Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

At a time when academic activity in the area of communication is principally assessed by the impact of scientific journals, the scientific media and the scientific productivity of researchers, the question arises as to whether social factors condition scientific activity as much as these objective elements. This investigation analyzes the influence of scientific productivity and social activity in the area of communication. We identify a social network of researchers from a compilation of doctoral theses in communication and calculate the scientific production of 180 of the most active researchers who sit on doctoral committees. Social network analysis is then used to study the relations that are formed on these doctoral thesis committees. The results suggest that social factors, rather than individual scientific productivity, positively influence such a key academic and scientific activity as the award of doctoral degrees. Our conclusions point to a disconnection between scientific productivity and the international scope of researchers and their role in the social network. Nevertheless, the consequences of this situation are tempered by the nonhierarchical structure of relations between communication scientists.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction

The development and the future of scientific activity have generally been treated as endogenous aspects linked to the evolution of research, significant scientific discoveries and the process of transferring scientific knowledge and know-how, etc., generating unstoppable, gradual and, in some cases, exponential progress. However, for many decades, a strong social element has clearly been identified in scientific activity that can determine its creation, diffusion and demarcation to an extraordinary extent (Kuhn, 1962; Merton, 1973). Scientific ac?tivity may be the origin and/or the result of social structures, giving rise to specific disciplines, such as the sociology of science (Ben-David & Sullivan, 1975; Lamo-de-Espinosa & al., 1994).

Special attention is given to the social structures that underlie scientific activity, because of the relative youth of social sciences and the habitual coexistence of possible paradigms and currents of thought that may be reflected upon simultaneously, which may at times assume opposing and antagonistic positions (Rodríguez, 1993). Many scientific communities, to a greater or lesser extent, have geographical boundaries that depend on their scope of knowledge, while academic traditions, linguistic environments and the physical structures of scientific activity more often than not generate its national geographical environment. It is therefore of interest to know the particularities of the scientific communities in each country or region.

In this context, it appears pertinent to look into the social aspects of the Spanish scientific community linked to the field of communication. University studies in this field are recent (the first faculty was founded in 1971) and arise out of the framework of the so-called «Napoleonic» university model, centred on professional training. At present, a transition to the «Humboldtian» model is underway, the main aim of which is the generation and transference of scientific knowledge (Ginés, 2004: 14). This change is leading to a slow increase in the specific weight attached to research in the promotion of university teaching staff. At the same time, communication represents a fertile territory, as in other social disciplines with high levels of interdisciplinary studies, in which social aspects are given a prominent place in scientific activity. Less than 50% of Spanish contributions to communication journals listed on the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) are from faculties and departments of communication (Masip, 2011: 7). In addition, it appears especially relevant to link social activity in this field to aspects that are related to scientific communication, as the current trend is to assess scientists and academics in their discipline in accordance with their publications and the impact factors of the journals in which they publish (Soriano, 2008; Perceval & Fornieles, 2008; Fernández-Quijada, 2010; Masip, 2011; Castillo & Ruiz, 2011). Studies on Spanish Communication Academia have concentrated on the most relevant journals, on their role in the furtherance of knowledge and on detecting the structure of the field through bibliometric studies (Castillo & Carretón, 2010; López-Ornelas, 2010; Martínez & Saperas, 2011; Castillo, Rubio & Almansa, 2012). However, it would be worth asking whether the weight of such apparently objective measures of scientific prominence (publications and citations) is the criterion shaping the structure of Spanish communication academia and whether the baseline of social relations between scientists plays a defining role in their scientific activity.

This work has the objective of determining whether the demonstrated relevance of a researcher in the field of communication, measured in terms of scientific productivity, and the researcher’s social position, measured in terms of membership of the active core of academia, have an influence on important decisions for academic and scientific activity. In response to that question, we will study how both scientific productivity and social activity influence a key academic decision in the scientific community: the choice of committee members that evaluate doctoral theses in the field of knowledge. Social network analysis was selected as a referential framework in which to conduct an acceptable analysis of social ties between scientists arising from the academic act of the reading of a doctoral thesis (Scott, 1991).

