Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

In this paper we analyze ICT integration in higher education institutions focusing on the leadership practices of ICT policies, a research field that has not received much attention in higher education studies. An empirical study was carried out using a distributed leadership approach to analyze such practice in higher education institutions in Colombia, a country where a national ICT policy has steered and promoted ICT policy plans. In particular, the inquiry attempted to understand how the leadership of ICT is distributed in different higher education environments. Through a multiple case study, that included semi-structured interviews with leaders and team members, focus groups with professors, document analysis and a survey applied to faculty members ICT leadership practices and their implications were investigated. The results indicate a set of struggles that leaders have to cope with when deploying an ICT policy plan, for instance, coping with a lack of institutional regulations, and fostering educational change despite reluctance. Indeed, ICT leadership is a challenging and underexplored practice in higher education. This paper is a systematic attempt to demonstrate this statement and its implications. These findings are of particular relevance for the work of policy makers, ICT coordinators and leaders in higher education around the world.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Within the field of ICT integration in education, one research tradition focuses on the conditions that support ICT use for teaching and learning (Vanderlinde & Van-Braak, 2010). Within this stream, one of the conditions that has only recently received attention is situated at the organizational level, more specifically in what is called the ICT policy planning, referred to as «having a shared vision on technology integration and an ICT policy plan» (Hew & Brush, 2007). The general assumption and common agreement is that ICT policy plans increase the success of ICT integration in educational contexts (Bates, 2001; Wang & Woo, 2007; Gulbahar, 2007). At the national, district or institutional level, ICT policy plans are conceived as a blueprint of what education should look like through the use of ICT (Fishman & Zhang, 2003). Furthermore, such an ICT policy plans outlines learning objectives for the use of ICT, making this process a strategic device and potentially a driver for educational change (Vanderlinde, Van-Braak & Dexter, 2012).

In this paper, we inquire how leadership of ICT is distributed in different higher education environments, highlighting the sorts of problems that emerge in such activity. As we will argue in the next section, the analysis of ICT leadership from a distributed leadership approach is an appropriate perspective from which to study the challenging nature of ICT leadership in higher education. In order to understand how leadership is displayed in higher education institutions (HEI hereinafter) in which ICT policy plans are enacted, we use a distributed leadership perspective as the main theoretical framework. Compared to traditional perspectives, this approach assumes leadership is diffused and dispersed within organizations (Parry & Bryman, 2006). Instead of focusing primarily on the appointed leader and intrinsic traits, the analysis pays attention to the activity of leadership practices and their effects.

Spillane (2006) develops the notion of distributed leadership in contrast to the traditional conception of a charismatic leader who performs tasks in an organization on the basis of individual qualities. Therefore, the unit of analysis should be the activity of leadership (not the individual) distributed through the interaction between leader and followers across situations. Spillane was not the first to develop the idea of distributed leadership practice as a unit of analysis (Gronn, 2002; Copland, 2003). However, he offers a more consistent perspective embedded in theories of learning such as activity theory (Leontiev, 1981; Wertsch, 1991) and distributed cognition (Pea, 1993).

Accordingly, this theory assumes that followers are not individuals separated from the practice of leaders, as there is a social distribution of tasks. Such interdependence of leaders, followers and their situation means that leadership activity cannot be viewed as undertaken solely by any one of them; rather, each one is a precondition for the analysis of the entire activity. Spillane (2006) emphasizes the role of actors in a socio-cultural situation working with artifacts, which represent vehicles of thoughts. These artifacts are not only devices for achieving efficiency but they also transform the nature of leadership activity. According to Spillane tools, routines and structures enact these artifacts, both defined and re-defined by leadership practice (Spillane, 2006). In our analysis the idea of policies as tools, routines and structures is relevant as we assume ICT policy plans as artifacts (Vanderlinde, Van-Braak & Dexter, 2012).

The work of Spillane has underpinned a recent perspective that emphasizes the need of institutions to have leaders guiding and supporting those artifacts through a distributed approach. Technology leadership or ICT leadership represents this process of guidance and support in educational settings (Dexter, 2011). As McLeod and Richardson (2011) state, there has been little research on leadership of technology in general, despite recent interest in studying the key role of leaders in educational institutions to enhance innovation. Although research studies demonstrate the complexity of technology leadership –highlighting the relevance of individual and institutional factors when addressing ICT integration– there has been a gap in such studies in relation to understanding how technology leaders should enact this endeavor (Dexter, 2011).

Previous research has identified factors associated with effective leadership, defining three broad categories of leadership practices: setting direction, developing people and redesigning the organization (Leithwood, Anderson & Wahlstrom, 2004; Leithwood & Jantzi, 2003, 2005). These categories have also been applied in relation to ICT leadership practice, focusing on: 1) the vision for ICT within the institution, 2) promoting ICT teacher development and instructional support, and finally, 3) providing ICT access and technical aid, supportive policies and other conditions (Dexter, Anderson & Ronnkvist, 2002; Zhao & Frank, 2003).

A lack of literature when researching ICT leadership in higher education has been claimed (Van-Ameijde, Nelson, Billsberry & Van-Meurs, 2009). Therefore, following these studies and recommendations, we aim to study how the leadership of ICT in different higher education environments is distributed, focusing on the practice of leadership, paying attention to the artifacts, and the situations that should be considered in this unexplored context of higher education.

2. Methodological design of the research

This study was situated in Colombia, where a national ICT policy has been in place since 2007, consisting of the elaboration of guidelines to formulate and implement ICT policy plans in HEIs. Through this policy, named PlanEsTIC, more than 100 HEIs throughout the country were steered to elaborate, implement and evaluate their own plan (Osorio, Cifuentes & Rey, 2011). Although this project was not a single initiative from the government, compared to other regions in Latin America this policy developed a National ICT policy oriented on strategic planning for ICT. Therefore we consider this a relevant case to increase knowledge about ICT leadership. As Hinostroza and Labbé says: «From a regional perspective, the introduction and use of ICTs in education in Latin America is not different than in the rest of the world. Where the region differs from many developed countries is that there is very little evidence on the characteristics of policies and the extent to which they are being implemented» (Hinostroza & Labbé, 2011: 12)

According to the guidelines of PlanEsTIC, a team in each HEI was selected and guided through whole process with coordination at the national level, creating leadership conditions to deliver the individual plans. Our empirical research started with an initial exploratory stage in one of the seven regions in which PlanEsTIC was conducted, focusing on seven institutions of the selected region. Within each HEI, the leader and team members were contacted for an initial interview. It was important to select HEIs that met two minimum conditions: an explicit ICT policy plan and an ICT unit established. Essentially, ICT units are the teams in charge of integrating technology in different areas within an institution. Although many HEIs around the world have a team in charge of IT support, we were looking for ICT units that fulfill one of the guidelines of PlanEsTIC, i.e., they incorporated at least three different roles composed of a technological role, a pedagogical role, and a planning or financial role.

After the implementation of PlanEsTIC, all these institutions should have had their plans and teams arranged, but we wanted to explore initially if these plans were explicitly formulated and teams were still operating. Following initial contact, it became apparent that only three institutions had appropriate conditions to study ICT leadership in relation to developing an ICT policy plan. The graph in Figure 1 shows the structure and composition of selected the cases after the exploratory stage.


Draft Content 102123482-36825-en070.jpg

To answer the research question, a mixed methods design was carried out with three case studies. More specifically, in organizational studies, it is now considered that qualitative approaches are of particular relevance in analyzing the roles of leaders and their followers (Mumford & an-Doorn, 2001). Especially case studies are illustrative for leadership processes (Bryman, 2004). Several instruments were applied in each HEI to explore the leadership practices, taking into account that not only the team but also professors are essential in the situated analysis of such practice. In our case, professors engaged and reluctant to use ICT were contacted and a focus group was arranged covering issues in relation to the general strategy to integrate ICT in the institution, as well as their experience of teaching supported by the ICT unit. After these initial approaches, a survey was employed at each institution to measure the general perception of the staff regarding the strategy to integrate ICT in the institution and the achievements and failures of such strategy. Table 1 shows the number and type of methods applied in each HEI.

Document analysis was also part of the methodological design. The documents were predominantly ICT policy plans, official documents (such as those relating to foundation of units) minutes from meetings, and several Excel files containing the strategic plans of units and institutions. All structured interviews, semi-structured interviews and focus groups were transcribed and coded. For the analysis of qualitative data, Atlas.ti 7 software was used. Codes were assigned to sections of each transcription.

