Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

In today’s context of media proliferation and increasing access to diverse media content, it becomes necessary to address young people’s motivation to consume information. Researching this age group is relevant given that adolescence is a key period in people’s civic socialization. This study explores how 13 to 17 year old Chileans consume news, in a multiple-platform, convergent and mobile media context. There are few studies that focus on the information habits of this particular age group. Using a quantitative self-administered questionnaire applied to 2,273 high school adolescents from four different regions in the country, this paper analyses participants’ news consumption habits, their interest in news, their perception about the importance of different topics, and their motivations to being informed. The results show that surveyed teenagers access information mainly via social media like Facebook, to the detriment of traditional media. These adolescents are least interested in traditional politics, but they think this is the most prominent topic in the news. Their motivations to consume news have to do with their wish to be able to defend their points of view and deliver information to others. Also, they think that their portrayal in the news agenda is both inadequate and negative. These findings suggest that the news industry has a pending debt with young audiences.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Adolescents’ lives are «mediated», since «digital media are a central part of their out-of-school experiences and of their everyday relationships and identities» (Buckingham & Martínez-Rodríguez, 2013: 10). Different authors have become interested in analyzing new communication practices among adolescents beyond the school domain, in a technological environment that is changing, convergent, online (Carlsson, 2011), and increasingly crossed by the communication of mobile culture (Caron & Caronia, 2005). The fact that adolescents have access to media and information and communication technologies goes beyond their constitution in mere «new audiences» (Jenkins & al., 2006): they are immersed in a participatory and expressive culture of media convergence, in which their members are creative participants, believe in the importance of their contribution, and feel a certain degree of connection with each other. Scholars Orozco (2009), and Ritzer and Jurgenson (2010) consider these users as prosumers, that is to say producers and consumers simultaneously, whereas Burns (2010) employs the concept of «produser».

Educational, family, and informative systems participate in the change of media landscape, its cultural industries, and adolescents’ communication and media consumption new practices. Casero (2012: 152) underlines the need to know the changes in young audiences’ informative habits «to calibrate the scope and effects of digital convergence and their future perspectives». The informative news industry faces the challenge of achieving higher levels of pluralism and freedom of expression. To what degree do journalists –and the information system in general– set their agenda to include pertinent information aimed at adolescents? Regarding that matter, Zaffore (1990) states that every means of communication should contain an accumulation of different opinions and that such diversity is correlative to the increasing complexity of the social framework they must reflect. The task is not easy: the volume of news forces journalism to include, exclude and establish a hierarchy of information (De-Fontcuberta, 2011; Puente & Mujica, 2004). Then it is necessary to know if the multiplication of access to different communication platforms benefits adolescents and therefore allows them a greater access to a variety of news about their surroundings (Buckingham, 2000).

Pluralism is not only expressed in the exercise of «the freedom of expression in the media of different kinds of priority, management, size and editorial direction, so that contents that express social, cultural, gender, geographical, and about original peoples are created» (Fundación Friedrich Ebert, 2013: 1). It is also manifested in the possibility that different kinds of audiences can be informed about the topics that affect and interest them. Adolescents are citizens in the present from multiple perspectives, before the exercise of suffrage (Condeza, 2009), from multiple perspectives, and they are part of a complex media ecology (Ito & al., 2010). Tracing their informative consumption in different media is socially relevant.

In that context, this article analyzes the news consumption habits of 2,273 Chilean adolescents between the ages of 13 and 17, by geographical location, socio-economical status and gender, in different regions of the country. This is the first study of its kind in Chile, funded by the National Commission for Scientific and Technological Research. It was conducted from January through September 2013 to know: a) which media and technologies adolescents use to be informed; b) their motivations to consume news; c) their perception about pluralism and the informative agenda and d) to associate motivations, media consumption, adolescents’ attitudes and behaviors toward public affairs.

2. Educated to be informed?

Researchers from different disciplines have underlined the importance of informative consumption in teenagers’ lives. Developmental psychology has studied how, in search of their identities, adolescents turn to the media in order to understand what is socially acceptable, how to identify with their peers, express degrees of autonomy regarding adults’ preferences or for the need of evasion-introspection (Padilla-Walker, 2007). According to Flanagan and Syvertsen (2006), adolescents symbolize the replacement of older generations in the political and social process. For political science and sociology, the informative habits expressed in news consumption in different media are related to citizenship training, the interest in public affairs, higher rates of civic participation, the exercise of the right to vote, and different forms of activism (McLeod, 2000; Valenzuela, 2013). Thus, news and media are considered to be relevant agents in adolescents’ socialization that interact with similar agents, such as the family and educational institutions.

Along these lines, the interdisciplinary area of scientific research in communication and education has emphasized the critical formation on consumption of news, advertising, and fictional content (Aguaded, 2009; Buckingham, 2000; De-Fontcuberta, 2009). This is materialized in different levels and actions of media education related to citizenship training, such as courses of media literacy in Europe, enacted by its Parliament (2009); a state policy, like in Argentina (Morduchowicz, 2009), or a proposal for Chilean teachers training in media literacy (De-Fontcuberta & al., 2006-2008; De Fontcuberta, 2009). Bévort and others (2012) say that the degree of pluralism in the media has an effect on the configuration of debate spaces in the national and international agenda to which citizens have access, and that massive media education is an essential democratic challenge. For Livingstone (2004), it is crucial for the democratic agenda that consumers create content, which turns them into participative citizens.

When it comes to research into adolescents’ news consumption in an online, convergent environment, studies are scarce. Casero (2012) analyzed the consumption habits and perceptions of 549 Spanish youths between 16 and 30 years old with journalistic information. Huang (2009) explored consumption preferences of 28 American college students in different media, from the uses and gratifications approach. In these studies and others, the adolescents tend to get lost within the broader age categories (young, young adult or college students). Recent research on Internet and social media usage habits in adolescents (García & al., 2013), does not consider news consumption among the habits and usage practices analyzed.

In Chile and Latin America the relationship between adolescents and news has been studied from the perspective of the representation journalists make of them (Antezana, 2007; Condeza, 2005a, 2005b; Cytrynblum & Fabbro, 2011; Maronna & Sánchez, 2005; Sánchez, 2007, Túñez, 2009; Yez, 2007). Some studies that give adolescents a voice in this subject come from UNICEF and the Network of news in infancy for Latin America (Andi, 2013).

Studying the news consumption of Chilean adolescents matters for two reasons: 1) The Chilean population is young, a third is under 18 years old (INE, 2010). 2) During 2006, 2011 and 2012, they were the protagonists of social movements demanding free, good quality education, while some of them criticized the practices of traditional politics (Condeza, 2009; Meunier & Condeza, 2012; Valenzuela, 2013). Little is still known about how this participation is related to the adolescents’ news consumption. 3) The current secondary education curriculum does not pair civic education and citizenship training with media literacy or informative consumption.

3. Methodology

The data obtained comes from a quantitative questionnaire applied in schools to a representative sample of 60% of the population between 13 and 17 years old, in the main cities of four regions (provinces) of Chile. The sample was stratified by urban center in three stages. Institutions were selected according to their dependence or typology, since there are three types of schools in Chile: municipal, subsidized, and private (municipal schools are managed by each of the local city councils, and are funded by the state. Subsidized schools are owned and managed by private individuals and receive public resources in addition to a copayment from the parents. Finally, private schools are owned and managed privately). Specialists from different disciplines have criticized such conditions, as the schools that are managed in this way would reproduce and even worsen the social stratification in the country (Puga, 2011). The sample was segmented according to the real percentage that each type of school represents of the total student enrollment in those urban centers, through probability sampling proportional to its size (number of students between ninth and eleventh grade, according the yearbook of Chile’s Department of Education) (Mineduc, 2013). For the next two stages (grade), simple random sampling was used. This yielded a sample of 163 schools. Between 20 and 30 students per institution were randomly selected to be surveyed. The questionnaire was used with 2.744 youths between 13 and 18 years old, from 105 schools of different types, for a response rate of 64%. This sample was reduced to 2.273 valid cases, as 15% (N=411) was discarded for incorrectly answering a control question to measure attention; and 2.8% (N=77) was 18 years old (adult age). With 2,273 valid cases, under a maximum variance assumption and a confidence level of 95%, the margin of error is ±2,05%.

