Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This article presents the results of a study on the use of social networks among young Andalusians. The main objectives are to know the uses of social networks, their frequency and the motives behind their use. A questionnaire was used to collect the data. The sample includes 1487 adolescents in Andalusia. The results show that young people, for the most part, consistently used social networks. We identified two motivational aspects in this use: one social and the other psychological. There are not significant gender differences in frequency of use, but rather in the motivations for access. Boys tend to be the more emotional type, while girls were dominated by a more relational motivation. The results show similarities with international researches in environments that vary greatly from the present work. The conclusions suggest the need for future lines of work. This study also identifies the implications of social network uses for active citizenship and participatory training and social integration. These results are also important for the enrichment of dimensions such as social capital development and education.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and state of the question

Virtual social networks constitute an important phase in the development and use of Internet, and are increasingly the focus of research although their history as a resource is relatively recent. In this regard, Boyd and Ellison (2008) reviewed the launching of social networks through their identification of three phases since 1997. The first period spans the onset in 1997 up to 2001 and is characterized by the creation of numerous virtual communities to provide space for a diverse combination of user profiles. A new era began in 2001, characterized by these networks’ approach to business. In other words, professional exchange and business networks were created to become a powerful instrument in global economy. In the third stage –today– social networks attract the attention of researchers in a number of disciplines and fields with their enormous potential as an object of study. This has resulted in virtual social networks becoming privileged scenarios to carry out promising lines of research. An indicator of this tendency is the fact that international journals and magazines the Journal of Computer-Mediated Com mu nication includes this topic in its editorial when noting that research can help us understand the practices, implications, culture and meanings of virtual spaces. From this perspective, researchers are urged to make use of the various research methodologies, theoretical focuses and treatment of the data analysed.

In this research scenario, demographic niches, that is to say, specific populations constitute sample units that are the object of scientific interest. Thus, the populations of young people and adolescents have attracted the attention of recent international studies (Zheng & Cheok, 2011, Jung Lee, 2009, Notley, 2009 (Su brah manyam & Greenfield, 2008; Subrah manyam and Lin, 2007; Subrahmanyam, Greenfield, and Tynes, 2004) which approach two key questions: the frequency these networks are used and the motivations for use. These re searchers justify the relevance of studying this population sector based on the fact that young people increasingly prefer to express themselves through virtual communication systems while social networks are becoming more and more extensive. On the other hand, studying the social networks used by young people is especially relevant due to the fact that they favour these communication forms over other more traditional means as they offer direct personal contact.

Recently, Zheng and Cheok (2011) analysed young people’s use of social networks and suggest that it is necessary for this type of information to be updated given the rapid changes these technologies generate. While in 2008 only 30% of the young people from Singapore made use of social networks, by 2011 99% of young people between 7 and 24 years of age had become social network users. In our study, we seek to obtain this type of information for a population of young people and adolescents who study in state-funded schools in Andalusia (Spain).

Another line of work focuses on the detection of factors that explain the use of social networks. In this regard, Notley (2009) identified the key factors affecting the use that young Australians and adolescents make of social networks. Through a narrative methodology, the author establishes an explanatory theoretical model composed of four dimensions: personal interests, necessities, relationships and technological competencies.

This research studies the concept of social digital exclusion and inclusion, to detect sectors of young people excluded from these technologies. This same topic was approached by other authors in various geographical areas (Zheng, Flygare, & Dahl, 2009, Bu rrow-Sanchez & al. 2011) using a quantitative methodological focus. International scientific production prefers to identify two lines of work: the first focuses on the motivations behind social network usage from the psychological point of view. In this case, individual differences in the uses of social networks (Flygare & Dahl, 2009), motivations (Leese, 2009) and identity (Calvert, 2002) are studied. The second line of work reviews more social perspective to incorporate concepts such as social capital and/or welfare.


Draft Content 879500215-26712-en001.jpg

Complementarily to these two positions, some au thors (Burrow-Sanchez, Donnelly, Call & Drew, 2011) indicate the need to research social networks from a holistic perspective, establishing relationships between the psychological, social and cognitive dimensions. In this regard, some studies (Bianchi & Phillips, 2005; Eastin, 2005; Lin, 2006; Subrah manyam, Smehal, and Greenfield, 2006; Valkenburg & Peter, 2007) show that young people’s online social communication is influenced by the perception of their identity and self-esteem, as well as social compensation and environment. On the other hand, Subrah manyam & col. (2006) research the self-construction of adolescent identity within the context of on-line social communication, establishing relationships between identity and social behaviour.

Furthermore, this connection between personal psychological characteristics and social behaviour was the object of the work by Gross (2004); Williams and Merten, (2008), who concluded that although extroverts use social networks more frequently, the potential of Internet, such as anonymity, flexibility and multiple interactions, as well as languages and means of ex pression, stimulate introverted people to communicate with others. In contrast, Inte rnet reduces visual and auditory signals which could alleviate the social anxiety introverted people experience to more quickly develop positive relationships with the others.

From a social perspective, the field is currently working with a number of references and constructs. Thus, the social compensation construct has recently been recaptured to explain the behaviour of young people in social networks. This construct arose in the twenties and was attributed to Kohler (1926). It translates the idea that the achievements of a group depend on the relationship of each person with other members of that group. Authors such as Chak and Leung (2004); Valkenburg and Peter (2007); Valkenburg, Peter and Schouten, (2006) incorporate this into their social network research. Other studies suggest it is a tool to facilitate social inclusion (Notley, 2009).

Current research incorporates the term «social capital» into social networks. Despite the debates generated, there is consensus that capital stock is a set of resources or benefits available to people through their social interactions (Lin, 1999). More specifically, capital stock could be understood as accessible resources integrated into the social structure, which are mobilized by individuals through intentional actions (Lin, 1999: 35). Recent studies incorporate this construct into their research into online social networks. Greenhow and Burton (2011) approach the potential of social networks in the creation of social capital. The fact that social networks –composed of groups and networks– are generally used to share, collaborate and interact with others makes this construct especially valuable as a conceptual tool to research this subject.

The lines of work and research mentioned to date place the accent on the relationship of young people with social networks, focusing basically on variables that explain why they use them.

Our contribution seeks to add to this line of work, with the main scientific objective being to learn what young people make of social networks such as MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, etc. We specifically seek to answer the following questions:

• At what age do young people begin participating in social networks and how is the intensity of use distributed according to the age groups?

• How often are social networks used?

• Are young people free to connect to the network whenever they want to?

• What are the reasons that lead them to use social networks?

• Are there differences between sexes in the use and motivations behind the use of social networks?

2. Material and methods

Data was collected using the questionnaire we designed, based on non-excluding nominal scales. The resulting scale (table 1) was created by taking the theoretical reviews (psychological and social reasons) as a reference, as well as the ideas of information technology experts, plus direct information supplied by young people in advance through open interviews about the reasons why they use social networks. Basic general information about the study sample was collected: sex, age, nationality, type of school, educational level and year.


Draft Content 879500215-26712-en002.jpg

Questionnaire items were designed to collect information about frequency of use and reasons why they connected to the social network. The following table shows the items included.

