Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

This article presents the results of a quantitative analysis of two Romanian Facebook communities' self-presentations during the online and offline anti-fracking protests in Romania. In 2013 Romanians started to protest against the gas exploration of the US giant Chevron in the village of Punge?ti. The online and offline Punge?ti Resistance Movement turned within one month from a rural to a national mobilization tool meant to help the Romanian peasants affected by the proposed shale gas exploration operations of Chevron. Since the online engagement desired to finally turn into an offline participation is highly dependent on the informing practice, we consider that a framing analysis of the Facebook posts will reflect whether they are culturally compatible and relevant for the protesters. Using the framing theory in social movements as our theoretical background, we provided a comparative content analysis of two Romanian Facebook communities' postings (October, 2013 - February, 2014). We focused on identifying the verbal and visual framing devices and the main collective action frames used for the shaping of the online communities' collective identity. The findings revealed a dominance of «land struggle» as a collective action frame followed by «conflict» and «solidarity» and a salience of photos and video files used as framing devices of cultural relevance for Romanian protesters and of evidence of offline anti-fracking activism in Romania.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Cyber-protests as «extensions of a social movement into a new media space» (Zimbra & al., 2010: 49) are mainly linked to political protest movements or to social protests of minorities or marginalized groups. Lately digital activist groups have also protested against corporations either to claim a reduction in the influence of corporations on politics (Occupy Wall Street movement) or to stop oil companies from oil drilling (the Lego and Greenpeace «Save the Artic» community or the oil subsidy removal protests in Nigeria). In 2013 the Romanian Government’s decision to pursue Chevron’s hydraulic fracturing in a Romanian village was the opportunity factor which triggered cyber-protests. The anti-fracking protests reveal that Romanian citizens have gradually started to build a protest culture. We will place the analysis of the online social movement against Chevron in Romania within the theoretical context of framing processes because the online protesters used Facebook posts as a means of shaping and generating «collective action frames» (Benford & Snow, 2000) through which they succeeded in informing and mobilizing other Romanian citizens

This study of the Romanian anti-fracking online protests has a twofold objective: (a) to provide a comparative analysis of the framing devices and of the collective action frames used by two Romanian online communities in their presentation of the anti-fracking movement; (b) to determine the visual and verbal categories used by these communities for the most dominant collective action frames.

1.1. Insights into protests 2.0

The social media supporting protest movements provide the benefits of quickly and cheaply mobilizing a wide audience, overcoming geographical distance or of pluralism of information (Passini, 2012; Soengas, 2013). Cyber-activism turns common people into «netizens» (Franklin, 2010) who become important members of a civic engagement community with a minimal participation. The rise of social networks (Facebook) as sites of digital civic activism allows the shaping of a collective identity since the SNS users are united by a common bond, sharing the same grievances concerning a political, social, educational or cultural issue. Mercea (2012: 155) identifies «digital prefigurative participation» as «a specific genre of digital participation in activism». Formed of three distinct levels (mobilization, identity-building, organizational transformation), «digital prefigurative participation» is prior to offline social movement engagement and involves the interaction of individuals through computer-mediated communication.

Within the process of identity-building, the online communities favor the development of «the new social movements» (Diani, 2003), whose features are decentralization, dynamism, the lack of a formal hierarchy, and a group of participants identifying themselves with the movement’s perspectives and objectives. Castells (2012) states that online communities construct themselves through a process of autonomous communication. Thus the cyber-protest communities create a new public space, labeled by Castells as «a space of autonomy», which is the networked space between the digital and the urban space. Within this new hybrid space of freedom, the online affordances allow a trajectory from outrage to hope and finally to action. This last behavioral component of protests 2.0 should not restrict itself to the offline mobilizing actions. The research (Schultz, 2008; Petray, 2011; Castells, 2012) shows that protests 2.0 become effective if they occupy an urban space, by creating an external site, where the online community members may meet when they want to become more involved in the movement. Although the publicly open structure of Facebook provides a high degree of self-presentation (Kaplan & Haenlein, 2010), it is not designed to activism and it provides false consensus and conformism (Schultz, 2008; Passini, 2012). The opaqueness of dedication levels may be counterbalanced by linking online and offline tactics and by creating real-world actions (Schultz, 2008). Passini (2012) agrees that the social networks are the engines of the latest Facebook and Twitter revolutions, but he also emphasizes that the online protest movements should adopt offline civil resistance techniques in order to bring some social changes.

1.2. Digital civic activism in Romania

After the 1989 revolution, Romania has been going through a transition period from communism to democracy which has not led to a high level of post-communist civic engagement (B?descu & al., 2004; Mercea, 2012). There are two main reasons for Romanians’ lack of trust in civic associations (B?descu & al., 2004): (1) the economic gain that many NGOs set up by entrepreneurs seem to pursue, and (2) the establishing of such NGOs by political parties as a screen to illegally raise campaign funds.

Although the Romanian NGOs claim that they are the citizens’ voice and although the budget cuts and all sorts of austerity driven reforms may have been the triggers of social movements in Romania (Presad?, 2012), Romanians have not been very active protesters against the government by January 2012. «The protests in January were a lesson given by the un-organized civil society to the organized civil society» (Presad? 2012) since the citizens spontaneously gathered themselves without any support of the organized civil society. We consider that the protests in January 2012 were a turning point for Romanians’ civic engagement. Protesting against the President B?sescu’s proposal to reform the healthcare system and against the resignation of the Romanian Secretary of State for Health (Raed Arafat), Romanians used Facebook communities to organize themselves. The 2012 protests in the University Square in Bucharest were important for the development of digital civic activism in Romania for three main reasons: (1) they were the first social movements where Facebook was used as a tool to mobilize citizens; (2) the offline site (University Square) was used as the reference point of protesters’ meeting for other uprisings, such as protests against the Anti Counterfeiting Trade Agreement and against fracking; (3) they constituted the social movements with immediate institutional changes, such as Raed Arafat’s re-instatement, resignation of the Government and of the public TV station news director.

One year later, the January 2012 protest was followed by the social movement against the gas exploration of the US giant Chevron in the village of Punge?ti (Vaslui county, North-East Romania). These protests against fracking initiatives should be included in an international context of social movements against Chevron. In 2012 Polish villagers from Zurawlow succeeded in blocking the US company’s intention to drill but one year later the company filed a civil lawsuit against the villagers claiming that they had violated its lawful right to access the site. Since 2013 Argentinians have been protesting against Chevron after the government allowed the company to drill more than 100 wells. In 2010 the Romanian government and Chevron signed an agreement which stipulated that Chevron would own more than two million acres of land in Romania. On October 3 2013, Chevron obtained all the necessary authorizations to start the shale gas explorations in the village of Punge?ti. Romania’s decision to pursue the hydraulic fracturing, whereas some other European countries (France, Germany, Bulgaria) refused was the opportunity factor triggering the offline Romanian villagers’ uprising and the Romanian citizens’ cyber-protests. On October 12, the first Facebook community, Punge?ti-TV was created. Two days later the Romanian newspapers presented the protests of 150 villagers who occupied the road leading to Chevron’s construction site. Then almost 500 protesters gathered at the University Square in Bucharest, as a sign of solidarity with the Punge?ti villagers. They protested against the Romanian government, the public TV station and the Minister of Public Affairs, calling them thieves and trying to mobilize more protesters. On October 23, the second Facebook community (Punge?ti-Resistance) was created. As Merca (2012) and Garrett (2006) highlight, identity building in the online communities is essential for digital participation. The logo created by community members and posted as profile pictures constituted a means of uniting the online participants. The Punge?ti-Resistance community used the image of a bull destroying a well as a connotative representation of protesters. The bull with horns having the colours of the Romanian flag has a historical signification. The bull’s head is represented on the flag and coat of arms of Moldavia (the region where the protests took place). The use of the bull as the logo of this online community is appropriate since it may provide a high level of cultural identification among members due to its historical connotation.

Throughout the following months, more citizens from Romanian cities joined the movement at the offline site (The Resistance Camp of Punge?ti). The two locations external to Facebook (University Square in Bucharest and the Resistance Camp of Punge?ti) show that the anti-fracking protests 2.0 in Romania have become an integrated part of the overarching social movement, which Petray (2011) considers essential for any successful protest. An issue which may have seemed local (anti-fracking protests in the village of Punge?ti) has gradually been framed into a national one (Romanians against hydraulic fracturing), turning into an uprising against the Romanian governmental and presidential corruption (Coman & Cmeciu, 2014). The online events reflect the concept of «digital prefigurative participation» (Mercea, 2012) since they triggered the presence of protesters offline. The online and offline protests brought an immediate change: Chevron stopped its search for shale gas in the village of Pungesti.