Most studies in Chile are carried out in the Metropolitan Region of Santiago and its media. To reduce this bias, schools from the main cities in the regions of Antofagasta (mining zone in the north with a strong economical expansion), Valparaíso (the province were the Congress operates), Biobío (industrial area in the south of the country with high rates of poverty and unemployment) and Santiago (the capital) were selected. A total of 388 cases (17.1% of the sample) were students from the Region of Antofagasta; 541 cases (23.8%) from the Region of Valparaíso; 530 cases (23,.3%) from the Region of Biobío, and 814 cases (35.8%) from the Metropolitan Region of Santiago.

The questionnaire (30 questions, self-administered) was elaborated by the project researchers, from the uses and gratifications perspective (Rubin & al., 2008; Huang, 2009), and based on questions tested in national and international studies, among them, that of professor Edgar Huang from the University of Purdue (Condeza & al., 2013). The questionnaire was piloted in field conditions and adjusted accordingly. Fieldwork, conducted between May and August of 2013, was commissioned to the Institute of Sociology of the Pontificia Univesidad Católica de Chile. The Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Communications of the same university authorized the no-objection letters for the participants, and the consent forms for the parents and school directors.

The students’ average age is 15 years old. 52% were male and 47.9% were female, divided homogenously across the three course levels examined. When breaking the sample down by educational type of school, 39.9% of the cases were municipal institutions; 48.7% were subsidized schools, and 11.5% were private, paid establishments.

4. Result analysis

4.1. Frequency of media usage and daily information technologies

Traditional media have a minor presence in the informative diet of the surveyed adolescents, whereas the social network Facebook is the medium they use the most to be informed. 64.9% use it more than one hour a day, followed by websites like YouTube (52.9%) and, to a lesser degree, broadcast television (31.4%). The least used media are news websites (7.3%), print magazines and newspapers (4.3% and 2.9% respectively; see graph 1):

Women consume more news on Twitter and print magazines, while men prefer Facebook and video websites. There are significant differences by type of school across all the media analyzed. Students from municipal schools consume more news on Facebook, broadcast TV, cable and radio. Those from private institutions consume significantly fewer news through these media. The students from subsidized schools use more website videos, like YouTube, at similar levels as students from municipal schools. The private school students’ informative diet is significantly more varied (Twitter, blogs, other social media, online newspapers and magazines, news websites, and print newspapers and magazines).


Draft Content 408103767-29645-en008.jpg

The main medium used to access news on the surveyed adolescents’ own city, country, and the world is broadcast television, followed by Facebook, although some differences are observed depending on the geographical focus (city, country, world). Broadcast television is the most consumed medium in the case of national news, and it decreases in the case of international ones. For international news, the use of cable television increases up to the same level as Facebook.

When analyzing the most consulted medium to look for information about the country, municipal schools’ students are the ones who most use broadcast television and Facebook, while students from private schools are the ones who use news websites the most.

When it comes to main activities carried out on the Internet, the list is topped by Wikipedia queries (49.8%) and information searches related to their studies (48%). Next is the use of the instant messaging service Whatsapp (45.9%) and online games (38.8%). The frequency of activities related to the web’s expressive power and participants’ produser condition in the informative domain –that is to say, creating content, collaborating with a medium or writing on a blog– is quite moderated.

4.2. Adolescents’ interests and motivations to consume news

Adolescents were asked about their attention to different types of news: crime; sports; politics and elections; environment; economy; education; health; show business; their own schools; the student movement, and science and technology. Over 70% report paying attention to news about education, health, crime, the student movement, science and technology, and environment. The least popular topics are economy (41%) and politics and elections (32.9%).


Draft Content 408103767-29645-en009.jpg

Significant differences are observed by genre in nine of the eleven topics. Women pay more attention to education, health, politics, student movement, environment, their schools, and show business; and men to science and technology, and sports. When considering regional variety, only crime showed a statistically significant difference: 80.3% of the surveyed participants from the Region of Antofagasta reported paying attention to this type of news, 78.1% from the Region of Valparaíso, 76.2% from Region of Biobío, and 69.5% from the Metropolitan Region of Santiago.

Significant differences were also found by type of school in four topics: crime (students from municipal and subsidized schools are more attentive than the ones from private institutions), student movement (youths from municipal schools declare to be more attentive), environment (youths from subsidize schools declare to be more interested), and politics and elections (the only topic that students from private schools declare to be more attentive about than the rest of the adolescents). Still, in general politics and elections seem less interesting to them, regardless of other variables.

While 65% of the surveyed individuals show an interest in news, 63% disagree with others telling them what news to pay attention to (see graph 2). This could be an expression of their autonomy and independence perception (Padilla-Walker, 2007) and underlines a distance between normative aspects and news consumption. The adolescents declare they somewhat agree (47,6%) or strongly agree (44,1%) with only consuming news that they are really interested in .85% demonstrate agreement with the idea of learning something new through the news, while most of them do not consider news affects their lives in an important way (44.9% does not agree).

The latter could be related to the news value that they add to informative content, or how significant, close, and pertinent are the news items they have access to. There is a consensus about the role parents play in the news consumption habit, since 71.4% report (41.4% somewhat agrees and 31% strongly agree) having inherited it from them. Regarding news, adolescents do not consider its format to be complicated nor do they think news to be entertaining in general.

There are no statistically significant differences by gender (except that women report not having enough time to follow the news), grade or region. But there are differences by type of school: students from private schools accept more that other people tell them what news to follow. Adolescents from public and subsidized schools show less interest in news.

Motivations to consume news were grouped in three categories according to the uses and gratifications approach (Katz & al., 1974; Rubin & al., 2008): 1) Current affairs monitoring (surveillance), 2) Entertainment, and 3) Social utility. Adolescents agree on the importance of being aware of current affairs (54.6% somewhat agree and 29.3% strongly agree). They would consume news mainly to be aware of the problems that affect people like them (49.5% somewhat agree) and 31.7% strongly agree). A lower percentage considers consuming news to decide on the important topics of the day (46.5% somewhat agree and 37.7% do not agree). Knowing what the government does is less prominent (43.7% do not agree, 37.8% somewhat agree, 18.5% strongly agree).


Draft Content 408103767-29645-en010.jpg

The surveyed individuals do not agree, however, on the fact that news is consumed because it is entertaining, dramatic, or stimulating. Among the social utility factors they consider being informed is important in defending their point of view to other people (49.8% somewhat agree and 29.8% strongly agree). Being informed allows them to talk about interesting things with others (43.6% somewhat agree and 31.5% strongly agree). Also, giving other people information (49.8% somewhat agree and 31.5% strongly agree). They do not perceive journalists as approachable people (to 79.9% of surveyed participants journalists do not seem like people they know). Commentators are not their referent when it comes to comparing ideas (38.6% do not agree and 43.8% somewhat agree). What is more, 48.1% disagree with the idea that journalists humanize the news. There are substantial differences by type of school. The adolescents from subsidized and private schools report being significantly more motivated to consume news to be aware of current events and to talk about relevant things than those who attend public schools. For students who attend subsidized schools it is more important to be informed to defend their points of view.

4.3. Talking with others about the news

Talking about current affairs in different spheres and with different actors spurs a dialogue and interest in civic affairs. The parents are the most frequent interlocutors of the surveyed adolescents, followed by their friends. Nearly half of the sample reports talking about news once a month or less often with their teachers. This suggests that current affairs are not a discussion topic in the classroom. Their discussion networks are rather homogenous: low frequency of conversation with other people with a different ideology or social background.

Students who attend private schools talk with their family and their peers (friends and classmates) significantly more frequently than with their teachers. While 52.2% of the surveyed adolescents from public schools talk about current affairs with their teachers once a month, 47.3% of the students attending private institutions do so at least once a week. Their home, their school, and social media are the three places where the students talk about the news with the highest frequency.


Draft Content 408103767-29645-en011.jpg

4.4. Assessment of topics and evaluation of their appearance in the agenda

Adolescents were asked about the importance of 17 topics. Education (77.3%), poverty (76.8%), domestic violence (76.6%), health (76.2%) and discrimination (76.1%) are the topics considered very important with the highest frequency. Next as very important are social inequality (68%), crime, muggings and robberies (67%), drugs (65.5%), environment (64.4%), and corruption or influence peddling (62.9%). Rising prices as well as public transportation seem very relevant to adolescents, though in 51.2% and 48.2% respectively. Politics are the topic about which students show least interest.

