía de Aylan Kurdi. Autora: Nilüfer Demir/Agencia Dogan (Reuters, 2015).

2.4. Análisis ético

El debate ético sobre una imagen como la de Aylan plantearía aspectos como la gravedad y pertinencia de su publicación; la instrumentalización del documento de registro con fines mercantiles (vender periódicos, captar audiencias, etc.) o la posible morbosidad del consumo de la imagen dramática. Plantearía cuestiones sobre el tratamiento de la imagen de niños y niñas (Espinosa & al., 2007). Podría atender el dilema de la difusión extensiva y los derechos de autoría. Pero, ¿dónde se percibía el foco del dilema ético? A continuación desglosamos una selección de opiniones recabadas de cuatro expertos en torno al debate de la imagen.

La consulta realizada a profesionales de probada experiencia y compromiso ético, como el premio Nacional de Fotografía 2009, Gervasio Sánchez, confirma que esta imagen debía ser publicada y que su impacto ha conseguido el efecto movilizador requerido3. La fotografía se ha convertido en uno de los iconos del drama de los refugiados en la segunda década del siglo XX, en una imagen transformadora.

No estamos acostumbrados a ver imágenes de niños muertos, ahogados, publicadas en los diarios ni editadas en los informativos de televisión. En palabras de Gervasio Sánchez, lo que destaca es que sea «un cuerpo completo», ya que lo más habitual en conflictos bélicos o catástrofes es encontrar cuerpos destrozados, mutilados o amputados. Los cuerpos de las personas ahogadas suelen llegar a las costas muy deteriorados. En esta imagen esto no sucede. Estamos ante un niño que podría ser identificado por cualquier observador de occidente como «uno de los nuestros» (lo que abre el debate sobre la hipocresía de una sociedad que necesita de imágenes «movilizadoras» de este tipo para provocar reacciones). La reflexión del dibujante El Roto (2015), «Una imagen vale más que mil ahogados», revela los porqués de una situación que nos remite a las múltiples causas de una guerra y nos hace buscar el significado y el sentido profundo, más allá de la propia imagen. La conclusión es que una imagen fija puede resultar mucho más movilizadora que otras imágenes televisivas o que cientos de textos alusivos, pero sin duda nos debe remitir a reflexionar sobre las causas profundas de una tragedia que se concentra en un único caso «ejemplificador» del cruel destino de cientos de miles de refugiados.

El dilema evidenció divisiones en Europa. Muchos diarios defendieron las vendas en los ojos respecto al drama. Ningún periódico nacional alemán ni francés difundió la foto (excepto «Le Monde»). Los principales diarios británicos («The Guardian», «The Independent», «Daily Mail», «The Sun»), en cambio, difundieron la imagen en sus portadas. Los medios italianos se dividieron («La Repubblica» no la divulgó). En Portugal, la dirección editorial de «Público» tuvo que dar explicaciones de por qué la había publicado. En España, «El Mundo» publicó el vídeo en el que se testificaba el debate sobre su publicación en la reunión de edición. Pese al «revelador velado mediático», la imagen se difundía a gran velocidad desde las redes sociales. El debate deontológico se hacía estéril ante el arrastre divulgativo de las redes sociales.

La publicación de la fotografía coincidía con la celebración del principal festival mundial del fotoperiodismo, «Visa Pour l’Image», en Perpignan, en el que el debate giró en torno a la autenticidad. La imagen de Aylan anulaba todo escepticismo por ser auténtica. La manipulación empezaba después, al ser difundida por la ciudadanía. Por ello, un caso como el analizado exige un análisis ético de la responsabilidad ciudadana con estas imágenes y sus procesos de resignificación, apropiación y gestión estratégica. Podría plantearse si es ético manipular la imagen, o alterar su significado. La imagen comenzó a ser alterada digitalmente y se viralizó la respuesta de artistas que con gran rapidez tomaron la vanguardia en la denuncia y la restitución pincelada de la realidad. Esos dibujos restaban iconicidad a la imagen y quitaban dramatismo con su tono lírico. Se publicaban con los hashtags antes mencionados. Tuvo una gran acogida la imagen ilustrada de Steve Dennis (Álvarez, 2015), quien colocó al niño en una cuna. Contraimagen esta interpretable como lo que se ha llamado arte de satisfacción, para recrear un mundo que coincida con los deseos. La imagen se transformó en escultura de arena, grafiti y otras tantas manifestaciones de arte protesta, un ejercicio de superación simbólica de la conmoción causada por la noticia, que ejercía presión sobre el tratamiento político y la movilización ciudadana sobre el tema.