1.3. Protests and collective action framing

The new values and goals produced through social movements trigger a change within the institutions of a society since these institutions should create «new forms to organize social life» (Castells, 2012: 9). Thus protesters turn into «social movement entrepreneurs» (Noakes & Johnston, 2005). By selectively punctuating and encoding events, experiences and sequences of actions, protesters become signifying agents of meaning construction (Snow & Benford, 1992). They generate, elaborate and diffuse what Benford and Snow (2000) identify as «collective action frames». To resonate with social movement participants’ common and shared values and beliefs, collective action frames should have three qualities (Benford & Snow, 2000; Noakes & Johnston, 2005): to be culturally compatible (the compatibility of frames and symbols with the «cultural tool kit» - cultural narratives, cultural heritage and symbols), to be consistent (the internal consistency and thoroughness of the beliefs, claims and actions promoted in the frames) and to be relevant (the capacity to make sense of the participants’ experiences within the respective society).

In their reviewing study of social movement frames, Benford & Snow (2000) mention that collective action frames have an action-oriented function and that they involve interactive, discursive processes. The action-oriented function refers to three core framing tasks: diagnostic (problem identification and attributions of responsibility), prognostic (solutions, plans of attack) and motivational (socially-constructed vocabularies of motive). This action function is achieved through two discursive processes: framing articulation and framing amplification. In the frame articulation we will include different types of verbal and visual framing devices. Corrigall-Brown & Wilkes (2012) consider that alongside texts, images of collective action also shape public understanding of social movement campaigns and issues because they will be remembered longer and may convey a greater emotional response than textual accounts. The frame amplification as part of the alignment process «involves the idealization, embellishing, clarification, or invigoration of existing values or beliefs» (Benford & Snow, 2000). The analysis of the socially constructed vocabularies of motives beyond every social movement may reveal a cultural insight into a society’s narratives or folk wisdom.

Another aspect to be taken into account is the relation between the framing of collective action and digital spaces. Highlighting the sporadic, dynamic and fluid nature of online social movements, Sádaba (2012) considers that this blending between the new formations of collective action and new technologies brings forth two important aspects: (a) specific tools which may be accessed and used for representation with a mediation function; (b) these tools of sociological information production provide more insightful accounts into the local collective actions than other common techniques, such as surveys, interviews, or focus groups. The two Romanian Facebook communities formed in order to represent the collective actions against Chevron are a clear example of the power that this social network service played in the framing of a local action which gradually turned into a national and international issue.

2. Material and methods

We employ a framing analysis of the Facebook posts of the two online communities during the four months (October 12, 2013 - February 22, 2014) following the beginning of the anti-fracking protests in Romania. Our sample included 409 posts (294 Punge?ti-Resistance and 115 Punge?ti-TV).

2.1. Visual and verbal framing

The study employs both a deductive and an inductive method. We used a deductive method by seeking to find the types of verbal and visual framing devices within the online communities’ Facebook posts. Starting from the literature on visual and verbal framing (Gamson & Lasch, 1983; Parry, 2010; Corrigall-Brown & Wilkes, 2012), we adapted each framing device to the discursive specificity of the anti-fracking Facebook communities’ posts. A content analysis of a sample of online posts (n=15), randomly selected from each online community, was conducted to determine the framing devices. Another sample of posts (N=61), approximately 15% of the total number (409), was double-coded to determine inter-coder reliability (Kappa) and the agreement between the two coders was .91 on average.

We included the following categories in the coding scheme for the verbal framing devices:

1) Catchphrases: a single theme statement, tag-line, title or slogan that is intended to suggest a general frame (Facebook post titles and slogans used to mobilize other citizens).

2) Depictions have a threefold aspect:

• General Description: information provided by the online community members about their reasons to protest or about the protest development.

• Statistics: reports about the damage that fracking may cause, about the injured people during the protests or the statistical evidence of the governmental mismanagement.

• Testimonies of a third party in the description (different categories of supporters: celebrities, elites, politicians, representatives of social movement organizations etc.).

3) Exemplars (real and hypothetical examples):

• Real examples of the past or present focusing on the villagers’ stories about the consequences that Chevron fracking may have on their lives and the protesters’ stories about their experiences during this social movement.

• Hypothetical examples: possible scenarios (statements relying on possible outcomes unless the hydraulic fracturing stops).

We included in the coding scheme for the visual framing devices the following categories:

• Logo of the online communities’ and of other organizations’ visual identification.

• Advertisements: images used to promote an online and offline event.

• Photographs: images depicting the participants (protesters, gendarmes, politicians etc.) during the protests.

• Caricatures and Charts.

• Maps showing geographical locations of protests, of the areas to be exploited by Chevron.

• Anthropomorphic images which become visual metaphors (objects performing human actions).

• Video files user-generated posted or shared by the community members.

2.2. Collective frames

The inductive method was used for an in-depth analysis of the verbal and visual framing devices in order to find the types of frame to which they were assigned by the two online communities. We identified five main frames: land struggle frame, conflict frame, solidarity frame, political opportunity frame and ecology frame. The land struggle frame refers to villagers’ social welfare within the context of Chevron’s hydraulic fracturing. It focuses on verbal and visual accounts of persons peacefully protesting in the Resistance Camp, of the disadvantages of shale gas exploration operations (destruction of local businesses, resettlements) and of the advantages of the anti-shale gas exploration operations (local traditions, daily life and social customs). The conflict frame includes verbal and visual accounts depicting either participants (protesters and gendarmes) engrossed in violent scenes (fighting, police repression), participants (protesters and opponents) engrossed in verbal attacks or accounts of TV stations’ misinformation about the protesters. The solidarity frame includes verbal and visual accounts of protesters’ supporters (common people, elites, TV presenters, present at the offline sites). The political opportunity frame refers to verbal and visual accounts of politicians who used this social movement to their political benefit. The ecology frame refers to accounts of environmental welfare, posts depicting local areas affected by exploration operations (destruction) versus intact local areas (preservation).

2.3. Research questions

Based on the literature regarding verbal and visual framing, offline and online social movements, the following research questions were developed:

• RQ1: What is the salience of verbal and visual framing devices?

• RQ2: What collective action frames do the anti-fracking online communities use in their Facebook posts?

• RQ3: How do the online communities use the visual and verbal framing devices to represent the five frames?

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Frequency of verbal and visual framing devices

The number of framing devices used by the posts analyzed reveal a great discrepancy. The Punge?ti-Resistance used 1121 framing devices in 294 posts, whereas the Punge?ti-TV only used 361 framing devices in 115 posts. As shown in table 1, both online communities understood the importance of visual framing devices in the online representation of protesters’ anti-fracking actions and more than half of the devices focused on a visual depiction. The first research question sought to determine the salience of the two types of framing devices. Table 1 shows a dominance of photos in both online communities’ posts, followed by general descriptions, videos, catchphrases and real examples. Although these five devices were the most commonly used in both online communities, a difference in their overall distribution may be noticed.

In the Punge?ti-TV community, fewer than half of devices (44%) were photos, whereas in the Punge?ti-Resistance community photos were more than half (65%). General descriptions were the second mostly frequent used device. Though less than one-quarter (18%; The Punge?ti-Resistance and 22%; The Punge?ti-TV) of the devices provided descriptions about the reasons of the anti-fracking social movement and the protests’ development, the frequency (n=201 and n=87) is important highlighting the online community members’ desire to explain their demands and to properly organize their protests. Videos constitute a significant visual element and they are the third framing device most commonly used by both online communities. Catchphrases are the fourth most frequently used device and they mainly focused on slogans to mobilize new protesters. Although real examples were not very commonly used, both online communities provided stories of the protesters who were abused by the police or of the villagers who had to suffer after Chevron’s hydraulic fracturing activities.


Draft Content 785647789-49355-en004.jpg

3.2. Frequency of collective action frames

The second research question focused on the types of collective action frames used by the two online communities during the anti-fracking protests.

As observed in table 2, both communities used land struggle, conflict and solidarity as the first three most salient collective action frames. The high frequency of the «land struggle» frame is hardly surprising given that the protests were started by the villagers of Punge?ti as a way of protecting their land from the Chevron’s invasion. «Conflict» as the second mostly dominant frame may be explained through the offline violent confrontations between the protesters and the gendarmes. Although both online communities provide a similar framing of the anti-fracking protests, two differences may be noticed:


Draft Content 785647789-49355-en005.jpg

1) More than half of the devices used by the Punge?ti-Resistance community members frame the villagers’ land struggle whereas only less than half of the devices used by the second community members frame this collective action.