If students’ valuations of important topics are compared to the perception they have of their appearance frequency in the news, an opposite relation can be observed. The five most frequently topics evaluated as appearing often are social inequality (76.4%), crime, muggings and robberies (74.4%), politics (66.5%), sports (62.5%) and drugs (55.4%). On the other hand, the most invisible topics for students are the environment (35.5%), corruption or influence peddling (25.2%) and poverty (22.4%).

This assessment varies again by type of school. In subsidized schools students qualify topics as very important with a higher frequency, followed by municipal and private institutions. Education matters more to students who attend subsidized (80%) and public (76.5%) schools. The same happens with work related topics, which are very important for students who attend subsidized and municipal schools (66.6% and 64.4% respectively, while 56% in private schools). Sports, on the other hand, is valued as very important with a higher frequency in the case of students who belong to municipal schools (45.4%), in contrast to 38.7% in the case of adolescents from subsidized schools and 35% private ones. Adolescents from private schools assign politics a high importance with a higher frequency (35.4%) than students from subsidized (30.3%) and municipal (28.2%) schools. A third of the surveyed students from municipal schools (33.38%) qualified politics as not important.


Draft Content 408103767-29645-en012.jpg

Likewise, students –regardless of their gender or type of school they attend– consider that journalists do not include young people’s opinions and say false things about them. When asking them about the social function of journalists some of them consider that the news media show deficiencies when giving truthful information or a diversity of points of view. Something similar happens when evaluating the coverage given to their respective cities and regions, and the rest of the country.

5. Conclusions and projections

This work represents an advance in the study of the informative habits of a relevant group of the population, which has not been addressed on a large scale in Chile so far. This is particularly important since it is in this life period that media consumption habits are developed, alongside civic-politic ones. In other studies, adolescents are usually considered indistinctly within the category of «youths», together with college students or professionals.

In terms of frequency of media use to be informed daily, results show the importance Facebook has for teenagers against traditional media, except television. The news diet presents differences according to the type of school. This confirms the presence of economic biases in the news consumption by these adolescents.

Regarding interests in news, the main topics are education, health, crime, and the student movement. The topics that are least interesting for adolescents are politics and economics. This could be interpreted as a lack of interest in traditional politics, but not necessarily as indifference towards civic or political action, precisely because of the interest in topics related to the public sphere.

In addition, the data reveals that topic interest depends on the type of institution. Thus, this study proposes a new angle for debate over economic, educational, and informative segregation in Chile, which will be discussed in later works by the research team.

When comparing these results with the news agenda in Chilean media (Mujica & Bachmann, 2013) it is possible to detect a gap between the interests of adolescents and what news media offer. This study may help the news industry plan editorial strategies that offer a greater range and diversity of topics for these groups. For adolescents, the main motivations to consume news are linked to their social utility over their informative value. This suggests boosting news for this kind of use (addressing topics which interest them, allowing to share and comment news, among others).

It is possible to project new studies to deepen the understanding of adolescents’ motivations and explore the content in the news agenda they criticize. Some of the correlations currently under study examine variables such as talking about news with parents, the inheritance of this habit, motivations for news consumption, interest in public and political affairs, and the impact of the type of school in the information gap, as well as topics of interest. Likewise, they observe the role of parents and teachers in promoting an interest in consuming news and talking about it, and citizenship training through this process.

A greater challenge for researchers is the divesting of epistemological and theoretical frameworks as well as the traditional analysis of what is news. What is more, the challenge of divesting of what scholars consider desirable for the students to deem of informative value in order to observe adolescents’ interests with more freedom –and less oriented to regulate teenagers’ behaviors and habits. If Facebook and YouTube are the media to which adolescents dedicate more time daily, it is necessary to know the habits and content of consumption on those platforms. There are spaces clearly identified as news-related on social media. What is news for adolescents then? What is news for them on a social network, on which they exchange personal and group information as well as information about public affairs? Is it that informative consumption is the product of a comment by one or more peers about a piece of news previously seen in another media or format? Does their perception of news respond to journalistic criteria? What kind of news makes students circulate on social media or «self-broadcasting» platforms?

There is also the risk of replicating ideas about the unilateral power of technologies in the socialization of adolescents. As this study shows, they are interested in what occurs around them. They need the news to assert opinions and talk with others. An important finding –and a ground wire– is the fact that the type of school is an informative inequality factor which generates greater differences in news consumption by type of medium, attention and interest in news, conversation with others and public affairs interest. It is possible to identify consumption patterns and to characterize the surveyed individuals’ news diet based on the type of school they attend. Is an unequal social stratification being formed in Chile based on the type of school, which deepens social segregation (Puga, 2011) in relation to the informative domain?

Acknowledgements

The authors thank Dr. Edgar Huang, Indiana University Purdue (USA), for providing his questionnaire for consultation. In addition to the authors, to this article contributed as co-investigator Dr. Sebastián Valenzuela, Assistant Professor of the Faculty of Communication at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

References

Aguaded, J.I. (2009). El Parlamento europeo apuesta por la alfabetización mediática. Comunicar, 32, 7-8. (DOI: 10.3916/c32-2009-00-001).

Andi (Ed.) (2013). Derechos de la infancia y derecho a la comunicación. Brasilia: Andi.

Antezana, L. (2007). Los jóvenes en los noticieros televisivos chilenos. Revista Latinoamericana de Ciencias de la Comunicación, 5, 154-163.

Bévort, E., Frémont, P. & Joffredo, L. (2012). Éduquer aux médias ça s’apprend! Paris: Ministère de l’Éducation Nationale.

Buckingham, D. & Martínez-Rodríguez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos: Nueva ciudadanía entre redes sociales y escenarios escolares. Comunicar, 40, 10-13. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-01-01).

Buckingham, D. (2000). Creating Citizens: News, Pedagogy and Empowerment. In The Making of Citizens. Young People, News and Politics. (pp. 35-58). London and New York: Routledge.

Burns, A. (2010). Distributed Creativity: Filesharing and Produsage. In S. Sonvilla-Weiss (Ed.), Mashup Cultures (pp.24-37). Springer Wien: Germany

Carlsson, U. (2011). Young People in the Digital Media Culture. In C. Von Feilitzen, Carlsson, U. & C. Bucht (Eds.), New Questions, New Insights, New Approaches (pp.15-18). Göteborg: The International Clearinhouse on Children, Youth and Media.

Caron, A. & Caronia, L. (2005). Culture Mobile: Les nouvelles pratiques de communication. Montréal: PUM.

Casero, A. (2012). Más allá de los diarios: el consumo de noticias de los jóvenes en la era digital. Comunicar, 39, 151-158. (DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-03-05).

Condeza, R (2005b). La infancia y la adolescencia en primera plana, Cuadernos de Información, 18, 140-147.

Condeza, R. (2005a). Infancia, Violencia y medios: Conocer para intervenir. Montevideo: BICE.

Condeza, R. (2009). Las estrategias de comunicación utilizadas por los adolescentes. Cuadernos de Informacion, 24, 67-78.

Condeza, R., Mujica, C., Valenzuela, S. & Bachmann, I. (2013). Uso de medios de comunicación y prácticas de consumo informativo de adolescentes chilenos en cuatro regiones del país. Santiago: Facultad de Comunicaciones Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PLU 120024- CONICYT, Fondo de Estudios sobre el Pluralismo en el Sistema Informativo Nacional 2012).

Cytrynblum, A. & Fabbro, G. (Ed.) (2011). La niñez en los noticieros. Buenos Aires: Asociación Civil Periodismo Social.

De-Fontcuberta, M. (2009). Propuestas para la formación en educación en medios en profesores chilenos. Comunicar, 32, 201-207. (DOI: 10.3916/c32-2009-03-001).

De-Fontcuberta, M. (2011). La noticia. Pistas para percibir el mundo. Barcelona: Paidós.

De-Fontcuberta, M., Fernández, F., Condeza, R. & Gálvez, M. (2006-2008). Evaluación de la educación en medios en Chile. Una propuesta de criterios para la formación continua de profesores de lenguaje y comunicación. Fondecyt Regular 2006-2008 Nº 1060418. Santiago de Chile: Comisión Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología CONICYT.

Flanagan, C. & Syversten, A. (2006). Youth as Social Construct and Social Actor. In Sherrod, R., (Ed), Youth Activism. An International Encyclopedia (pp.11-19). Wesport: Greenwood Press.

Fundación Friedrich Ebert (2013). Por el derecho a la comunicación: Dimensiones de una política pública de comunicación. (http://goo.gl/W3V9MN) (10-11-2013).