We used two clusters of codes. The first group was related to tools, routines and structures. The second related to leadership practices, including setting of direction, staff development and the redesign of the organization. When all coding was completed, the Atlas.ti 7 program was used to capture all text segments within one specific code. These reports (Yin, 2003) were useful to obtain main themes that emerged from the qualitative data. For the survey, descriptive data were analyzed. Due to the nature of the problem and the research question, it was found irrelevant to compare or establish statistical generalizations between HEIs. Therefore, the survey was employed to complement the understanding of beliefs and attitudes among academic staff at each institution.

The research design was structured in a case study approach (Yin, 2003). We consider that these cases were a good opportunity to analyze ICT leadership under particular conditions. A first vertical analysis allowed understanding of each case using the reports from Atlas.ti 7 and a later cross-case analysis was applied. As criteria for the quality of the research design, an analytical generalization was pursued: previously developed theory was used as a template to compare empirical results (Yin, 2003).

3. Analysis and results

Initial findings from the exploratory stage showed that institutions without an established team or a formal ICT policy plan tended to have two kinds of problems. First, when a plan exists but there is no unit in charge, efforts are pointless; and second, when a unit is appointed but there is no explicit plan to integrate technology in educational processes, there is a lack of vision, efforts cannot be guided, and strategies and activities cannot be measured in the long term. Based on this initial analysis, we selected three cases that fulfilled the conditions stated above (an explicit ICT policy plan and an ICT unit established). As we stated initially, ICT leadership is a challenging and underexplored practice in higher education. To support this argument and to answer the question regarding how the leadership of ICT is distributed in different higher education environments, we structure our findings in three sections.

First, we describe the nature of these units (structure, functions, etc.) and situate the role of artifacts through a vertical analysis of each setting. Second, through a cross-case analysis, we study the leadership activity in these contexts, using as a lens the threefold categories of leadership practice (setting direction, promoting teacher development, and redesigning organizational work) translated into ICT leadership contexts. Finally, we discuss the challenging nature of ICT leadership practice in higher education attending to certain implications for these scenarios.

3.1. Foundation and structure of each unit (within-case analysis)

We started analyzing on each setting the interdependence of leaders and followers in institutional situations in which they enacted ICT policy plans through tools, routines and structures (artifacts). As our point of departure is a deep definition of ICT policy plans, we paid attention not only to the official documentation but also to the process of delivering and enacting it within the organization. As will be described, units were appointed to deliver an ICT policy plan within each institution. However, there were different conditions for starting such endeavor depending on institutional and organizational structures, meaning different socio-cultural situations (Spillane, 2006).


Draft Content 102123482-36825-en071.jpg

3.1.1. Case 1

In case 1, the University Council created the unit in 2008. At that time, the Minister of Education was in charge of a national project to give pedagogical support to a set of universities to implement a methodology for the development of an on-line program. From the time the university was selected to take part in the project, this ICT unit was appointed to participate; the appointed leader saw an opportunity to create a broader team within the institution to build a participatory policy on ICT (including professors and students). Therefore, in the same year, an institutional ICT policy was formulated and endorsed by the University Council. This participatory policy (bottom-up) documented needs, activities, and actors in charge; similarly indicators were delineated to achieve each activity. According to the leader, that artifact was an initial attempt to establish ICT leadership but there was a need for a more accurate strategy.

Therefore the team elaborated another artifact, called the «Virtual Strategy», to operationalize the policy to a great extent. This was an overall strategy that set out principles, a methodology and a way for the ICT unit to lead ICT integration within the institution. The process of elaboration of this artifact was built on a distributed perspective, meaning that tasks were spread among the team; even graphic design (one of the areas in the unit) was carefully considered to create an attractive and clear artifact –the Virtual Strategy– potentially known by every member of the educational community. Enhancing the previous version of the policy, this artifact defined a pedagogical model (inspired by international models), the role of teachers and students in virtual learning environments, and quality standards.

3.1.2. Case 2

The foundation of the ICT unit in this case was preceded by an institutional process of reflection on needs and opportunities in using ICT for teaching and learning. That process started 12 years ago and the unit was one of the first outcomes. Founded at that time the unit was in charge of the design of digital content and virtual learning environments. Indeed, PlanEsTIC was a later external artifact that was preceded by an institutional policy-making and ICT leadership process started in 2007. At that time, the ICT unit led to a group of professors and a research group (on educational informatics) to undertake a project on ICT integration to support academic staff. The University Council endorsed this project, linking it to the institutional strategic plan. The next year, the unit started developing the project through six strategies, including an overall diagnosis of different dimensions of ICT integration. At the end of the year, PlanEsTIC was placed as an external artifact, useful in delivering a first draft of an ICT policy plan (2009) and taking advantage of all the know-how brought by the Minister of Education.

However, as the unit leader mentioned in the interview, this external policy was not sufficient to run a formal ICT policy in the institution. Despite the knowledge transferred and organizational learning acquired, another kind of leadership was needed beyond the ICT policy plan which had been developed. Three years later, in 2012, the ICT policy plan was finally endorsed and the University Council approved the document, but only through a long and challenging process of policy-making (explained in the next section). Five strategic lines are described in this artifact: ICT diffusion, pedagogical training, pedagogical support, monitoring and assessment, and infrastructure. The overall strategy appointed a leader for each one of the strategic lines (our interviewed leader was in charge of one of them). A positive effect from this strategy was that 80% of the academic staff surveyed was aware of a formal ICT training strategy in the institution. Similarly, 58% considered that the institution offers to appropriate conditions for staff to innovate with ICTs.

3.1.3. Case 3

Four stages are described in the historical documentation of the ICT unit in this case. The first stage started in 2003, with a previous process of pedagogical training and an ICT diffusion campaign, which included the participation of the Rector, academic staff and administrative employees. The next year, the unit was founded and a second stage consisted in the formal development of several strategies -locally designed artifacts- by this unit. These strategies included research, communication, outreach services, and teaching and learning. As we could analyze in our case study reports, each of these artifacts was composed of different projects representing tasks to be enacted. For instance, one of the strategic lines (teaching and learning) drove a first training program for teachers that later became a strong and renowned program even outside the institution as an ICT training strategy for teacher development. A third stage of the ICT unit enhanced strategic lines within the university through the production of blended courses in different academic programs. In addition, at this stage, a permanent connection with the Minister of Education was established to develop projects and agreements through outreach services. The fourth stage (to date) was the consolidation of the current team, defining areas of expertise such as pedagogy, quality assessment, support system, financial management and marketing of e-learning, and design and development.

Compared to the other cases, one important feature in this ICT unit is a «shared leadership» practice. This means that since 2006, the appointed director has been sharing the coordination of the unit with another member, distributing administrative and managerial responsibilities to enhance decision-making processes. The unit has also continued to establish projects with the Minister or Education; the leaders mention that the quality of the unit is due to the level of commitment and the «high-pressure style» they are used to coping with when giving reports and detailing outcomes to the Minister. Despite this positive performance outside the institution, the leaders declare that opposition to the overall strategy from staff and other units within the institution is a common source of struggle.

3.2. How is ICT leadership distributed within the organization?

In this section we describe findings from the cross-case analysis. We focus in each category of leadership practice applied in ICT leadership contexts, i.e., setting direction, staff development and redesign of the organization (Dexter, 2011). Having considered both vertical and horizontal analyses, our findings lead to a reading of practices as a set of struggles that leaders and teams encounter in each institution.

3.2.1. Policy-making: Struggles in setting direction

As stated above, an in-depth definition of ICT policy planning highlights the process of leadership rather than the final product (document). Therefore, we paid attention to different kinds of challenges identified when analyzing ICT policy planning. One challenge is the process of development and gaining support from directors. Another is to convince Heads of Departments, coordinators, and –clearly– academic staff of the relevance of the plan. A third common struggle was the pursuit of a common vision of ICT integration within the institution. All our units of study were related to the Academic Vice-Rectory, which implied that they were in a strategic position to promote their vision. Indeed, they were all in an arena in which they could obtain support and gain a reputation that would allow them to achieve ICT integration. However, we found that followers of these units (academic staff who were enthusiastic about and engaged in ICT integration) encountered resistance from their own colleagues.