2) Whereas the Punge?ti-TV community provided the same frequency for the «political opportunity» and «ecology» frames, the Punge?ti-Resistance community members used the «ecology» frame more than the «political opportunity» frame.

3.3. The verbal and visual accounts of the collective action frames

The third research question focused on the discrepancies in framing device use for the five collective action frames. To better understand the verbal and visual framing devices by collective action frames, mean values were calculated to determine how often they were used by the two Facebook communities.

As table 3 shows, photos, general descriptions and video files were the three most commonly used devices in three frames related to the anti-fracking protests in Romania, namely land struggle, conflict and solidarity. To frame «land struggle», both communities provided the same hierarchy in the framing device use: photos, general descriptions, and video files. As observed, photos outscored all other devices used to frame to the «land struggle» frame for both online communities. To frame «conflict», the Punge?ti-Resistance used photos (m=5.78) more than general descriptions (m=3.92), whereas the Punge?ti-TV provided more verbal descriptions of the conflicts with the gendarmes (m=2.78) than visual accounts of these confrontations (m=1.42). The devices used to frame «solidarity» by the two online communities were nearly the same: photos of the crowds depicting protesters supporting the villagers and general descriptions of the protest organization and development. The Punge?ti-Resistance community outscored the Punge?ti-TV community in the usage of devices to frame «political opportunity», the main focus being on verbal descriptions of politicians supporting the protesters (m=0.21). A discrepancy in the device use is at the level of the «ecology» frame. Whereas the Punge?ti-TV community members provided only general descriptions of the disadvantages of hydraulic fracturing (m=0.21), the Punge?ti-Resistance members used five framing devices. General descriptions (m=1.71), photos (m=0.49) and video files (m=0.28) had the highest level of revealing the dangers that fracking may cause unless it is stopped.


Draft Content 785647789-49355-en006.jpg

4. Discussion and conclusion

By analyzing the content of two Romanian anti-fracking online communities during a four-month online protest, this study found that the online communities preferred to use more visual framing devices (more than 60%) than verbal framing devices and that they mainly represented their actions as collective action frames of land struggle, conflict and solidarity. The extensive use of visual accounts (photos and video files), typical of Facebook, is consistent with Corrigall-Brown and Wilkes’s findings which highlight the importance assigned to this framing device by conveying a greater emotional response than textual accounts of the social movement. Beyond this emotional impact, images of protests serve as motivational and evidence tools. The photos and video files depicting villagers, protesters and challengers (gendarmes, local authorities and Chevron representatives) provide visual accounts of two important steps in organizing an activism campaign on Facebook, as Schultz (2008) mentions in his study: the existence of an external site and the beginning of real-world actions. The visual depictions of villagers and protesters at the two external sites (the resistance camp in Punge?ti and the University Square in Bucharest) constitute significant evidence that the two online communities were used to enhance the offline anti-fracking activism in Romania. Besides the evidence function that Facebook visual depictions have, they reveal, as Sádaba (2012) mentions, a more insightful account into the local collective action. The visual depictions of the protesters’ fighting for their land provide a clear representation of the villagers’ power to mobilize themselves against a foreign enemy (Chevron).

During social movements the visual and verbal legitimacy of a group is important because it shows cohesion among protesters. But at the same time, legitimacy bestowed on individuals also plays a significant role because the dramatic displays of individuals’ stories may trigger a higher mobilization of new protesters. Real examples and testimonies are two verbal framing devices used to associate a face with a name. Although these two devices did not have the highest frequency, they were used by the two online communities. The Punge?ti-Resistance and the Punge?ti-TV communities provided 26 and 16 real examples of villagers, of hunger strikers, or of individuals who suffered from police’s violent action. As Dan Schultz (2008) pointed out, the generation of media support is important in online activism campaigns. This media support was represented through the verbal framing device of testimonies. Unlike the Punge?ti-TV community, the Punge?ti-Resistance community offered more testimonies of supporters (TV producers, national and international journalists or Romanian elites) who joined the protests or who tried to provide an objective media account of the social movement.

Catchphrases constitute another significant verbal framing device during online activism campaigns. Unlike the Punge?ti-TV group, the Punge?ti-Resistance community provided catchphrases to create two online events. Both online communities used the greatest number of catchphrases for photo albums or video files («Punge?ti is all over Romania! An example for the whole planet!» or « «We shall not be intoxicated! No to shale gas!»).

The constant postings of the anti-fracking offline and online protests allowed us to observe the evolution of the collective action frames used by the two online communities throughout a four-month interval (October 2013 - February 2014). Initially depicted by both communities as a peaceful struggle about Punge?ti peasants’ right to land, the anti-fracking social movement in Romania evolved into an overt double conflict. Both community members provided, on the one hand, vivid descriptions of the physical conflict between the villagers and gendarmes, and on the other hand, a conflict between protesters and the local, governmental and parliamentary representatives responsible for Chevron’s fracking and hydraulic fracturing in Romania. Whereas the Punge?ti-TV community members provide a constant framing of conflict, the Punge?ti-Resistance community members put an emphasis on the violent confrontations between the protesters and the gendarmes at the beginning of December when the police arrested villagers, destroyed their private properties and closed down all access roads. Although Chevron resumed its search for shale gas after these violent conflicts, the two online communities continued to provide information about the protests. In January and February the Punge?ti-TV community members used conflict as the most dominant collective action frame, whereas the Punge?ti-Resistance community members focused on supporters’ solidarity with villagers and through the ecology frame they provided experts’ opinions about the potential health and environmental risks of fracking in the region. The «political opportunity» frame was scarcely used by the community members because the majority of Romanian politicians were represented as corrupted social actors who simply obey the Prime Minister’s orders. Two Romanian politicians and the eleven Green members of the European Parliament from five countries who sent an open letter to Martin Schultz about the abusive actions of the Romanian government and Chevron were framed as allies for the villagers’ struggle.

Although the two communities did not decentralize the online control of posts and shares, their visual and verbal accounts of the anti-fracking protests in Romania had the force to mobilize citizens from all over Romania. Both communities used collective action frames which had the three qualities mentioned by Benford & Snow (2000) and Noakes & Johnston (2005): cultural compatibility, consistency and relevance. The successful online mobilization of the protesters was due to an appropriate choice of collective action frames relevant to the villagers (land struggle and conflict) and to other Romanian citizens (solidarity and conflict). The dominance of «land struggle» as a frame is consistent with the daily lived experiences of the peasants from the village of Punge?ti, ready to defend their land against the «enemy» (Chevron). The Romanian peasants were framed as social movement entrepreneurs since they were able to construct a representation of a social movement from the inside (group-level experience as villagers of Punge?ti) out by embedding symbols borrowed from the Romanian common cultural kit. The verbal and visual accounts of the frames used by both online communities were culturally compatible with Romanian symbols and narratives (e.g. logo as a bull with horns, see 1.2.; or mobilizing catchphrases which depict the local development of the protest. «To the Senate. Against the shale gas fracking»).

Though this study showed the efficiency of visual and verbal online devices in depicting the collective action frames of land struggle, conflict, and solidarity during the anti-fracking protests in Romania, it should be noted that only two online communities were examined during a four-month protest without taking into account the interaction between the Facebook community administrators and its members. These limitations do not undermine the importance of this research, but they give ideas for future research. Case studies should be conducted to help offer insights into various aspects: the interactive nature of the online community by analyzing the members’ comments, a comparative analysis between Romanian and foreign anti-fracking Facebook communities, or a visual framing analysis of how the visual legitimacy of different individuals and groups of actors is rendered in images of anti-fracking collective action.

Acknowledgement

This work was supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research and Innovation, CNCS-UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-RU-TE-2014-4-0599.

References

B?descu, G., Sum, P., & Uslaner, E.M. (2004). Civil Society Development and Democratic Values in Romania and Moldova. East European Politics & Societies, 18, 2, 316-341. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177-/0888325403259915

Benford, R.D., & Snow, D.A. (2000). Framing Processes and Social Movements: An Overview and Assessment. Annual Review of Sociology, 26, 611-639. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev.soc.26.1.611

Castells, M. (2012). Networks of Outrage and Hope: Social Movements in the Internet Age. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Coman, C., & Cmeciu, C. (2014). Framing Chevron Protests in National and International Press. Procedia - Social and, Behavioral Sciences, 149, 228-232. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2014.08.222

Corrigall-Brown, C., & Wilkes, R. (2012). Picturing Protest: The Visual Framing of Collective Action by First Nations in Canada. American Behavioral Scientist, 56, 2, 223-243. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177-/0002764211419357

Diani, M. (2003). Networks and Social Movements: A Research Programme. In M. Diani, & D. McAdam (Eds.), Social Movements and Networks. Relational Approaches to Collective Action (pp. 49-76). Oxford University Press.