García, A., López De Ayala, M. & Catalina, B. (2013). Hábitos de uso en Internet y en las redes sociales de los adolescentes españoles. Comunicar, 41, 195-204. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-19).

Huang, E. (2009). The Causes of Youths' Low News Consumption and Strategies for Making Youths Happy News Consumers. Convergence, 15 (1), 105-122. (DOI: 10.1177/1354856508097021).

INE Chile (2010). Estadísticas del Bicentenario. Evolución de la población de Chile en los últimos 200años. Enfoque estadístico Mayo 2010. Santiago: Instituto Nacional de Estadísticas (INE).

Ito & al. (2010). Hanging out, Messing around, and Geeking Out: Kids Leaving and Learning with New Media. Cambrige (M.A): The MIT Press.

Jenkins, H., Clinton, K., Purushotoma, R., Robison, A. & Weigel, M. (2006). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture. Chicago: The MacArthur Foundation.

Jensen, J. (Ed.) (2007). Encylopedia of Children, Adolescents and the Media. London: Sage.

Katz, E., Blumler, J. & Gurevitch, M. (1974). Uses of Mass Communication by the Individual. In W. Davison & F. Yu (Ed.), Mass Communication Research (pp.11-34). Nueva York: Praeger Publishers.

Livingstone, S. (2004). The Challenge of Changing Audiences: Or, What is the Audience Researcher to do in the Age of the Internet? European Journal of Communication, 19 (1), 75-86.

Maronna, M. & Sánchez, R. (2005). Narrativas de infancia y adolescencia: investigación sobre sus representaciones en los medios de comunicación. Montevideo: BICE.

Mcleod, J. (2000). Media and Civic Socialization of Youth. Journal of Adolescent Health, 27S, 45-51.

Meunier, D. & Condeza, R. (2012). Le mouvement 2.0 des lycéens chiliens de mai 2006: Usages des Tics et action collective. Revue Terminal, Technologie de l’information, culture Société, 111, 33-48.

Mineduc (Ed.) (2013). Nivel de matrícula 2006-13. Ministerio de Educación, Gobierno de Chile. (http://goo.gl/TwP3bc) (01-10-2013).

Morduchowicz, R. (2009). Cuando la educación en medios es política de Estado. Comunicar, 32, 131-138. (DOI: 10.3916/c32-2009-02-011).

Mujica, C. & Bachmann, I. (2013). Melodramatic profiles of Chilean newscasts: the case of emotionalization. International Journal of Communication, 7, 1.801-1.820.

Orozco, G. (2009). Entre pantallas. Nuevos escenarios y roles comunicativos de sus audiencias usuarios. In M. Aguilar, E. Nipón, A. Portal & R. Winocur (Eds.), Pensar lo contemporáneo: de la cultura situada a la convergencia tecnológica (pp. 287-296). Barcelona: Anthropos/UAM-Iztapalapa.

Padilla-Walker, L. (2007). Adolescents, Developmental needs of, and Media. In J. Jensen (Ed.) (2007), Encylopedia of Children, Adolescents and the Media (pp. 2-4). London: Sage.

Puente, S. & Mujica, C. (2004). ¿Qué es noticia (en Chile)? Cuadernos de Información, 16, 86-100.

Puga, I. (2011). Escuela y estratificación social en Chile: ¿cuál es el rol de la municipalización y la educación particular subvencionada en la reproducción de la desigualdad social? Estudios Pedagógicos, 37 (2), 213-232.

Ritzer, G. & Jurgenson, N. (2010). Production, Consumption, Prosumption. Journal of Consumer Culture, 10 (1), 13-36. (DOI: 10.1177/1469540509354673).

Rubin, R., Pamlmgreen, Ph. & Shypher, E. (Eds.) (2008). Communication Research Measures: A source book. New York: The Guilford Press.

Sánchez, R. (2007). Infancia y violencia en los medios. Una mirada a la agenda informativa. Montevideo: Unicef.

Sherrod, R. (Ed.) (2006). Youth Activism. An International Encyclopedia. Wesport: Greenwood Press.

Túñez, M. (2009). Jo?venes y prensa en papel en la era Internet. Estudio de ha?bitos de lectura, criterios de jerarqui?a de noticias, satisfaccio?n con los contenidos informativos y ausencias tema?ticas. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 15, 503-524.

Valenzuela, S. (2013). Unpacking the Use of Social Media for Protest Behavior: The Roles of Information, Opinion Expression and Activism. American Behavioral Scientist, 57, 920-942. (DOI: 10.1177/0002764213479375).

Yez, L. (2007). De maleante a revolucionario. Cuadernos de Información, 20, 37-43.

Zaffore, J. (1990). La comunicación masiva. Regulación, libertad y pluralismo. Buenos Aires: Depalma.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En un contexto de proliferación de medios y creciente acceso a diversos contenidos mediáticos, se vuelve necesario examinar las motivaciones de las audiencias jóvenes para consumir información. El estudio de este grupo etario es relevante, dado que la adolescencia es un período fundamental en la socialización cívica de las personas. Esta investigación explora cómo chilenos de 13 a 17 años consumen noticias, en un contexto mediático de múltiples soportes, convergencia y cultura móvil. Pocos estudios se centran en los hábitos informativos de este grupo específico. A partir de un cuestionario cuantitativo autoaplicado en 2013 a 2.273 adolescentes en establecimientos educativos de cuatro regiones del país, se analizan sus hábitos de consumo, interés en las noticias, percepción sobre la importancia de los temas de la agenda y motivaciones informativas. Los resultados muestran que los jóvenes encuestados se informan principalmente a través de redes sociales como Facebook, en detrimento de los medios convencionales. El tema que menos les interesa es la política tradicional, que, a su juicio, es el que más aparece en las noticias. Sus motivaciones en el consumo informativo se relacionan con el deseo de defender sus puntos de vista y de transmitir información a otros. Además, estiman que su representación en la agenda informativa es inadecuada y negativa. Estos resultados sugieren una deuda pendiente de la industria informativa con los jóvenes.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Las vidas de los adolescentes están «mediatizadas», porque «los medios digitales son parte central de sus experiencias extraescolares y de sus relaciones e identidades cotidianas» (Buckingham & Martínez-Rodríguez, 2013: 10). Distintos autores se han interesado en analizar las nuevas prácticas de comunicación de los adolescentes más allá del ámbito escolar, en un entorno tecnológico cambiante, convergente, on-line (Carlsson, 2011) y crecientemente atravesado por la comunicación de la cultura móvil (Caron & Caronia, 2005). El hecho de que los adolescentes tengan acceso a los medios y a las tecnologías de información y de comunicación va mucho más allá de su constitución en meros «nuevos públicos» (Jenkins & al., 2006): están inmersos en una cultura participativa y expresiva de la convergencia de los medios, en la cual sus miembros son participantes creativos, creen en la importancia de su contribución y sienten un cierto grado de conexión los unos con los otros. Los autores Orozco (2009), y Ritzer y Jurgerson (2010) consideran a estos usuarios como prosumidores, es decir simultáneamente como productores y consumidores, mientras Burns (2010) emplea el concepto de «produser».

Los sistemas educativos, familiares e informativos participan del cambio del paisaje mediático, de sus industrias culturales, y de las nuevas prácticas de comunicación y consumo de medios de los adolescentes. Casero (2012: 152) subraya la necesidad de conocer los cambios en los hábitos informativos de la audiencia joven «para calibrar el alcance y los efectos de la convergencia digital y sus perspectivas de futuro». El sistema informativo enfrenta el desafío de lograr mayores niveles de pluralismo y de libertad de expresión. ¿Hasta qué punto los periodistas –y el sistema informativo en general– orientan su quehacer para contribuir con información pertinente dirigida a los adolescentes? Al respecto, Zaffore (1990) afirma que todo medio de comunicación debiera contener una acumulación de opiniones distintas y que tal diversidad es correlativa a la creciente complejidad del entramado social que deben reflejar. La tarea no es fácil: el volumen de noticias obliga al periodismo a incluir, excluir y jerarquizar información (De-Fontcuberta, 2011; Puente & Mujica, 2004). Se requiere entonces conocer si la multiplicación de acceso a distintas plataformas de comunicación beneficia a los adolescentes, permitiéndoles un mayor acceso a variedad de información noticiosa sobre su entorno (Buckingham, 2000).

