Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

There is a currently ongoing discussion regarding the most effective methodologies for establishing collaborative virtual learning environments (VLEs) and the true contribution to student creativity and innovation in such environments, particularly in the corporate sphere. Educational social networks based on collaborative learning have grown exponentially in recent years, with countless networks now established in nearly all fields. However, stimulation of creativity among VLE users in general, and specifically in the corporate sphere, has become an important issue in educational research. Utilizing experiences of corporate distance learning (DE) in Brazil, the present paper proposes a means of evaluating the presence of creativity indicators among students in collaborative virtual teaching and learning environments. Case studies are used to compare a corporate VLE project that uses information and communication technologies (ICTs) under a creative and educommunicative approach with a project that uses ICTs under a traditional approach. The study was conducted in partnership with the consulting and e-learning company Perfectu. The results obtained suggest that the pedagogic model adopted and the manner in which ICTs are employed determine whether ICTs lead to innovative results, not the use of ICTs alone. The average level of creativity in the group that used the creative and educommunicative model was higher than that of the group that used the traditional paradigm.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

Societal complexity stemming from the confluence of new and diverse social actors and forces, together with the growing pervasiveness of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in all aspects of social life (Morin, 1996), has given rise to new questions about creativity and its development among DE students.

Distance learning (DL) is defined as «planned learning that normally occurs in a location different from the teaching location and demands special techniques of course design and instruction, communication via various technologies, and a special organizational and administrative disposition» (Moore & Kearsley, 2007: 87). Although DL inherently demands a creative approach to pedagogical resources, new technologies are often used within an outdated pedagogical paradigm.

The last several years have seen a proliferation of post-secondary corporate education programs, including complete courses and assignments in virtual learning environments (VLEs) in all fields in institutions of higher learning (Aguaded, Tirado & Hernando, 2011). Additionally, many interesting VLA experiences outside the traditional university and academic world are not described or adequately recognized by the research community (Martin-Barbero, 2002; Soares, 2011; Arnab & al., 2013).

While the first VLEs, based on Web 1.0, represented a giant step toward the integration of ICTs into the teaching and learning processes of higher education, their limitations in certain fundamental respects quickly became apparent (Hennessey & Dionigi, 2013). One such limitation concerns user interactivity, and another is the impossibility of communication with teaching staff who author VLE courses and with fellow students in order to work on assignments, share opinions and ideas, and undertake group assignments.

Web 2.0 (and Web 3.0) opened up many possibilities for collaborative work among staff, students, and other actors in the VLE teaching and learning process (Hennessey & Dionigi, 2013). Despite the great advance represented by the appearance of the educational Web 2.0, viewed by some authors as «a web revolution» (Jenkins, 2009; Aparici, 2010; Okada, 2011), teaching staff (coordinators, teachers, and content creators) began to worry about the extent to which the new VLEs were capable of stimulating creativity among students. A common mistake was to believe that the mere existence of Web 2.0 and 3.0 guaranteed creative teaching.

This is an ongoing concern that has led to new research into the stimulation of creativity among DE students through interactivity with VLEs and their potential use for collaboration among students and professors to solve problems through individual and group assignments (Palloff & Pratt, 2002; Okada, 2011). Current empirical research indicates the need for adequate training of DL professors and teachers (Donnelly & Boniface, 2013; Calma, 2013).

A new generation of internet users and DL students has arisen, one with a new profile and requiring a distinct kind of motivation (Palloff & Pratt, 2004; Levi, 2004; Baccega, 2009). Members of this generation do not wish to be mere passive consumers of content but rather active collaborators and creators of new knowledge (Bender, 2003) that is reciprocally discovered or constructed through the student-instructor/facilitator and student-student relationship, using all the resources now available in the digital realm (Triantafyllakos, Palaigeorgiou & Tsoukalas, 2010; Kenski, 2011).

This development suggests the need to furnish professionals responsible for producing and managing DL educational materials and technological interfaces (coordinators, writers, web designers, teachers, and facilitators) with a deep understanding of creativity: its epistemological roots, its manifestation in the educational environment, and ways to develop it among students in VLEs (Borroto, 2005; Calma, 2013).

It must also be emphasized that this process should not be viewed as an application to a virtual environment of traditional creativity techniques but rather as an effort to maintain a creative management model that also includes the application of creativity techniques to virtual environments (Chibás, 2012a). Another challenge that remains is the need for creative management of the entire VLE educational process with clear goals for innovative results that permit students to cultivate and develop their creative competencies and abilities.

It is thus appropriate to understand creativity as an energy (Torre, 2008) by which individual intelligence is augmented and multiplied through the use of new technologies in collaborative networks characterized by profound symbiosis and leading to the formation (individually or collectively) of new synergies, products, ideas, and relationships, among others.

A DL model or strategy that includes aspects of the formulation of the programme for UK English, course, or discipline, along with new content that takes advantage of the seemingly infinite possibilities that ICTs and the internet offer (Saad, 2003), must therefore be developed. The formation of such strategies involves decisions such as whether to use synchronous or asynchronous technologies and online or offline modes, among others. It is also necessary, in developing clear pedagogic goals, to work with a concept of multimedia and integrated communication (Kunsch, 2003) that allows for the integration of all forms of communication (both face-to-face and virtual) used during the process.

Distance learning could be understood as the application of a collection of educational strategies that combine methods and techniques as well as pedagogical, psychological, logistical, and technological resources. These strategies are placed at the students’ disposal, in order that they may use interactive, monitored self-learning to develop the necessary critical and creative competencies and abilities (Alterator & Deed, 2013).

The idea is to build new communicative ecosystems or spaces for student-staff coexistence (Martin-Barbero, 2002) that promote a new pedagogical relationship among student, staff, course content, and the technological devices used (computers, software, e-learning platform).

In this sense, in the corporate DL projects that we have implemented, it has been useful to implement the notion of a «pedagogic project». In this case, the Project Management Institute (PMI) approach was used to emphasize the importance of viewing each undertaking as a unique entity with a beginning, middle, and end (PMI, 2004).

Another concept that has helped us in the implementation of corporate DL courses is «creative educational management» (Chibás, 2012b). Creative educational management within networks is a means of administrating organizations with pedagogical functions and of implementing educational projects that emphasize a creative and communicative vision of the organization guided by a transdisciplinary approach. Its main goal is to promote the creativity of all participants in the educational process (students, staff, managers, parents, community, etc.) and to facilitate, through clear operational indicators, the presence and implementation of more up-to-date and flexible education management processes. Creative educational management means implementing, in an innovative way, flexible strategies that are adapted to the situation and context of the organization or educational project and applying the management of projects and the other administrative instruments noted above to the evaluation of courses and student performance indicators.

The educommunicative approach is an obvious possible avenue for implementation of creative educational management, starting with students’ critical appropriation of a course’s communication methods and the collective construction of the path to knowledge. A critical and dialogue-based vision based on both professor-student and student-student interactions allows for the control of the direction of a course to be truly shared between students and the professor. Figure 1 presents some of these relationships graphically.

Among the question the authors seek to answer are the following: How can VLA courses contribute to the development of creativity among students? What are plausible indicators of creativity that should be stimulated in students through collaborative VLEs? The authors also share their evaluations and experiences of research on creativity, research that has enabled them to identify a group of indicators that can be used to evaluate the extent to which a VLE stimulates student creativity.