The initial version of the questionnaire was reviewed by a panel of experts (n=8) all of whom were specialist researchers in Educational Technology. This review improved the items proposed, both in content and drafting. Subsequently, an electronic version of the questionnaire was designed for completion via Internet. The schools participating in this study granted consent for the participation of their students. Students included in the sample were informed about the study and were requested to participate. The estimated completion time was 10 minutes.

The data presented in this study is representative of young Andalusians and makes up part of the Research for Excellency, financed through a public summons, titled «Scenarios, digital technologies and young people in Andalusia», which is currently on-going. Of the total population of young Andalusians, which included 283,423 subjects, a sample of 2,509 subjects was obtained using stratified probabilistic sampling and conglomerates, with an estimated level of confidence of 95% and a sampling error of ± 2%. We worked with a real sample of 1,487 young people from the Region of Andalusia between 13 and 19 years of age, with 15 years being the average age (this represents a confidence level of 95% and a sample error of ± 2.3% for the total population). The discrepancy between the theoretical and real sample is due to incidences that frequently converge in field work: null questionnaires, questionnaires with incomplete items, forgetting the identification, etc. Participants in this research studied at IT centres (schools integrating Information Technologies into the curriculum). This sample includes 49.5% boys and 50.5% girls. Most subjects included were studying secondary education: 54.14% in 4th ESO and 44.12% in 3rd ESO (years 11 & 10 of secondary school, respectively).

3. Analysis and results

For the first objective of our research –identify the age when young people begin using social networks– the data obtained indicates that the average age is approximately 12 and a half years, the median being 13 and mode 12.


Draft Content 879500215-26712-en003.jpg

Graph 1 illustrates this variability. As indicated, 71.7% of Andalusian youth join social networks be tween the ages of twelve and fourteen; a percentage that reaches 94.99% upon expanding the age range from 10 to 15 years old. The remaining 5% is distributed between prior periods that range from 6 to 10 and another later section, ranging from 15 to 17 years of age.

Therefore, this indicates that it is, in fact, during the onset of puberty when young people begin online social relationships. This data coincides with psychological developmental theories that consider this stage the beginning of their social relationships and the value given to friend ship among peers. However, a limited percentage begins at an earlier or later age.

The data obtained about the frequency of social network use indicates that 64.4% of all young people connected to social networks daily; this added to the 26% who connect a few days a week accounts for a total of 90% of young Andalusians who habitually use social networks. These results coincide with those obtained in other recent studies into the population of young Andalusians (Gomez, Roses & Farias, 2012), which indicated that 91.2% of young university students, with an average age of 21 years, use social networks. It also coincides with international studies by Zheng and Cheok, (2011) in which the percentage is even higher – 99%; or related studies by Greenhow and Burton (2011), referring to various international populations, around 90%. Graph 2 indicates the percentages obtained in all the response ranges.


Draft Content 879500215-26712-en004.jpg

Despite the high percentage identified, almost 10% fail to use these resources with any degree of frequency. A possible explanation may be due to paternal or family control, or the digital gap. However, this small percentage of non-users was also indicated in a previous study when referring to a university population (Gómez, Roses & Farias, 2012). This coincidence leads us to believe that the digital gap may be a plausible explanation, together with other factors such as the origin of the subjects, gender, or their personal characteristics, etc.

Analysing the degree of family control could shed light on this variant; thus we researched this question further. The results obtained indicate that more than three quarters of all young people connect to social networks whenever they want to, with no limitations being imposed by the family; 22.3% appear to have certain limits. This would explain the previous 10% and would leave another 12% who break family rules in this regard. Consequently, we could state that 94.99% of young Andalusians connect to social networks at an age ranging from 10 to 15 years, and that 90% routinely use social networks. Only 22.3% have rules for use; the rest access the network with no limits of any type.

The high percentage of social network usage by Andalusian adolescents led us to think about another important question: What drives this use? The results obtained are presented in graph 3 (next page).

As seen in graph 3, the main reason is «to share experiences with friends» (82.8%), followed by «knowing what my friends say about the photos I upload and our experiences» (51%) and «make new friends» (45.6%). These three reasons have a common denominator: cover young people’s social need to interact with peers. This is followed by 20-25% in which the responses are linked to the more psychological and affective aspects; for example «I am satisfied to know that my friends like and appreciate me» (24.9%), «it makes me feel good when I am sad» (23.5%) and «I can be more sincere with my friends than when I am with them» (20.6%).


Draft Content 879500215-26712-en005.jpg

The least indicated reasons are: «the network gives me the possibility to explore and do things that I would not do otherwise» (17.3%), followed by: «social networks are a way of life» (9.3%). These last two options could be under stood as an intense level of use of social networks, or an innovative and creative use which may be the reason why they were chosen less.

In summary, we can conclude that there are two basic motivational areas why youth use social networks: one social –covering 50% of the population– and another psychological which accounts for 20% of the sample studied. These two dimensions cover young people’s basic needs during this developmental phase. These results are coherent and coincide with the current lines of research and conclusions reached. International studies show that young people’s on-line, social network behaviour is motivated by factors such as self-identity, self-confidence, social compensation and social environment (Williams & Mer ten, 2008; Bianchi & Phillips, 2005; Eastin, 2005; Lin, 2006; Subrahmanyam, Smehal & Greenfield, 2006; Valken burg & Peter, 2007).

Given the strong impact of the sex variable in a large proportion of the current research, we proceeded to study whether this variable constitutes a significant differential factor, both in the frequency of use of social networks and in the usage types and motivations for use. Given the nominal scale of data collection used, we applied the ?² for contingency to test these hypotheses.

The results obtained indicate that there are no significant differences between sexes when it comes to the frequency of social network usage (?2=2.005; p=.367). The correlation between the sex variable and uses of social networks is not significant either (contingency Coefficient=.046 p=.367). Graph 4 illust rates the positions of both genders on this question. This visualization shows the similarity of behaviour between sexes.


Draft Content 879500215-26712-en006.jpg

Nevertheless, the differences between sexes may lie with uses rather than frequency, in which case, we decided to statistically compare whether there were differences in the reasons for connecting to social networks. The results obtained indicate that there are significant differences in three variables: to make new friends (?; p=., 002), with a significant correlation (contin gency Coeffi cient=.102 p=.002); it makes me feel good when I am sad, (?2= 13.267; p=.,004), with a significant co rrelation (contingency Coefficient =.117 p=.004); and I like knowing what my friends say about the photos that I upload (?2=13.920; p=.,00), with a significant correlation (contingency Coeffi cient= .120 p=.000). These differences are presented in graph 5:

Graph 5 shows that girls use social networks to make friends to a greater extent than boys. However, boys surpassed girls in the reasons: I like knowing what my friends say about the photos I upload and it makes me feel good when I am sad. Therefore, these results seem to indicate that in the case of boys, the motivation is basically psychological in nature and for personal recognition, while a relational/social use prevails in girls. These results could be interpreted from the perspective of gender roles and/or gender psychology. Previous works (Ertl & Helling, 2011; Lawl or, 2006) show the relevance of the gender variable in the study of young people’s behaviour in social networks.