El pluralismo no solo se expresa en el ejercicio de «la libertad de expresión en medios de comunicación de distinto tipo de propiedad, gestión, tamaño y orientación editorial, de modo que se generen contenidos que expresen la diversidad social, cultural, de género, geográfica y de los pueblos originarios» (Fundación Friedrich Ebert, 2013: 1). También se manifiesta en la posibilidad de que distintos tipos de públicos puedan informarse sobre los temas que les interesan y afectan. Los adolescentes son ciudadanos en el presente desde múltiples perspectivas, antes del ejercicio del derecho a sufragio (Condeza, 2009) y están insertos en una ecología de medios compleja (Ito & al., 2010). «Mapear» su consumo informativo en distintos soportes reviste relevancia social.

En ese contexto, este artículo analiza el consumo de noticias de 2.273 adolescentes chilenos entre 13 y 17 años en distintos medios y soportes, según ubicación geográfica, grupo socioeconómico y género, en distintas regiones del país. Es el primer estudio en Chile financiado por concurso público de la Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica. Se condujo entre enero y septiembre de 2013 para conocer: a) Qué medios y tecnologías usan para informarse; b) Sus motivaciones para consumir noticias; c) Sus percepciones sobre el pluralismo y la agenda informativa; d) Las motivaciones, consumo de medios, actitudes y comportamientos de los adolescentes en relación a los asuntos públicos.

2. ¿Educados para estar informados?

La importancia del consumo informativo en la vida de los adolescentes ha sido subrayada por investigadores de distintas disciplinas. La psicología del desarrollo ha estudiado cómo, en búsqueda de su identidad, estos se vuelven hacia los medios, para entender qué es lo socialmente aceptable, identificarse con sus pares, expresar grados de autonomía con respecto a las preferencias de los adultos o por necesidad de evasión-introspección (Padilla-Walker, 2007).

Según Flanagan y Syvertsen (2006), los adolescentes simbolizan el reemplazo de las generaciones más antiguas en el proceso político y social. Para la ciencia política y la sociología, los hábitos informativos expresados en el consumo de noticias en distintos medios están asociados con la formación ciudadana, el interés por los asuntos públicos, mayores índices de participación cívica, el ejercicio del derecho a voto y distintas formas de activismo (McLeod, 2000; Valenzuela, 2013). De allí que las noticias y los medios sean considerados agencias relevantes de su socialización, en interacción con otras, como la familia y los establecimientos educativos. En esa misma línea el área interdisciplinaria de investigación científica en comunicación y educación ha puesto el acento en la formación crítica sobre el consumo de los contenidos informativos, publicitarios y de ficción (Aguaded, 2009; Buckingham, 2000; De-Fontcuberta, 2009). Esta se materializa en distintos niveles y acciones de educación en medios, relacionadas con la formación ciudadana, tales como el curso de educación mediática en Europa, decidida por su Parlamento (2009); una política de Estado, como en Argentina (Morduchowicz, 2009) o una propuesta de plan de formación de profesores chilenos en alfabetización mediática (De-Fontcuberta & al., 2006-2008; De-Fontcuberta, 2009). Bévort y otros (2012) plantean que el grado de pluralismo de los medios incide en la configuración de espacios de debate del acontecer nacional e internacional a los que tiene acceso los ciudadanos y que la educación masiva en medios es un desafío democrático esencial. Para Livingstone (2004), que los consumidores creen contenidos es crucial para la agenda democrática, lo que los convierte en ciudadanos participativos.

A la hora de investigar el consumo de noticias de los adolescentes en un entorno mediático on-line y de convergencia, los estudios escasean. Casero (2012) analizó los hábitos de consumo y percepciones de 549 jóvenes españoles, entre 16 y 30 años con la información periodística. Huang (2009) exploró las preferencias del consumo informativo de 28 jóvenes universitarios estadounidenses en distintos soportes, desde el enfoque de usos y gratificaciones. En estos estudios y otros, los adolescentes tienden a perderse dentro de categorías de edad más amplias (jóvenes, adultos jóvenes o universitarios). Investigaciones recientes sobre los hábitos de usos de Internet y de las redes sociales en adolescentes (García & al., 2013) no consideran el consumo de noticias entre los hábitos y prácticas de uso analizados.

En Chile y América Latina, la relación de los adolescentes con las noticias se ha investigado desde la perspectiva del análisis de la representación que los periodistas hacen de estos (Antezana, 2007; Condeza, 2005a, 2005b; Cytrynblum & Fabbro, 2011; Maronna & Sánchez, 2005; Sánchez, 2007; Túñez, 2009; Yez, 2007). Algunos estudios que dan voz a los adolescentes en este ámbito provienen de UNICEF y de la Red de noticias en infancia para América Latina (Andi, 2013).

Estudiar el consumo informativo de los adolescentes chilenos importa por otras razones: 1) La población chilena es joven, un tercio, menor de 18 años (INE, 2010). 2) Durante 2006, 2011 y 2012, fueron protagonistas de movimientos sociales por la calidad y la gratuidad de la educación, mientras una parte criticó las prácticas de la política tradicional (Condeza, 2009; Meunier & Condeza, 2012; Valenzuela, 2013). Poco se sabe aún sobre cómo esta participación se relaciona con su consumo informativo. 3) El currículum de enseñanza secundaria no asocia la educación cívica y la formación ciudadana con la alfabetización mediática o el consumo informativo.

3. Metodología

Los datos obtenidos provienen de un cuestionario cuantitativo, aplicado en colegios a una muestra representativa del 60% de la población de 13 a 17 años, en las principales ciudades de cuatro regiones (provincias) de Chile. La muestra fue estratificada por centros urbanos, en tres etapas. Se seleccionaron los establecimientos de acuerdo con su dependencia o tipología, pues existen tres tipos: municipal, subvencionada y particular. Los establecimientos municipales son administrados por cada uno de los ayuntamientos locales y tienen financiamiento estatal. Los colegios particulares subvencionados son de propiedad y administración privada y reciben recursos públicos además de un copago por parte de los padres. Finalmente, los colegios particulares son de propiedad y financiamiento privado. Esta condición ha sido criticada por especialistas de distintas disciplinas. Los colegios así administrados reproducirían e incluso profundizarían la estratificación social del país (Puga, 2011). La muestra fue segmentada en función del porcentaje real que cada modalidad representa del total de la matrícula en esos centros urbanos a través del muestreo con probabilidades de selección proporcional a su tamaño (número de estudiantes entre primer y tercer año, según anuario del Ministerio de Educación) (Mineduc, 2013). Para las dos etapas siguientes (curso), se empleó el muestreo aleatorio simple. Esto arrojó una muestra de 163 colegios. Se seleccionó aleatoriamente una cantidad de entre 20 y 30 alumnos a encuestar por institución. Se aplicó el cuestionario a 2.744 jóvenes entre 13 y 18 años, de 105 establecimientos de distinto tipo, para una tasa de logro del 64%. Esta muestra se redujo a 2.273 casos válidos, por lo siguiente: El 15% (N= 411) fue descartado por contestar incorrectamente una pregunta de control para medir la atención; el 2,8% (N=77) tenía 18 años (mayoría de edad). También fueron excluidos los valores perdidos en la edad. Con 2.273 casos válidos, bajo un supuesto de varianza máxima y un nivel de confianza del 95%, el margen de error es de ±2,05%.

La mayoría de los estudios en Chile se concentran en la Región Metropolitana de Santiago y sus medios. Para paliar este sesgo, se seleccionaron establecimientos de las principales ciudades de la región de Antofagasta (zona minera del norte del país, en fuerte expansión económica), de Valparaíso (provincia donde opera el Congreso), del Biobío (área industrial en el sur del país, con altos índices de pobreza y desempleo) y de la Región Metropolitana de Santiago (capital). Un total de 388 casos (17,1% de la muestra) son alumnos de la Región de Antofagasta; 541 casos (23,8%) de la Región de Valparaíso; 530 casos (23,3%), de la Región del Biobío, y 814 casos (35,8%), de la Metropolitana.

El cuestionario (30 preguntas, autoadministrado) fue elaborado por los investigadores del proyecto, desde la perspectiva de los usos y gratificaciones (Rubin & al., 2008; Huang, 2009) y a partir de baterías de preguntas probadas en estudios nacionales e internacionales, entre ellos la del profesor Edgar Huang de la Universidad de Purdue (Condeza & al., 2013). Fue piloteado en terreno y ajustado. El trabajo de campo, conducido entre mayo y agosto de 2013 fue encargado al Instituto de Sociología de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. El Comité de Ética de la Facultad de Comunicaciones de la misma universidad autorizó las cartas de asentimiento para los adolescentes participantes, y las de consentimiento para los padres y directores de colegio.