Draft Content 811766290-29654-en034.jpg

The main objective of this research is to describe the effects on creativity of collaborative educational experiences in a virtual learning environment, where such experiences involved face-to-face methodologies implemented under principles of creative educational management and educommunication. This experience is compared with an experience in a similar environment in which these principles were not employed. The educational principles that contribute to the development of creativity in such an environment or collaborative communicative ecosystem are also reflected upon. It is emphasized that the results obtained do not depend upon the use of new technologies per se but on the manner in which the new technologies are used: the educational models, objectives pursued, and formative values that support the pedagogical-technological resources used. Perfectu, the company with which the research was carried out, is a consulting firm that specializes in DL and digital marketing. It is part of the multinational French-Spanish group, Global Strategies, which operates in 15 countries spanning four continents. The outreach, training, and courses offered by Perfectu on the internet and in a blended format are geared toward a corporate audience. The same courses that are offered on the internet for anyone to purchase from the Perfectu virtual store are also offered «in company», as courses for businesses. Courses are offered by Perfectu together with Brazilian and Spanish universities, and participants who complete the courses or disciplines obtain a double certification from Perfectu and from the associated university.

Creativity was evaluated using questionnaires and quantitative and qualitative indicators developed by Chibás (2006). The importance of a pedagogic-technological model that serves as the basis for a VLE and is reflected in the characteristics of course materials, learning objects, and an assignment system that includes creative tasks must be stressed. Some definitions of the fundamental concepts addressed in this paper are suggested.

2. Material and methods

The present paper is the first attempt to explore the issue in question. The general method employed is theoretical-empirical, wherein, dialectically, theory leads to practice, which subsequently leads back to theory. A quali-quantitative method is also employed, and quantitative and qualitative analysis is used to triangulate the results obtained through different research techniques (Lakatos, 2006). These methods were combined with a case study (Yin, 1989) in which the management style of a DL project with a pedagogical educommunicative vision was compared to the educational management of a DL project that also used new technologies but followed a traditional approach.

The research techniques used were a bibliographic and document review (physical and internet); Chibás’ system of qualitative and quantitative creativity questionnaires (sent by email, using Google and spaces in Perfectu’s web portal and its Moodle platform, as this was the e-learning company where we conducted our research); and participatory observation and in-depth interviews (Lakatos, 2006). The latter technique was applied to cases where an individual’s responses to the qualitative questionnaires were very detailed or when there was some confusion. MSN and Skype with a webcam were used to conduct interviews in some cases. After transcribing the interviews, a content analysis was conducted, in which information was classified into content categories. To gain a better understanding of their general work strategy, interviews were also conducted with Perfectu’s director, the coordinators of the course studied, and the principal managers.

In both the quantitative and qualitative questionnaire, the four basic parameters or indicators of creativity evaluated were originality, acceptance of challenges, creative problem solving, and flexibility.

For the quantitative creativity questionnaire, statistical analysis was conducted using ANOVA and Tukey’s test to determine whether significant differences existed between answers of the two groups, those who participated in the educommunicative (creative educational management) course and those who participated in the course that followed a traditional view of the use of new technologies in distance learning. The following table shows how answers were classified for the creativity parameters evaluated.

The research methodology used was validated by the Perfectu research committee composed of consultants, teachers, content creators, and professors from institutions of higher education such as the Complutense University of Madrid, the University of Barcelona, the University of Havana, the University of Sao Paulo, the Pontifical Catholic University of Sao Paulo, and the University Center of the Sao Paulo SENAC. A pilot application was conducted before the general application to correct for possible errors and make any necessary changes.


Draft Content 811766290-29654-en035.jpg

The sample consisted of 42 students who purchased the course on the internet. 21 of the students participated in the traditional course, whereas 21 participated in the course that followed the educommunicative and creative educational methodology.

The two groups received the same marketing materials and were informed that they were participating in a research project. The students from both groups were college graduates who sought to further their professional careers. Both virtual classrooms had the same gender distribution of 12 women (57.14%) and 9 men (42.85%). There were students from different states in Brazil, but the majority, 25 (59.52%) of 42, were from the southeast. Of the five foreign students (non-Brazilians), two were in the group that adopted the educommunicative-creative methodology, and three were in the traditional group. The predominant age range was between 29 and 37 years, which would classify them as younger adults.

2.1. Procedures

The results obtained for participants in two groups of virtual/in-person classes for a 120-hour blended course (mixing in-person and virtual classes) that used both e-learning and other non-internet activities were compared. The pedagogic activities offered were designed to balance online and offline time as well as synchronous and non-synchronous activities. The course was expanded to 120 hours at the request of the students of a previously successful 44-hour course.

Students invested roughly 4-6 hours per week in the course, which lasted six months. The course was offered on the Moodle platform of the Perfectu website, with one classroom using the traditional approach and the other using creative educational management implemented under the educommunicative approach. In the course selected for this research project, titled «Socially Responsible Marketing Management», participants were taught to manage socially responsible projects, using administrative and communication tools. Both classrooms had access to the same technological resources on the course website (e-book texts, videos, presentation rooms, a virtual library, a virtual blackboard or whiteboard, chat rooms, debate forums, individual mini-blogs, individual student email, direct contact with the teacher or facilitating instructor, MSN, Skype, Second Life software to work with avatars, etc.).

Course planning included three face-to-face meetings conducted between the teachers and those students who could attend. Students who could not attend participated via Skype, using a webcam. One meeting occurred at the beginning of the course, one in the middle, and one at the end.

Additionally, telephone communication took place when the instructor-facilitator or the Perfectu support team deemed it necessary because participating students had not entered the platform, and an email was sent to remind students about the activity calendar. Instructors specified days and times that they would be available online to clarify individual or collective questions through chat. Both classrooms or groups of students had a teaching team consisting of five people: a coordinator, two instructors, a content creator, and a support team member.


Draft Content 811766290-29654-en036.jpg

The classroom that offered the course outside the traditional and reactive DE pattern implemented creative educational management through the application of educommunication. Creative ecosystems were established based on the application of the following principles derived from the indicators previously described by Chibás (2012a):

• The main issues, bibliography, and form of course evaluation were negotiated in the first face-to-face work meeting between the teacher and students.

• From the beginning, the objective of forming a true learning community and creating affective links was established.

• In addition to the communication formats offered exclusively to students by the Moodle platform, the students decided to create two communication formats open to the public outside of the course (a blog and Facebook page). Here, students posted their work and gave each other feedback. This outlet offered students a way to «test» their ideas in the «world». These formats were fully administered by the students but monitored by the instructor-facilitator.

• At different times, the class reflected on how blog maintenance works and how to develop blog content.

• The teacher’s role was dialogic and not as the bearer of knowledge. The teacher was a mediator and facilitator of the process.

• The instructor-facilitator’s attitude was that of cautious explicit interest in learning about students’ daily worries and the ways in which course content was applied.

• Cooperation and a healthy interdependence were stimulated through collective assignments, which involved joint research and collaborative activities.

• Assignments with closed or multiple choice questions were avoided. Most assignments included open-ended questions.

• Creative techniques were used in various virtual meetings and in the second face-to-face group meetings. These techniques included brainstorming and the Six Thinking Hats method, among others. The course sought explicit ways of stimulating creativity, differing analyses and readings of reality, and novel structuring of the form and content of the formats created by the group.

• Assignments integrated collective and individual evaluation as well as auto-evaluation.

• The course promoted analysis of exemplary situations taken from real life that were relevant to the course themes. These analyses were promoted online via chat and offline via the debate forum.

• Participants were encouraged to analyze course content and the work method used.

• The instructor showed explicit interest in and commitment to student achievements.

• The instructor emphasized research and collective knowledge construction, making students responsible for their learning.


Draft Content 811766290-29654-en037.jpg

The other group followed the common DL course pattern and received technological resources and training under the same schedule but did not apply the principles described above. The students did not create communication formats open to the general public, instead only using those that already existed on the Moodle platform. The teacher maintained a more reactive and distant attitude and focused on course content. Assignments included 50% multiple choice and 50% open-ended or opinion questions. Most work was done individually, stimulating competition for individual grades, although the final project was undertaken by groups.