Draft Content 879500215-26712-en007.jpg

There is another possible interpretation of the results from the social capital theory. For young people, on-line social networks are a source of resources used to fulfil needs, both psychological and social. However, the differences between genders in these variables demonstrate that they play a compensatory role; males generally use them to cover emotional aspects and reinforce their self-esteem, while for young women, the relational function prevails

4. Discussion and conclusions

The results obtained in this work allow us to verify, and therefore establish the main conclusions of the study, which is that 94.99% of young Andalusians connect to social networks at an age ranging from 10 to 15 years. 90% routinely use social networks. Only 22.3% have some rules for use; the rest have unlimited access. The driving force behind this use falls between two extremes: seeking to cover the social need young people have to share experiences, and activity being recognised by others, thus establishing new social relationships.

Regarding young people’s motivations, these are preferably of an individual nature, aimed at covering an emotional dimension; the social network is a virtual space that is emotionally gratifying and allows young people to express their intimate feelings through the perception others have of them. Comparing these results based on sex, we saw that there are no differences regarding the frequency of use; however, there are differences with regards to the reasons behind this use. Three variables are statistically significant: «I like knowing what my friends say about the photos that I upload», «it makes me feel good when I am sad» and «to make new friends». In the case of Andalusian girls, the fundamental reason for use is social and relational (to make new friends), while for boys, it is more individual in nature, aimed at reinforcing internal variables of the subject as an individual, specifically reinforcing self-esteem (I like knowing what my friends say about the photos that I upload) and emotional (It makes me feel good when I am sad). These results fit the model by Notley (2009) to the extent that the motivations to use social networks falls within the sphere of personal interests, as well as social needs of a relational nature. But they are also in keeping with other international studies such as those by Costa, (2011), Flores, (2009) and De Haro (2010), which impact on the social and personal value of social networks for young people.

These results could also be interpreted in the light of the three constructs that have supported the realization of this research: social compensation, social capital, and online atmos phere.

From the «social compensation» construct, given the extensive use of social networks by young An dalusians from a very early age, the results obtained indicate the potential that this resource could have to train young people in social construction and inclusion processes. Today’s society demands that young people develop collaboration-related skills; from this perspective, social networks are a platform to research how group achievements are obtained, starting with the relationship established by each individual with other members of the group. In this sense, it would connect with the work by Watts, (2006) and Christakis and Fowler (2010). This aspect has immense prospective value when faced with how to educate young people to attain achievements, both personal and professional, in group construct processes and finally, social improvement.

This result, verified in our study, is directly related to another construct that has been the basis for the data obtained, which is social capital. In this regard, social networks not only «train» young people in group processes aimed at attaining achievements, but they also become resources where each one «looks for or uses» what they need at any given moment. This result is not only important in training social capital, as suggested by Greenhow and Burton (2011), but also, it can be an important educational resource to favour equality and the development of more inclusive schools (Notley, 2008).

Our results coincide with other international studies (Rudd & Walker, 2010). This research indicates that young people make extensive use of the 2.0 technologies, essentially relating with their peers and channelling their opinions. However, there is a minority of young people who do not use these technologies, which must be explained by economic factors or other barriers. Thus, the resulting recommendations are of interest to agencies dedicated to understanding young people’s behaviour in social networks, and who are working with inclusion. The study by Notley (2009) clarifies this question.

There is also international data about the spheres where young people make use of social networks. It has been concluded that most young people use their social networks outside of school. Based on such results, the recommendations for professionals are aimed at promoting greater informal development of «e-skills». These practices are seen as beneficial for education in democratic citizenship values, since they facilitate knowing the opinions of young people, who in turn become active agents, not only in the local policies, but also at the regional and national level, thus reinforcing participative democracy. In this regard, there are already a number of good practices, as the idea is to incorporate these technological resources into the organizational structures of educational centres to grant students a voice through a means that is a standard aspect of their communication, while at the same time breaking down personal barriers found at that age: shyness, insecurity, embarrassment, etc. Recent studies (Gil de Zúñiga, Jung & Valenzuela, 2012) into how social networks can contribute to democratic processes and the creation of social capital.

In conclusion, the ideas expressed herein back up the claim that social networks are of major educational value in addition to being an important resource for education, both in personal and social values, as indicated by De Haro (2010) and Bryant (2007). Although research into these subjects is still scarce, it could shed light on the processes that shape social interaction as the basis for personal and social improvement.

Support

This work falls within the scope of a Research Project of Excellency titled «Scenarios, digital technologies and Young people in Anda lusia». Financed though the Projects of Excellency 2008-11 summons (Ref. HUM-SEJ-02599).

References

Bianchi, A. & Phillips, J. (2005). Psychological Predictors of Problem Mobile Phone Use. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 8 (1), 39-51.

Boyd, D. & Ellison, N. (2008). Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Commu­nication 13, 210-230.

Bryant, L. (2007). Emerging trends in social software for education. In Becta. Emerging Technologies for Learning, 2. Coventry: Becta.

Burrow-Sanchez, J., Call, M., Zheng, R. & Drew, C. (2011). Are Youth at Risk for Internet Predators?: What Counselors Need to Know. Journal of Counseling and Development, 89 (1), 3-10.

Calvert, S.L. (2002). Identity Construction on the Internet. In S.L. Calvert, A.B. Jordan & R. Cocking (Eds.), Children in the Di­gital Age: Influences of Electronic Media on Development (pp. 57-70). Westport, CT: Praeger.

Chak, K. & Leung, L. (2004). Shyness and Locus of Control as Predictors of Internet Addiction and Internet Use. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 7(5), 559-570.

Christakis, N. & Fowler, J. (2010). Conectados. El sorprendente poder de las redes sociales y cómo afectan nuestras vidas. Ma­drid: Taurus.

Costa, J. (2011). Los jóvenes portugueses de los 10 a los 19 años: ¿qué hacen con los ordenadores? Teoría de la Educación. Edu­cación y Cultura en la Sociedad de la Información, 12 (1), 209-239.

De Haro, J.J. (2010). Redes sociales para la educación. Madrid: Anaya.

Eastin, M.S. (2005). Teen Internet Use: Relating Social Perceptions and Cognitive Models to Behavior. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 8 (1), 62-75.

Ertl, B. & Helling, K. (2011). Promoting Gender Equality in Digital Lite­racy. Journal Educational Computing Research, Vol. 45(4), 477-503.

Flores, J.M. (2009). Nuevos modelos de comunicación, perfiles y tendencias en las redes sociales. Comunicar, 33, XVII, 73-81.

Gil-de-Zúñiga, H., Jung, N. & Valenzuela, S. (2012). Social Media Use for News and Individuals’ Social Capital, Civic Enga­gement and Political Participation. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 17, 319-336.

Gómez, M., Roses, S. & Farias, P. (2012). El uso académico de las redes sociales en universitarios. Comunicar, 38, XIX, 131-138.

Greenhow, C. & Burton, L. (2011). Help from my «Friends» Social Capital in the Social Networks Site of Low-Income Students. Journal Educational Computing Research, 45 (2), 223-245.

Gross, E.F. (2004). Adolescent Internet Use: What We Expect, What Teens Report. Applied Developmental Psychology, 25, 633-649.

Jung-Lee, S. (2009). Online Communication and Adolescent So­cial Ties: Who Benefits More from Internet use? Journal of Com­pu­ter-Mediated Communication, 14, 509–531.