La edad promedio de los estudiantes es de 15 años. El 52,1% corresponde a hombres y el 47,9% a mujeres, divididos de manera en general homogénea en los tres niveles de cursos. Al desglosar por dependencia educacional, el 39,9% de casos corresponde a establecimientos municipales; el 48,7%, a subvencionados, y el 11,5%, a particulares pagados.

4. Análisis de resultados

4.1. Frecuencia de uso de medios y tecnologías para informarse diariamente

Los medios convencionales tienen una presencia menor en la dieta informativa de los adolescentes encuestados. En cambio, la red social Facebook es el medio que más usan para informarse. El 64,9% lo usa más de una hora por día, seguido de sitios como YouTube (52,9%) y, en menor medida, la televisión abierta (31,4%). Los medios menos usados son los portales de noticias (7,3%), las revistas y los diarios en papel (4,3% y 2,9% respectivamente) (gráfico 1).

Las mujeres consumen más noticias en Twitter y en revistas impresas, los hombres en Facebook y sitios web de vídeo. Se observan diferencias significativas por dependencia escolar en todos los medios. Los alumnos de colegios municipales consumen más en Facebook, televisión abierta, cable y radio. Los de centros particulares consumen significativamente menos noticias en estos medios. Los de colegios subvencionados usan más sitios de vídeos, como YouTube, en niveles muy similares a los de los municipales. La dieta informativa por medio de los alumnos de colegios particulares es significativamente más variada (Twitter, blogs, otras redes sociales, diarios y revistas online, portales de noticias y diarios y revistas en papel).


Draft Content 408103767-29645 ov-es008.jpg

El principal medio usado para informarse sobre las noticias que ocurren en su propia ciudad, en el país y en el mundo es la televisión abierta, seguida por Facebook, si bien se observan diferencias dependiendo del foco geográfico de la información (ciudad, país, mundo). La televisión abierta es el medio más consumido en el caso de las noticias sobre el país y disminuye en el caso de noticias internacionales. La importancia de Facebook baja para la información nacional. En el caso de las noticias internacionales el uso del cable aumenta casi al mismo nivel que Facebook.

Al analizar el principal medio consultado para buscar información sobre el país, los alumnos de establecimientos municipales son los que más usan la televisión abierta y Facebook, mientras que los de colegios particulares son los que más usan portales de noticias.

En cuanto a las principales actividades realizadas por Internet, figuran las consultas a Wikipedia (49,8%) y la búsqueda de información relacionada con sus estudios (48%). Le siguen el uso de la aplicación Whatsapp (45,9%) y los juegos on-line (38,8%). La frecuencia de actividades relacionadas con el poder expresivo de la web y su condición de produsers en el ámbito informativo –es decir, crear contenido, colaborar con un medio o escribir en un blog– es más moderada.

4.2. Intereses y motivaciones de los adolescentes para consumir noticias

Se preguntó a los adolescentes por su atención a una lista de tipos de noticias: policiales, deportes, política y elecciones, medio ambiente, economía, educación, salud, espectáculos, su propio colegio, el movimiento estudiantil, y ciencia y tecnología. Sobre el 70% declara prestar atención a las noticias sobre educación, salud, policía, movimiento estudiantil, ciencia y tecnología, y medio ambiente. Los temas menos atendidos son los de economía (41%) y de política y elecciones (32,9%).


Draft Content 408103767-29645 ov-es009.jpg

Se observan diferencias significativas por género en nueve de los once temas. Las mujeres prestan más atención a educación, salud, policía, movimiento estudiantil, medio ambiente, su colegio y espectáculos; y los hombres, a ciencia y tecnología, y deportes. Al considerar la variable regiones solo se encontraron diferencias significativas en los temas policiales: el 80,3% de los encuestados de la Región de Antofagasta declara prestarles atención, 78,1% de los de la Región de Valparaíso, 76,2% de los de la Región del Biobío y 69,5% de los de la Región Metropolitana.

Por dependencia se encontraron diferencias significativas en cuatro temas: policía (en los colegios municipales y subvencionados están más atentos que en los particulares), movimiento estudiantil (los jóvenes de colegios municipales dicen estar más atentos), medio ambiente (los jóvenes de los colegios subvencionados declaran estar más interesados), y política y elecciones (el único tema del que los adolescentes de colegios particulares dicen estar más atentos que los de los otros tipos de establecimiento). Aun así, en general la política y elecciones les parecen menos interesantes, independientemente de otras variables.

Si bien el 65% de los encuestados manifiesta interés en las noticias, el 63,6% está en desacuerdo que otros les indiquen qué noticia atender (gráfico 2). Esto fue interpretado como una manifestación de su percepción de autonomía e independencia (Padilla-Walker, 2007). Subraya una distancia de los aspectos normativos en relación al consumo informativo. Responden estar de acuerdo (47,6%) o muy de acuerdo (44,1%) con consumir solo las noticias que realmente les interesan. El 85% manifiesta estar de acuerdo con que les gusta conocer algo nuevo a través de las noticias, si bien no necesariamente consideran, en un porcentaje mayoritario, que esto afecte de modo importante en sus vidas (44,9% nada de acuerdo). Esto último podría relacionarse con el valor noticioso que le asignan a los contenidos informativos, así como con cuán significativos, próximas y pertinentes son las noticias a las que acceden. Se aprecia un consenso sobre el rol que juegan los padres en el hábito de consumir noticias, ya que el 71,4% está de acuerdo (41,4% algo de acuerdo y 31% muy de acuerdo) en que lo heredaron de estos. Respecto a las noticias, no consideran que su formato sea complicado, ni que en general sean entretenidas.

No se observan diferencias estadísticamente significativas por género (salvo que las mujeres dicen no tener suficiente tiempo para seguir las noticias) ni por curso o región. Sí por dependencia educacional: los alumnos de colegios privados aceptan más que otros que les digan qué noticias seguir. Los adolescentes de colegios públicos y subvencionados declararon menor interés en las noticias.

Las motivaciones para consumir noticias fueron agrupadas en tres categorías, de acuerdo con el enfoque de los usos y gratificaciones (Katz & al., 1974; Rubin & al., 2008): 1) vigilancia-monitoreo de la actualidad; 2) entretenimiento y 3) utilidad social. Los adolescentes están de acuerdo en que es importante estar al día con la actualidad (54,6% algo de acuerdo y 29,3% muy de acuerdo) y consumirían noticias principalmente para saber los problemas que afectan a personas como ellos (49,5% algo de acuerdo y 31,7% muy de acuerdo). Un porcentaje sustantivamente menor considera consumir noticias para decidir sobre los temas importantes del día (46,5% algo de acuerdo y 37,7% nada de acuerdo). Saber lo que hace el gobierno tiene menor peso (43,7% nada de acuerdo, 37,8% algo de acuerdo, 18,5% muy de acuerdo).

Los encuestados no están de acuerdo, sin embargo, con que consumen noticias porque sean entretenidas, dramáticas o estimulantes. Dentro de los factores de utilidad social consideran importante informarse para defender sus puntos de vista ante otras personas (49,8% algo de acuerdo y 29,8% muy de acuerdo). Estar informado les permite conversar sobre cosas interesantes con los demás (43,6% algo de acuerdo y 31,5% muy de acuerdo). También entregar información a otras personas (49,8% algo de acuerdo y 31,5% muy de acuerdo). No perciben a los periodistas como personas cercanas (para el 79,9% de los adolescentes encuestados los periodistas no se parecen a personas que conocen). Los comentaristas no son su referente al momento de comparar ideas (38,6% está nada de acuerdo y 43,8%, algo de acuerdo). Aún más, el 48,1% está en desacuerdo con que los periodistas humanizan las noticias.


Draft Content 408103767-29645 ov-es010.jpg

Las únicas diferencias sustantivas se producen por dependencia. Los jóvenes de colegios subvencionados y particulares reportan estar significativamente más motivados para consumir noticias para estar al día con la actualidad y conversar sobre cosas interesantes que aquellos de establecimientos públicos. Para los alumnos de centros subvencionados es más importante informarse para defender sus puntos de vista.