Equally, we found that levels of support for the ICT policy plan from academic staff tended not to be high among our case studies. From the staff surveyed, only in Case 2 we were able to find majority acceptance (56%), in contrast to the other cases in which favorable attitudes were held by less than 50%. In all the cases, a common feature of the practice of these leaders was a permanent struggle in the implementation of a formulated plan. For instance, promoting a shared vision also implied that leaders and their teams dealt with reluctant academic staff as part of policy-making. As claimed by one of the teams, the strong beliefs held by such staff concerning technology were a major struggle. Some of these staff members perceived the policy-making as «top-down» and «informative» (in a prescriptive sense), despite interviews with leaders mentioning a participatory process.

3.2.2. Encouraging educational change: Struggles in developing staff

As the literature states, technology leadership has to do with broader functions than technical support alone. Curriculum management and fostering educational change should be part of such an endeavor (Tondeur, Van-Keer, Van-Braak & Valcke, 2008). In our case studies, teams at each university had to struggle not only with implementing an ICT policy plan, but also trying to create conditions for innovation and educational change at different levels.

A common struggle in all the cases concerned time and this was expressed in relation to various aspects: time for academic staff training to develop ICT skills; time for academic staff to implement innovations in their courses; time for members of the unit to attain defined goals. This kind of struggle is relatively straightforward and is connected to a financial issue that intersects all ICT policies. In one of our cases the main achievements was that team members and academic staff were given time for ICT training and support activities on ICTs. However, cross-case analysis showed that this could be explained as an overlapping of different policies. Indeed, in this case, the allocation of time was possible because an administrative policy regarding funding for staff could be approved (one of the members of the team was also a member of the Administrative Council which defined the ICT policy).

As the leader mentioned, one of the most important factors in an ICT policy is the concrete allocation of time for team members and academic staff to engage with related practices, rather than a short allocation for ICT integration. As we expected, even engaged academic staff complain of lack of time when attempting to innovate: If you want to use all that (pedagogical and technological support from the ICT unit), it requires too much time. Setting up a whole on-line course, involves you spending a lot of time, a lot, a lot (Member of academic staff, Case 1)

3.2.3. Administrative regulations: Struggles in redesigning the organization

As stated above, leadership activity is a situated practice that is constrained and framed according to possibilities and institutional conditions. Among these conditions, we also mention institutional governance as a complex web of factors such as the legislative framework, policy funding, autonomy, and market regulations (OECD, 2003). In our cases, legislative and administrative regulations regarding the payment of staff, types of recruitment (staffing), and even educational models supported by ICT (e-learning, b-learning) exert a considerable influence on ICT leadership.

According to one of the team members, in on-line modalities there is a need to clarify several economic and academic issues. For instance, there are issues concerning the hiring of staff when implementing blended and e-learning programs: what is the rate and cost of time for an on-line member of academic staff , assuming that he/she will invest more time in the beginning of the course? Similarly, rewards for enthusiastic staff members have not yet been formalized; as one staff member stated, «Those of us who have invested time deserve a reward for that extra mile we give» (Member of academic staff, Case 2)

Quality assurance is another struggle for leaders and their teams in relation to the implementation of on-line and blended modalities. One of the leaders in Case 3 described the struggle with the Administrative Board of the institution, which demanded that on-line courses have the same number of students (40) as regular classroom courses. The leaders in this case instead defended the idea of a maximum of 30 students per course because when that number is increased «It doesn´t stimulate interaction or social knowledge construction».

4. Discussion and conclusions

In order to answer the research question, this paper has demonstrated how challenging ICT leadership is in a higher education context. To accomplish that goal, we have studied this phenomenon from a distributed leadership approach, as we consider it a powerful framework for analyzing the nature of such activity in a little-explored field. We found that formulating an ICT policy plan and establishing an ICT unit are preconditions to fostering innovation with ICTs in higher education. However, our analysis shows that further attention must be paid to policy making, steering educational change in academic staff, and dealing with administrative regulations. All these aspects constrain and frame ICT leadership practices. Concretely, using the three categories of ICT leadership (setting direction, staff development, redesign of the organization) it is possible to mention the relevance of this study for different roles involved.

For policy-makers and decision-makers at educational institutions this paper reveals the necessity of promoting ICT units envisioning them beyond IT support functions. As a matter of fact, setting direction implies not only an ICT policy plan but also a team in charge of its enactment, two prior conditions that we highlight from our initial findings.

Consequently, ICT units have a great responsibility and actually are key mediators for educational change, for instance, promoting new teaching practices as part of staff development. However, such activity leadership implies a permanent struggle with academic and even administrative staff. Indeed, educational change involves both pedagogical and administrative issues (legislative framework, policy funding, etc.) as a way to redesign the organization; any ICT unit should take this into consideration when enacting ICT policy plans.

For leaders and members of ICT units in higher education, these findings are relevant to understanding leadership as a matter of appropriate distribution of tasks depending on the ICT vision elaborated and the artifacts to hand (locally designed or received). ICT policy planning and policy-making are ongoing processes (Taylor, 1997) revealed in our cases through the persistent (and challenging) work of those teams when elaborating and redefining artifacts to increase possibilities of enacting an ICT policy plan.

Similarly, this study represents a contribution for education policy analysis in the Latin America context. Particularly the analysis of policy enactment in higher education deserves further research as we stated above, considering a deeper definition of ICT policy plans, i.e., a process more than a document to implement.

From this regional perspective, the methodological approach applied can be useful in increasing evidence based knowledge about ICT leadership in the region, since the cases illustrate the issues experienced by ICT teams that attempted to enact ICT policy plans. As literature shows, many countries in Latin America are formalizing ICT policy plans but few of them are incorporating systems for evaluating the enactment of those policies (Hinostroza & Labbé, 2011). In this regard, a possible limitation of the study is the focus on a particular region in Colombia with specific dynamics; further studies should analyze differences among regions, and even countries, on ICT policy planning. Another possible limitation is related the scope of this study on solely institutions with an ICT policy plan. Further studies should, therefore also analyze dynamics of ICT leadership when such a plan is absent.

Leadership practice and associated analytical categories have previously been conceived and tested through school-level research (Dexter, Anderson & Ronnkvist, 2002; Leithwood, Anderson & Wahlstrom, 2004; Leithwood & Jantzi, 2003, 2005; Zhao & Frank, 2003; Vanderlinde, 2010; 2013). Despite these contributions, this study outlines that when applying such framework in higher education, the high complexity of such environments deserves more attention from scholars.

Furthermore, we consider that ICT leadership in higher education should focus on different dimensions which are still under-explored, such as cultural and institutional issues. Indeed context as sociocultural situations shape differently leadership activity (Spillane, 2006). In the context of Latin America, where this study was carried out, research on ICT policy plans and leadership to enhance educational change should take this into consideration for further studies.

References

Bates, T. (2001). National Strategies for E-learning in Post-secondary Education and Training. Paris: UNESCO: International Institute for Educational Planning.

Bryman, A. (2004). Qualitative Research on Leadership: A Critical but Appreciative Review. The Leadership Quarterly, 15(6), 729-769. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2004.09.007

Copland, M.A. (2003). Leadership of Inquiry: Building and Sustaining Capacity for School Improvement. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 25(4), 375-395. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/01623737025004375

Dexter, S. (2011). School Technology Leadership: Artifacts in Systems of Practice. Journal of School Leadership, 21.

Dexter, S., Anderson, R.E., & Ronnkvist, A. (2002). Quality Technology Support: What is it? Who has it? And What Difference does it Make? Journal of Educational Computing Research, 26, 287-307.

Fishman, B.J., & Zhang, B.H. (2003). Planning for Technology: The Link between Intentions and Use. Educational Technology, 43, 14-18.

Gronn, P. (2002). Distributed Leadership as a Unit of Analysis. The Leadership Quarterly, 13(4), 423-451. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1048-9843(02)00120-0

Gulbahar, Y. (2007). Technology Planning: A Road Map to Successful Technology Integration in Schools. Computers and Education, 49, 943-956.

Hew, K., & Brush, T. (2007). Integrating Technology into K-12 Teaching and Learning: Current Knowledge Gaps and Recommendations for Future Research. Educational Technology Research & Development, 55, 223-252. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11423-006-9022-5

Hinostrosa, J., & Labbé, C. (2011). Policies and Practices for the Use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) in Education in Latin America and the Caribbean. Chile: United Nations.

Leithwood, K., & Jantzi, D. (2005). Transformational leadership. In B. Davies (Ed.), The Essentials of School Leadership. (pp. 31-43). California: Sage.