Lawlor, C. (2006).Gendered Interactions in Computer-mediated Computer Conferencing. Journal of Distance Education, 21(2), 26-43.

Leese, M. (2009). Out of Class. Out of Mind? The Use of a Virtual Learning Environment to Encourage Student Engagement in Out of Class Activities. British Journal of Educational Technology, 40 (1), 70-77.

Lin, H.F. (2006). Understanding Behavioral Intention to Participate in Virtual Communities. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 9(5), 540-547.

Lin, N. (1999). Building a Network Theory of Social Capital. Con­nections, 22 (1), 28-51.

Notley, T. (2008). Online Network Use in Schools: Social and Educational Opportunities. The Journal of Youth Studies Australia, 27, 20-29.

Notley, T. (2009). Young People, Online Networks, and Social Inclusion. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14, 1208-1227.

Subrahmanyam, K. & Greenfield, P. (2008). Online Communi­ca­tion and Adolescent Relationships. Future of Children, 18(1), 119-146.

Subrahmanyam, K. & Lin, G. (2007). Adolescents on the Net: Internet Use and Well-being. Adolescence, 42, 659-667.

Subrahmanyam, K., Greenfield, P. & Tynes, B. (2004). Cons­truct­ing Sexuality and Identity in an Internet Teen Chatroom. Jour­nal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 25, 651-666.

Subrahmanyam, K., Smehal, D., & Greenfield, P. (2006). Con­nec­ting Developmental Constructions to the internet: Identity Pre­sentation and Sexual Exploration in Online Teen Chat Rooms. Developmental Psychology, 42(3), 395-406.

Valkenburg, P., Peter, J., & Schouten, A.P. (2006). Friend Net­working Sites and their Relationship to Adolescents Well-being and Social Self-esteem. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 9(5), 584-590.

Valkenburg, P.M. & Peter, J. (2007). Preadolescents and Ado­lescents Online Communication and their Closeness to Friends. Developmental Psychology, 43, 267-277.

Watts, D. (2006). Seis grados de separación. La ciencia de las re­des en la era del acceso. Barcelona, Paidós.

Williams, A.L., & Merten, M.J. (2008). A Review of Online Social Networking Profiles by Adolescents: Implications for Future Research and Intervention. Adolescence, 43, 253-274.

Zheng, R. & Cheok, A. (2011). Singaporean Adoles­cents´ Per­ceptions of On-line Social Communication: An Exploratory Factor Analysis. Journal Educational Computing Research, Vol. 45(2), 203-221.

Zheng, R., Flygare, J., & Dahl, L. (2009). Style Matching or Ability Building? An Empirical Study on FDI Learners’ Learning in Well-structured and Ill-structured Asynchronous Online Learning Environments. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 41(2), 195-226.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Este artículo presenta los resultados de un estudio sobre la utilización que hacen los jóvenes andaluces de las redes sociales. Los objetivos fundamentales son: conocer los usos preferentes de las redes sociales, su frecuencia y los motivos que les impulsan a su utilización. Además se estudia si existen diferencias de sexo tanto en la frecuencia como en las motivaciones de uso. Se aplica un cuestionario para la recogida de datos. La muestra es de 1.487 adolescentes de Andalucía. Los resultados muestran que los jóvenes en su mayoría usan de manera habitual las redes sociales y se identifican dos vertientes motivacionales en su uso: una social y otra psicológica. No se hallan diferencias significativas entre sexos en cuanto a frecuencia de uso, pero sí en las motivaciones para su acceso. Las de los chicos son de tipo emocional, mientras que en las chicas predomina la motivación de carácter relacional. Los resultados obtenidos muestran coincidencias con investigaciones internacionales realizadas en contextos muy diferentes al presente estudio. En la discusión de resultados se plantean futuras líneas de trabajo, a la vez que se identifican implicaciones que los usos de las redes sociales tienen para la formación e integración social de una ciudadanía activa y participativa, así como para el enriquecimiento de dimensiones como el desarrollo del capital social y la educación.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

Las redes sociales virtuales constituyen un importante estadio en el desarrollo y uso de Internet, de ahí que sean objeto de investigación creciente en los últimos años, a pesar de que su trayectoria histórica como recurso sea relativamente reciente. En este sentido, Boyd y Ellison (2008) proponen una trayectoria del na cimiento y evolución de las redes sociales, identificando tres etapas desde 1997 hasta el momento ac tual. El primer periodo abarca desde su nacimiento en 1997 hasta el año 2001 y se caracteriza por la creación de numerosas comunidades virtuales que dan cabida a combinaciones diversas de perfiles de usuarios. A partir de 2001 comienza una nueva etapa ca racterizada por el acercamiento de estas redes al es cenario económico, es decir, se crean redes profesionales de intercambio y negocio convirtiéndose en un poderoso instrumento para la economía globalizada. En una tercera etapa, en el momento actual, las redes sociales atraen la atención de investigadores de diferentes disciplinas y campos de trabajo, al observar su enorme potencial como objeto de estudio para sus respectivos campos profesionales. De ahí que las redes sociales virtuales se conviertan en escenarios privilegiados para el desarrollo de prometedoras líneas de investigación. Un indicador de esta tendencia es el he cho de que revistas internacionales tales como «Jour nal of Com puter-Mediated Communication» incluyan en sus lí neas editoriales esta temática, al entender que la in ves tigación puede ayudar a comprender las prácticas, implicaciones, cultura y significados de los es pacios virtuales. Desde esta perspectiva se insta a hacer uso de diferentes metodologías de in vestigación, enfoques teóricos y tratamientos en el análisis de datos.

En este escenario investigador los ni chos demográficos, es decir, poblaciones es pecíficas, se constituyen en unidades muestrales objeto de interés científico. De tal manera que las po blaciones de jóvenes y adolescentes ocupan la atención de estudios internacionales recientes (Zheng & Cheok, 2011; Jung Lee, 2009; Not ley, 2009; Subrah manyam & Greenfield, 2008; Subrahmanyam & Lin, 2007; Subrah manyam, Green field & Tynes, 2004) que abordan dos cuestiones claves: la frecuencia de uso de estas redes y sus motivaciones para utilizarlas. La pertinencia de estudiar este sector poblacional se justifica, por parte de estos investigadores, en el hecho de que los jóvenes cada vez con mayor frecuencia se expresan preferentemente a través de sistemas de comunicación virtual y la utilización de las redes sociales se hace cada vez más extensiva. Por otra parte, el estudio de las redes sociales utilizadas por jóvenes es especialmente relevante en tanto que ellos priorizan estas formas de comunicación respecto a las tradicionales, basadas en el contacto personal directo.

Recientemente Zheng y Cheok (2011) han analizado el uso que los jóvenes hacen de las redes sociales. Estos autores plantean que es necesario tener este tipo de información actualizada, dados los rápidos cam bios que generan estas tecnologías. Si en el año 2008 solo el 30% de los jóvenes de Singapur hacían uso de las redes sociales, se ha constatado que, en 2011, el 99% de los jóvenes con edades comprendidas entre 7 y 24 años son usuarios de estas redes sociales. En nuestro estudio pretendemos obtener este tipo de información sobre una población de jóvenes y adolescentes que estudian en centros públicos de Andalucía (Es paña).