4.3. Conversar con otros sobre las noticias

Conversar sobre la actualidad en distintas esferas y con distintos actores genera diálogo e interés por los asuntos ciudadanos. Los padres son los interlocutores más frecuentes de los adolescentes encuestados, seguidos por los amigos. Casi la mitad de la muestra dice conversar sobre noticias una vez al mes o menos con los profesores. Esto sugiere que la actualidad no es un tema de discusión en clase. Sus redes de discusión son más bien homogéneas: poca frecuencia de conversación con personas de ideología o nivel social diferentes.

Los alumnos de colegios particulares conversan significativamente con mayor frecuencia con su familia, sus pares (amigos y compañeros) que con sus profesores. Si el 52,2% de los encuestados de establecimientos municipales conversa sobre actualidad con sus profesores una vez al mes, el 47,3% de los de particulares lo hacen al menos una vez a la semana. El hogar, el establecimiento educativo y las redes sociales son los tres espacios en los que los encuestados conversan sobre las noticias con mayor frecuencia.


Draft Content 408103767-29645 ov-es011.jpg

4.4. Valoración de los temas y evaluación de su aparición en la agenda

Se preguntó a los adolescentes sobre la importancia de 17 temas. La educación (77,3%), la pobreza (76,8%), la violencia intrafamiliar (76,6%), la salud (76,2%) y la discriminación (76,1%) son los temas considerados muy importantes con mayor frecuencia. Le siguen como muy importantes la desigualdad social (68%), la delincuencia, los asaltos y los robos (67%), las drogas (65,5%), el medio ambiente (64,4%) y la corrupción o el tráfico de influencias (62,9%). El alza de los precios, así como el transporte público también les parecen muy relevantes, aunque en un 51,2% y en un 48,2% respectivamente. La política es el tema informativo por el que manifiestan menor interés.

Si se comparan las valoraciones de los escolares sobre los temas importantes con la percepción que tienen de su frecuencia de aparición en las noticias, se observa una relación opuesta. Los cinco temas que más frecuentemente fueron evaluados como que aparecen mucho son: la desigualdad social (76,4%), la delincuencia, los asaltos o los robos (74,4%), la política (66,5%), los deportes (62,5%) y las drogas (55,4%). En tanto, los temas más invisibles a juicio de los adolescentes son el medio ambiente (35,5%), la corrupción o el tráfico de influencias (25,2%) y la pobreza (22,4%).

Esta valoración nuevamente varía por dependencia. En los centros subvencionados los alumnos califican los temas como muy importantes con mayor frecuencia, seguidos por los municipales y los particulares. La educación importa más a los alumnos de colegios subvencionados (80%) y públicos (76,5%) que a los privados. Lo mismo ocurre en los temas laborales, muy importantes para los estudiantes de los colegios subvencionados y municipales (66,6% y 64,4% respectivamente, en tanto 56,5% de los particulares). El deporte, en cambio, es valorado con mayor frecuencia como muy importante en el caso de los adolescentes de colegios municipales (45,4%), mientras que por 38,7% de los subvencionados y 35% los particulares. Los jóvenes de establecimientos privados asignan mucha importancia a la política con mayor frecuencia (35,4%) que los adolescentes de los colegios subvencionados (30,3%) y de los municipales (28,2%). Un tercio de los encuestados de centros educacionales municipales (33,38%) calificó la política como nada importante.


Draft Content 408103767-29645 ov-es012.jpg

Asimismo los escolares –independientemente de género o dependencia del centro educativo– consideran que los periodistas no incluyen la opinión de los jóvenes y que dicen cosas falsas sobre su grupo etario. Al consultarles sobre la función social de los periodistas algunos de ellos consideran que los medios presentan deficiencias a la hora de entregar información verdadera o diversidad de puntos de vista. Algo similar ocurre al evaluar la cobertura dada a sus respectivas ciudades y regiones, y el resto del país.

5. Conclusiones y proyecciones

Este trabajo representa un avance en el estudio de los hábitos informativos de un grupo de población relevante, hasta ahora poco abordado en Chile y Latinoamérica. Es particularmente importante, pues los adolescentes forman sus hábitos de consumo de medios, pero también de acción cívico-política. En otros estudios suelen considerarse indistintamente dentro de la categoría «jóvenes», junto a universitarios o a profesionales.

En términos de frecuencia de uso de medios para informarse diariamente, los resultados muestran la importancia que tiene Facebook para los adolescentes, frente a los medios tradicionales, salvo la televisión. La dieta informativa presenta diferencias de acuerdo con la dependencia escolar. Esto ratifica la presencia de sesgos socioeconómicos en el consumo de noticias de estos adolescentes.

En cuanto al interés por las noticias, los principales temas son educación, salud, policía y el movimiento estudiantil. Los temas que menos interesan son política y economía. Esto puede interpretarse como falta de interés en la política tradicional, pero no necesariamente como indiferencia hacia la acción cívica o política, precisamente por el interés hacia temas de la esfera pública.

Los datos además revelan que el interés por los temas depende del tipo de establecimiento. De este modo, el estudio propone un nuevo ángulo para el debate sobre segregación económica, educacional e informativa en Chile, que se discutirá en trabajos posteriores del equipo de investigación.

Al comparar estos resultados con la pauta informativa de los medios chilenos (Mujica & Bachmann, 2013), es posible detectar una distancia entre lo que interesa a los adolescentes y a los medios. El estudio puede servir para que la industria informativa planifique estrategias editoriales que ofrezcan mayor oferta y diversidad de temas para estos grupos. Para los adolescentes las principales motivaciones para consumir noticias están ligadas a su utilidad social por su valor informativo. Ello sugiere potenciar noticias para este tipo de usos (apelar a temas de su interés, posibilidades de compartirlas y comentarlas, entre otros).

Es posible proyectar nuevos estudios, para profundizar en la comprensión de las motivaciones de los adolescentes y explorar el contenido de la agenda noticiosa que critican. Algunas de las correlaciones en las que se trabaja actualmente asocian variables como conversar sobre noticias con los padres, la herencia de este hábito, las motivaciones de consumo informativo, el interés por lo público y por lo político y el impacto del tipo de establecimiento en las brechas de información, así como en los temas de interés. Asimismo el rol de los padres y profesores en promover el interés por consumir noticias y conversarlas, así como en la formación ciudadana por esta vía.

Un desafío mayor para los investigadores es que se despojen de los marcos epistemológicos, teóricos y de análisis tradicionales sobre qué es noticia. Más aún, sobre lo que estos consideran deseable que los adolescentes estimen que tiene valor informativo, para poder observar con mayor libertad –al tiempo que menos normativamente– sus intereses. Si Facebook y YouTube son los medios a los que los adolescentes dedican más tiempo diario, se precisa conocer las formas y los contenidos de dicho consumo en esas plataformas. En las redes sociales no hay espacios claramente identificados como noticiosos. ¿Qué es noticia para los adolescentes?, ¿qué es noticioso para ellos en una red social, en la que indistintamente se intercambia información personal, grupal y sobre hechos públicos?, ¿acaso el consumo informativo es producto del comentario de uno o más pares sobre una noticia vista previamente en otro medio o formato?, ¿su percepción de lo noticioso responde a los criterios del trabajo periodístico?, ¿qué tipo de noticias hacen circular los jóvenes en las redes sociales o plataformas de «autobroadcasting»?

También existe el riesgo de replicar ideas sobre el poder unilateral de las tecnologías en la socialización de los adolescentes. Como se vio, están interesados en lo que sucede a su alrededor. Necesitan las noticias para afirmar puntos de vista y conversar con otros. Un hallazgo es precisamente el factor que genera mayores diferencias en el consumo de noticias por tipo de medio, atención e interés en las noticias, conversación con otros e interés en lo público: la dependencia de los establecimientos como factor de desigualdad informativa. Es posible identificar patrones de consumo y caracterizar la dieta informativa de los encuestados a partir del tipo de colegio al que asisten. ¿Se está reproduciendo a partir del centro educativo una estratificación social desigual en Chile, que profundiza la segregación social (Puga, 2011), en relación con lo informativo?

Agradecimientos

Al Dr. Edgar Huang, de Indiana University Purdue (USA), por facilitar el cuestionario de su estudio para consulta. Por otro lado, en este artículo participó como coinvestigador y coautor el Dr. Sebastián Valenzuela, Profesor Asistente del Departamento de Periodismo de la Facultad de Comunicaciones de la Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (savalenz@uc.cl).

Referencias

Aguaded, J.I. (2009). El Parlamento europeo apuesta por la alfabetización mediática. Comunicar, 32, 7-8. (DOI: 10.3916/c32-2009-00-001).