2. The academic and scientific community in the field of communication

The analysis of social factors in scientific production has a long tradition and has generated a particular field of knowledge: the sociology of science (Merton, 1973). The influence of social structures on scientific production may be conceptualised as invisible colleges. De Solla Price (1963) pointed to the existence of groups of scientists that were basically constituted by a contact and by informal communication that generated a stable social structure (highlighting the role of the elite within it). Where De Solla Price highlighted the role of informal communication as the basis of the social structure, Crane (1969; 1972) stressed the possibility of belonging to the group (invisible college) through indirect contacts between scientists between whom multiple simultaneous relations are established (co-authorships, citations, exchange of drafts, joint presence at events and in organizations, management of doctoral theses, etc.). Crane (1969; 1972) used an incipient network analysis to highlight the appearance of emergent social structures in the scientific field in the form of invisible colleges or social circles. To do so, she used various relations between scientists and pointed out that the set of relations comprised a social circle in an informal way (an informal social structure with fuzzy limits).

Zuccala (2006) proposed the concept of the invisible college as the organizational structure of a set of social actors (researchers) who exchange formal and informal information on the framework of the rules in a discipline and certain research problems. She used social network analysis and the analysis of co-citations to identify these invisible colleges in a particular field. Moody (2004) used the relation of co-authorship to describe the collaborative networks in social science and constructed various models to test how collaboration affects scientific practice (appearance of small relatively isolated groups, exchanges between groups with different interests, and networks dominated by star scientists). The first two possibilities were also explored by Crane (1969). In the field of communication, invisible colleges and their definition have also been explored through bibliometric studies (Chang & Tai, 2005; Tai, 2009).

The Spanish communication academia may be studied in terms of an invisible college that generates a tie of membership between its members and that will generate a series of formal and informal contacts between them at various scientific gatherings (congresses, workshops, academic proceedings and professional events, etc.), transference of information and knowledge between them and both direct and indirect informal communication. Various researchers have brought up the existence of these networks in communication. The majority used the analysis of co-authorships in articles published in scientific journals from the discipline (López-Ornelas, 2010; Masip, 2011). Fernández-Quijada (2011) established a network of collaborations between professors belonging to the different Spanish universities based on a bibliometric study of co-authorships in Spanish communication journals with the highest impact. This author suggests the need for more in-depth studies for an understanding of how these networks are formed and how they function.

Martínez-Nicolás (2006) studied the quality of research in the area of journalism and related it to the structure of the scientific community. This structure responds to the «vicissitudes of its historic constitution and development». Empirical studies focusing on the groups that have been identified would be of interest. The pioneering bibliometric studies of Daniel E. Jones and others (2000) should be highlighted, in relation to the study of doctoral theses on communication, which have contributed an important body of knowledge that has served as the basis for subsequent investigations.

Repiso, Torres, and Delgado (2011b) analysed social networks in communication on the basis of the members of the doctoral thesis committees. They structured the research system into different specialities such as television (Repiso & al., 2011a), radio (Repiso & al., 2011b) and cinema (Repiso & al. 2011c), in Spain, around the main university chairs in those disciplines.

The reading of a doctoral thesis represents an important part of scientific activity within the Spanish communication academia, because of the characteristics of its contribution and because of the fact that it implies a validation of the research capabilities of the doctoral students. It is therefore very important that each thesis should be evaluated by qualified researchers. Its defence is conducted before a panel made up of various doctors in the field and from other related disciplines. The director of the doctoral thesis and the departmental members intervene in a decisive way in the choice of the committee members through informal processes, which are therefore based on considerations that go beyond the purely scientific. These choices should be based on criteria that should be objective, arising from the research capabilities of the members that sit on the doctoral committees. The scientific productivity of academics is a measure of the success of their scientific activity, marking the road towards professional progress (Alcántara, 2000; Joy, 2009). Therefore, the professional development of researchers and, consequently, their selection by the academic community to conduct research-related activities will be conditioned by what they are objectively able to contribute. Thus,