Otra de las líneas de trabajo se centra en la detección de factores que explican el uso de las redes sociales. En este sentido podemos citar el trabajo de Notley (2009) que trata de identificar los factores clave que afectan al uso que los jóvenes y adolescentes australianos hacen de las redes sociales. A través de una metodología narrativa establece un modelo teórico explicativo que se compone de cuatro dimensiones, intereses personales, necesidades, relaciones y competencias tecnológicas.

En este estudio se plantea el concepto de exclusión e inclusión social digital, ya que detecta sectores de jóvenes excluidos de estas tecnologías. Esta misma temática la abordan otros autores de procedencia geográfica distinta (Zheng, Flygare & Dahl, 2009; Bu rrow-Sanchez, Call & Drew, 2011), con un enfoque metodológico cuantitativo. En la producción científica internacional se identifican preferentemente dos líneas de trabajo: la primera se centra en las motivaciones de uso de las redes sociales en el plano psicológico. En ella se abordan cuestiones tales como dife rencias individuales en los usos de las redes sociales (Zheng, Flygare & Dahl, 2009), motivaciones (Leese, 2009) e identidad (Calvert, 2002). La segunda línea de trabajo tiene una perspectiva más social, in cor porando conceptos como capital y/o bienestar social.


Draft Content 879500215-26712 ov-es001.jpg

Complementariamente a estas dos orientaciones, algunos autores (Burrow-Sanchez & al., 2011) indican la necesidad de investigar las redes sociales desde una perspectiva holística, estableciendo relaciones entre las dimensiones psicológicas, sociales y cognitivas. En este sentido algunos trabajos (Bianchi & Phillips, 2005; Eas tin, 2005; Lin, 2006; Sub rahmanyam, Smehal & Green field, 2006; Valkenburg & Pe ter, 2007) muestran que la comunicación social on-line de jóvenes está influida por la percepción de su identidad y autoestima, así como la compensación social y entorno social. Por otra parte, Subrah manyam y colaboradores (2006) investigan la auto-construcción de la identidad de los adolescentes en el contexto de la comunicación social en línea, estableciendo relaciones entre identidad y comportamiento social.

También esta conexión en tre características psicológicas personales y comportamiento social ha sido objeto de trabajos tales como el de Gross (2004) y Williams y Merten (2008), quienes concluyen que, si bien, las personas extrovertidas son las que exhiben una mayor frecuencia de uso de las redes sociales, las potencialidades de Internet, tales como el anonimato, la flexibilidad y la facilitación de múltiples interacciones, así como de lenguajes y medios de expresión, estimulan a las personas introvertidas a co municarse con otros. Por otra parte, la reducción de las señales visuales y auditivas en Internet puede aliviar la ansiedad social que experimentan las personas introvertidas, y así desarrollar relaciones positivas con los demás de forma más rápida.

Desde una perspectiva social se trabaja con diferentes referencias y constructos. Así el constructo de compensación social se retoma recientemente para explicar el comportamiento de los jóvenes en las redes sociales. Este constructo surge en la década de los años veinte. Traduce la idea de que los logros de un grupo dependen de la relación de la persona con los otros miembros del grupo. Autores como Chak y Leung (2004), Valkenburg y Peter (2007), Valken burg, Peter y Schouten (2006) lo incorporan a sus investigaciones sobre redes sociales. Otros estudios lo plantean como herramienta para facilitar la inclusión social (Notley, 2009).

También se incorpora a la investigación actual so bre redes sociales el término «capital social». A pesar de los debates que ha generado, existe consenso al entender el capital social como recursos o beneficios que se ponen a disposición de las personas a través de sus interacciones sociales (Lin, 1999). Más específicamente, el capital social puede ser entendido como los recursos integrados en la estructura social, a los que se tiene acceso y que los individuos movilizan en acciones intencionales (Lin, 1999: 35). Estudios recientes incorporan este constructo a la investigación sobre re des sociales on-line. Concretamente Greenhow y Bur ton (2011) abordan el potencial del uso de las redes sociales para la formación de capital social. El hecho de que las redes sociales sean utilizadas principalmente para compartir, colaborar e interactuar con otros, constituyéndose grupos y redes, hace a este constructo especialmente valioso como herramienta conceptual para la investigación sobre el tema que nos ocupa.

Los trabajos y líneas de investigación hasta aquí apuntadas ponen el acento en la relación de los jóvenes con las redes sociales, centrándose básicamente en variables que explican el sentido del uso de las mismas.

Nuestra aportación pretende sumarse a esta línea de trabajos planteándose como principal objetivo científico conocer los usos que los jóvenes hacen de las redes sociales, tales como MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, etc. Concretamente tratamos de responder a los si guientes interrogantes:

• ¿A qué edad se inician los jóvenes en las redes sociales y cómo se distribuye la intensidad de uso según las franjas de edad?

• ¿Con qué frecuencia utilizan las redes sociales?

•¿Tienen libertad para conectarse a la Red cuando lo desean o no?

• ¿Cuáles son los motivos que les llevan a utilizar las redes sociales?

• ¿Existen diferencias entre sexos en el uso y motivaciones en el uso de las redes sociales?

2. Material y métodos

La recogida de datos se ha realizado a partir de la elaboración de un cuestionario construido a partir de escalas nominales no excluyentes. La escala resultante (tabla 1) se configura tomando como referencia las revisiones teóricas realizadas (motivos psicológicos y motivos sociales), las ideas de expertos en tecnologías de la información, y la información directa de jóvenes aportada previamente a través de entrevistas abiertas sobre los motivos de uso de las redes sociales. Ini cial mente se recoge información básica general de la muestra del estudio: sexo, edad, nacionalidad, tipo de centro donde realizan los estudios, nivel educativo y curso.


Draft Content 879500215-26712 ov-es002.jpg

Los ítems del cuestionario fueron diseñados para recabar información sobre frecuencia de uso y motivos para conectarse a la red social. La tabla siguiente mues tra los ítems que la conforman.

La versión inicial del cuestionario fue revisada por un panel de expertos (n=8), todos ellos investigadores especialistas en Tecnología Educa tiva. Esta revisión me joró la propuesta de ítems, tanto en su contenido como en su redacción. Posteriormente, se hizo una ver sión electrónica del cuestionario para su cumplimentación vía Internet. Los centros educativos que participan en este estudio han dado el consentimiento para la participación de su alumnado. Los alumnos/as de la muestra fueron informados del estudio y fue solicitado su consentimiento para participar en el mismo. El tiempo estimado de cumplimentación del cuestionario fue de 10 minutos.