Leithwood, K.A., Louis, K.S., Anderson, S., & Wahlstrom, K. (2004). How Leadership Influences Student Learning: A Review of Research for the Learning from Leadership Project. New York.

Leontiev, A.N. (1981). Problems of the Development of Mind. Moscow: Progress Publishers.

McLeod, S., & Richardson, J.W. (2011). The Dearth of Technology Leadership Coverage. Journal of School Leadership, 21(2), 216-240.

Mumford, M.D., & Van-Doorn, J.R. (2001). The Leadership of Pragmatism: Reconsidering Franklin in the Age of Charisma. The Leadership Quarterly, 12(3), 279-309. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1048-9843(01)00080-7

OECD. (2003). Changing Patterns of Governance in Higher Education. In OECD (Ed.), Education Policy Analysis. OECD.

Osorio, L., Cifuentes, G., & Rey, G. (2011). ICT Incorporation in Higher Education: E-maturity in the PlanEsTIC Project. In Uniandes (Ed.), Educación para el siglo XXI: Aportes del Centro de Investigación y Formación en Educación (Vol. 2).

Parry, K., & Bryman, A. (2006). Leadership in Organizations. In Sage (Ed.), The Sage Handbook of Organization Studies.

Pea, R.D. (1993). Practices of Distributed Intelligence and Designs for Education. In G. Salomon (Ed.), Distributed Cognitions. (pp. 47-87). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Spillane, J.,P. (2006). Distributed Leadership. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.

Taylor, S. (1997). Critical Policy Analysis: Exploring Context, Texts and Consequences. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 18(1), 23-35. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0159630970180102

Tondeur, J., Van-Keer, H., Van-Braak, J., & Valcke, M. (2008). ICT Integration in the Classroom: Challenging the Potential of a School Policy. Computers & Education, 51(1), 212-223. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2007.05.003).

Van-Ameijde, J.D.J., Nelson, P.C., Billsberry, J., & Van-Meurs, N. (2009). Improving Leadership in Higher Education Institutions: A Distributed Perspective. Higher Education: The International Journal of Higher Education and Educational Planning, 58(6), 763-779. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10734-009-9224-y

Vanderlinde, R., & Van-Braak, J. (2010). Implementing an ICT Curriculum in a Decentralised Policy Context: Description of ICT Practices in three Flemish Primary Schools. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(6), 139-141.

Vanderlinde, R., & Van-Braak, J. (2013). Technology Planning in Schools: An Integrated Research Based Model. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(1), 14-17. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2012.01321.x).

Vanderlinde, R., Van-Braak, J., & Dexter, S. (2012). ICT Policy Planning in a Context of Curriculum Reform: Disentanglement of ICT Policy Domains and Artifacts. Computers & Education, 58(4).

Wang, Q., & Woo, H.L. (2007). Systematic Planning for ICT Integration in Topic Learning. Educational Technology & Society, 10(1), 148-156.

Wertsch, J. (1991). Voices of the Mind: A Sociocultural Approach to Mediated Action. London: Harvester Wheatsheaf.

Yin, R. (2003). Case Study Research: Design and Methods. California: SAGE.

Zhao, Y., & Frank, K.A. (2003). Factors Afecting Technology Uses in Schools: An Ecological Perspective. American Educational Research Journal, 40, 807-840.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En este artículo analizamos la integración de las TIC en instituciones de educación superior. Nos centramos en las prácticas de liderazgo en políticas sobre TIC, un campo de investigación que no ha recibido mucha atención en los estudios sobre educación superior. Usando un enfoque de liderazgo distribuido se analizó dicha práctica en instituciones de educación superior en Colombia, un país donde una política de incorporación de las TIC llevó a promover la elaboración de planes estratégicos en dichas instituciones. En particular, la investigación buscó entender cómo el liderazgo de las TIC es distribuido en diferentes ambientes de educación superior. A partir de un estudio de caso múltiple que incluyó entrevistas semiestructuradas con líderes y miembros de equipos, grupos focales con profesores, análisis documental y una encuesta aplicada a profesores, fueron investigadas las prácticas de liderazgo de las TIC y sus implicaciones. Los resultados indican un conjunto de tensiones que los líderes deben enfrentar cuando incorporan un plan estratégico de TIC, por ejemplo, la ausencia de regulaciones institucionales o la necesidad de promocionar el cambio educativo a pesar de las resistencias. De hecho, el liderazgo de las TIC es una práctica retadora y aún poco explorada en educación superior. Este artículo es un intento sistemático por demostrar este enunciado y sus implicaciones. Estos hallazgos son de particular relevancia para el trabajo de los diseñadores de políticas, coordinadores de TIC y líderes en educación superior de todo el mundo.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

En el campo de integración de las TIC en educación, una de las corrientes investigativas se enfoca en estudiar las condiciones que soportan el uso de las TIC para la enseñanza y el aprendizaje (Vanderlinde & Van-Braak, 2010). En esta corriente, una de las condiciones que solo recientemente ha recibido atención está situada a nivel organizacional, más específicamente en lo que se denomina como la planificación de las políticas TIC, la cual se refiere a «tener una visión compartida sobre la integración tecnológica y un plan estratégico en TIC» (Hew & Brush, 2007). El supuesto general y acuerdo común en la literatura es que los planes estratégicos en TIC aumentan el éxito en la integración de las TIC en contextos educativos (Bates, 2001; Wang & Woo, 2007; Gulbahar, 2007). A nivel nacional, distrital o institucional, los planes estratégicos en TIC son concebidos como un modelo que refleja cómo será la educación a través del uso de las TIC (Fishman & Zhang, 2003). Más aún, dichos planes estratégicos en TIC delinean objetivos de aprendizaje para el uso de las mismas, haciendo de este proceso un recurso estratégico y potencialmente un direccionador del cambio educativo (Vanderlinde, Van-Braak & Dexter, 2012).

En este trabajo indagamos sobre cómo el liderazgo de las TIC es distribuido en diferentes ambientes en educación superior, resaltando el tipo de problemas que emergen en tal actividad. Como sostenemos en la siguiente sección, el análisis del liderazgo de las TIC, desde un enfoque de liderazgo distribuido, es una perspectiva apropiada desde la cual se puede estudiar la naturaleza desafiante del liderazgo de las TIC en educación superior. Para entender cómo el liderazgo se manifiesta en las instituciones de educación superior –IES en adelante– en las cuales se ponen en práctica los planes estratégicos en TIC, usaremos una perspectiva de liderazgo distribuido como marco teórico principal. Comparado con perspectivas tradicionales, este enfoque asume el liderazgo como difuso y disperso en las organizaciones (Parry & Bryman, 2006). En vez de centrarse exclusivamente en los líderes designados y sus rasgos intrínsecos, el análisis se enfoca en las prácticas de liderazgo y sus efectos.

Spillane (2006) desarrolla la noción de liderazgo distribuido en contraste con la concepción tradicional de un líder carismático, que desarrolla tareas en una organización sobre la base de cualidades individuales. Por consiguiente, la unidad de análisis debería ser la actividad de liderazgo (no el individuo) distribuida en la interacción entre el líder y sus seguidores en medio de situaciones. Spillane no fue el primero en desarrollar la idea de una práctica de liderazgo distribuida como unidad de análisis (Gronn, 2002; Copland, 2003). Sin embargo, este autor ofrece una perspectiva más consistente y alineada con teorías del aprendizaje como el de la teoría de la actividad (Leontiev, 1981; Wertsch, 1991) y la cognición distribuida (Pea, 1993).

En consecuencia, esta teoría asume que los seguidores no son individuos separados de la práctica de los líderes, en la medida en que hay una distribución social de las tareas. Tal interdependencia entre líderes, seguidores y sus situaciones implica que la actividad de liderazgo no puede ser emprendida solamente por uno de ellos; en cambio, cada uno es condición previa para el análisis de la actividad en su totalidad. Spillane (2006) enfatiza el rol de los actores en una situación socio-cultural en la que trabajan con artefactos, los cuales representan vehículos para el pensamiento. Estos artefactos no son solo recursos para lograr eficiencia sino que ellos también transforman la naturaleza de la actividad de liderazgo. De acuerdo con Spillane las herramientas, rutinas y estructuras ponen en práctica estos artefactos, siendo definidos y redefinidos por la actividad de liderazgo (Spillane, 2006). En nuestro análisis la idea de política como herramientas, rutinas y estructuras es relevante en la medida en que asumimos los planes estratégicos en TIC como artefactos (Vanderlinde, Van-Braak & Dexter, 2012).