• Hypothesis 1: The selection of doctoral committee members in the field of communication will be positively influenced by their scientific productivity, measured by their publications and the number of citations received. Furthermore, a complementary hypothesis may be developed that links social factors to relevant decisions of scientific activity in communication. It appears logical to think that social structures that take shape in the network of researchers and academics in an area of knowledge might determine or condition the evaluation of a first rate piece of research and the accreditation within the scientific community of the investigative worth of the doctorand. The idea of the aforementioned social circles or invisible colleges (Crane, 1972) and the network structure in the academic relations between researchers (Molina, Muñoz & Doménech, 2002) help explain a possible association between personal and professional knowledge transfer between communication researchers and academics and the choices that they make, so that other actors evaluate the theses that they have directed. In an empirical way and using social network analysis, Sierra (2003) demonstrated, on the basis of the composition of CSIC thesis committees, that the choice of committee members did not follow random criteria, but that there is a social grounding for those decisions. Likewise, Casanueva and Larrinaga (2013) presented evidence that social factors and, in particular, the previous contact between other members of the network significantly influenced the choice of doctoral committee members and their chairpersons in the discipline of accounting and finance. The following hypothesis may therefore be formulated:

• Hypothesis 2: the selection of doctoral committee members in the field of communication will be positively influenced by the social activity of the members of the academia.

3. Methods

3.1. The network in the field of communication based on doctoral committees

The network constituted by researchers and academics from the field of communication who have participated in doctoral committees from 2000 up until 2012 is selected as the area of study, in order to test the two hypotheses on the influence of scientific productivity and social activity in scientific decisions. The Teseo database was used to demarcate the area of study, which provides different information on doctoral theses read in Spain. This database is still the most complete resource available and an essential reference for the consultation of doctoral theses in Spanish universities (Sorli & Merlo, 2002: 203), even though it presents a series of drawbacks such as lack of standardization, incompleteness, duplication of entries and omissions (Repiso & al., 2011: 419). The definition of the theses within the area is complicated, insofar as there are no suitable descriptors that mark out clear frontiers, without overlaps in the area of communication. Therefore, our strategy involved the identification of all theses produced in departments of audiovisual communication, marketing and journalism from all Spanish universities. In total, 1298 doctoral theses read in the period under consideration were analysed. Almost 2500 different doctors had a role in those theses as directors and members of the doctoral committees, as researchers in the same or in other similar disciplines in Spain or as foreign doctors. Many of these actors had no relevant role in the network. A relational criterion was therefore chosen, in line with Laumann and others (1989), when defining the network, in order to conduct a more suitable empirical analysis that would respond to the purpose of this investigation, in such a way that only those doctors who sat on eight committees or more were analysed. This meant a more manageable and sufficiently broad network in terms of its analysis that would limit itself to the 180 most active doctors on the doctoral committees.

Data obtained on these 180 researchers in the field of communication refer to their affiliations and to their scientific productivity. The number of publications and the number of citations from those same publications were used for the calculation of scientific production. The information contained in the most standardized international databases (SSCI and Scopus) produced no search results that clearly differentiated between the 180 members chosen from the network in terms of their scientific production. For example, only 27.22% of them had one or more publications in SSCI. This finding is consistent with earlier studies that described the limited internationalization of publications from communication academics in Spain (Masip, 2011). So, we referred to Google Scholar to obtain the most important data on the scientific production of the 180 actors. Harzing’s Publish or Perish (version 2.8.3.4792), available as an on-line programme, was used to systematise the search. Data referring to articles in journals, books, and chapters of books were all considered. Manual inspection the data gathered in this way and its registration was done, as this tool is not very discriminatory with regard to names and document types.

3.2. Analysis of social networks

The study of the influence of social relations in academic decisions, and more specifically in the selection processes for the committees that will evaluate doctoral theses should pay specific attention to the social relations that they engender and the social structure that arises from them. An acceptable analysis of social structures should be based on specific data, not on the characteristics, but on the social ties of the individual. Social network analysis is used for this purpose (Wellman & Berkowitz, 1988).