La ética de la imagen apropiada por la ciudadanía traslada el debate ético del emisor informativo al receptor como ciber-emisor, a públicos «mediactivos» y «recursivos» (Kelty, 2008; Gillmor, 2010; Sampedro, 2015), proceso que ha de ser analizado en términos de participación política y asunción de poder ideológico que la ciudadanía quiere y está dispuesta a asumir respecto de los asuntos de gobierno que le importan.


Draft Content 499770043-49356 ov-es010.jpg

Tabla 1. Testimonios recogidos a expertos a través de entrevistas telefónicas.

3. Discusión y conclusiones: «¿Una imagen vale más que mil ahogados?»

A partir del estudio de caso realizado, podemos definir como «imagen transformadora» aquella que adquiere dimensión política, transitando de su dimensión informativa inicial a bandera de manifestación personal y colectiva. La lectura de la imagen es siempre histórica (Aparici & al., 2009: 210), depende del conocimiento previo del lector. En este caso, la imagen llegaba después de años de guerra en Siria, un conflicto que ha sido definido en el Parlamento Europeo como la mayor tragedia humanitaria desde la II Guerra Mundial. He aquí que una imagen de tal poder transformador lo es en tanto se convierte en símbolo de un gran problema social.

Pensemos que una imagen es transformadora porque alberga un nuevo discurso. Una imagen que promueve de pronto la solidaridad en un tema que no es nuevo tiene ese poder porque es capaz de romper un estereotipo limitante. El caso de la imagen de Aylan rompía el estereotipo de refugiado de guerra en campos hacinados donde las masas de población anulan la historia individual de cada ser humano. La nueva imagen daba nombres y apellidos, relataba una historia de vida truncada, generaba proyección e identificación.

Si una imagen es capaz de empujar la toma de decisiones hacia la justicia social es porque anula la mirada escéptica y derroca argumentos justificativos de una opresión. Orienta la actitud de la ciudadanía no hacia la impotencia y el miedo, sino hacia la denuncia y la búsqueda de soluciones. Podemos decir que una imagen para la solidaridad es una imagen capaz de ser apropiada por la ciudadanía para su expresión, denuncia o recreación. La imagen digital en red no es sésil. No puede definirse como estática, sino por su dinamismo, su potencial de alteraciones y manipulaciones múltiples. La imagen de Aylan ha sido capaz de iniciar una cadena de valor simbólico y resignificación. Se trata de una imagen nodal en una reacción ciudadana, como pensamiento mental actuante en el debate ético y político, en diálogo con otros estudios como Chouliaraki y Baagard (2013). No son imágenes que cumplan con un objetivo noticiero de crónica efímera, sino que responden a una lógica de procesos (Kaplún, 1998) y son evaluables en la dinámica de comunicar para transformar, transformar para comunicar (Marí, 2011). Lejos del paradigma de transmisión de información, las imágenes transformadoras dan el salto a un modelo de comunicación solidaria para la persuasión de conductas, lo que implica un pensamiento estratégico. Pertenecen a un modelo de comunicación entendido «como una red que se empieza a tejer desde lo cercano y lo próximo hasta ir implicando a otros en dinámicas solidarias» (Marí, 2014: 155).

No es solo el hecho representado lo que hace que una imagen sea transformadora, sino su poder de simbolización, de explicación procesual; los vínculos y redes en los que es capaz de deslizarse, el destilado de crítica y problematización que puede condensar para una fácil pero diversa descodificación, y su capacidad de ser deslocalizada para una difusión masiva.