Franklin, M.I. (2010). Digital Dilemmas: Transnational Politics in the Twenty-First Century. Brown Journal of World Affairs, XVI, 2, 67-85. (http://goo.gl/vheq01) (20-06-2012).

Gamson, W., & Lasch, K.E. (1983). The Political Culture of Social Welfare Policy. In S.E. Spiro, & E. Yuchtman-Yaar (Eds.), Evaluating the Welfare State: Social and Political Perspectives (pp. 397-415). New York: Academic Press.

Garrett, R.K. (2006). Protest in an Information Society. A Review of Literature on Social Movements and New ICTs. Information, Communication & Society, 9, 2, 202-224. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/-13691180600630773

Kaplan, A.M., & Haenlein, M. (2010). Users of the World, Unite! The Challenge and Opportunities of Social Media. Business Horizons, 53, 1, 59-68. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bushor.2009.09.003

Mercea, D. (2012). Digital Prefigurative Participation: The Entwinement of Online Communication and Offline Participation in Protest Events. New Media & Society, 14, 1, 153-169. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177-/1461444811429103

Noakes, J., & Johnston, H. (2005). Frames of Protest: A Road Map to a Perspective. In Johnston, H., & Noakes, J. (Eds.), Frames of Protests. Social Movements and the Framing Perspective (pp.1-32). Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Parry, K. (2010). A Visual Framing Analysis of British Press Photography during the 2006 Israel-Lebanon Conflict. Media, War, & Conflict, 3, 1, 67-85. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1750635210353679

Passini, S. (2012). The Facebook and Twitter Revolutions: Active Participation in the 21st Century. Human Affairs, 22, 3, 301-312. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/s13374-012-0025-0

Petray, T.L. (2011). Protest 2.0: Online Interactions and Aboriginal Activists. Media, Culture & Society, 33, 6, 923-940. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0163443711411009

Presad?, F. (2012). Case Study on the Romanian Protests, 2012. (http://goo.gl/dhKqUz) (20-08-2013).

Sádaba, I. (2012). Acción colectiva y movimientos sociales en las redes digitales. Aspectos históricos y metodológicos. Arbor, 188-756, 781-794. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3989/arbor.2012.756n4011

Schultz, D. (2008). A DigiActive Introduction to Facebook Activism. (http://goo.gl/JkVtpU) (23-08-2013).

Snow, D.A., & Benford, R.D. (1992). Master Frames and Cycles of Protest. In A.D. Morris, & C.M. Mueller (Eds.), Frontiers in Social Movement Theory (pp. 133-155). New Haven CT: Yale University Press.

Soengas, X. (2013). The Role of the Internet and Social Networks in the Arab Uprisings - An Alternative to Official Press Censorship [El papel de Internet y de las redes sociales en las revueltas árabes: una alternativa a la censura de la prensa oficial]. Comunicar, 41, 147-155. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-14

Zimbra, D., Abbasi, A., & Chen, H. (2010). A Cyber-archeology Approach to Social Movement Research: Framework and Case Study. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 16, 48-70. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1083-6101.2010.01531.x



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Este artículo presenta los resultados del análisis cuantitativo de las auto-representaciones de dos comunidades rumanas en Facebook durante las protestas on-line y off-line en contra del «fracking» en Rumanía. En 2013 los rumanos comenzaron a protestar contra las explotaciones de gas del gigante energético norteamericano Chevron en la aldea de Pungesti. Este movimiento de resistencia pasó, en poco más de un mes, de ser una herramienta de movilización rural a una de alcance nacional cuyo objetivo era ayudar a los campesinos afectados por las explotaciones de gas planificadas por Chevron. Dado que el óptimo grado de implicación on-line para pasar a una participación off-line depende mucho de las prácticas informativas, consideramos que un análisis de textos publicados en Facebook reflejará si éstos son compatibles y relevantes para los manifestantes. Nuestra premisa teórica está basada en la teoría del encuadre en movimientos sociales e informa nuestro análisis de contenido comparativo de los textos de dos comunidades rumanas de Facebook desde octubre de 2013 hasta febrero de 2014. En el trabajo se identifican las estrategias de encuadre verbal y visual, y los marcos de acción colectiva utilizados para formar la identidad de estas comunidades on-line. Los resultados obtenidos muestran el predominio de «la lucha por la tierra» como principal marco de acción colectiva, seguido del «conflicto» y la «solidaridad», e indican la preeminencia de fotos y archivos de vídeo como recursos de encuadre de relevancia cultural y como pruebas del activismo fuera de Internet en contra del «fracking» en Rumanía.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

Las ciberprotestas como «extensiones de un movimiento social en un nuevo espacio mediático» (Zimbra & al., 2010: 49) están relacionadas mayoritariamente con los movimientos de las protestas políticas o con las protestas sociales de las minorías y de los grupos marginados. Últimamente los grupos activistas digitales han protestado también en contra de las corporaciones para exigir una disminución de la influencia de estas en la política (el movimiento de Occupy Wall Street) o para parar las extracciones de las compañías petroleras (la comunidad «Save the Artic» de Lego y de Greenpeace, o las protestas por la eliminación del subsidio petróleo en Nigeria). En 2013 la decisión del gobierno rumano de seguir la fracturación hidráulica de Chevron en una aldea de Rumanía fue el factor que desencadenó las ciberprotestas. Las manifestaciones contra el «fracking» demuestran que los ciudadanos rumanos han ido desarrollando poco a poco una cultura de la protesta. Nuestro análisis enfocará el movimiento social rumano en Internet en contra de Chevron dentro del marco teórico del proceso de encuadre, puesto que los manifestantes on-line utilizaron las publicaciones en Facebook como una manera de plasmar y generar «los encuadres de la acción colectiva» (Benford & Snow, 2000), a través de lo cual consiguieron informar y movilizar a otros ciudadanos rumanos.

Este trabajo sobre las protestas contra el fracking on-line tiene un doble objetivo: a) ofrecer un análisis comparativo de las estrategias de encuadre y de los escenarios de la acción colectiva utilizados por dos comunidades rumanas on-line a lo largo de su movimiento contra el fracking; b) determinar las categorías visuales y verbales que estas dos comunidades utilizan para los encuadres más dominantes de la acción colectiva.

1.1. Perspectivas sobre las protestas 2.0

Los medios sociales que apoyan los movimientos de protesta tienen la ventaja de poder movilizar de manera rápida y barata a una amplia audiencia, de superar los límites geográficos, de alcanzar el pluralismo de la información (Passini, 2012; Soengas, 2013). El ciberactivismo vuelve a la gente común en «ciudadanos de la Red» (Franklin, 2010), que llegan a ser importantes miembros de una comunidad de compromiso cívico con una participación mínima. El aumento de las redes sociales (Facebook) como sitios del activismo cívico digital permite la formación de una identidad colectiva puesto que los usuarios de SRS (servicios de redes sociales) están unidos por una meta común, compartiendo las mismas reclamaciones concernientes a los asuntos políticos, económicos, sociales, educativos o culturales. Mercea (2012: 155) identifica la «participación digital prefigurativa» como «un determinado tipo de participación digital en el activismo». Formada por tres niveles distintos (la movilización, la construcción de la identidad, la transformacional organizacional), la «participación digital prefigurativa» es anterior al compromiso del movimiento social off-line y supone la interacción de individuos a través de la comunicación mediada por el ordenador.

Dentro del proceso de la construcción de la identidad, las comunidades on-line favorecen el desarrollo del «nuevo movimiento social» (Diani, 2003), cuyos rasgos son la descentralización, el dinamismo, la falta de jerarquía y un grupo de participantes que se identifica con los objetivos y las perspectivas del movimiento. Castells (2012) afirma que las comunidades on-line se construyen a través de un proceso de comunicación autónoma. Por lo tanto las comunidades de la ciberprotesta crean un nuevo espacio público, tachado por Castells de «espacio de la autonomía», que representa el espacio interconectado entre el espacio digital y el urbano. Dentro del nuevo espacio híbrido de la libertad, la permisividad de la Red admite una trayectoria desde la indignación hasta la esperanza y finalmente la acción. Este último componente comportamental de las protestas 2.0 no debería limitarse a las acciones de movilización off-line. La investigación (Schultz, 2008; Petray, 2011; Castells, 2012) indica que las protestas 2.0 se vuelven eficaces si ocupan un espacio urbano, creando un sitio exterior, donde los miembros de la comunidad on-line pueden encontrarse cuando quieren involucrarse más en el movimiento. A pesar de que la estructura de Facebook abierta al público ofrece un alto grado de auto-presentación (Kaplan & Haenlein, 2010), no está diseñada para el activismo e indica un falso consenso y conformismo (Schultz, 2008; Passini, 2012). La opacidad de los niveles de compromiso pueden contrarrestarse al relacionar las tácticas on-line y off-line, y al crear acciones en el mundo real (Schultz, 2008). Passini (2012) coincide con la idea de que las redes sociales, como Facebook y Twitter, son los motores de las últimas revoluciones, pero también resalta que los movimientos de protesta en Internet deberían adoptar técnicas civiles de resistencia off-line para traer cambios sociales.