Unlike quantitative methods of investigation in social sciences, based on the analysis of the attributes of sample elements (Wasserman & Faust, 1994), social network analysis centres its attention on the identification of the ties that are generated between a series of nodes or actors that constitute the network. Social network analysis attempts to reveal the overall structure of the ties between actors, identifying the existence of general relational patterns that result from the abstraction of individual choices or from the links between the nodes.

A network may be defined in a simple way as a set of interrelated nodes. So, the starting point of network analysis is the study of these two basic units: the nodes that represent the actors or elements of the network and the ties between those nodes. Since its recent origin, social network analysis has been applied to the study of scientific activity (Crane, 1972). It has undergone notable development over recent years with the availability of massive bibliographies on co-authorships in scientific publications (Moody, 2004; Newman, 2001).

3.3. Variables

Different regression models were prepared to test the hypothesis, the variables of which are explained below:

• Dependent Variable. As an outcome variable, the dependent variable used the sum of the times that each of the 180 doctors who represent the sample of the most active doctors was chosen to participate in a doctoral committee. As mentioned earlier, the minimum value of this variable was set at 8.

• Independent Variables. Four basic indicators of scientific productivity were used for their measurement. In the first place, «Publications» measured the breadth of scientific production throughout the professional career of each network member. These included books, book chapters, and publications in scientific journals that have been cited at least once. They are taken in aggregate, without differentiating between document types. In second place, the variable «Citations» corresponds to the number of citations of each author received by the aforementioned publications. The third variable seeks an overall measurement of publication capacity and of the impact of the published documents measured by the number of citations they have received: «the h-Index». An author will have an h-index of 10, if 10 of the author’s articles have received at least 10 citations. The fourth variable, «International», takes a value of 1 if the member of the network has published in an SSCI journal, which was taken as a reference to indicate the international scope of an author, and a value of 0 if otherwise. The preparation of the indicator of social activity was more complex. In the first place, a new network was constructed, in which the link under consideration was the joint presence of academics at the reading of a doctoral thesis. In other words, each thesis brings together committee members, directors, and co-directors of the thesis at a single academic act (from which other social events often arise). This mutual contact means that the members of the network get to know each other (or their familiarity is deepened). The social network programme UCINET (Borgatti, Everett & Freeman, 2002) was used to construct the indicator, which divides the network into two groups by means of a process of iteration. The first of these is made up of the core of the network and second by its periphery. The variable «Core» is determined by the doctor forming part of that network core with a joint presence on doctoral committees in the field of communication.

Control Variables. Two control variables were used. The «Chair» variable seeks to reflect the value of occupying the most senior posts in the academic hierarchy as a predictor of academic elections, as highlighted in earlier studies in the context of Spain (Casanueva & Larrinaga, 2013) and in the context of Germany (Muller-Camen & Salzgeber, 2005). A dichotomic variable was constructed with a value of 1 for academics that occupy a university chair. The second control variable «Journal Editorial Board» measures whether a member of the network forms part of the managerial, scientific and/or editorial boards of the nine journals (Revista Latina, Comunicación y Sociedad, Comunicar, Estudios del Mensaje Periodístico, Zer, Trípodos, Ámbitos, Anàlisi y Telos) in the first quartile of the In-Recs index for 2011.

4. Results

Draft Content 228004041-26775-en032.jpg

Graph 1 shows the network of the 180 most active doctoral committee members. Even though the existence of very dense zones may be appreciated in the graph of the network, it is better to study the indicators that arise from the analysis of social networks, as graphic representations offer a very limited scope for analysis. Table 1 presents the most relevant indicators of the complete network of the selection of the doctoral committee members in the field of communication together with those same indicators referring to the network that comprises the 180 doctors selected for the empirical analysis. Data on academic networks from another two areas of the social sciences are shown, to facilitate a comparative analysis of the data on network structure: marketing (Casanueva & Espasandín, 2004) and accounting and finance (Casanueva, Escobar & Larrinaga, 2007).