El estudio del caso muestra la importancia actual de los procesos de manipulación de imágenes que pueden analizarse como ejercicios de resolución simbólica y participación ciudadana generadores de corrientes de opinión, capaces de ejercer presión política sobre un tema y llamar a la solidaridad. Los nuevos procesos que están permitiendo los medios digitales de recreación y redifusión de imágenes hacen que pueda afirmarse que el poder de una imagen hoy está en sus posibilidades de apropiación ciudadana como instrumento de comunicación, lo que trasciende el debate ético sobre la manipulación de imágenes. Emerge en cambio la cuestión del poder de cambio social conseguido por el factor dialógico y superador de la intervención abierta, reflexiva, creativa, política y responsable sobre la imagen.

Notas

1 La búsqueda en Google de «Aylan Kurdi» aporta 7.730.000 resultados (2015-09-27). De forma inmediata se creó una entrada en Wikipedia.

2 La búsqueda en Google del hashtag aporta 92.100 resultados en multitud de lenguas (2015-09-27).

3 Otros profesionales coinciden: DevReporter Network (2015). Reflexiones de fotoperiodistas sobre la imagen de Aylan Kurdi. (http://goo.gl/SYaD8T) (2015-12-01).

Apoyos y reconocimiento

Proyecto de investigación CSO 2012-34066 del Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (http://goo.gl/b0z7Gw) y Proyecto P1-1B2015-21 del Plan de Promoción de la Investigación de la UJI.

Referencias

Álvarez, R. (2015). 23 homenajes, 23 reflexiones acerca de la muerte del pequeño Aylan. Magnet (http://goo.gl/xtPQ8L) (26-9-2015).

Aparici, R., Fernández-Baena, J., García-Matilla, A., & Osuna, S. (2009). La imagen. Análisis y representación de la realidad. Barcelona: Gedisa.

Arroyo, I., & Gómez, I. (2015). Efectos no deseados por la comunicación digital en la respuesta moral [The Undesired Effects of Digital Communication on Moral Response]. Comunicar, 44(XXII), 149-158. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C44-2015-16.

Barranquero, A. (2012). De la comunicación para el desarrollo a la justicia eco-social y el buen vivir. CIC, 17, 63-78. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5209/rev_CIYC.2012.v17.39258

Bernardo, A. (2015). Cómo la crisis de los refugiados sacudió nuestra conciencia en Red. Hipertextual.com, 3-9-2015 (http://goo.gl/iH0OGb) (18-9-2015).

Boltanski, L. (2000). Lo spettacolo del dolore. Milán: Raffaello Cortina Editore.

Chaparro, M. (2013). La comunicación del desarrollo. Construcción de un imaginario perverso. Telos, 94, 31-42.

Chouliaraki, L. (2015). Digital Witnessing in Conflict Zones: The Politics of Remediation. Information, Communication & Society, 18(11), 1362-1377. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1369118X.2015.1070890

Chouliaraki, L., & Blaagaard, B.B. (2013). Special Issue: The Ethics of Images. Visual Communication, 12 (3), 253-259. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1470357213483228

CNN en español (2015). Magnate egipcio dice que ya encontró la isla que comprará para los refugiados. CDN (http://goo.gl/tTlywx) (28-09-2015).

Cros, E. (2009). La sociocrítica. Madrid: Arco Libro.

Echeverry, P.A., & Herrera, Á.M. (2005). La fotografía social como herramienta terapéutica para trabajo social. Trabajo Social, 7, 141-160.

EFE (Ed.) (2015). Canadá rechazó conceder refugio a la familia del niño sirio Aylan Kurdi (http://goo.gl/7c9klX) (03-09-2015).

El Roto (2015). Una imagen vale más que mil ahogados, El País, Viñeta (http://goo.gl/N8SBxc) (04-09-2015).

Espinosa, M.A., García-Matilla, A., García-Matilla, L., & Lara, T. (Dirs.) (2007). ¿Autorregulación?... y más. La protección y defensa de los derechos de la infancia en Internet. Madrid: Unicef, Ministerio de Asuntos Sociales.