Los datos presentados en este estudio son representativos de la población de jóvenes andaluces y forman parte del proyecto de Investigación de Exce lencia, financiado a través de una convocatoria pública, y titulado «Escenarios, tecnologías digitales y juventud en Andalucía», vigente en la actualidad. De la po blación total de jóvenes andaluces, que asciende a 283.423 sujetos, se ha obtenido mediante muestreo probabilístico estratificado y por conglomerados, estimado a un nivel de confianza del 95% y con un error muestral del ±2%, una muestra de 2.509 sujetos. Se ha trabajado con una muestra real de 1.487 jóvenes pertenecientes a la Comunidad Autónoma Andaluza en edades comprendidas entre 13 y 19 años, siendo 15 años la media de edad (que representa a la población total a un nivel de confianza del 95% y un error muestral de ±2,3%). Esta discrepancia entre muestra teórica y real se debe a diferentes incidencias que frecuentemente concurren en el trabajo de campo: cuestionarios nulos, cuestionarios en los que no se cumplimenta un ítem, olvido de la identificación, etc. Los sujetos de esta investigación cursan sus estudios en centros TIC (centros escolares que participan en las políticas educativas destinadas a la integración de las tecnologías de la comunicación en el sistema educativo). Esta mues tra se compone de un 49,5% de chicos y un 50,5% de chicas. La mayoría de sujetos de la muestra cursa estudios de Enseñanza Secundaria Obligatoria: el 54,14% en 4º de ESO, y el 44,12% en 3º de ESO.

3. Análisis y resultados

Respecto al primer objetivo de nuestra investigación, es decir, la identificación de la edad de inicio en el uso de las redes sociales, los datos obtenidos indican que la media de edad se sitúa aproximadamente en 12 años y medio, siendo la mediana 13 y la moda 12.


Draft Content 879500215-26712 ov-es003.jpg

El gráfico 1 ilustra esta variabilidad. Como se pue de apreciar el 71,7% de los jóvenes se incorporan a las redes sociales entre los doce y catorce años, porcentaje que alcanza un 94,99% si ampliamos el rango de edad de 10 a 15 años. El casi 5% restante se distribuye entre una franja previa que oscila entre 6 y 10 y otra posterior entre 15 y 17 años.

Por tanto esta información nos indica que es precisamente en la etapa de comienzo de la pubertad cuando los jóvenes comienzan estas prácticas de relaciones sociales online. Estos datos son congruentes con las teorías evolutivas de desarrollo psicológico, considerando esta etapa con el inicio de sus relaciones sociales y el valor dado a las amistades entre iguales. Sin embargo, un porcentaje escaso se inicia en una franja de edad anterior o posterior.

En relación a la frecuencia de uso de las redes so ciales los datos obtenidos nos indican que el 64,4% de los jóvenes se conectan diariamente a las redes sociales, lo que sumado al 26% que lo hace algunos días a la semana, acumula un total del 90% de los jóvenes que hacen un uso habitual de las redes sociales. Estos resultados convergen con los obtenidos en otros estudios recientes sobre población de jóvenes andaluces (Gómez, Roses & Farias, 2012), en los que se indica que el 91,2% de jóvenes universitarios, con una media de edad de 21 años, utilizan las redes sociales. Y también con estudios internacionales Zheng y Cheok (2011), en los que el porcentaje es aún más elevado, el 99%; o estudios realizados por Greenhow y Burton (2011) referidos a distintas poblaciones internacionales, en torno al 90%. En el gráfico 2 se detallan los porcentajes obtenidos en todos los rangos de respuesta.


Draft Content 879500215-26712 ov-es004.jpg

No obstante, a pesar del elevado porcentaje identificado, cerca del 10% no hace un uso frecuente de estos recursos. Una posible explicación podría estar en el control paterno o familiar, o en la posible brecha digital. Sin embargo este bajo porcentaje de no utilización se refleja también en un estudio anterior referido a una población universitaria (Gómez, Roses & Farias, 2012). Esta coincidencia nos inclina a pensar que la brecha digital puede ser una explicación plausible, junto con otros factores como la procedencia de los su jetos, género, características de los sujetos, etc.

El análisis del grado de control familiar sobre esta práctica podría arrojar luz sobre esta variante, de ahí que indaguemos sobre esta cuestión. Los resultados obtenidos nos indican que más de las tres cuartas partes de los jóvenes se conectan a las redes sociales cuando quieren, sin tener limitaciones por parte de la familia; y el 22,3% parecen tener regulada esta actividad. Esto explicaría el 10% anterior y dejaría otro 12% de sujetos que se saltan las normas familiares en este aspecto. Por tanto, en síntesis podemos decir que el 94,99% de los jóvenes andaluces se conectan a las redes sociales en un rango de edad de 10 a 15 años, y que el 90% de ellos hacen un uso habitual de las redes sociales. Solo el 22,3% tiene unas normas de uso; el resto puede acceder a la Red sin ningún tipo de limitación.

El elevado porcentaje de uso de las redes sociales por parte de los jóvenes y adolescentes andaluces nos lleva a plantearnos otra cuestión importante: ¿Qué es lo que les impulsa a este uso? En el gráfico 3 se presentan los resultados obtenidos.

Como podemos apreciar en el gráfico 3, el principal motivo es el de «compartir experiencias con los amigos», el 82,8%, seguido de «saber lo que dicen mis amigos de las fotos que subo y las experiencias que vivimos», 51%, y para hacer nuevos amigos con un 45,6%. Estos tres motivos tienen como base común cubrir la necesidad social de los jóvenes de interactuar con sus iguales. En segundo término, en torno al 20-25% de las respuestas, los motivos se circunscriben a la dimensión más psicológica y afectiva, por ejemplo «me satisface saber que gusto y lo que me valoran mis amigos» 24,9%, «me hace sentir bien cuando estoy triste», 23,5,%, y «puedo ser más sincero con mis amigos que cuando estoy con ellos», 20,6%.


Draft Content 879500215-26712 ov-es005.jpg

Los motivos menos señalados son: «la Red me da posibilidad de explorar y hacer cosas que no haría de otra manera», el 17,3%, y por último «las redes sociales son un tipo de vida», el 9,3%. Estas dos últimas opciones pueden entenderse como un nivel intenso de uso de las redes sociales, o bien suponen un uso innovador y creativo de las mismas, de ahí la posible explicación de su reducida elección.

Por tanto, como síntesis podemos concluir que en los motivos de usos de las redes sociales se detectan dos áreas motivacionales básicas, una social que cubre en torno al 50% de la población y otra psicológica con la que se identifican en torno al 20% de la muestra objeto de estudio. Estas dos dimensiones cubren las necesidades básicas que la juventud tiene en esta etapa evolutiva. Estos resultados son coherentes y concuerdan con las actuales líneas de investigación y conclusiones obtenidas. Estudios internacionales muestran que el comportamiento de los jóvenes adolescentes en redes sociales online está motivado por factores de autoidentidad, confianza en sí mismos, compensación social y entorno social (Wi lliams & Merten, 2008; Bianchi & Phillips, 2005; Eastin, 2005; Lin, 2006; Subrah man yam, Smehal & Greenfield, 2006; Val ken burg & Peter, 2007).

Dado el fuerte impacto de la variable se xo en gran parte de las investigaciones actuales, procedimos a contrastar si dicha variable constituye un factor que marca diferencias significativas, tanto en la frecuencia de uso de las redes sociales, como en los tipos de usos y en las motivaciones para utilizarlas. Para contrastar estas hipótesis aplicamos la ?² para tablas de contingencia, dada la escala nominal de recogida de datos que utilizamos.