1.2. El activismo cívico digital en Rumanía

Después de la revolución de 1989, Rumanía pasó por un período de transición desde el comunismo hasta la democracia que no desembocó en un alto nivel de compromiso cívico poscomunista (B?descu & al., 2004; Mercea, 2012). Hay dos razones principales para la falta de confianza de los rumanos en las asociaciones cívicas (B?descu & al., 2004): 1) El beneficio económico que parecen perseguir muchas ONG fundadas por empresarios; 2) La creación de tales ONG por los partidos políticos como tapadera de la recaudación ilegal de fondos para las campañas.

Aunque las ONG rumanas pretenden representar la voz de los ciudadanos y aunque los recortes del presupuesto y todo tipo de reformas determinadas por la austeridad pueden haber desencadenado los movimientos sociales en Rumanía (Presad?, 2012), los rumanos no fueron unos protestatarios muy activos en contra del gobierno antes de enero de 2012. «Las protestas de enero fueron una lección dada por una sociedad civil desorganizada a la sociedad civil organizada» (Presad?, 2012) ya que los ciudadanos se reunieron espontáneamente sin ningún respaldo por parte de la sociedad civil organizada. Consideramos que las protestas de enero de 2012 representaron un punto de inflexión para el compromiso cívico de los rumanos. Al protestar en contra de la propuesta del presidente B?sescu para reformar el sistema de sanidad y en contra de la dimisión del Secretario de Salud (Raed Arafat), los rumanos utilizaron las comunidades de Facebook para organizarse. Las protestas de 2012 en la Plaza de la Universidad de Bucarest fueron importantes para el desarrollo del activismo cívico digital por tres razones: 1) fueron los primeros movimientos sociales a partir del uso de Facebook como herramienta para movilizar a los ciudadanos; 2) el lugar físico (la Plaza de la Universidad) fue utilizado como punto de referencia para el encuentro de los manifestantes en otras sublevaciones, como en las protestas por el Acuerdo Comercial de Lucha contra la Falsificación y contra el fracking; 3) fueron los movimientos sociales con un cambio institucional inmediato, como la reincorporación de Raed Arafat, la dimisión del gobierno y del gerente de informativos de la televisión pública.

Un año más tarde, en enero de 2012, a las protestas le siguieron los movimientos sociales en contra de la explotación de gas del gigante norteamericano Chevron en la aldea de Punge?ti (en el condado de Vaslui, al noreste de Rumanía). Estas protestas contra las iniciativas del fracking deben incluirse en un contexto internacional de los movimientos sociales en contra de Chevron. En 2012 los campesinos polacos de Zurawlow consiguieron bloquear las intenciones de perforación de la compañía norteamericana, pero un año más tarde la compañía presentó un pleito civil en contra de los aldeanos afirmando que habían violado su derecho legal de acceso al lugar. Desde 2013 los argentinos han protestado en contra de Chevron después de que el gobierno permitiera que la compañía perforara más de 100 pozos. En 2010 el gobierno rumano y Chevron firmaron un acuerdo que estipulaba que Chevron poseería más de dos millones de acres de tierra en Rumanía. El 3 de octubre de 2013, Chevron obtuvo las autorizaciones necesarias para empezar la explotación de gas de esquisto en la aldea de Punge?ti. La decisión de Rumanía de seguir la fracturación hidraúlica mientras que otros países europeos (Francia, Alemania, Bulgaria) se habían negado, fue el factor que desencadenó el levantamiento off-line de los aldeanos y las ciberprotestas de los ciudadanos rumanos. El 12 de octubre fue creada la primera comunidad de Facebook, la TV Punge?ti. Dos días más tarde los periódicos rumanos presentaron las protestas de 150 aldeanos que habían ocupado el camino que llevaba al lugar de la construcción de Chevron. Luego casi 500 manifestantes se reunieron en la Plaza de la Universidad en Bucarest, como señal de solidaridad con los campesinos de Punge?ti. Protestaron en contra del gobierno rumano, de la cadena de televisión pública y del Ministerio de Interior, llamándolos ladrones e intentando convocar a más manifestantes. El 23 de octubre fue creada la segunda comunidad en Facebook (Resistencia de Punge?ti). Según Merca (2012) y Garrett (2006), la construcción de la identidad en las comunidades on-line es vital para la participación digital. El logotipo creado por los miembros de la comunidad y publicado como foto de perfil constituye una manera de unir a los participantes en Internet. La comunidad de la Resistencia de Punge?ti utilizó la imagen de un toro que destruye un pozo como representación connotativa de los protestatarios. El toro con cuernos de los colores de la bandera rumana tiene un significado histórico. La cabeza de toro, o sea de uro, está presente sobre la bandera y el escudo de Moldavia (la provincia donde tuvieron lugar las protestas). Utilizar el logotipo del toro por la comunidad de Internet resulta apropiado puesto que ofrece un alto nivel de identificación cultural entre sus miembros debido a su connotación histórica.

A lo largo de los siguientes meses, más ciudadanos de Rumanía se unieron al movimiento en el sitio off-line (Campamento de Resistencia de Punge?ti). Las dos ubicaciones exteriores a Facebook (la Plaza de la Universidad en Bucarest y el Campamento de Resistencia en Punge?ti) indican que las protestas 2.0 contra el fracking en Rumanía se han vuelto parte integrante de los movimientos sociales globales, según considera Petray (2011) es lo que debe ocurrir para hablar de éxito en las protestas. Un asunto que parecía local (las protestas contra el fracking en la aldea de Punge?ti) fue poco a poco enmarcándose como nacional (los rumanos en contra de la fracturación hidraúlica), convirtíendose en un levantamiento en contra del gobierno rumano y la corrupción presidencial (Coman & Cmeciu, 2014). Los acontecimientos on-line reflejan el concepto de «participación prefigurada por los medios informáticos» (Mercea, 2012), puesto que determinaron la presencia de los manifestantes off-line. Las protestas on-line y off-line aportaron un cambio inmediato: Chevron suspendió la búsqueda de gas de esquisto en la aldea de Punge?ti.

1.3. Protestas y encuadre de la acción colectiva

Los nuevos valores y objetivos que se producen a través de los movimientos sociales determinan un cambio en las instituciones de una sociedad puesto que dichas instituciones deberían crear «nuevas formas para la organización de la vida social» (Castells, 2012: 9). Por lo tanto los manifestantes se transforman en «emprendedores de los movimientos sociales» (Noakes & Johnston, 2005). Puntualizando selectivamente y codificando acontecimientos, experiencias y secuencias de acciones, los manifestantes se convierten en agentes para generar significado (Snow & Benford, 1992). Generan, elaboran y transmiten lo que Benford y Snow (2000) identifican como «encuadres de la acción colectiva». Para resonar con los valores y creencias comunes compartidas por los participantes en los movimientos sociales, los encuadres de la acción colectiva deben tener tres cualidades (Benford & Snow, 2000; Noakes & Johnston, 2005): ser compatible desde el punto de vista cultural (la compatibilidad de encuadres y símbolos con el «conjunto de herramientas culturales»: las narraciones culturales, la herencia cultural y los símbolos), ser consistente (la consistencia interna y la rigurosidad de creencias, demandas y acciones promovidas por los encuadres) y ser relevante (la capacidad de inferir sentido de las experiencias de los participantes en su respectiva sociedad).

En su estudio, que revisa los encuadres de los movimientos sociales, Benford y Snow (2000) mencionan que los encuadres de la acción colectiva tienen una función orientada hacia la acción y suponen procesos interactivos, discursivos. La función orientada hacia la acción se refiere a tareas de encuadre de tres núcleos: diagnóstico (la identificación del problema y la atribución de la responsabilidad), el pronóstico (soluciones, planes de ataque) y el motivacional (vocabulario de motivos construidos socialmente). La función de la acción se alcanza a través de dos procesos discursivos: la articulación del encuadre y la amplificación del encuadre. En la amplificación del encuadre incluimos varios tipos de dispositivos de encuadre verbal y visual. Corrigall-Brown & Wilkes (2012) consideran que junto al texto, las imágenes de la acción colectiva también forman la comprensión pública de los asuntos y de las campañas de los movimientos sociales porque serán recordados por más tiempo y expresarán una mayor respuesta emocional que los informes textuales. El encuadre de la amplificación como parte de los procesos de alienamiento «supone la idealización, el embellecimiento, la clarificación, la vigoración de los valores existentes y de las creencias» (Benford & Snow, 2000). El análisis del vocabulario de los motivos constituidos socialmente por encima de todos los movimientos sociales puede revelar una visión cultural en la narrativa de una sociedad o la sabiduría popular.