Fueyo, A. (2002). De exóticos paraísos y miserias diversas. Publicidad y (re)construcción del imaginario colectivo sobre el sur. Barcelona: Icaria.

Gillmor, D. (2010). Mediactive. (http://goo.gl/VnhAOO) (29-09-2015).

Holsti, O.R. (1962). The Belief System and National Images: A Case Study. The Journal of Conflict Resolution, 3 (VI), 244-252.

Iriarte, D. (2015). Cuando vi a Aylan Kurdi se me heló la sangre. ABC, 03-09-2015.

Kaplún, M. (1998). Procesos educativos y canales de comunicación. Chasqui, 64, 4-8.

Kelty, C. (2008). Two Bits: The Cultural Significance of Free Software. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press. (http://goo.gl/NZeeVs) (29-11-2015).

Linde, A. (2005). Reflexiones sobre los efectos de las imágenes de dolor, muerte y sufrimiento en los espectadores [Effects that Images of Suffering, Violence and Death Have on Viewers and Society]. Comunicar, 25. (http://goo.gl/nLmUon) (28-11-2015).

Malcuzynski, M.P. (1991). Sociocríticas. Prácticas textuales. Cultura de fronteras. Amsterdam: Rodopi.

Marí, V.M. (2011). Comunicar para transformar, transformar para comunicar: tecnologías de la información, organizaciones sociales y comunicación desde una perspectiva de cambio social. Madrid: Popular.

Marí, V.M. (2014). Comunicación y tercer sector audiovisual en la actual transición paradigmática. In M. Chaparro (Ed), Medios de proximidad: participación social y políticas públicas (pp.135-160). Málaga: Imedea.

Martínez, P.C. (2006). El método de estudio de caso. Estrategia metodológica de la investigación científica. Pensamiento & Gestión, 20, 165-193.

Martínez-Guzmán, V. (2003). Políticas para la Diversidad: Hospitalidad contra Extranjería. Convergencia. Revista de Ciencias Sociales, 33 (septiembre-diciembre), 19-44.

Murray S (2008). Digital Images, Photo-sharing, and our Shifting Notions of Everyday Aesthetics. Journal of Visual Culture 7(2), 147-163. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1470412908091935

Novaes, J. (2015). ¿Es posible una narrativa en la fotografía social?, Razón y Palabra, 90, 1-28.

Pinazo, D., & Nos-Aldás, E. (2013). Developing Moral Sensitivity through Protest Scenarios in International NGDOs’ Communication. Communication Research, First Published on June 18, 2013. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0093650213490721.

Platt, J. (1992). «Case Study» in American Methodology Thought. Current Sociology, 40 (17), 17-48. doi:10.1177/001139292040001004.

Reuters (2015). Troubling Image of Drowned Boy Captivates, Horrifies (http://reut.rs/1ExFCO8) (02-09-2015).

Roberts, P., & Webber, J. (1999). Visual Truth in the Digital Age: Towards a Protocol for Image Ethics. Australian Institute of Computer Ethics Conference, July 1999, Lilydale, 1-12. (http://goo.gl/gCLvDq) (20-9-2015).

Sampedro, V. (2015). El cuarto poder en Red. Barcelona: Icaria.

Sampedro, V., & Sánchez-Duarte, J.M. (2011). A modo de epílogo. 15-M: la Red era la plaza. In V. Sampedro (Coord.), Cibercampaña. Cauces y diques para la participación (pp.237-242). Madrid: Complutense.

Sontag, S. (2003). Ante el dolor de los demás, Madrid: Alfaguara.

Sontag, S. (2008). Sobre la fotografía. Barcelona: Random House Mondadori.

Subirana, V. (2015). La pedagogía transformadora. Madrid: Sanz y Torres.

Tufte, T. (2015). Comunicación para el cambio social. La participación y el empoderamiento como base para el desarrollo mundial. Barcelona: Icaria.

Valle, J.M. (1978). Imágenes-tatuaje. Mensaje y Medios, 4, 47-50.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/16
Accepted on 31/03/16
Submitted on 31/03/16

Volume 24, Issue 1, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C47-2016-03
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 15
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?