In addition to the factors involved in creativity, as evaluated with respect to students from both groups, the following variables were controlled for: student satisfaction index; course retention rate; index of the achievement of course objectives, according to professors, students, and course managers; and the concrete creativity results based on the quantity and quality of student assignments.

The limitations of this methodology could be derived from its complexity and the need for training the teachers or facilitating instructors.

The main question of the study is: What are the effects on student creativity of a course designed under an educommunicative-creative approach compared with the effects on a control group that had access to the same content and technology but from a traditional approach?

3. Results

Some of the principle quantitative and qualitative results are presented below:

• The DL course employing the traditional format was completed by 12 (57.14%) of the participants, whereas the course based on an educommunicative-creative approach had an 81.33% retention rate, with 17 students finishing the course.

• The index of course satisfaction among professors and students was analyzed, using an evaluation questionnaire given at the end of the course. The course that followed the educommunicative-creative methodology had a student satisfaction rating of 85.71% (18 students) and 100% staff satisfaction; the traditional DL course had a student satisfaction of merely 52.38% (11 students) and 60% staff satisfaction (three of five staff from the teaching team corresponding to each classroom).

• The course objective achievement index, according to staff, managers, and students, was also higher in the group that followed educommunicative-creative principles. For this group, 100% of professors (all five members of the instruction team) and 81.33% of the students (17) agreed that course objectives were achieved. In the more traditional classroom, 43.90% of students (11) and 40% of the management-teaching team (2) agreed that course objectives were met.

• Additionally, the concrete creativity results, that is, the quantity and quality of student assignments, was greater in the classroom that adopted the educommunicative-creative perspective, with 16 final assignments found to be highly creative by the course’s teacher-manager team (76.19%), based on the four indicators of creativity evaluation described above. The classroom that did not follow this approach produced eight final assignments (38.09%) that the teaching team considered creative.

These results were later corroborated in an interview conducted with course managers and coordinators. Below, we present the average creativity values obtained by both groups:

As can be seen in the table, for each factor of creativity evaluated among students at the end of the course, as well as for total creativity, the average was higher for the group that worked under the educommunicative-creative approach than for the group that used the traditional paradigm. Statistical analysis using ANOVA (2006) and Tukey’s Test (2006) showed that the values for creativity obtained for the two groups of students differed significantly (at the 0.01 significance level).


Draft Content 811766290-29654-en038.jpg

4. Discussion

The case presented allowed for a comparison between results obtained through creative educational management using the educommunication approach in a VLE and results obtained in a VLE in which the same course using the same technologies was administered but under different strategies and approaches. Significant differences favoring the VLE that applied an educommunicative-creative approach were found with respect to student and staff satisfaction indexes, the student course retention index, concrete creative results, and the achievement of course objectives (according to staff, managers, and students). It was also found that average values in the factors used to assess creativity were superior in the group that employed the educommunicative-creative networks approach.

This result corresponds to those obtained in a study conducted by Peppler and Solomou (2011), in which 5 participants in a collaborative 3D virtual learning environment (a social network) showed growth and extension of creativity, as measured by social and cultural characteristics, in online communities, due to the manner in which content was organized.

Our results also coincide with those of Hwang, Wu, and Chen (2012) in a more restricted sense, given that the sample with which they worked consisted of children that specifically used games as a collaborative-creative tool.

Based on the results obtained, it is suggested that successful VLE courses should be designed with a balance between multimedia activities and those that give preference to one kind of media; online and offline assignments; face-to-face and internet activities; and synchronous and asynchronous assignments.

It should be emphasized that the results obtained depend more on how these technologies are used, that is, on the educational models applied to each VLE, than on the mere use of these technologies.

A methodology with clear indicators was proposed and tested and can be used in other VLEs with different content. It can be concluded that current VLE management should be based on strategic planning complemented by project management.

It would be useful for future research to map both the diverse management models or paradigms that are currently being empirically applied in formal and informal DL educational environments and the creative strategies of managers, professors, and students.

A second phase would be the elaboration of more functional research-action instruments that perform these diagnostics quickly and thus contribute to the formation of professionals who are truly manager-educators, able to create educational projects in VLEs that have at their core the development of the individual through sensitivity, emotion, and creativity.

This would allow for the development of theoretical-practical knowledge of management models that can produce better results in educational networks and formal and informal VLEs. Additionally, the most effective management models, strategies, and tactics can be identified for each sector of corporate education, thus removing the principle barriers to communication and creative educational management.

References

Aguaded, J.I., Tirado, R. & Hernando, A. (2011). Campus virtuales en universidades andaluzas: tipologías de uso educativo, competencias docentes y apoyo institucional. Teoría de la Educación, 23, 159-179. (http://goo.gl/gvFqOK) (05-07-2013).

Alterator, S. & Deed, C. (2013). Teacher Adaptation to Open Learning Spaces. Issues in Educational Research, 23(3), 315-329 (http://goo.gl/mfkmIR).

Aparici, R. (Coord.) (2010). Educomunicación, más allá del 2.0. Madrid: Gedisa.

Arnab, S., Brownb, K., Clarke, S., Dunwell, I., Lim, T., Suttie, N., Louchart, S., Hendrix, M. & Freitas, S. (2013). The Development Approach of a Pedagogically-driven Serious Game to Support Relationship and Sex Education (RSE) within a Classroom Setting. Computers & Education, 69, 15-30. (http://goo.gl/UYv8gT).

Baccega, M. (2009). Campo Comunicação/Educação: mediador do processo de recepção. In M. Baccega &

Bender, W. (2003). Prefácio. SAAD, Beth. Estratégias 2.0 para a Mídia Digital (pp. 9-13). São Paulo: Senac.

Borroto, G. (2004). Un modelo para la autoeducación y la creatividad en la universidad cubana. Revista Enseñanza Universitaria, 24, 59-69. (http://goo.gl/1dmHru) (05-07-2013).

Calma, A. (2013). Preparing Tutors to Hit the Ground Running: Lessons from New Tutors’ Experiences. Issues in Educational Research, 23(3), 331-345 (http://goo.gl/fqNsT3).

Chibás, F. (2006). Evaluar la creatividad organizacional: uso combinado de cuestionarios cuantitativos y cualitativos. In V. Violant & S. De-la-Torre (Eds.), Comprender y evaluar la creatividad: cómo investigar y evaluar la creatividad 725-736. Málaga: Aljibe.

Chibás, F. (2012a). Creatividad + Dinámica de Grupo = Eureka. La Habana: Pueblo y Educación.

Chibás, F. (2012b). Educomunicação na gestão educacional criativa em projetos corporativos EAD: um estudo de caso. Hermes, 6, 77-97. (http://goo.gl/s4oLnF).

Costa, M. Estética da comunicação. In M. Baccega & M. Costa (Orgs.), Educomunicação, gestão da comunicação, epistemologia e pesquisa teórica (pp. 101-124). São Paulo: Paulinas.

De La Torre, S. (2008). Creatividad cuántica. Una mirada transdisciplinar. Encuentros Multidisciplinares, 28, 5-21. (http://goo.gl/NBpclY) (05-07-2013).

Donnelly, D. & Boniface, S. (2013). Consuming and Creating: Early-adopting Science Teachers’ Perceptions and Use of a Wiki to Support Professional Development. Computers & Education, 68, 9-20.

Hennessey, A. & Dionigi, R.A. (2013) Implementing cooperative learning in Australian primary schools: Generalist teachers’ perspectives. Issues in Educational Research, 23(1), 52-68. (http://goo.gl/VhMg7y).