Los resultados obtenidos indican que no existen diferencias significativas entre sexos res pecto a la frecuencia de uso de las redes sociales (?2 =2,005; p=.367). La correlación entre las variable sexo y usos de las redes sociales tampoco es significativa (coeficiente de contingencia =.046; p=.367). En el gráfi co 4 se ilustran las posiciones de ambos se xos en esta cuestión. Esta visualización permite observar la similitud de comportamiento entre ellos.


Draft Content 879500215-26712 ov-es006.jpg

Sin embargo, tal vez las diferencias entre sexos estriben más en los usos que en la frecuencia, de ahí que nos planteáramos contrastar estadísticamente si existen diferencias en los motivos que llevan a la conexión a las redes sociales. Los resultados obtenidos nos indican que las diferencias significativas se encuentran en tres variables: «Para hacer amigos nuevos» (?2=10,033 ; p=,002 ), con una correlación también significativa (coeficiente de contingencia =.102; p=.002); «me hace sentir bien cuando estoy triste», (?2=13,267; p=.,004), con una correlación tam bién significativa (coeficiente de contingencia =.117; p=.004); «y me gusta saber lo que dicen mis amigos de las fotos que subo» (?=13,920; p=.,00), con una correlación también significativa (coeficiente de contingencia =.120 p=.000). En el gráfico 5 se visualizan estas diferencias.

En el gráfico 5 podemos observar que las chicas, en mayor medida que los chicos, hacen uso de las re des sociales para hacer amigos, sin embargo los chicos superan a las chicas en los motivos: «Me gusta saber lo que dicen mis amigos de las fotos que subo» y «Me hace sentir bien cuando estoy triste». Por tanto estos resultados parecen indicar que en el caso de los chicos hay una motivación básica de índole psicológica y de reconocimiento personal, mientras en las chicas predomina un uso relacional/social. Estos resultados podrían interpretarse desde la perspectiva de los roles de género y/o de la psicología de género. Otros trabajos anteriores (Ertl & Helling, 2011; Lawlor, 2006) ponen de manifiesto la relevancia de la variable género en el estudio del comportamiento de los jóvenes en las redes sociales.


Draft Content 879500215-26712 ov-es007.jpg

También cabría hacer otra interpretación de los resultados obtenidos desde la teoría del capital social. Las redes sociales on-line son para la juventud fuente de recursos que son utilizados para cubrir necesidades, tanto de índole psicológica como social. Sin em bargo, las diferencias entre sexos en estas variables demuestran que tienen un papel compensatorio, ya que son los hombres los que mayormente recurren a ellas para cubrir facetas emocionales y reforzar su au toestima, mientras en el caso de las jóvenes prima una función relacional.

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Los resultados obtenidos en este trabajo nos permiten constatar y, por tanto, establecer como conclusiones principales del estudio, que el 94,99% de los jó venes andaluces se conectan a las redes sociales en un rango de edad de 10 a 15 años. El 90% de ellos hacen un uso habitual de las redes sociales. Solo el 22,3% tiene unas normas de uso; el resto puede acceder a la Red sin ningún tipo de limitación. Los motivos que impulsan este uso se sitúan entre dos polos: el primero va dirigido a cubrir la necesidad social que tienen los jóvenes de compartir experiencias, y también de reconocimiento de su actividad ante los demás, estableciendo nuevas relaciones sociales.

Respecto a las motivaciones de los jóvenes, son preferentemente de tipo individual, dirigidas a cubrir una dimensión emocional; la red social es un espacio virtual que gratifica emocionalmente y que permite expresar los sentimientos íntimos de los jóvenes a través de la percepción que los otros tienen de ellos. Contrastados estos resultados en función del sexo, pudimos apreciar que no existen diferencias en cuanto a la frecuencia de uso, pero sí con relación a los motivos que impulsan su uso. Tres variables resultan estadísticamente significativas: «Me gusta saber lo que dicen mis amigos de las fotos que subo», «me hace sentir bien cuando estoy triste», y «para hacer nuevos amigos». En el caso de las chicas andaluzas el motivo fundamental de uso es social, relacional (hacer nuevos amigos), mientras que en los chicos es de ca rácter individual, dirigido a reforzar variables internas del sujeto como individuo concretado en el refuerzo de su autoestima –«me gusta saber lo que dicen mis amigos de las fotos que subo»– y emocional –«me hace sentir bien cuando estoy triste»–. Estos resultados se ajustan al modelo de Notley (2009), en tanto que las motivaciones de uso de las redes sociales pertenecen a la esfera de intereses personales, así como a necesidades sociales de tipo relacional. Pero también concuerdan con otros estudios internacionales como los de Costa (2011), Flores (2009) y De Haro (2010) que inciden en el valor social y personal de las redes sociales para los jóvenes.

Estos resultados también podemos interpretarlos a la luz de los tres constructos que han soportado la realización de esta investigación: compensación social, capital social y ambiente on-line.

Desde el constructo «compensación social» dado el uso extensivo que hacen los jóvenes andaluces de las redes sociales desde una edad muy temprana, los resultados obtenidos nos indican el potencial que pue de tener este recurso para formar a los jóvenes en procesos de construcción e inclusión social. La sociedad actual demanda a los jóvenes que desarrollen competencias vinculadas a la colaboración; desde esta perspectiva, las redes sociales se convierten en una plataforma en la que investigar cómo se obtienen los logros grupales a partir de la relación que cada persona como individuo establece con el resto de los miembros del grupo. En este sentido se conectaría con la lí nea de trabajos de Watts (2006) y Christakis y Fow ler (2010). Este aspecto tiene un gran valor prospectivo de cara a cómo educar a los jóvenes para la consecución de logros, tanto personales como profesionales, en los procesos de construcción grupal y en definitiva de mejora social.

Este resultado constatado en nuestro estudio está directamente relacionado con otro de los constructos que ha servido de base a los datos obtenidos como es el de capital social; en este sentido las redes sociales no solo «entrenan» a los jóvenes en los procesos grupales orientados a la consecución de logros, sino que además se convierten en una fuente de recursos en la que cada uno «busca o usa» lo que necesita en cada mo mento. Este resultado no solo es importante para la formación de capital social como abordan los trabajos de Greenhow y Burton (2011), sino que además pue de ser un importante recurso educativo para favorecer la equidad y el desarrollo de escuelas más inclusivas (Notley, 2008)

Los resultados aquí obtenidos son coincidentes con otros estudios internacionales. Estas investigaciones indican que los jóvenes hacen un uso extensivo de las tecnologías 2.0, destinado fundamentalmente a re lacionarse con sus iguales y a canalizar la expresión de sus opiniones. Sin embargo, un grupo minoritario de jóvenes no utilizan estas tecnologías, lo que cabe explicar por motivos económicos, o por otro tipo de barreras. De ahí que las recomendaciones que se ha cen de estos resultados se dirijan a indicar a las agencias dedicadas a conocer el comportamiento de los jóvenes en las redes sociales, que trabajen en temáticas orientadas a la inclusión. El estudio de Notley (2009) arroja luz so bre esta cuestión.