Otro aspecto que se debe tener en cuenta es la relación entre el encuadre de la acción colectiva y los espacios digitales. Recalcando la naturaleza esporádica, dinámica y fluida de los movimientos sociales en Internet, Sádaba (2012) considera que esta mezcla entre nuevas formaciones de la acción colectiva y nuevas tecnologías pone de manifiesto aspectos importantes: a) herramientas específicas de acceso y uso para representarse con función mediadora; b) estas herramientas que generan información sociológica brindan informes más detallados sobre las acciones colectivas locales que otras técnicas comunes, como las encuestas, las entrevistas o los grupos focales. Las dos comunidades rumanas de Facebook, al representar las acciones colectivas contra Chevron, son ejemplos del poder que desempeñó esta red social en el encuadre de la acción local que paulatinamente se transformó en un asunto nacional e internacional.

2. Materiales y métodos

Empleamos un análisis del encuadre de las publicaciones en Facebook de las dos comunidades on-line durante cuatro meses (12 de octubre de 2013 y 22 de febrero de 2014) desde el principio de las protestas contra el fracking en Rumanía. Nuestra muestra incluyó 409 publicaciones (294 de la Resistencia de Punge?ti y 115 de TV Punge?ti).

2.1. Encuadre visual y verbal

El estudio emplea un método deductivo y también un método inductivo. Usamos un método deductivo intentando encontrar los tipos de dispositivos de encuadre visual y verbal de las publicaciones de Facebook de las comunidades on-line. Comenzando con la literatura sobre los encuadres visuales y verbales (Gamson & Lasch, 1983; Parry, 2010; Corrigall-Brown & Wilkes, 2012), adaptamos cada dispositivo de encuadre a la especificidad discursiva de las publicaciones contra el fracking de las comunidades en Facebook. Se llevó a cabo un análisis de una muestra de publicaciones on-line (n=15), aleatoriamente seleccionadas de cada comunidad de la Red, para determinar los dispositivos de encuadre. Otra muestra de publicaciones (n=61), aproximadamente el 15% del número total (409) fue doblemente codificada para determinar la confiabilidad entre codificadores (Kappa); el acuerdo entre los dos codificadores fue 91 de promedio.

Incluimos las siguientes categorías en el esquema codificante para los dispositivos de encuadre verbal:

1) Lemas: una sola declaración principal, etiquetas, títulos o eslóganes previstos para sugerir un encuadre general (las publicaciones y los eslóganes en Facebook utilizados para movilizar a otros ciudadanos).

2) Las representaciones tienen tres aspectos:

• Descripción general: información ofrecida por los miembros de la comunidad on-line sobre sus razones de protestar o sobre el desarrollo de la protesta.

• Estadísticas: informes sobre el daño que puede causar el fracking, sobre la gente herida durante las protestas o las pruebas estadísticas de la mala gestión del gobierno.

• Testimonios de una tercera parte en la descripción (varias categorías de simpatizantes: famosos, élites, políticos, representantes de las organizaciones del movimiento social, etc.).

3) Modelos (ejemplos reales e hipotéticos):

• Ejemplos reales del pasado o del presente enfocando las historias de los aldeanos sobre las consecuencias que la fracturación de Chevron pueda tener sobre su vida y las historias de los manifestantes sobre sus experiencias durante el movimiento social.

• Ejemplos hipotéticos: posibles guiones (declaraciones que se basan en posibles desenlaces a menos que la fracturación cese).

Incluimos en el esquema codificador para el dispositivo del encuadre visual las siguientes categorías:

• Logotipo de la identificación visual de las comunidades on-line y de otras organizaciones.

• Anuncios: imágenes usadas para promocionar los eventos en y fuera de Internet.

• Fotografías: imágenes que representan los participantes (manifestantes, policias, políticos, etc.) durante las protestas.

• Caricaturas y gráficos.

• Mapas indicando el lugar de las protestas, las áreas que serán explotadas por Chevron.

• Imágenes antropomórficas que se vuelven metáforas visuales (objetos que desempeñan acciones humanas).

• Archivos de vídeo creados por los usuarios publicados o compartidos por los miembros de la comunidad.

2.2. Encuadres colectivos

El método inductivo fue utilizado para un análisis en profundidad de los dispositivos del encuadre verbal y visual para encontrar los tipos de encuadre a los que fueron asignados por las dos comunidades on-line. Identificamos cinco encuadres principales: el encuadre de la lucha por la tierra, el encuadre del conflicto, el encuadre de la solidaridad, el encuadre de la oportunidad política y el encuadre ecológico. El encuadre de la lucha por la tierra se refiere al bienestar social de los aldeanos en el contexto de la fracturación hidráulica de Chevron. Se fija en los informes verbales y visuales de las personas que protestaron en el Campamento de la Resistencia, en las desventajas de las operaciones de la explotación del gas de esquisto (la destrucción de los negocios locales, reasentamientos) y las ventajas de las operaciones contra la explotación del gas de esquisto (las tradiciones locales, las costumbres sociales y la vida cotidiana). El encuadre del conflicto abarca los informes verbales y visuales de cualquiera de los participantes (sea manifestante, sea gendarme) involucrados en una escena violenta (pelea o represión policial), participantes (manifestantes y oponentes) involucrados en ataques verbales o pruebas de las desinformaciones sobre los manifestantes realizadas por las cadenas de televisión. El encuadre de la solidaridad incluye los informes verbales y visuales de los simpatizantes de los protestatarios (gente corriente, élites, presentadores de televisión presentes en los lugares off-line). El encuadre de la oportunidad política se refiere a informes verbales y visuales de los políticos que aprovechan este movimiento social para su propio interés político. El encuadre ecológico se refiere a informes del bienestar medioambiental, a publicaciones que representan áreas locales afectadas por las operaciones de explotación (destrucción) frente a áreas locales intactas (conservación).

2.3. Preguntas de investigación

A partir de la literatura sobre el encuadre verbal y visual, sobre los movimientos on-line y off-line, se desarrollan las siguientes preguntas de investigación:

• PI1: ¿Cuál es la relevancia de los dispositivos de encuadre verbal y visual?

• PI2: ¿Qué encuadres de la acción colectiva usan las comunidades on-line contra el fracking en sus publicaciones en Facebook?

• PI3: ¿Cómo utilizan las comunidades on-line los dispositivos de encuadre visual y verbal para representar los cinco encuadres?

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Frecuencia de los dispositivos de encuadre verbal y visual

El número de dispositivos de encuadre utilizados en las publicaciones analizadas revela una gran discrepancia. La Resistencia de Punge?tii utilizó 1.121 dispositivos de encuadre en 294 publicaciones, mientras que TV Punge?ti utilizó solo 361 dispositivos de encuadre en 115 publicaciones. Según se indica en la primera tabla, ambas comunidades on-line comprendieron la importancia de los dispositivos de encuadre visual en la representación on-line de las acciones contra el fracking de los manifestantes y más de la mitad de los dispositivos enfocaron una representación visual. La primera pregunta de la investigación intentó determinar la relevancia de los dos tipos de dispositivos de encuadre. La tabla 1 indica el predominio de las fotos en las publicaciones de ambas comunidades on-line, seguido por las descripciones generales, los vídeos, los lemas y los ejemplos reales. Aunque estos cinco dispositivos son los más utilizados por ambas comunidades on-line, se puede notar una diferencia en su distribución total.

En la comunidad de TV Punge?ti, menos de la mitad de los dispositivos (44%) fueron representados por fotos, mientras que en la comunidad de la Resistencia de Punge?ti las fotos fueron más de la mitad (65%). Las descripciones generales constituyeron el segundo dispositivo más utilizado. Aunque menos de un cuarto (18%; la Resistencia de Punge?tii y 22%; TV Punge?ti) de los dispositivos proporcionaron descripciones de las razones del movimiento social contra el fracking y del desarrollo de las protestas, la frecuencia (n=201 y n=87) es importante para resaltar el deseo de los miembros de la comunidad on-line para explicar sus exigencias y organizar sus protestas adecuadamente. Los vídeos representan un elemento visual significativo y son el tercer dispositivo de encuadre más utilizado por ambas comunidades on-line. Los lemas son el cuarto dispositivo más utilizado y se fijan principalmente en los eslóganes para movilizar a los manifestantes. Aunque los ejemplos reales no se utilizaron muy a menudo, ambas comunidades on-line proporcionaron testimonios de los manifestantes que habían sido maltratados por la policía o de los aldeanos que habían sufrido tras las actividades de facturación hidráulica de Chevron.