El trabajo de Spillane ha fundamentado una perspectiva reciente que enfatiza la necesidad en las instituciones de tener líderes que guíen y apoyen estos artefactos a través de una aproximación distribuida. Liderazgo tecnológico o liderazgo de las TIC representa este proceso de guía y apoyo en contextos educativos (Dexter, 2011). Como lo mencionan McLeod y Richardson (2011), es muy poca la investigación desarrollada sobre el liderazgo tecnológico en general, a pesar del interés reciente por estudiar el rol clave que tienen los líderes en instituciones educativas para promover la innovación. Aunque algunas investigaciones demuestran la complejidad del liderazgo tecnológico –resaltando la relevancia de factores individuales e institucionales al direccionar la integración de las TIC– ha habido una brecha en dichos estudios al tratar de comprender cómo los líderes de la tecnología deberían desempeñar esta tarea (Dexter, 2011).

Investigaciones previas han identificado factores asociados con el liderazgo efectivo, definiendo tres categorías generales de las prácticas de liderazgo: direccionamiento, desarrollo del personal y rediseño de la organización (Leithwood, Anderson & Wahlstrom, 2004; Leithwood & Jantzi, 2003, 2005). Estas categorías también han sido aplicadas a la práctica de liderazgo de las TIC, centrándose en: 1) La visión de las TIC en la institución, 2) La promoción del desarrollo profesoral con TIC y el apoyo instruccional, y finalmente, 3) La provisión de acceso a las TIC y apoyo técnico, políticas de apoyo y otras condiciones (Dexter, Anderson & Ronnkvist, 2002; Zhao & Frank, 2003).

Se ha resaltado una ausencia en la literatura cuando se investiga el liderazgo de las TIC en educación superior (Van-Ameijde, Nelson, Billsberry & Van-Meurs, 2009). Por consiguiente, para alinearse con estos estudios y recomendaciones, proponemos estudiar cómo es distribuido el liderazgo de las TIC en diferentes ambientes en educación superior. Para ello nos enfocaremos en la práctica del liderazgo, prestando atención a los artefactos y las situaciones que deberían ser consideradas en este contexto aún poco explorado de la educación superior.

2. Diseño metodológico de la investigación

Este estudio fue situado en Colombia, en donde se llevó a cabo una política nacional de incorporación de las TIC desde 2007, con el propósito de elaborar lineamientos para la formulación e implementación de planes estratégicos de uso de las TIC en instituciones de educación superior. A través de este programa, denominado PlanEsTIC, más de 100 instituciones de educación superior a lo largo del país fueron incentivadas a elaborar, implementar y evaluar su propio plan (Osorio, Cifuentes & Rey, 2011). Aunque este proyecto no era la única iniciativa desde el gobierno, comparada con otras regiones en Latinoamérica este programa desarrolló una política nacional de TIC orientada desde la planeación estratégica. Por tanto, consideramos que este es un caso relevante para incrementar el conocimiento acerca del liderazgo de las TIC. Como lo plantean Hinostroza y Labbé: «Desde una perspectiva regional, la introducción y uso de las TIC en educación en Latinoamérica no es diferente del resto del mundo. Donde la región difiere de muchos países desarrollados es en que hay muy poca evidencia acerca de las características de las políticas y el grado en el que ellas están siendo implementadas» (Hinostroza & Labbé, 2011: 12).

Según los lineamientos de PlanEsTIC, un equipo en cada Instituto (IES) fue seleccionado y guiado durante el proceso desde una coordinación nacional, creando condiciones de liderazgo para formular los planes individuales. Nuestra investigación empieza con una etapa exploratoria en una de las siete regiones en la cual PlanEsTIC fue desarrollada, enfocándose en siete instituciones de la región seleccionada. En cada institución, el líder y los miembros del equipo fueron contactados para una entrevista inicial. Era importante seleccionar IES que cumplieran con dos condiciones: contar con un plan estratégico de las TIC y contar con una unidad TIC establecida. Esencialmente, estas unidades de apoyo son equipos encargados de la integración tecnológica en diferentes áreas dentro de una institución. Aunque muchos IES alrededor del mundo cuentan con un equipo encargado del soporte tecnológico, buscábamos unidades que cumplieran con uno de los lineamientos de PlanEsTIC, esto es, que incluyeran al menos tres roles diferentes: uno tecnológico, uno pedagógico y uno de planeación o financiero.

Tras de la implementación de PlanEsTIC, todas estas instituciones debían contar con sus planes y equipos establecidos, sin embargo quisimos explorar inicialmente si estos planes estaban explícitamente formulados y sus equipos aún en funcionamiento. Tras un contacto inicial, solo tres instituciones tenían condiciones apropiadas para estudiar el liderazgo de las TIC en relación con el desarrollo de un plan estratégico de TIC. La figura 1 muestra la estructura y composición de los casos seleccionados después de la etapa exploratoria.


Draft Content 102123482-36825 ov-es070.jpg

Para responder a la pregunta de investigación, fue desarrollado un diseño de método mixto con tres casos de estudio. Específicamente, en estudios organizacionales, se considera hoy día que aproximaciones cualitativas son de particular relevancia para analizar el rol de los líderes y sus seguidores (Mumford & Van-Doorn, 2001). Los estudios de caso son especialmente explicativos sobre los procesos de liderazgo (Bryman, 2004). Varios instrumentos se aplicaron en cada institución para explorar las prácticas de liderazgo, teniendo presente que no solo el equipo sino los profesores eran esenciales en el análisis situado de dicha práctica. En nuestro estudio, se contactó con profesores entusiastas y resistentes al uso de las TIC, y se desarrolló un grupo focal para cubrir problemáticas relacionadas con la estrategia general para integrar las TIC en la institución, así como también para indagar sobre su experiencia docente apoyada por la unidad TIC. Tras estas aproximaciones iniciales, se aplicó una encuesta en cada institución para medir la percepción inicial del profesorado con relación a la estrategia de integración de las TIC, así como los logros y fallas de tal estrategia. La tabla 1 muestra el número y tipo de métodos aplicados en cada IES.

El análisis documental también formó parte del diseño metodológico. Los documentos fueron predominantemente planes estratégicos de TIC, documentos oficiales (tales como aquellos relacionados con la fundación de las unidades) actas de reuniones, y diversos archivos de Excel que contenían los planes estratégicos de las unidades e instituciones. Todas las entrevistas estructuradas, semiestructuradas y los grupos focales fueron transcritos y codificados. Para el análisis cualitativo, se utilizó el programa Atlas.ti. Los códigos fueron asignados a secciones de cada transcripción.

Usamos dos clusters de códigos. El primer grupo estaba relacionado con herramientas, rutinas y estructuras. El segundo con prácticas de liderazgo, incluyendo el direccionamiento, desarrollo del personal y rediseño de la organización. Cuando se completó toda la codificación, se utilizó el programa Atlas.ti 7 para captar todos los segmentos de texto dentro de un código específico. Estos reportes (Yin, 2003) fueron útiles para obtener temas principales que emergieron de los datos cualitativos. Para la encuesta, se analizaron datos descriptivos. Debido a la naturaleza del problema y la pregunta de investigación, se encontró irrelevante comparar o establecer generalizaciones estadísticas entre IES. Por consiguiente, la encuesta fue empleada para complementar el entendimiento sobre las creencias y actitudes entre el profesorado en cada institución.

El diseño de la investigación fue estructurado bajo un enfoque de estudio de caso (Yin, 2003). Consideramos que estos casos representaron una buena oportunidad para analizar el liderazgo de las TIC bajo condiciones particulares. Un primer análisis vertical permitió la comprensión de cada caso usando los reportes obtenidos de Atlas.ti 7, y posteriormente fue aplicado un análisis de casos cruzados. Como criterio de calidad del diseño de investigación, se buscó la generalización analítica: la teoría, desarrollada previamente, fue utilizada como referente para comparar los resultados empíricos (Yin, 2003).