También se dispone de datos internacionales so bre los ámbitos que los jóvenes utilizan para hacer uso de las redes sociales. En este sentido se concluye que la mayoría de los jóvenes lo hace fuera de los centros escolares. De aquí se deriva que las recomendaciones a los profesionales se dirijan a propiciar un mayor de sarrollo informal de estas «e-habilidades». Estas prácticas se observan como beneficiosas para la formación en valores de ciudadanía democrática, ya que permiten recoger las opiniones de los jóvenes y de esta manera ser agentes activos, tanto en las políticas locales como en las regionales y nacionales, robusteciendo así la democracia participativa. Se cuenta ya con buenas prácticas en este sentido, ya que se trata de incorporar estos recursos tecnológicos en las estructuras organizativas de los centros educativos, permitiendo así dar voz a los estudiantes a través de un medio que les es y, por un lado, habitual para ellos en la comunicación a la vez que rompe con las barreras personales que se tienen a esa edad, tales como timidez, inseguridad, vergüenza, etc. Re cientes trabajos (Gil de Zúñiga, Jung & Valenzuela, 2012) indagan en cómo las redes so ciales pueden contribuir a los procesos democráticos y a la creación de capital social.

En definitiva, lo que aquí se ha formulado permite sostener que las redes sociales tienen un gran valor educativo, además de ser un recurso importante para la formación tanto en valores personales como sociales, como así lo indican De Haro (2010) y Bryant (2007). La investigación sobre estas temáticas aún escasas puede arrojar luz sobre los procesos que dan forma a la interacción social como base para la mejora personal y social.

Apoyos

Este trabajo se enmarca en el Proyecto de Investigación de Exce lencia titulado «Escenarios, tecnologías digitales y Juventud en An dalucía». Financiado en la convocatoria de Proyectos de Exce lencia 2008/11 (HUM-SEJ-02599)

Referencias

Bianchi, A. & Phillips, J. (2005). Psychological Predictors of Problem Mobile Phone Use. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 8 (1), 39-51.

Boyd, D. & Ellison, N. (2008). Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Commu­nication 13, 210-230.

Bryant, L. (2007). Emerging trends in social software for education. In Becta. Emerging Technologies for Learning, 2. Coventry: Becta.

Burrow-Sanchez, J., Call, M., Zheng, R. & Drew, C. (2011). Are Youth at Risk for Internet Predators?: What Counselors Need to Know. Journal of Counseling and Development, 89 (1), 3-10.

Calvert, S.L. (2002). Identity Construction on the Internet. In S.L. Calvert, A.B. Jordan & R. Cocking (Eds.), Children in the Di­gital Age: Influences of Electronic Media on Development (pp. 57-70). Westport, CT: Praeger.

Chak, K. & Leung, L. (2004). Shyness and Locus of Control as Predictors of Internet Addiction and Internet Use. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 7(5), 559-570.

Christakis, N. & Fowler, J. (2010). Conectados. El sorprendente poder de las redes sociales y cómo afectan nuestras vidas. Ma­drid: Taurus.

Costa, J. (2011). Los jóvenes portugueses de los 10 a los 19 años: ¿qué hacen con los ordenadores? Teoría de la Educación. Edu­cación y Cultura en la Sociedad de la Información, 12 (1), 209-239.

De Haro, J.J. (2010). Redes sociales para la educación. Madrid: Anaya.

Eastin, M.S. (2005). Teen Internet Use: Relating Social Perceptions and Cognitive Models to Behavior. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 8 (1), 62-75.

Ertl, B. & Helling, K. (2011). Promoting Gender Equality in Digital Lite­racy. Journal Educational Computing Research, Vol. 45(4), 477-503.

Flores, J.M. (2009). Nuevos modelos de comunicación, perfiles y tendencias en las redes sociales. Comunicar, 33, XVII, 73-81.

Gil-de-Zúñiga, H., Jung, N. & Valenzuela, S. (2012). Social Media Use for News and Individuals’ Social Capital, Civic Enga­gement and Political Participation. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 17, 319-336.

Gómez, M., Roses, S. & Farias, P. (2012). El uso académico de las redes sociales en universitarios. Comunicar, 38, XIX, 131-138.

Greenhow, C. & Burton, L. (2011). Help from my «Friends» Social Capital in the Social Networks Site of Low-Income Students. Journal Educational Computing Research, 45 (2), 223-245.

Gross, E.F. (2004). Adolescent Internet Use: What We Expect, What Teens Report. Applied Developmental Psychology, 25, 633-649.

Jung-Lee, S. (2009). Online Communication and Adolescent So­cial Ties: Who Benefits More from Internet use? Journal of Com­pu­ter-Mediated Communication, 14, 509–531.

Lawlor, C. (2006).Gendered Interactions in Computer-mediated Computer Conferencing. Journal of Distance Education, 21(2), 26-43.

Leese, M. (2009). Out of Class. Out of Mind? The Use of a Virtual Learning Environment to Encourage Student Engagement in Out of Class Activities. British Journal of Educational Technology, 40 (1), 70-77.

Lin, H.F. (2006). Understanding Behavioral Intention to Participate in Virtual Communities. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 9(5), 540-547.

Lin, N. (1999). Building a Network Theory of Social Capital. Con­nections, 22 (1), 28-51.

Notley, T. (2008). Online Network Use in Schools: Social and Educational Opportunities. The Journal of Youth Studies Australia, 27, 20-29.

Notley, T. (2009). Young People, Online Networks, and Social Inclusion. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 14, 1208-1227.

Subrahmanyam, K. & Greenfield, P. (2008). Online Communi­ca­tion and Adolescent Relationships. Future of Children, 18(1), 119-146.

Subrahmanyam, K. & Lin, G. (2007). Adolescents on the Net: Internet Use and Well-being. Adolescence, 42, 659-667.

Subrahmanyam, K., Greenfield, P. & Tynes, B. (2004). Cons­truct­ing Sexuality and Identity in an Internet Teen Chatroom. Jour­nal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 25, 651-666.

Subrahmanyam, K., Smehal, D., & Greenfield, P. (2006). Con­nec­ting Developmental Constructions to the internet: Identity Pre­sentation and Sexual Exploration in Online Teen Chat Rooms. Developmental Psychology, 42(3), 395-406.

Valkenburg, P., Peter, J., & Schouten, A.P. (2006). Friend Net­working Sites and their Relationship to Adolescents Well-being and Social Self-esteem. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 9(5), 584-590.

Valkenburg, P.M. & Peter, J. (2007). Preadolescents and Ado­lescents Online Communication and their Closeness to Friends. Developmental Psychology, 43, 267-277.

Watts, D. (2006). Seis grados de separación. La ciencia de las re­des en la era del acceso. Barcelona, Paidós.

Williams, A.L., & Merten, M.J. (2008). A Review of Online Social Networking Profiles by Adolescents: Implications for Future Research and Intervention. Adolescence, 43, 253-274.

Zheng, R. & Cheok, A. (2011). Singaporean Adoles­cents´ Per­ceptions of On-line Social Communication: An Exploratory Factor Analysis. Journal Educational Computing Research, Vol. 45(2), 203-221.

Zheng, R., Flygare, J., & Dahl, L. (2009). Style Matching or Ability Building? An Empirical Study on FDI Learners’ Learning in Well-structured and Ill-structured Asynchronous Online Learning Environments. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 41(2), 195-226.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 28/02/13
Accepted on 28/02/13
Submitted on 28/02/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C40-2013-02-01
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 78
Views 1
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?