Draft Content 785647789-49355 ov-es004.jpg

3.2. La frecuencia de los encuadres de acción colectiva

La segunda pregunta de la investigación enfoca los tipos de encuadres de acción colectiva utilizados por las dos comunidades on-line durante las protestas contra el fracking.

Según se observa en la tabla 2, ambas comunidades utilizan la lucha por la tierra, el conflicto y la solidaridad como los primeros tres encuadres de acción colectiva más relevantes. La alta frecuencia de la «lucha por la tierra» no es nada sorprendente teniendo en consideración que las protestas fueron iniciadas por los habitantes de Punge?ti como un medio de proteger su tierra de la invasión de Chevron. «El conflicto» como el segundo encuadre más dominante puede explicarse por las confrontaciones violentas off-line entre los manifestantes y los gendarmes. Aunque ambas comunidades on-line proporcionan un encuadre parecido de las protestas contra el fracking, se pueden señalar dos diferencias:


Draft Content 785647789-49355 ov-es005.jpg

1) Más de la mitad de los dispositivos utilizados por los miembros de la comunidad de la Resistencia de Punge?ti encuadra la lucha por la tierra de los aldeanos mientras que solo menos de la mitad de los dispositivos utilizados por los miembros de la segunda comunidad encuadra esta acción colectiva.

2) Mientras que la comunidad de TV Punge?ti proporcionó la misma frecuencia de los encuadres de «la oportunidad política» y de «la ecología», los miembros de la comunidad de la Resistencia de Punge?ti utilizaron más el encuadre de «la ecología» que el encuadre de «la oportunidad política».

3.3. Los informes verbales y visuales de los encuadres de la acción colectiva

La tercera pregunta de investigación enfoca las discrepancias en el uso de los dispositivos de encuadre para los cinco marcos de la acción colectiva. Para comprender mejor estos dispositivos verbal y visual, a través de los encuadres de la acción colectiva, calculamos los valores medios para determinar la frecuencia con la que fueron utilizados por las dos comunidades de Facebook.

Según indica la tabla 3 (página siguiente), las fotos, las descripciones generales y los archivos de vídeo son los tres principales dispositivos utilizados en tres encuadres relacionados con las protestas contra el fracking en Rumanía, o sea la lucha por la tierra, el conflicto y la solidaridad. Para encuadrar «la lucha por la tierra», ambas comunidades proporcionaron la misma jerarquía en el uso de los dispositivos de encuadre: fotos, descripciones generales y archivos de vídeo. Según se nota, las fotos superaron todos los demás dispositivos utilizados para encuadrar «la lucha por la tierra» para ambas comunidades on-line. Para encuadrar «el conflicto», la Resistencia de Punge?ti utilizó más fotos (m=5,78) que descripciones generales (m=3,92), mientras que TV Punge?ti proporcionó más descripciones verbales de los conflictos con los gendarmes (m=2,78) que informes visuales de dichos enfrentamientos (m=1,42). Los dispositivos utilizados por las dos comunidades on-line para encuadrar «la solidaridad» fueron casi los mismos: fotos de las multitudes enfocando a los protestatarios que apoyaban a los aldeanos y las descripciones generales de la organización y del desarrollo de las protestas. La comunidad de la Resistencia de Punge?ti superó la comunidad de TV Punge?ti en cuanto al uso de los dispositivos de encuadre de «la oportunidad política», siendo el principal enfoque las descripciones verbales de los políticos que apoyaban a los protestatarios (m=0,21). Se notó una discrepancia en el uso de los dispositivos en cuanto al encuadre de «la ecología». Mientras que los miembros de la comunidad de TV Punge?ti proporcionaron solo descripciones generales de las desventajas de la fracturación hidráulica (m=0,21), los miembros de la Resistencia de Punge?ti utilizaron cinco dispositivos de encuadre. Las descripciones generales (m=1,71), las fotos (m=0,49) y los archivos de vídeo (m=0,28) tuvieron el más alto nivel de sugerencia de los peligros que constituye el fracking a menos que cese.


Draft Content 785647789-49355 ov-es006.jpg

4. Debates y conclusiones

Después de analizar el contenido de dos comunidades rumanas on-line contra el fracking a lo largo de cuatro meses de protestas, el presente trabajo halló que las comunidades on-line prefirieron utilizar más recursos visuales (más de 60%) que estrategias verbales y que representaron sus acciones con marcos de acción colectiva por la lucha de la tierra y la solidaridad. El extenso uso de recursos visuales (fotos y archivos de vídeo), típicos de Facebook, concuerda con los hallazgos de Corrigall-Brown y Wilkes que resaltan la importancia atribuida a este recurso para transmitir una respuesta emocional mucho mayor que los informes textuales del movimiento social. Por encima del impacto emocional, las imágenes de las protestas sirven como herramientas motivacionales y de evidencia. Los archivos fotográficos y de vídeo de los campesinos, manifestantes y contrincantes (policías, autoridades locales y representantes de Chevron) proporcionan documentos visuales importantes en la organización de una campaña de activismo en Facebook, según la opinión de Schultz (2008): la existencia de un espacio exterior y el inicio de acciones en el mundo real. La representación visual de los lugareños y contestatarios en los dos espacios exteriores –el campamento de resistencia en Punge?ti y en la Plaza de la Universidad en Bucarest– constituye una prueba significativa de que las dos comunidades on-line fueron utilizadas para apoyar el activismo rumano contra el fracking off-line. Por encima de la función de evidencia que tienen las representaciones visuales en Facebook, estas revelan, según menciona Sádaba (2012), un informe más profundo de la acción local colectiva. La representación visual de la lucha de los manifestantes por la tierra proporciona una representación clara del poder de los aldeanos de movilizarse en contra del enemigo (Chevron).

Durante los movimientos sociales la legitimidad visual y verbal de un grupo es importante porque enseña la cohesión de los manifestantes. Pero a la vez la legitimidad otorgada a individuos juega un papel significativo porque el alarde dramático de las historias de los individuos puede producir una mayor movilización en nuevos manifestantes. Los ejemplos reales y los testimonios son dos dispositivos de posicionamiento verbal utilizados para asociar un rostro a un nombre. Aunque estos dos dispositivos no tuvieron la mayor frecuencia, fueron utilizados por ambas comunidades on-line. Las comunidades Resistencia de Punge?ti y TV Punge?ti proporcionaron 26 y 16 ejemplos reales de lugareños, huelguistas de hambre, o de individuos que habían sufrido por las acciones violentas de la policía. Según indicó Dan Schultz (2008), el refuerzo mediático es importante en las campañas de activismo on-line. Este apoyo vicarial se representó a través de los recursos de encuadre verbal de los informes. A diferencia de la comunidad de TV Punge?ti, la Resistencia de Punge?ti ofreció más informes de los simpatizantes –los productores de televisión, los periodistas nacionales e internacionales o la élite rumana– que se unieron a las protestas o que intentaron proporcionar mensajes mediáticos objetivos del movimiento social.

Los lemas constituyen otro significativo medio de encuadre verbal durante las campañas de activismo on-line. A diferencia del grupo de TV PPunge?ti, la comunidad de Resistencia de Punge?ti proporcionó lemas para crear dos eventos on-line. Ambas comunidades virtuales utilizaron un mayor número de lemas para colecciones de fotos y archivos de vídeo («¡Punge?ti es toda Rumanía! ¡Un ejemplo para todo el Planeta!» o «¡No nos dejaremos contaminar!, ¡No al gas de esquisto!»).