3. Análisis y resultados

Los resultados iniciales de la fase exploratoria mostraron que instituciones sin un equipo establecido o un plan estratégico en TIC tendían a enfrentar dos tipos de problemas. Primero, cuando un plan existe pero no hay una unidad a cargo del mismo, los esfuerzos son poco significativos; y segundo, cuando una unidad TIC es asignada pero no hay un plan explícito para integrar tecnología en procesos educativos, se carece de una visión, los esfuerzos no pueden ser orientados, y las estrategias y actividades no pueden ser evaluadas a largo plazo. Basados en este análisis inicial, seleccionamos tres casos que cumplieran con las condiciones mencionadas anteriormente (un plan estratégico en TIC explícito y una unidad TIC establecida). Como lo señalamos inicialmente, el liderazgo de las TIC es una práctica desafiante e inexplorada en educación superior. Para defender este argumento y responder la pregunta referida a cómo el liderazgo de las TIC es distribuido en diferentes escenarios de educación superior, estructuramos nuestros hallazgos en tres secciones.

Primero, describimos la naturaleza de estas unidades (estructura, funciones, etc.) y situamos el rol de artefactos a través de un análisis vertical de cada contexto. Segundo, por medio de un análisis cruzado de casos, estudiamos la actividad de liderazgo en estos contextos, usando como lente de análisis las tres categorías que la componen (direccionamiento, promoción del desarrollo profesoral y rediseño del trabajo organizacional) traducido a contextos de liderazgo de las TIC. Finalmente, discutimos la naturaleza desafiante de la práctica del liderazgo de las TIC en educación superior considerando ciertas implicaciones para estos escenarios.

3.1. Creación y estructura de cada unidad (análisis de cada caso)

Empezamos por analizar en cada contexto la interdependencia de líderes y seguidores en situaciones institucionales en las que ellos ponían en práctica el plan estratégico de TIC por medio de herramientas, rutinas y estructuras (artefactos). Dado que nuestro punto de partida es una definición profunda de los planes estratégicos de TIC, prestamos atención no solo a la documentación oficial sino también al proceso de poner en práctica el plan al interior de la organización. Como será descrito más adelante, las unidades fueron nombradas para ejecutar un plan estratégico en cada institución. Sin embargo, fueron diversas las condiciones para iniciar dicha labor en función de las estructuras institucionales y organizacionales, es decir, diferentes situaciones socio-culturales (Spillane, 2006).


Draft Content 102123482-36825 ov-es071.jpg

3.1.1. Caso 1

En el caso 1, el Consejo Superior de la Universidad creó la unidad en el año 2008. En ese tiempo, el Ministerio de Educación estuvo a cargo de un proyecto nacional dando soporte pedagógico a un conjunto de universidades para que implementaran una metodología de elaboración de un programa en modalidad virtual. Desde el momento en que la universidad formó parte de este proyecto, la unidad TIC fue nombrada para participar; el líder elegido vio una oportunidad para crear un equipo más grande en la institución con el fin de elaborar una política sobre las TIC participativa (incluyendo profesores y estudiantes). Por ello, fue formulada y avalada por el Consejo Superior una política institucional en TIC en el mismo año. Esta política participativa (bottom-up) documentaba necesidades, actividades y actores a cargo; de igual manera, se diseñaron indicadores para el logro de cada actividad. De acuerdo con el líder, ese artefacto fue un intento inicial por establecer el liderazgo de las TIC, pero aún había una necesidad de contar con una estrategia más precisa.

Por consiguiente, el equipo elaboró otro artefacto, denominado «Estrategia virtual», que hasta cierto punto operacionalizaba la política TIC. Este artefacto era una estrategia general que planteaba principios, una metodología, así como la forma en que la unidad liderara el proceso de integración de las TIC en la institución. El proceso de elaboración de este artefacto fue construido desde una perspectiva distribuida, lo que significaba que las tareas eran diseminadas entre el equipo; incluso el diseño gráfico (una de las áreas en la unidad) fue cuidadosamente considerado para diseñar un artefacto atractivo y claro –la estrategia virtual– potencialmente conocida por cada miembro de la comunidad educativa. Mejorando la versión previa de la política TIC, este artefacto definió un modelo pedagógico (inspirado en modelos internacionales), el rol de los docentes y estudiantes en ambientes virtuales de aprendizaje, y estándares de calidad.

3.1.2. Caso 2

La fundación de la Unidad TIC en este caso fue precedida por un proceso de reflexión institucional sobre las necesidades y oportunidades en el uso de las TIC para la enseñanza y el aprendizaje. Dicho proceso se inició 12 años antes y la unidad fue uno de sus resultados. Fundada en ese entonces, la unidad estuvo a cargo del diseño de contenidos digitales y de ambientes virtuales de aprendizaje. De hecho, PlanEsTIC fue un artefacto externo posterior que fue precedido por un proceso institucional de elaboración de política y de liderazgo de las TIC que empezó en 2007. En aquel momento, la unidad TIC lideró a un grupo de profesores y a un grupo de investigación (sobre informática educativa) para llevar a cabo un proyecto sobre integración de las TIC para el apoyo al personal académico. El Consejo Superior de la Universidad avaló este proyecto, relacionándolo con el plan estratégico institucional. Al año siguiente la unidad empezó a desarrollar el proyecto a través de seis estrategias, incluyendo un diagnóstico general sobre diferentes dimensiones de la integración de las TIC. Al final del año, PlanEsTIC se empezó a desarrollar como artefacto externo, siendo provechoso en la medida en que permitió elaborar un primer borrador del plan estratégico en TIC (2009) así como a beneficiarse de todo el «know-how» proveniente del Ministerio de Educación.

Sin embargo, como lo mencionó el líder en la entrevista, esta política externa no fue suficiente para desarrollar formalmente una política TIC en la institución. A pesar del conocimiento transferido y el aprendizaje organizacional adquirido, otro tipo de liderazgo fue necesario más allá del plan elaborado. Tres años después, en 2012, un nuevo plan estratégico en TIC fue finalmente avalado y el Consejo Superior aprobó el documento pero solo tras un largo y desafiante proceso de elaboración de política. Cinco líneas estratégicas se describen en este artefacto: difusión de las TIC, formación pedagógica, acompañamiento pedagógico, monitoreo y evaluación e infraestructura. La estrategia general asignó un líder para cada una de estas líneas estratégicas (nuestro líder entrevistado estaba a cargo de una de ellas). Un efecto positivo de esta estrategia es que, entre los docentes encuestados, el 80% estaba enterado de la estrategia de formación en TIC en la institución. De igual forma, el 58% de los encuestados consideraba que la institución ofrecía condiciones apropiadas a los docentes para innovar con TIC.

3.1.3. Caso 3

Cuatro etapas son descritas en la documentación histórica de la unidad TIC en este caso. La primera etapa empezó en 2003, con un proceso previo de formación pedagógica y una campaña de difusión de las TIC, la cual incluyó la participación del rector, el profesorado y personal administrativo. Al siguiente año la unidad fue fundada y una segunda etapa consistió en la elaboración formal de diversas estrategias -artefactos localmente diseñados- por parte de esta unidad. Dichas estrategias incluían aspectos de investigación, comunicación, servicios de extensión, y enseñanza y aprendizaje. Como pudimos analizar en nuestros reportes de estudio de caso, cada uno de estos artefactos estaba compuesto por diferentes proyectos representando tareas a poner en práctica. Por ejemplo, una de las líneas estratégicas (enseñanza y aprendizaje) condujo a un primer programa de formación de docentes que más tarde se convirtió en un programa consolidado y renombrado incluso fuera de la institución, relacionado con una estrategia de formación en TIC para el desarrollo profesional docente. Una tercera etapa de la unidad TIC consolidó líneas estratégicas dentro de la universidad a través de la producción de cursos en modalidad «blended» en diferentes programas académicos. Adicionalmente, en esta etapa se estableció una conexión permanente con el Ministerio de Educación para desarrollar proyectos y acuerdos a través de servicios de extensión. La cuarta etapa (a la fecha) fue la consolidación del equipo actual, definiendo áreas de experticia tales como pedagogía, evaluación de la calidad, sistema de apoyo, gestión financiera y mercadeo del e-learning, y diseño y desarrollo.

Comparado con otros casos, una característica importante en esta unidad TIC es la práctica de «liderazgo compartido». Ello significa que desde 2006, el director nombrado ha compartido la coordinación de la unidad con otro miembro del equipo, distribuyendo responsabilidades administrativas y de gestión para consolidar el proceso de toma de decisiones. La unidad ha continuado igualmente estableciendo proyectos con el Ministerio de Educación; los líderes mencionan que la calidad de la unidad se debe al nivel de compromiso y a un «estilo de alta presión» que ellos suelen enfrentar cuando emiten reportes y resultados detallados al Ministerio. A pesar de este desempeño positivo fuera de la institución, los líderes declaran que la oposición a la estrategia general por parte del profesorado y otras unidades dentro de la institución es una fuente común de tensión.