Andi (Ed.) (2013). Derechos de la infancia y derecho a la comunicación. Brasilia: Andi.

Antezana, L. (2007). Los jóvenes en los noticieros televisivos chilenos. Revista Latinoamericana de Ciencias de la Comunicación, 5, 154-163.

Bévort, E., Frémont, P. & Joffredo, L. (2012). Éduquer aux médias ça s’apprend! Paris: Ministère de l’Éducation Nationale.

Buckingham, D. & Martínez-Rodríguez, J.B. (2013). Jóvenes interactivos: Nueva ciudadanía entre redes sociales y escenarios escolares. Comunicar, 40, 10-13. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C40-2013-01-01).

Buckingham, D. (2000). Creating Citizens: News, Pedagogy and Empowerment. In The Making of Citizens. Young People, News and Politics. (pp. 35-58). London and New York: Routledge.

Burns, A. (2010). Distributed Creativity: Filesharing and Produsage. In S. Sonvilla-Weiss (Ed.), Mashup Cultures (pp.24-37). Springer Wien: Germany

Carlsson, U. (2011). Young People in the Digital Media Culture. In C. Von Feilitzen, Carlsson, U. & C. Bucht (Eds.), New Questions, New Insights, New Approaches (pp.15-18). Göteborg: The International Clearinhouse on Children, Youth and Media.

Caron, A. & Caronia, L. (2005). Culture Mobile: Les nouvelles pratiques de communication. Montréal: PUM.

Casero, A. (2012). Más allá de los diarios: el consumo de noticias de los jóvenes en la era digital. Comunicar, 39, 151-158. (DOI: 10.3916/C39-2012-03-05).

Condeza, R (2005b). La infancia y la adolescencia en primera plana, Cuadernos de Información, 18, 140-147.

Condeza, R. (2005a). Infancia, Violencia y medios: Conocer para intervenir. Montevideo: BICE.

Condeza, R. (2009). Las estrategias de comunicación utilizadas por los adolescentes. Cuadernos de Informacion, 24, 67-78.

Condeza, R., Mujica, C., Valenzuela, S. & Bachmann, I. (2013). Uso de medios de comunicación y prácticas de consumo informativo de adolescentes chilenos en cuatro regiones del país. Santiago: Facultad de Comunicaciones Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PLU 120024- CONICYT, Fondo de Estudios sobre el Pluralismo en el Sistema Informativo Nacional 2012).

Cytrynblum, A. & Fabbro, G. (Ed.) (2011). La niñez en los noticieros. Buenos Aires: Asociación Civil Periodismo Social.

De-Fontcuberta, M. (2009). Propuestas para la formación en educación en medios en profesores chilenos. Comunicar, 32, 201-207. (DOI: 10.3916/c32-2009-03-001).

De-Fontcuberta, M. (2011). La noticia. Pistas para percibir el mundo. Barcelona: Paidós.

De-Fontcuberta, M., Fernández, F., Condeza, R. & Gálvez, M. (2006-2008). Evaluación de la educación en medios en Chile. Una propuesta de criterios para la formación continua de profesores de lenguaje y comunicación. Fondecyt Regular 2006-2008 Nº 1060418. Santiago de Chile: Comisión Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología CONICYT.

Flanagan, C. & Syversten, A. (2006). Youth as Social Construct and Social Actor. In Sherrod, R., (Ed), Youth Activism. An International Encyclopedia (pp.11-19). Wesport: Greenwood Press.

Fundación Friedrich Ebert (2013). Por el derecho a la comunicación: Dimensiones de una política pública de comunicación. (http://goo.gl/W3V9MN) (10-11-2013).

García, A., López De Ayala, M. & Catalina, B. (2013). Hábitos de uso en Internet y en las redes sociales de los adolescentes españoles. Comunicar, 41, 195-204. (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-19).

Huang, E. (2009). The Causes of Youths' Low News Consumption and Strategies for Making Youths Happy News Consumers. Convergence, 15 (1), 105-122. (DOI: 10.1177/1354856508097021).

INE Chile (2010). Estadísticas del Bicentenario. Evolución de la población de Chile en los últimos 200años. Enfoque estadístico Mayo 2010. Santiago: Instituto Nacional de Estadísticas (INE).

Ito & al. (2010). Hanging out, Messing around, and Geeking Out: Kids Leaving and Learning with New Media. Cambrige (M.A): The MIT Press.

Jenkins, H., Clinton, K., Purushotoma, R., Robison, A. & Weigel, M. (2006). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture. Chicago: The MacArthur Foundation.

Jensen, J. (Ed.) (2007). Encylopedia of Children, Adolescents and the Media. London: Sage.

Katz, E., Blumler, J. & Gurevitch, M. (1974). Uses of Mass Communication by the Individual. In W. Davison & F. Yu (Ed.), Mass Communication Research (pp.11-34). Nueva York: Praeger Publishers.

Livingstone, S. (2004). The Challenge of Changing Audiences: Or, What is the Audience Researcher to do in the Age of the Internet? European Journal of Communication, 19 (1), 75-86.

Maronna, M. & Sánchez, R. (2005). Narrativas de infancia y adolescencia: investigación sobre sus representaciones en los medios de comunicación. Montevideo: BICE.

Mcleod, J. (2000). Media and Civic Socialization of Youth. Journal of Adolescent Health, 27S, 45-51.

Meunier, D. & Condeza, R. (2012). Le mouvement 2.0 des lycéens chiliens de mai 2006: Usages des Tics et action collective. Revue Terminal, Technologie de l’information, culture Société, 111, 33-48.

Mineduc (Ed.) (2013). Nivel de matrícula 2006-13. Ministerio de Educación, Gobierno de Chile. (http://goo.gl/TwP3bc) (01-10-2013).

Morduchowicz, R. (2009). Cuando la educación en medios es política de Estado. Comunicar, 32, 131-138. (DOI: 10.3916/c32-2009-02-011).

Mujica, C. & Bachmann, I. (2013). Melodramatic profiles of Chilean newscasts: the case of emotionalization. International Journal of Communication, 7, 1.801-1.820.

Orozco, G. (2009). Entre pantallas. Nuevos escenarios y roles comunicativos de sus audiencias usuarios. In M. Aguilar, E. Nipón, A. Portal & R. Winocur (Eds.), Pensar lo contemporáneo: de la cultura situada a la convergencia tecnológica (pp. 287-296). Barcelona: Anthropos/UAM-Iztapalapa.

Padilla-Walker, L. (2007). Adolescents, Developmental needs of, and Media. In J. Jensen (Ed.) (2007), Encylopedia of Children, Adolescents and the Media (pp. 2-4). London: Sage.

Puente, S. & Mujica, C. (2004). ¿Qué es noticia (en Chile)? Cuadernos de Información, 16, 86-100.

Puga, I. (2011). Escuela y estratificación social en Chile: ¿cuál es el rol de la municipalización y la educación particular subvencionada en la reproducción de la desigualdad social? Estudios Pedagógicos, 37 (2), 213-232.

Ritzer, G. & Jurgenson, N. (2010). Production, Consumption, Prosumption. Journal of Consumer Culture, 10 (1), 13-36. (DOI: 10.1177/1469540509354673).

Rubin, R., Pamlmgreen, Ph. & Shypher, E. (Eds.) (2008). Communication Research Measures: A source book. New York: The Guilford Press.

Sánchez, R. (2007). Infancia y violencia en los medios. Una mirada a la agenda informativa. Montevideo: Unicef.

Sherrod, R. (Ed.) (2006). Youth Activism. An International Encyclopedia. Wesport: Greenwood Press.

Túñez, M. (2009). Jo?venes y prensa en papel en la era Internet. Estudio de ha?bitos de lectura, criterios de jerarqui?a de noticias, satisfaccio?n con los contenidos informativos y ausencias tema?ticas. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 15, 503-524.

Valenzuela, S. (2013). Unpacking the Use of Social Media for Protest Behavior: The Roles of Information, Opinion Expression and Activism. American Behavioral Scientist, 57, 920-942. (DOI: 10.1177/0002764213479375).

Yez, L. (2007). De maleante a revolucionario. Cuadernos de Información, 20, 37-43.

Zaffore, J. (1990). La comunicación masiva. Regulación, libertad y pluralismo. Buenos Aires: Depalma.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/14
Accepted on 30/06/14
Submitted on 30/06/14

Volume 22, Issue 2, 2014
DOI: 10.3916/C43-2014-05
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 11
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?