Hwang, G., Wu, P. & Chen, C. (2012). An Online Game Approach for Improving Students’ Learning Performance in Web-based Problem-solving Activities. Computers & Education, 59, 1.246-1.256. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2012.05.009) (05-06-2014).

Kenski, V. (2011). Tecnologias digitais e a universalização da educação. (http://goo.gl/UUzI4E) (24-09-2011).

Kunsch, M. (2003). Planejamento de relações públicas na comunicação integrada. São Paulo: Summus.

Lakatos, E. (2006). Fundamentos de metodologia científica. São Paulo: Atlas.

Lévy, P. (2004). Cibercultura. São Paulo: Editora 34.

Martín-Barbero, J. (2002). La educación desde la comunicación. Buenos Aires: Norma.

Moore, M. & Kearsley, G. (2007). Educação a distância: Uma visão integrada. São Paulo: Cenage Learning.

Morin, E. (1996). O problema epistemológico da complexidade. Lisboa: Publicações Europa-América.

Okada, A. (2011). Colearn 2.0: Refletindo sobre o conceito de co-aprendizagem via REAs na Web 2.0. In Barros, D. & al. (2011). Educação e tecnologias: reflexão, inovação e prática (pp. 119- 139). Lisboa: Universidade Aberta. (http://goo.gl/UGdx9R) (05-07-2013).

Palloff, M. & Pratt, K. (2002). Construindo comunidades de aprendizagem no ciberespaço. Estratégias eficientes para salas de aula on-line. Porto Alegre: Artmed Editora.

Palloff, M. & Pratt, K. (2004). O aluno virtual: um guia para trabalhar com estudantes on-line. Porto Alegre: Artmed.

Peppler, K.A. & Solomou, M. (2011). Building Creativity: Collaborative Learning and Creativity in Social Media Environments. On the Horizon, 19 (1), 13-23. (DOI 10.1108/10748121111107672).

PMI (Project Management Institute) (2004). PMBOK: Project Management Body of Knowledge. São Paulo: Newton Square.

Saad, B. (2003). Estratégias para a mídia digital. São Paulo: Senac.

Soares, I. (2011). Educomunicação, o conceito, o profissional, a aplicação. São Paulo: Paulinas.

Triantafyllakos, G., Palaigeorgiou, G. & Tsoukalas, I. (2010). Designing Educational Software with Students through Collaborative Design Games: The We!Design&Play Framework. Computers & Education. 56 (1), 1-16. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.08.002).

Yin, R. (1989). Case Estudy Research: Design and Methods. California: Sage Publications.



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Se mantiene abierta en nuestros días la discusión con respecto a las metodologías más efectivas en los entornos virtuales de aprendizaje (EVA) colaborativos y su verdadera contribución al desarrollo de la creatividad y la actitud innovadora en los estudiantes, particularmente en los ámbitos corporativos. Las redes sociales educativas basadas en el aprendizaje colaborativo crecen exponencialmente, y se hacen ya incontables en cualquier área del conocimiento. Sin embargo, la estimulación de la creatividad de los usuarios de los EVA en general y en el ámbito corporativo en específico, se ha convertido en un problema científico de gran importancia para las investigaciones en las Ciencias de la Educación. El presente trabajo se propone valorar la presencia de indicadores de creatividad en los estudiantes al interactuar con los entornos virtuales de enseñanza de aprendizaje colaborativo, basados en la experiencia de educación a distancia (EAD) corporativa acumulada en Brasil. El método de investigación utilizado es el del estudio de caso, que permitió comparar la realización de un proyecto EAD corporativo a partir de la utilización de las TIC con un enfoque creativo y educomunicativo, con otro que también utilizó las TIC pero con una visión tradicional. Fue realizado en la empresa de consultoría y e-learning Perfectu. Los resultados obtenidos sugieren que el modelo pedagógico adoptado y la forma de utilizar las TIC son las que llevan a resultados innovadores y no las TIC por sí mismas, dado que se observó que el promedio de creatividad del grupo que trabajó bajo el patrón educomunicativo-creativo fue más elevado que para el grupo que trabajó con el paradigma tradicional.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

La compleja sociedad actual con la nueva y diversa proporción de actores y fuerzas sociales que confluyen en ella, así como el impacto creciente de las tecnologías de información y comunicación (TIC) en todos los ámbitos de la vida social (Morin, 1996), han dado lugar a la aparición de nuevos cuestionamientos acerca de la creatividad y su desarrollo en los alumnos EAD.

La educación a distancia (EAD), concebida como «el aprendizaje planificado que ocurre normalmente en un lugar diferente del local de enseñanza, exigiendo técnicas especiales de creación del curso y de instrucción, comunicación por medio de varias tecnologías y disposiciones organizacionales y administrativas especiales» (Moore & Kearsley, 2007: 87), es una herramienta que, por sí misma, reclama de un enfoque creativo de los recursos pedagógicos utilizados. Pero esto no siempre es lo que sucede. Muchas veces lo que vemos es la utilización de las nuevas tecnologías con un paradigma pedagógico antiguo.

En los sistemas, programas educativos corporativos del nivel superior para cualquier carrera, realizados en instituciones de enseñanza superior abundan ya desde hace algunos años, los cursos completos y asignaturas montadas en soportes que constituyen entornos virtuales de aprendizaje, también conocidos por sus siglas EVA (Aguaded, Tirado & Hernando, 2011). Muchas veces, fuera de la universidad tradicional o academia, existen experiencias EAD interesantes que no son relatadas o debidamente reconocidas en el ámbito científico (Martin-Barbero, 2002; Soares, 2011; Arnab & al., 2013).

Los primeros EVA, basados en la web 1.0, si bien en su momento representaron un gran paso de avance en cuanto a la integración de las TIC al proceso de enseñanza aprendizaje en la educación superior, no pasó mucho tiempo para que comenzaran a mostrar sus limitaciones en algunos aspectos fundamentales (Hennessey & Dionigi, 2013). Una de ellas fue la interactividad del usuario.

Otra limitación fue la imposibilidad de permitir una permanente comunicación con los profesores autores del curso o la asignatura en el EVA, y menos aún con sus compañeros (los demás alumnos), para conjuntamente realizar las tareas docentes planteadas, compartir criterios, consultar ideas, trabajar en grupo...

Fue la Web 2.0 (y la Web 3.0) la que abrió amplias posibilidades al trabajo colaborativo de profesores y estudiantes, e incluso de otros actores, en el proceso de enseñanza aprendizaje a través de los EVA (Hennessey & Dionigi, 2013). Sin embargo, a pesar del gran salto de avance que representó el surgimiento de la Web 2.0 educativa, considerado por algunos autores como «una revolución de la web» (Jenkins, 2009; Aparici, 2010; Okada, 2011), otra inquietud comenzó a rondar en los profesores (coordinadores, tutores y creadores de contenido) con respecto a la medida en que los nuevos EVA son capaces de estimular la creatividad en sus principales usuarios, los alumnos. Un error común fue el de creer que por sí sola la existencia de la Web 2.0 y la 3.0 ya iría a garantizar la operacionalización de la enseñanza creativa.

Esta inquietud reina aún en nuestros días, de ahí la presencia de nuevas investigaciones que tienen en su centro la estimulación de la creatividad de los alumnos EAD mediante la interactividad con los EVA y el aprovechamiento de sus potencialidades para trabajar de forma colaborativa con sus colegas y profesores en la resolución de problemas mediante la ejecución de tareas individuales y grupales (Palloff & Pratt, 2002; Okada, 2011). También se insiste bastante en las investigaciones empíricas actuales en ofrecer una adecuada preparación a los profesores y tutores EAD (Donnelly & Boniface, 2013; Calma, 2013).