3.2. ¿Cómo es distribuido el liderazgo de las TIC en la organización?

En esta sección describimos hallazgos a partir de un análisis de casos cruzados. Nos enfocamos en cada una de las categorías de la práctica del liderazgo aplicado a contextos donde se lideran las TIC, a saber, direccionamiento, desarrollo del personal y rediseño de la organización (Dexter, 2011). Teniendo presente tanto el análisis vertical como el horizontal, nuestros hallazgos nos llevan a leer las prácticas como un conjunto de tensiones que los líderes y sus equipos encuentran en cada institución.

3.2.1. Elaboración de la política: Tensiones en el direccionamiento

Como se mencionó más arriba, una definición profunda de la planificación estratégica de las TIC destaca el proceso de liderazgo en lugar del producto final (documento). Por consiguiente, prestamos atención a diferentes tipos de retos identificados al analizar la planificación estratégica de las TIC. Un desafío es el proceso de elaboración y el apoyo obtenido por parte de las directivas. Otro desafío está relacionado con lograr el convencimiento de jefes de departamentos, coordinadores, y, claramente, del profesorado sobre la relevancia del plan. Un tercer desafío es la búsqueda de una visión común en la integración de las TIC al interior de la institución. Todas nuestras unidades de estudio estaban vinculadas a la Vicerrectoría Académica, lo cual implicaba que se encontraban en una posición estratégica para promocionar su visión sobre las TIC. De hecho, todas las unidades TIC estaban en una contienda en la cual pudieran obtener apoyo y ganar reputación, integrando satisfactoriamente las TIC. Sin embargo, encontramos que los seguidores de estas unidades (profesores entusiasmados y motivados hacia la integración de las TIC) mostraban resistencia hacia sus propios colegas.

Igualmente, encontramos que el nivel de apoyo al plan estratégico de TIC desde el profesorado tendía a no ser muy alto en nuestros casos de estudio. De los docentes encuestados, solo en el caso 2 encontramos una aceptación mayor (56%), en comparación con los otros casos en los cuales las actitudes favorables correspondían a menos de un 50%. En todos los casos, una característica común en la práctica de estos líderes era una confrontación permanente para la implementación del plan formulado. Por ejemplo, promover una visión compartida también implicaba que los líderes y sus equipos lidiaran con profesores resistentes como parte del proceso de elaboración de la política. Como lo mencionó uno de los equipos, las fuertes creencias de los docentes en relación a la tecnología generaban una tensión importante. Algunos de estos profesores percibían la elaboración de la política como «top-down» e «informativa» (en un sentido prescriptivo), a pesar de que los líderes mencionaban un proceso participativo en las entrevistas.

3.2.2. Promoviendo el cambio educativo: Tensiones en el desarrollo docente

Como se recoge en la literatura, el liderazgo de la tecnología tiene que ver con funciones más amplias que el solo soporte tecnológico. La gestión del currículo y la promoción del cambio educativo deberían hacer parte de dicha labor (Tondeur, Van-Keer, Van-Braak & Valcke, 2008). En nuestros casos de estudio, los equipos en cada universidad no solo tenían que lidiar con la implementación del plan estratégico en TIC, sino también tratar de crear las condiciones para la innovación y el cambio educativo a diferentes niveles.

Una tensión permanente en todos los casos estaba relacionada con el tiempo, lo cual se expresaba desde varios aspectos: tiempo de formación de docentes para desarrollar destrezas con TIC; tiempo de los docentes para implementar innovaciones en sus cursos; tiempo de los miembros de la unidad TIC para el logro de los objetivos propuestos. Este tipo de tensión está directamente conectado a un asunto financiero que intersecciona todas las políticas en TIC. En uno de nuestros casos, el principal logro fue que tanto los miembros de la unidad como los docentes recibieron tiempo para formación y actividades de soporte en TIC. Sin embargo, el análisis cruzado de casos mostró que esto pudo haberse debido a una superposición de diferentes políticas. De hecho, en este caso, la disposición de tiempo fue posible porque una política administrativa relacionada con la financiación de personal pudo ser aprobada (uno de los miembros del equipo era también miembro del Consejo Administrativo que definió el plan estratégico en TIC).

Como lo mencionó el líder, uno de los factores más importantes en un plan estratégico en TIC es la asignación concreta de tiempo para involucrar miembros del equipo y del profesorado, en vez de asignaciones limitadas para la integración de las TIC. Como se esperaba, incluso profesores entusiasmados se quejaban de la falta de tiempo cuando trataban de innovar: «Si usted quiere usar todo eso (soporte pedagógico y tecnológico desde la unidad TIC), requiere de mucho tiempo. Desarrollar todo un curso virtual le implica gastar mucho tiempo, mucho, mucho» (docente, caso 1).

3.2.3. Regulaciones administrativas: Tensiones en el rediseño de la organización

Como se recogió más arriba, la actividad de liderazgo es una práctica situada que está restringida y enmarcada según las posibilidades y condiciones institucionales. Dentro de estas condiciones, también nos referimos a la gobernanza institucional, entendida como una red compleja de factores tales como el marco legislativo, la política de financiación, la autonomía, y las regulaciones del mercado (OECD, 2003). En nuestros casos, las regulaciones legislativas y administrativas relacionadas con la remuneración salarial del profesorado, los tipos de contratación (de personal), e incluso los modelos pedagógicos apoyados en las TIC (e-learning, b-learning) ejercen una influencia considerable en el liderazgo de las TIC.

Según uno de los miembros de una unidad, en las modalidades virtuales existe la necesidad de clarificar varias problemáticas económicas y académicas. Por ejemplo, hay asuntos relacionados con la contratación de personal al momento de implementar programas blended o e-learning: cuál es la proporción y el costo de tiempo para un docente virtual, asumiendo que invertirá más tiempo al inicio de un curso. De igual forma, los incentivos para profesores entusiastas aún no han sido formalizados; como un docente expresó «Aquellos de nosotros que hemos invertido tiempo merecemos un reconocimiento por el esfuerzo que hacemos» (docente, caso 2).

El aseguramiento de la calidad es otra tensión para los líderes y sus equipos en relación con la implementación de modalidades virtuales y «blended». Uno de los líderes del caso 3 describió la confrontación que tuvo con la oficina administrativa de la institución, la cual demandaba que los cursos virtuales tuviesen el mismo número de estudiantes (40) que las clases presenciales. Los líderes en este caso defendían la idea de un máximo de 30 estudiantes por curso porque cuando dicho número aumenta «no se estimula la interacción o la construcción social del conocimiento».

4. Discusión y conclusión

Para responder a la pregunta de investigación, este escrito ha demostrado cuán desafiante es el liderazgo de las TIC en contextos de educación superior. Para lograr ese objetivo, hemos estudiado este fenómeno desde una perspectiva de liderazgo distribuido, en tanto lo consideramos un marco potente para analizar la naturaleza de tal actividad en un campo aún poco explorado. Encontramos que formular un plan estratégico en TIC y establecer una unidad TIC son precondiciones para promover la innovación con TIC en educación superior. Sin embargo, nuestro análisis muestra que debe prestarse atención adicional a la elaboración de la política, la dirección del cambio educativo en el profesorado, y lidiar con regulaciones administrativas. Todos estos aspectos restringen y enmarcan las prácticas del liderazgo de las TIC. Concretamente, usando las tres categorías del liderazgo de las TIC (direccionamiento, desarrollo del personal, rediseño de la organización) es posible mencionar la relevancia de este estudio para diferentes roles involucrados.

Para los diseñadores de política y tomadores de decisiones en las instituciones educativas, este escrito revela la necesidad de promocionar las unidades TIC concibiéndolas más allá de funciones de soporte tecnológico. En realidad, el direccionamiento implica no solo un plan estratégico en TIC sino también un equipo responsable de su puesta en práctica, dos condiciones prioritarias que resaltamos desde nuestros hallazgos iniciales.

En consecuencia, las unidades TIC tienen una gran responsabilidad y, de hecho, son mediadoras claves para el cambio educativo, por ejemplo, promocionando nuevas prácticas docentes como parte del desarrollo profesional. Sin embargo, tal actividad de liderazgo implica una tensión permanente con el personal académico e incluso administrativos. Por cierto, el cambio educativo involucra aspectos pedagógicos y administrativos –marco legislativo, políticas de financiación, etc.– como formas de rediseñar la organización; cualquier unidad TIC debería tener en cuenta esto al poner en práctica los planes estratégicos en TIC.