Las publicaciones constantes de las protestas contra el fracking on-line y off-line nos permitieron notar la evolución de los encuadres de acción colectiva utilizados por las dos comunidades on-line durante un período de cuatro meses (octubre de 2013 a febrero de 2014). Descrito inicialmente por ambas comunidades como una lucha pacífica por el derecho de los aldeanos de Punge?ti a la tierra, el movimiento social contra el fracking en Rumanía evolucionó hacia un doble conflicto público. Los miembros de ambas comunidades proporcionaron, por un lado, vívidas descripciones del conflicto físico entre los aldeanos y los gendarmes, y por otro lado, informes sobre el conflicto entre los manifestantes y los representantes locales, gubernamentales y parlamentarios responsables por el fracking de Chevron y la fracturación hidráulica en Rumanía. Mientras que los miembros de la comunidad de TV Punge?ti proporcionaron un encuadre constante del conflicto, los miembros de la comunidad de la Resistencia de Punge?ti resaltan los enfrentamientos violentos entre los protestatarios y los gendarmes al principio de diciembre, cuando la policía detuvo a aldeanos, destruyó sus propiedades privadas y cortó todas las carreteras de acceso. Aunque Chevron suspendió su búsqueda de gas de esquisto después de estos violentos enfrentamientos, las dos comunidades on-line siguieron proporcionando información sobre las protestas. En enero y febrero los miembros de la comunidad de TV Punge?ti utilizaron el conflicto como el más dominante encuadre de la acción colectiva, mientras que miembros de la comunidad de la Resistencia de Punge?ti se fijaron en la solidaridad de los simpatizantes de los aldeanos, y a través del encuadre de la ecología proporcionaron las opiniones de los expertos sobre los riesgos para la salud y para el medio ambiente que representaría el fracking en la región. El marco de «la oportunidad política» apenas fue utilizado por los miembros de la comunidad, puesto que la mayoría de los políticos rumanos fueron presentados como actores sociales corruptos que simplemente obedecían las órdenes del Primer Ministro. Dos políticos rumanos y once representantes «verdes» de cinco países del Parlamento Europeo, que enviaron una carta abierta a Martin Schultz sobre las acciones abusivas del gobierno rumano y de Chevron, fueron etiquetados como aliados en la lucha de los lugareños.

Aunque las dos comunidades no descentralizaron el control on-line de las publicaciones y elementos compartidos, sus informes visuales y verbales de las protestas contra el fracking en Rumanía tuvieron la fuerza de movilizar a los ciudadanos de todo el país. Ambas comunidades utilizaron los encuadres de la acción colectiva que tienen los tres rasgos mencionados por Benford y Snow (2000), y Noakes y Johnston (2005): compatibilidad cultural, consistencia y relevancia. El éxito de la movilización on-line de los contestarios se debe a la selección adecuada del espacio de la acción colectiva más relevante para los locales (la lucha por la tierra) y el resto de ciudadanos rumanos (solidaridad y conflicto). El dominio del entorno en «la lucha por la tierra» es consistente con las experiencias cotidianas de los campesinos de la aldea de Punge?ti, prestos a defender su tierra en contra del «enemigo» (Chevron). Los campesinos rumanos fueron posicionados como emprendedores sociales puesto que fueron capaces de construir una representación del movimiento social desde adentro hacia afuera (la experiencia al nivel del grupo por parte de los lugareños de Punge?ti), incorporando símbolos prestados del conjunto cultural rumano. Los informes verbales y visuales de los marcos utilizados por ambas comunidades on-line fueron compatibles desde el punto de vista cultural con los símbolos y las narrativas rumanas (por ejemplo, el logotipo del toro con cuernos, ver 1.2; o los lemas movilizadores que describen el desarrollo local de las protestas «Al Senado. Contra el fracking del gas de esquisto»).

A pesar de que el presente trabajo mostró el valor de los mecanismos visuales y verbales on-line para describir los espacios de acción colectiva de la lucha por la tierra, del conflicto y la solidaridad durante las protestas contra el fracking en Rumanía, se debe enfatizar que solo dos comunidades on-line fueron analizadas durante los cuatro meses de protestas sin tener en cuenta la interacción entre los administradores de la comunidad de Facebook y sus miembros. Estas limitaciones no disminuyen la importancia de la investigación, más bien ofrecen ideas para una futura investigación. Por ejemplo, el estudio de caso se debe incorporar con el propósito de ayudar al análisis profundo de aspectos variados como: la naturaleza interactiva de la comunidad on-line, analizando los comentarios de sus miembros, un análisis comparativo entre las comunidades de Facebook contra el fracking en Rumanía y otros países, o un análisis de los recursos visuales de cómo la legitimidad visual de diferentes individuos y grupos de actores se representa a través de imágenes de la acción colectiva en contra del fenómeno del fracking.

Agradecimiento

Este trabajo se realizó con el apoyo de una subvención ofrecida por la Autoridad Nacional Rumana para la Investigación Científica e Innovación, CNCS-UEFISCDI, número de proyecto PN-II-RU-TE-2014-4-0599.

Referencias

B?descu, G., Sum, P., & Uslaner, E.M. (2004). Civil Society Development and Democratic Values in Romania and Moldova. East European Politics & Societies, 18, 2, 316-341. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177-/0888325403259915

Benford, R.D., & Snow, D.A. (2000). Framing Processes and Social Movements: An Overview and Assessment. Annual Review of Sociology, 26, 611-639. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev.soc.26.1.611

Castells, M. (2012). Networks of Outrage and Hope: Social Movements in the Internet Age. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Coman, C., & Cmeciu, C. (2014). Framing Chevron Protests in National and International Press. Procedia - Social and, Behavioral Sciences, 149, 228-232. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2014.08.222

Corrigall-Brown, C., & Wilkes, R. (2012). Picturing Protest: The Visual Framing of Collective Action by First Nations in Canada. American Behavioral Scientist, 56, 2, 223-243. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177-/0002764211419357

Diani, M. (2003). Networks and Social Movements: A Research Programme. In M. Diani, & D. McAdam (Eds.), Social Movements and Networks. Relational Approaches to Collective Action (pp. 49-76). Oxford University Press.

Franklin, M.I. (2010). Digital Dilemmas: Transnational Politics in the Twenty-First Century. Brown Journal of World Affairs, XVI, 2, 67-85. (http://goo.gl/vheq01) (20-06-2012).

Gamson, W., & Lasch, K.E. (1983). The Political Culture of Social Welfare Policy. In S.E. Spiro, & E. Yuchtman-Yaar (Eds.), Evaluating the Welfare State: Social and Political Perspectives (pp. 397-415). New York: Academic Press.

Garrett, R.K. (2006). Protest in an Information Society. A Review of Literature on Social Movements and New ICTs. Information, Communication & Society, 9, 2, 202-224. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/-13691180600630773

Kaplan, A.M., & Haenlein, M. (2010). Users of the World, Unite! The Challenge and Opportunities of Social Media. Business Horizons, 53, 1, 59-68. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bushor.2009.09.003

Mercea, D. (2012). Digital Prefigurative Participation: The Entwinement of Online Communication and Offline Participation in Protest Events. New Media & Society, 14, 1, 153-169. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177-/1461444811429103

Noakes, J., & Johnston, H. (2005). Frames of Protest: A Road Map to a Perspective. In Johnston, H., & Noakes, J. (Eds.), Frames of Protests. Social Movements and the Framing Perspective (pp.1-32). Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Parry, K. (2010). A Visual Framing Analysis of British Press Photography during the 2006 Israel-Lebanon Conflict. Media, War, & Conflict, 3, 1, 67-85. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1750635210353679

Passini, S. (2012). The Facebook and Twitter Revolutions: Active Participation in the 21st Century. Human Affairs, 22, 3, 301-312. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/s13374-012-0025-0

Petray, T.L. (2011). Protest 2.0: Online Interactions and Aboriginal Activists. Media, Culture & Society, 33, 6, 923-940. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0163443711411009

Presad?, F. (2012). Case Study on the Romanian Protests, 2012. (http://goo.gl/dhKqUz) (20-08-2013).

Sádaba, I. (2012). Acción colectiva y movimientos sociales en las redes digitales. Aspectos históricos y metodológicos. Arbor, 188-756, 781-794. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3989/arbor.2012.756n4011

Schultz, D. (2008). A DigiActive Introduction to Facebook Activism. (http://goo.gl/JkVtpU) (23-08-2013).

Snow, D.A., & Benford, R.D. (1992). Master Frames and Cycles of Protest. In A.D. Morris, & C.M. Mueller (Eds.), Frontiers in Social Movement Theory (pp. 133-155). New Haven CT: Yale University Press.

Soengas, X. (2013). The Role of the Internet and Social Networks in the Arab Uprisings - An Alternative to Official Press Censorship [El papel de Internet y de las redes sociales en las revueltas árabes: una alternativa a la censura de la prensa oficial]. Comunicar, 41, 147-155. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3916/C41-2013-14

Zimbra, D., Abbasi, A., & Chen, H. (2010). A Cyber-archeology Approach to Social Movement Research: Framework and Case Study. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 16, 48-70. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1083-6101.2010.01531.x

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/03/16
Accepted on 31/03/16
Submitted on 31/03/16

Volume 24, Issue 1, 2016
DOI: 10.3916/C47-2016-02
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 4
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?