Junto con ello se ve surgir una nueva generación de internautas y alumnos EAD que tienen un nuevo perfil y que precisan ser motivados de otra manera (Palloff & Pratt, 2004; Levi, 2004; Baccega, 2009). Ellos no quieren ser apenas consumidores pasivos de contenidos, sino colaboradores activos y creadores de nuevos conocimientos (Bender, 2003) que son recíprocamente descubiertos o construidos en la relación alumno-instructor/facilitador y alumno-alumno utilizando todos los recursos que hoy nos permite el universo digital (Triantafyllakos, Palaigeorgiou & Tsoukalas, 2010; Kenski, 2011). Esto torna evidente la necesidad de proporcionar a los profesionales que tienen a su cargo la producción y gerencia de materiales educativos e interfaces tecnológicas EAD, es decir, a todos los educadores (coordinadores, escritores, webdesigners, tutores y facilitadores), una comprensión profunda de la creatividad, sus bases epistemológicas, su manifestación en el ámbito educativo y las vías para su desarrollo en los alumnos durante el proceso educacional desarrollado dentro de los EVA (Borroto, 2005; Calma, 2013).

Es necesario también destacar que no se debe ver este proceso apenas como una cuestión de aplicar las técnicas de creatividad tradicionales en el ámbito virtual, sino que se trata de tener un modelo de gestión creativa de los ámbitos virtuales, que incluya también la utilización de las técnicas de creatividad (Chibás, 2012a). Gerenciar de forma creativa todo el proceso educacional dentro de los EVA, con objetivos claros de obtención de resultados innovadores para los alumnos y que permitan la explotación, desarrollo y crecimiento de sus competencias y habilidades creativas es otro desafío que estamos lejos de vencer. En este sentido resulta conveniente entender la creatividad como una energía (Torre, 2008) en la cual se suman y multiplican las inteligencias individuales con las nuevas tecnologías utilizadas en redes colaborativas, en una profunda simbiosis, para crear (individualmente o en colectivo) nuevas sinergias, productos, ideas, relaciones, etc.

Es necesario entonces tener un modelo o estrategia EAD que incluya aspectos de formulación lógica del programa, curso o disciplina junto con el ofrecimiento de nuevos contenidos que aprovechen todas las posibilidades prácticamente infinitas que nos ofrecen hoy las TIC e Internet (Saad, 2003). La creación de estas estrategias pasa por decisiones tales como, si se usarán tecnologías síncronas o asíncronas, on-line o off-line, entre otras. Es también importante y necesario trabajar con un concepto de multimedios y comunicación integrada (Kunsch, 2003) que permita integrar todos los vehículos de comunicación utilizados dentro del proceso, tanto los presenciales como los virtuales siguiendo objetivos pedagógicos claros.

La educación a distancia pude ser comprendida como la aplicación de un conjunto de estrategias educativas que envuelven métodos, técnicas y recursos pedagógicos, psicológicos logísticos y tecnológicos, colocados a disposición de los alumnos para que, en régimen de autoaprendizaje interactivo monitorado, puedan desarrollar las competencias y habilidades críticas y creativas necesarias (Alterator & Deed, 2013).

Se trata de construir nuevos ecosistemas comunicativos o espacios de convivencia alumno-profesor (Martin-Barbero, 2002) en los que se propicie una nueva relación pedagógica entre ambos y entre los contenidos, así como con los dispositivos tecnológicos utilizados (computadores, software, plataforma e-learning).

En este sentido ha sido muy útil en los proyectos EAD corporativa que hemos implementado utilizar la noción de proyecto pedagógico, pero utilizando la perspectiva del PMI-Project Management Institute, la cual enfatiza la importancia de concebir cada emprendimiento como algo único con inicio, medio y fin (PMI, 2004).

Otro concepto que nos ha ayudado en la implementación de cursos corporativos EAD es el de gestión educacional creativa (Chibás, 2012b). Puede afirmarse que la gestión educacional creativa en redes es una propuesta para administrar organizaciones con funciones pedagógicas y operacionalizar proyectos educativos con énfasis en una visión creativa y comunicacional de la organización guiada por una noción transdisciplinar. Su finalidad principal es la de promover la creatividad de todos los participantes en el proceso educativo (alumnos, profesores, gestores, padres, comunidad, etc.) y la de facilitar, a través de indicadores operacionales claros, la visualización e implementación de una gestión educativa más actual y flexible.

Hacer una gestión educacional creativa significa, implementar estrategias flexibles y que se adapten a la situación de la organización o proyecto educativo y su contexto, así como aplicar la gestión de proyectos y demás instrumentos de la administración antes mencionados en la evaluación de los indicadores de desempeño del curso y del alumno, de forma innovadora.

Esta reflexión viene del encuentro, de forma natural, con la perspectiva educomunicacional, como una de las vías posibles de operacionalización de la gestión educacional creativa, partiendo de la apropiación crítica por parte de los alumnos de los vehículos de la comunicación utilizados en los cursos, así como de la construcción conjunta del camino del conocimiento y del propio conocimiento. Ello desde una visión crítica y dialógica que envuelva tanto el diálogo profesor-alumno, como el diálogo alumno-alumno, y que permita y estimule que el control del direccionamiento del curso sea realmente compartido entre el grupo de alumnos y el profesor. La figura 1 representa gráficamente algunas de estas relaciones.

Los autores aquí presentados intentan un acercamiento a la respuesta a los interrogantes: ¿Cómo contribuir al desarrollo de la creatividad de los educandos mediante los EVA?, ¿cuáles son los indicadores de creatividad factibles de ser estimulados en los estudiantes mediante los EVA colaborativos?, entre otras similares. De igual forma, los autores se proponen compartir sus valoraciones y experiencias en la investigación sobre la creatividad, que les han permitido identificar un conjunto de indicadores para valorar en qué medida un EVA contribuye a estimular la creatividad en los estudiantes.


Draft Content 811766290-29654 ov-es034.jpg

El objetivo principal es describir los efectos observados sobre la creatividad de las influencias educativas emanadas de una experiencia de educación colaborativa en un ambiente virtual de aprendizaje que también utilizó metodología presencial bajo los principios de la gestión educacional creativa y la Educomunicación, comparándola con una experiencia en un ambiente semejante que no utilizó estos principios. También reflexionar sobre los principios educativos, que contribuyen a desarrollar la creatividad en este tipo de ambientes o ecosistemas comunicativos colaborativos. Se resalta el hecho de que los resultados obtenidos no dependen de la utilización de las nuevas tecnologías en sí, sino más bien de la forma en que estas se utilizan, es decir de los modelos educativos, objetivos perseguidos y valores formativos que están por detrás de los recursos pedagógico-tecnológicos utilizados. Perfectu es una empresa de consultoría especializada en EAD y marketing digital que integra el grupo multinacional franco-español Global Estrategias, presente en 15 países de cuatro continentes. La estrategia de divulgación, capacitación y los cursos ofrecidos por Perfectu vía Internet y blended focalizan el público corporativo. Ofrece cursos «in company», cerrados para empresas ofrecidos vía Internet, abiertos para el mercado, disponibles en la tienda virtual Perfectu. Estos cursos son ofertados en conjunto con universidades brasileñas y españolas. Los participantes al finalizar los cursos o disciplinas obtienen la doble certificación, de Perfectu y de la universidad específica con la cual hayan hecho el curso.