Para líderes y miembros de las unidades TIC en educación superior, estos hallazgos son relevantes para comprender el liderazgo como un asunto de distribución apropiada de tareas dependiendo de la visión de las TIC elaboradas y los artefactos que se tenga a disposición (localmente diseñados o recibidos). La planificación de la política TIC y la elaboración de la política son procesos permanentes (Taylor, 1997) que se evidenciaron en nuestros casos a través de un persistente (y desafiante) trabajo de esos equipos que elaboraban y redefinían artefactos, incrementando las posibilidades de poner en práctica el plan estratégico en TIC.

De igual forma, este estudio representa una contribución para el análisis de política educativa en el contexto Latinoamericano. Particularmente, el análisis de la puesta en práctica de la política en educación superior merece atención adicional como hemos planteado anteriormente, considerando una definición profunda de los planes estratégicos de incorporación de las TIC, esto es, como un proceso más que un documento para implementar.

Desde esta perspectiva regional, la aproximación metodológica aplicada puede ser útil para incrementar conocimiento basado en evidencia acerca del liderazgo de las TIC en la región, dado que los casos ilustran las problemáticas experimentadas por las unidades TIC que intentan poner en práctica estos planes estratégicos. Como muestra la literatura, muchos países en Latinoamérica están formalizando planes estratégicos en TIC pero pocos están incorporando sistemas de evaluación sobre la puesta en práctica de esas políticas (Hinostroza & Labbé, 2011). En este sentido, una posible limitación de este estudio es que se enfoca en una región particular en Colombia con dinámicas específicas; estudios posteriores deberían analizar diferencias entre regiones e incluso países en relación a los planes estratégicos de TIC. Otra posible limitación tiene que ver con el alcance que tenía este estudio al centrarse solamente en instituciones que tenían un plan estratégico en TIC. Otros estudios deberían también analizar las dinámicas del liderazgo de las TIC cuando dicho plan está ausente.

Las prácticas de liderazgo y categorías analíticas asociadas han sido previamente concebidas y probadas al nivel de investigación en educación básica (Dexter, Anderson & Ronnkvist, 2002; Leithwood, Anderson & Wahlstrom, 2004; Leithwood & Jantzi, 2003, 2005; Zhao & Frank, 2003; Vanderlinde, 2010; 2013). A pesar de estas contribuciones, este estudio determina que cuando se aplica dicho marco de análisis en educación superior, la alta complejidad de dicho entorno merece más atención por parte de los investigadores.

Más aún, consideramos que el liderazgo de las TIC en educación superior debería enfocarse en diferentes dimensiones aún inexploradas, tales como aspectos culturales e institucionales. De hecho, el contexto entendido como situaciones socioculturales, configura de manera diferente la actividad de liderazgo (Spillane, 2006). En el contexto latinoamericano, donde este estudio se llevó a cabo, los estudios sobre planes estratégicos en TIC y el liderazgo para incentivar el cambio educativo deberían considerar estos aspectos para futuros estudios.

Referencias

Bates, T. (2001). National Strategies for E-learning in Post-secondary Education and Training. Paris: UNESCO: International Institute for Educational Planning.

Bryman, A. (2004). Qualitative Research on Leadership: A Critical but Appreciative Review. The Leadership Quarterly, 15(6), 729-769. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2004.09.007

Copland, M.A. (2003). Leadership of Inquiry: Building and Sustaining Capacity for School Improvement. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 25(4), 375-395. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/01623737025004375

Dexter, S. (2011). School Technology Leadership: Artifacts in Systems of Practice. Journal of School Leadership, 21.

Dexter, S., Anderson, R.E., & Ronnkvist, A. (2002). Quality Technology Support: What is it? Who has it? And What Difference does it Make? Journal of Educational Computing Research, 26, 287-307.

Fishman, B.J., & Zhang, B.H. (2003). Planning for Technology: The Link between Intentions and Use. Educational Technology, 43, 14-18.

Gronn, P. (2002). Distributed Leadership as a Unit of Analysis. The Leadership Quarterly, 13(4), 423-451. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1048-9843(02)00120-0

Gulbahar, Y. (2007). Technology Planning: A Road Map to Successful Technology Integration in Schools. Computers and Education, 49, 943-956.

Hew, K., & Brush, T. (2007). Integrating Technology into K-12 Teaching and Learning: Current Knowledge Gaps and Recommendations for Future Research. Educational Technology Research & Development, 55, 223-252. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11423-006-9022-5

Hinostrosa, J., & Labbé, C. (2011). Policies and Practices for the Use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) in Education in Latin America and the Caribbean. Chile: United Nations.

Leithwood, K., & Jantzi, D. (2005). Transformational leadership. In B. Davies (Ed.), The Essentials of School Leadership. (pp. 31-43). California: Sage.

Leithwood, K.A., Louis, K.S., Anderson, S., & Wahlstrom, K. (2004). How Leadership Influences Student Learning: A Review of Research for the Learning from Leadership Project. New York.

Leontiev, A.N. (1981). Problems of the Development of Mind. Moscow: Progress Publishers.

McLeod, S., & Richardson, J.W. (2011). The Dearth of Technology Leadership Coverage. Journal of School Leadership, 21(2), 216-240.

Mumford, M.D., & Van-Doorn, J.R. (2001). The Leadership of Pragmatism: Reconsidering Franklin in the Age of Charisma. The Leadership Quarterly, 12(3), 279-309. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1048-9843(01)00080-7

OECD. (2003). Changing Patterns of Governance in Higher Education. In OECD (Ed.), Education Policy Analysis. OECD.

Osorio, L., Cifuentes, G., & Rey, G. (2011). ICT Incorporation in Higher Education: E-maturity in the PlanEsTIC Project. In Uniandes (Ed.), Educación para el siglo XXI: Aportes del Centro de Investigación y Formación en Educación (Vol. 2).

Parry, K., & Bryman, A. (2006). Leadership in Organizations. In Sage (Ed.), The Sage Handbook of Organization Studies.

Pea, R.D. (1993). Practices of Distributed Intelligence and Designs for Education. In G. Salomon (Ed.), Distributed Cognitions. (pp. 47-87). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Spillane, J.,P. (2006). Distributed Leadership. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.

Taylor, S. (1997). Critical Policy Analysis: Exploring Context, Texts and Consequences. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 18(1), 23-35. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0159630970180102

Tondeur, J., Van-Keer, H., Van-Braak, J., & Valcke, M. (2008). ICT Integration in the Classroom: Challenging the Potential of a School Policy. Computers & Education, 51(1), 212-223. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2007.05.003).

Van-Ameijde, J.D.J., Nelson, P.C., Billsberry, J., & Van-Meurs, N. (2009). Improving Leadership in Higher Education Institutions: A Distributed Perspective. Higher Education: The International Journal of Higher Education and Educational Planning, 58(6), 763-779. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10734-009-9224-y

Vanderlinde, R., & Van-Braak, J. (2010). Implementing an ICT Curriculum in a Decentralised Policy Context: Description of ICT Practices in three Flemish Primary Schools. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(6), 139-141.

Vanderlinde, R., & Van-Braak, J. (2013). Technology Planning in Schools: An Integrated Research Based Model. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(1), 14-17. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2012.01321.x).

Vanderlinde, R., Van-Braak, J., & Dexter, S. (2012). ICT Policy Planning in a Context of Curriculum Reform: Disentanglement of ICT Policy Domains and Artifacts. Computers & Education, 58(4).

Wang, Q., & Woo, H.L. (2007). Systematic Planning for ICT Integration in Topic Learning. Educational Technology & Society, 10(1), 148-156.

Wertsch, J. (1991). Voices of the Mind: A Sociocultural Approach to Mediated Action. London: Harvester Wheatsheaf.

Yin, R. (2003). Case Study Research: Design and Methods. California: SAGE.

Zhao, Y., & Frank, K.A. (2003). Factors Afecting Technology Uses in Schools: An Ecological Perspective. American Educational Research Journal, 40, 807-840.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/15
Accepted on 30/06/15
Submitted on 30/06/15

Volume 23, Issue 2, 2015
DOI: 10.3916/C45-2015-14
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 3
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?