Para evaluar los resultados de creatividad se utilizaron los cuestionarios e indicadores cuantitativos y cualitativos elaborados por Chibás (2006). Se destaca, además, la importancia que tiene concebir un modelo pedagógico-tecnológico que sirva de base al EVA, lo que se refleja en las características de los materiales y objetos de aprendizaje contenidos en este, así como en un sistema de tareas docentes que contenga tareas creativas. Se plantean algunas definiciones de los conceptos fundamentales aquí tratados.

2. Material y métodos

La presente investigación es una primera aproximación de carácter exploratorio al tema en cuestión. El método general utilizado es el teórico-empírico, dado que de forma dialéctica se parte de la teoría para ir a la práctica, para nuevamente volver a la teoría. También se utilizaron análisis cuantitativos y cualitativos que cabe situar en el método cuali-cuantitativo dado que se triangularon los resultados obtenidos con las diferentes técnicas de investigación (Lakatos, 2006). Estos métodos se combinaron con el estudio de caso (Yin, 1989) dado que se comparó la forma de gerenciar un proyecto EAD con una visión pedagógica educomunicativa y de Gestión Educacional con un proyecto EAD que también utilizaba las nuevas tecnologías, pero partiendo de una mirada tradicional.

Las técnicas de investigación utilizadas fueron: la revisión bibliográfica y de documentos (físicos y de Internet), sistema de cuestionarios cuantitativos y cualitativos de creatividad de Chibás (enviados por email, utilizando Google y puestos en la web de Perfectu y en su plataforma Moodle, dado que fue en esta empresa que ofrece cursos e-learning donde realizamos la experiencia), observación participante y entrevistas en profundidad (Lakatos, 2006). Esta última técnica se aplicó en los casos que las respuestas de los cuestionarios cualitativos fueron muy ricas o cuando por el contrario quedó algún aspecto confuso. Para aplicar esta última técnica se recurrió en algunos casos a los programas MSN o Skype con una webcam. Las entrevistas fueron grabadas con permiso de los entrevistados. Después de transcritas, se hizo un análisis de contenido de las mismas, clasificando la información en categorías de contenido. También se realizaron entrevistas al director, coordinadores del curso investigado y principales gestores de Perfectu con vistas a entender su estrategia general de trabajo.

Tanto en el cuestionario cuantitativo como en el cualitativo se evalúan básicamente cuatro parámetros o indicadores de creatividad que son: originalidad, aceptación de desafíos, solución creativa de problemas y flexibilidad.

Junto con el cuestionario cuantitativo de creatividad se utilizó el procesamiento estadístico de la información aplicándose el análisis de varianza Anova y el test de Tukey para evaluar si existían diferencias significativas en las respuestas de los dos grupos de alumnos participantes en el curso bajo la perspectiva educomunicativa (gestión educacional creativa), y los que participaron en este mismo curso pero con una visión tradicional de la utilización de las nuevas tecnologías para la enseñanza a distancia. La tabla 1 muestra cómo eran clasificadas las respuestas para los parámetros de creatividad que fueron evaluados.

La metodología de investigación utilizada fue validada por el comité científico de Perfectu integrado por consultores, tutores, creadores de contenido y profesores de instituciones de enseñanza superior tales como la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Universidad de Barcelona, Universidad de La Habana, Universidad de São Paulo, PUC de São Paulo y Centro Universitario del SENAC de São Paulo. Antes de su aplicación general se hizo una aplicación piloto para rectificar posibles errores y realizar los ajustes necesarios.


Draft Content 811766290-29654 ov-es035.jpg

La muestra estuvo integrada por 42 alumnos que compraron vía web el curso. 21 de los alumnos fueron direccionados para el curso tradicional y 21 dirigidos para el curso utilizando la perspectiva educomunicacional y de gestión educacional creativa en redes.

Los dos grupos recibieron las mismas informaciones mercadológicas y se les informó que estaban participando en una experiencia de investigación. Los alumnos de ambos grupos eran personas graduadas de algún curso de educación superior que estaban procurando destacarse o mejorar sus carreras profesionales. En ambas salas virtuales hubo semejante distribución de género, siendo en cada grupo 12 mujeres (57,14%) y 9 hombres (42,85%). Con participación de alumnos de diferentes estados de Brasil, predominaron los alumnos del sudeste, 25 para un 59,52% en el total de los 42 alumnos. Se contó apenas con cinco alumnos extranjeros (que no eran brasileños) distribuidos dos en el grupo que adoptó la metodología educomunicativa-creativa y tres en el grupo tradicional. La franja etaria predominante fue de 29 a 37 años, pudiendo ser clasificados como adulto-joven.

2.1. Procedimientos

Se compararon los resultados obtenidos por los participantes de dos grupos o salas de aula virtual-presencial de un curso blended (que mezcló las aulas presenciales y virtuales) de 120 horas y que utilizaban tanto la modalidad e-learning como otras actividades que no utilizaban Internet. Las actividades pedagógicas ofrecidas fueron diseñadas con un equilibrio entre las que eran on-line y off-line, así como entre las que eran sincrónicas y asincrónicas. Este curso fue ampliado a 120 horas porque antes se tuvo una experiencia exitosa con 44 horas y los alumnos del curso anterior así lo solicitaron.

Los alumnos invertían en torno a 4-6 horas por semana en el curso, teniendo el mismo una duración total de seis meses. Este curso era ofrecido en la plataforma Moodle del sitio web de Perfectu, en una sala utilizando la perspectiva tradicional y en otra utilizando la de gestión educacional creativa operacionalizada con el enfoque educomunicacional. El curso escogido para realizar esta experiencia fue el de «Gestión de marketing de responsabilidad social» durante el cual se enseñaba a los participantes a gerenciar proyectos responsables utilizando las herramientas de la administración y la comunicación. Ambas salas disfrutaban de los mismos recursos tecnológicos disponibles en el sitio del curso (textos en e-book, vídeos, aulas con presentaciones, biblioteca virtual, pizarra virtual o cuadro blanco, sala de chat, fórum de debate, miniblog individual, email individual del alumno, canal de contacto directo con el tutor o instructor facilitador, MSN, Skype, software Second Life para trabajo con avatares, etc.).

En la planificación del curso para ambos grupos o salas de aula se incluían tres encuentros presenciales grupales entre los tutores y los alumnos que tuviesen disponibilidad de participar directamente. Los que no podían hacerlo así, participaron de la reunión presencial utilizando el programa Skype con una webcam. Estos tres encuentros eran uno al inicio, otro en el medio y uno al final del curso.

También eran realizadas llamadas telefónicas cuando era considerado necesario por parte del instructor-facilitador o del equipo de soporte de Perfectu para los alumnos participantes que no entraban en la plataforma, así como envíos de email para recordarles el calendario de actividades. El tutor establecía días y horarios en que estaría on-line, disponible vía Internet para el esclarecimiento de dudas individuales y aclaraciones de dudas colectivas vía chat. Las dos salas y grupos de alumnos contaron cada una con un equipo docente integrado por cinco personas, con un coordinador, dos instructores, un elaborador de contenido y una persona del equipo de soporte.


Draft Content 811766290-29654 ov-es036.jpg

En el caso de la sala que ofreció el curso fuera del patrón tradicional y reactivo EAD se operacionalizó la gestión educacional creativa a través de la aplicación de la educomunicación en la forma de la creación de ecosistemas creativos partiendo de la aplicación de los siguientes principios derivados de los indicadores antes descritos por Chibás (2012a):

• Se negociaron los principales temas, bibliografía y forma de evaluación del curso en la primera reunión presencial de trabajo del tutor con los alumnos.

• Desde el inicio se planteó el objetivo de formar una verdadera comunidad de aprendizaje y crear vínculos afectivos.

• Además de los vehículos de comunicación existentes en la plataforma Moodle, exclusivos para los alumnos participantes, los alumnos eran estimulados a crear dos vehículos de comunicación abierta con el público externo al curso (blog y página en el Facebook) donde se publicaban los trabajos realizados por ellos, dándose retroalimentación. Esta era una forma de «testar» sus ideas con el «mundo». Estos vehículos eran administrados totalmente por los alumnos, pero monitorado por el instructor-facilitador.

• En diversas oportunidades se reflexionaba sobre cómo funciona el mantenimiento de un blog y cómo construir contenidos para el mismo.

• La función del tutor era dialógica y no de detentor del conocimiento. El tutor como mediador y facilitador del proceso.

• La postura del instructor-facilitador era de un comedido interés explícito por conocer las preocupaciones cotidianas de los alumnos, así como por la forma en que los contenidos del curso eran aplicados.

• Se estimuló la cooperación y una sana interdependencia a través de tareas colectivas que implicaban la investigación conjunta y la realización de actividades colaborativas.

• Se evitaron tareas con preguntas cerradas o de alternativas; se utilizaron más tareas con preguntas abiertas.

• Se utilizaron en varias reuniones virtuales, y en la segunda reunión presencial del grupo, técnicas de creatividad como: tormenta de ideas (brainstorming), método de los seis sombreros, entre otras. Se buscaba de forma explícita estimular la creatividad, los análisis y lecturas diferentes de la realidad, así como una nueva estructuración de la forma y el contenido de los vehículos montados por el grupo.

• Las tareas realizadas integraban la evaluación colectiva e individual, así como la auto-evaluación.

• Se promovió en los participantes el análisis de situaciones que estuviesen sucediendo en la vida real en el momento actual, relativas a los temas del curso. Estos análisis eran promovidos on-line vía chat y off-line vía fórum de debate.

• Se estimulaba el análisis de los participantes sobre los contenidos del curso, y también sobre la metodología de trabajo utilizada.

• El tutor mostraba de forma explícita su interés y compromiso con que los alumnos obtuviesen un buen resultado.

• Se hacía un énfasis declarado por parte del tutor en la investigación y construcción conjunta del conocimiento, otorgando la responsabilidad del aprendizaje al alumno.


Draft Content 811766290-29654 ov-es037.jpg

El otro grupo que siguió el patrón común de los cursos EAD recibió el entrenamiento con la misma carga horaria, los mismos recursos tecnológicos, pero no aplicó los principios de trabajo descritos arriba. Los alumnos no crearon vehículos de comunicación abiertos al público en general y solo utilizaron los ya preexistentes en la plataforma Moodle. El tutor mantuvo una postura más reactiva y distante, focalizada en los contenidos del curso, orientó tareas con preguntas 50% de alternativas y 50% abiertas o de opinión, focalizó más el trabajo individual y estimuló la competición o nota individual; aun así se realizó un trabajo final en grupos.

Además de los factores de creatividad evaluados en los alumnos de ambos grupos, se controlaron las variables índice de satisfacción de los alumnos, tasa de permanencia de los alumnos en el curso, así como índice de cumplimiento de los objetivos del curso en la opinión de los profesores, alumnos y gestores del curso, del mismo modo que los resultados concretos de la creatividad, es decir, cantidad y calidad de los trabajos realizados por los alumnos.

La limitación que puede tener esta metodología puede venir derivada de su complejidad y el necesario entrenamiento de los tutores o instructores facilitadores.

La principal pregunta de investigación que se trató de responder fue: ¿Cuáles son los efectos sobre la creatividad de los alumnos participantes en un curso diseñado con una visión educomunicativa-creativa comparados con los efectos de un grupo control que tuvo acceso a los mismos contenidos y tecnología pero que fue realizado con una perspectiva tradicional?

3. Resultados

A continuación se muestran algunos de los principales resultados cuantitativos y cualitativos obtenidos:

• El curso EAD en el formato tradicional fue finalizado por 12 (57,14%) de los participantes, mientras que el que estaba basado en la perspectiva educomunicacional-creativa tuvo un índice de retención de 81,33% con 17 participantes que finalizaron el curso.

• El índice de satisfacción con el curso tanto para profesores, como para alumnos, fue analizado a través del cuestionario de evaluación aplicado al final del curso. En el caso del curso administrado, siguiendo la metodología educomunicacional-creativa, fue de 85,71% (18 estudiantes) para los alumnos y 100% para los profesores participantes, mientras que para el curso EAD administrado en formato tradicional fue de apenas 52,38% (11 alumnos) para los alumnos y 60% para los profesores (tres de los cinco profesores del equipo docente correspondiente a cada sala).

• El índice de cumplimiento de los objetivos del curso en la opinión de los profesores y gestores, y alumnos del curso también fue superior en el grupo que siguió los principios educomunicativo-creativos, siendo (100%) en la opinión de los profesores (los cinco profesores del equipo docente), y 81,33% de los alumnos (17) en el caso de la sala que siguió los procedimientos de gestión educacional creativa, en cuanto que en el caso de la otra sala más tradicional se obtuvieron índices de 43,90% de satisfacción de los alumnos (11) y 40% del equipo gestor-docente (2).

• También los resultados concretos de la creatividad, o sea, cantidad y calidad de los trabajos realizados por los alumnos fueron mejor en la sala que siguió la perspectiva educomunicacional-creativa con 16 trabajos finales considerados altamente creativos por el equipo docente-gestor del curso (76,19%), siguiendo los cuatro indicadores de evaluación de la creatividad arriba descritos, en cuanto en la sala que no siguió esta perspectiva el resultado obtenido fue de 8 trabajos finales considerados como creativos por el equipo docente (38,09%).

Estos resultados fueron después corroborados en entrevista realizada con los gestores y coordinadores de los cursos. Seguidamente presentamos los valores medios de creatividad obtenidos por ambos grupos:

Como se puede apreciar en la tabla 2, para cada factor de creatividad evaluado en los alumnos al finalizar el curso, así como para la creatividad total, se observó que el promedio del grupo que trabajó bajo el patrón educomunicativo-creativo fue más elevado que para el grupo que trabajó con el paradigma tradicional. El procesamiento estadístico de la información aplicándose el análisis de varianza Anova (2006) y el Test de Tukey (2006), permitió comprobar que eran significativamente diferentes los valores de creatividad obtenidos para los dos grupos de alumnos al nivel de significación de 0,01, es decir a un nivel bastante elevado.


Draft Content 811766290-29654 ov-es038.jpg

4. Discusión

El caso presentado permitió comparar los resultados que provoca la Gestión educacional creativa utilizando el enfoque de la Educomunicación en un EVA con los obtenidos en otro EVA que administró el mismo curso y utilizó las mismas tecnologías, pero con estrategias y un enfoque diferentes. Se observaron diferencias significativas favorables al EVA que aplicó el enfoque educomunicativo-creativo, tanto en los índices de satisfacción de los alumnos y profesores, índice de permanencia de los alumnos en el curso, resultados creativos concretos y en el cumplimento de los objetivos del curso según la opinión de profesores, gestores y alumnos. También se percibió que los valores medios de los factores de creatividad evaluados en los alumnos fueron mejores en el grupo que adoptó el enfoque educomunicacional-creativo en redes.

Este resultado se corresponde con los obtenidos por Peppler y Solomou (2011), según un estudio realizado con 85 participantes en un ambiente colaborativo de aprendizaje virtual 3D, clasificado como red social, cuyos resultados ilustran el aumento y extensión de la creatividad en las comunidades on-line, asociados a la forma en que se organizan los contenidos, siguiendo criterios de naturaleza social y cultural.

Nuestros resultados también corroboran los obtenidos por Hwang, Wu y Chen (2012) en un sentido más restrictivo, dado que la muestra con la que ellos trabajaron fue una muestra infantil y utilizando específicamente el juego como herramienta colaborativa-creativa.

A partir de los resultados observados se sugiere que para diseñar cursos EAD de éxito se tenga un equilibrio o mezcla de actividades multimedia con actividades que dan preferencia a una media de tareas on-line con off-line; de actividades presenciales y en Internet, así como de tareas síncronas y asíncronas.

Se resalta el hecho de que los resultados obtenidos dependen más de la forma en que estas se utilizan; es decir, de los modelos educativos aplicados en cada EVA, que de la utilización de las tecnologías en sí.

Se consiguió montar y testar una metodología de trabajo con indicadores claros que puede ser utilizada en otros EVA y con contenidos diferentes. Puede concluirse que la gestión EAD actual debe estar basada en la planificación estratégica, pero complementándose con la gestión de proyectos.

Para futuros trabajos sería positivo mapear los diversos modelos o paradigmas de gestión que están siendo empíricamente aplicados hoy en los procesos educacionales EAD formales y no formales, así como las estrategias creativas de gestores, profesores y alumnos.

Una segunda etapa sería la elaboración de instrumentos de investigación-acción más funcionales que permitan hacer rápidamente esos diagnósticos y de esa manera, contribuir para preparar profesionales que sean verdaderos gestores-educadores aptos para la creación de proyectos educativos en EVA que tengan como foco el desarrollo del individuo por medio de la sensibilidad, afectividad y creatividad.

Este direccionamiento permitirá el desarrollo de conocimiento teórico-práctico sobre los modelos de gestión que pueden dar mejores resultados en las redes educacionales y EVA formales y no formales. De esta manera, también se podrán identificar los modelos de gestión, estrategias y tácticas más eficaces para cada sector de educación corporativa, levantando las principales barreras a la comunicación y a la gestión educacional creativa.

Referencias

Aguaded, J.I., Tirado, R. & Hernando, A. (2011). Campus virtuales en universidades andaluzas: tipologías de uso educativo, competencias docentes y apoyo institucional. Teoría de la Educación, 23, 159-179. (http://goo.gl/gvFqOK) (05-07-2013).

Alterator, S. & Deed, C. (2013). Teacher Adaptation to Open Learning Spaces. Issues in Educational Research, 23(3), 315-329 (http://goo.gl/mfkmIR).

Aparici, R. (Coord.) (2010). Educomunicación, más allá del 2.0. Madrid: Gedisa.

Arnab, S., Brownb, K., Clarke, S., Dunwell, I., Lim, T., Suttie, N., Louchart, S., Hendrix, M. & Freitas, S. (2013). The Development Approach of a Pedagogically-driven Serious Game to Support Relationship and Sex Education (RSE) within a Classroom Setting. Computers & Education, 69, 15-30. (http://goo.gl/UYv8gT).

Baccega, M. (2009). Campo Comunicação/Educação: mediador do processo de recepção. In M. Baccega &

Bender, W. (2003). Prefácio. SAAD, Beth. Estratégias 2.0 para a Mídia Digital (pp. 9-13). São Paulo: Senac.

Borroto, G. (2004). Un modelo para la autoeducación y la creatividad en la universidad cubana. Revista Enseñanza Universitaria, 24, 59-69. (http://goo.gl/1dmHru) (05-07-2013).

Calma, A. (2013). Preparing Tutors to Hit the Ground Running: Lessons from New Tutors’ Experiences. Issues in Educational Research, 23(3), 331-345 (http://goo.gl/fqNsT3).

Chibás, F. (2006). Evaluar la creatividad organizacional: uso combinado de cuestionarios cuantitativos y cualitativos. In V. Violant & S. De-la-Torre (Eds.), Comprender y evaluar la creatividad: cómo investigar y evaluar la creatividad 725-736. Málaga: Aljibe.

Chibás, F. (2012a). Creatividad + Dinámica de Grupo = Eureka. La Habana: Pueblo y Educación.

Chibás, F. (2012b). Educomunicação na gestão educacional criativa em projetos corporativos EAD: um estudo de caso. Hermes, 6, 77-97. (http://goo.gl/s4oLnF).

Costa, M. Estética da comunicação. In M. Baccega & M. Costa (Orgs.), Educomunicação, gestão da comunicação, epistemologia e pesquisa teórica (pp. 101-124). São Paulo: Paulinas.

De La Torre, S. (2008). Creatividad cuántica. Una mirada transdisciplinar. Encuentros Multidisciplinares, 28, 5-21. (http://goo.gl/NBpclY) (05-07-2013).

Donnelly, D. & Boniface, S. (2013). Consuming and Creating: Early-adopting Science Teachers’ Perceptions and Use of a Wiki to Support Professional Development. Computers & Education, 68, 9-20.

Hennessey, A. & Dionigi, R.A. (2013) Implementing cooperative learning in Australian primary schools: Generalist teachers’ perspectives. Issues in Educational Research, 23(1), 52-68. (http://goo.gl/VhMg7y).

Hwang, G., Wu, P. & Chen, C. (2012). An Online Game Approach for Improving Students’ Learning Performance in Web-based Problem-solving Activities. Computers & Education, 59, 1.246-1.256. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2012.05.009) (05-06-2014).

Kenski, V. (2011). Tecnologias digitais e a universalização da educação. (http://goo.gl/UUzI4E) (24-09-2011).

Kunsch, M. (2003). Planejamento de relações públicas na comunicação integrada. São Paulo: Summus.

Lakatos, E. (2006). Fundamentos de metodologia científica. São Paulo: Atlas.

Lévy, P. (2004). Cibercultura. São Paulo: Editora 34.

Martín-Barbero, J. (2002). La educación desde la comunicación. Buenos Aires: Norma.

Moore, M. & Kearsley, G. (2007). Educação a distância: Uma visão integrada. São Paulo: Cenage Learning.

Morin, E. (1996). O problema epistemológico da complexidade. Lisboa: Publicações Europa-América.

Okada, A. (2011). Colearn 2.0: Refletindo sobre o conceito de co-aprendizagem via REAs na Web 2.0. In Barros, D. & al. (2011). Educação e tecnologias: reflexão, inovação e prática (pp. 119- 139). Lisboa: Universidade Aberta. (http://goo.gl/UGdx9R) (05-07-2013).

Palloff, M. & Pratt, K. (2002). Construindo comunidades de aprendizagem no ciberespaço. Estratégias eficientes para salas de aula on-line. Porto Alegre: Artmed Editora.

Palloff, M. & Pratt, K. (2004). O aluno virtual: um guia para trabalhar com estudantes on-line. Porto Alegre: Artmed.

Peppler, K.A. & Solomou, M. (2011). Building Creativity: Collaborative Learning and Creativity in Social Media Environments. On the Horizon, 19 (1), 13-23. (DOI 10.1108/10748121111107672).

PMI (Project Management Institute) (2004). PMBOK: Project Management Body of Knowledge. São Paulo: Newton Square.

Saad, B. (2003). Estratégias para a mídia digital. São Paulo: Senac.

Soares, I. (2011). Educomunicação, o conceito, o profissional, a aplicação. São Paulo: Paulinas.

Triantafyllakos, G., Palaigeorgiou, G. & Tsoukalas, I. (2010). Designing Educational Software with Students through Collaborative Design Games: The We!Design&Play Framework. Computers & Education. 56 (1), 1-16. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.08.002).

Yin, R. (1989). Case Estudy Research: Design and Methods. California: Sage Publications.

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/06/14
Accepted on 30/06/14
Submitted on 30/06/14

Volume 22, Issue 2, 2014
DOI: 10.3916/C43-2014-14
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 9
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?