Draft Content 228004041-26775-en033.jpg

The first row of table 1 shows the size of the network, which serves as a good reference in order to analyse its structure, as many indicators of the network structure will depend on it. The size of the network of all the doctors participating in the doctoral committees under consideration is 2496, while the ties between the 180 most active members were carefully analysed, as opposed to the 255 for accounting and the 84 for marketing.

The density is shown in the second row of table 1. Density refers to the number of real ties in the network in comparison with all the possible ties between its members. The low density of the complete communication network, with only 0.1% of possible links, is principally because of the large number of nodes that make up that network in relation to the number of people that can intervene in each event (reading of a thesis). The density in the second network increases by a factor of 50, almost reaching 5%. This relational level is already moderately high and shows that the 180 actors in the network show significant cohesion between each other and that they have had the opportunity of sharing tasks with many other members of the doctoral committees. In fact, the density is twice that of the two previously mentioned areas of knowledge, such that selection in the field of communication is considerably more interconnected than in other areas of the social sciences in Spain.

Indegree centralization indicates how the network is concentrated around certain points, but the level for ties relating to selection is very low in the complete network (2.46%) and is not considerable (12.67%) in the case of the 180 most active members. It leads one to think that the network is not very centralized and, therefore, not very hierarchical. This is very important, as its suggests that the academic act of reading a thesis is quite open to the participation of many actors and is not focused on a social structure with a dominant central core.

Conversely, outdegree centralization is an indicator of the level at which the thesis management process is focused on a few doctors. The values are low for both the overall network (almost 7%) and the 180 members (15.48%), such that once again the activity of managing a thesis is on the whole not linked to a central group. Similar values are found in the two other areas under analysis.

Betweeness centralization presents low values in the four networks presented in table 1, such that only with difficulty can doctors exploit their position as intermediaries or brokers (in general terms) to connect more distant or separate parts of the network and to gain advantage from that position. This situation is an indicator that the network is well connected and that anyone can access another node in the network along different paths. Once again, it suggests that this structure is far removed from a hierarchical one.

Table 2 shows the mean and the standard deviation of the previously explained variables. The most striking point is that average scientific productivity of the 180 most active members of the doctoral committees in the field of communication is quite high, close to 20 publications with at least one citation on average, the same as the impact of the journal, as the average number of citations that they have is 186. This last point should be qualified, as the dispersion is very high. These data may be explained because there are certain members of the network with numerous citations, basically because their works are standard references in their field. The fact that approximately half of the network members are university chairs and that a third participates or have participated in the management of the most relevant scientific journals in the field is also noteworthy.


Draft Content 228004041-26775-en034.jpg

A joint regression analysis with the variable «Selection» as the dependent variable was used to compare the hypotheses presented in the conceptual framework. Table 3 presents three regression models. The standardized coefficients of the variables and their level of meaning appears in the same table. Model 1 is the control model. It includes the control variables University Chair and Editorial Board. The model is significative and the percentage variance explained is considerable (R2=0.114). The results show a positive and significative relation (although at a different level) of the dependent variable with the control variables.

Model 2 is intended to test Hypothesis 1. The four variables that measure scientific productivity now intervene as independent variables. The model is significant and presents a R2=0.116. Almost no increase in the explained variance was observed as a result of the inclusion of the new variables in the model. Once again, a positive and significative relation was shown in Model 2 between the condition of university chair and the dependent variable, whereas the relations with the four independent variables that measure scientific productivity (Publications, Citations, h-Index and Internationalization) are not significative. No support is therefore forthcoming for Hypothesis 1.

Model 3 serves to test Hypothesis 2, including the variable «Core» in the model. The first thing that may be seen is the important increase of R2 that rises to a value of 0.218. The independent variable «Core» shows a positive and significative relation (with a high degree of meaning) with the dependent variable. Hypothesis 2, which states that the selection of doctoral committee members in the field of communication is positively associated with the social activity of the academics, is therefore confirmed.


Draft Content 228004041-26775-en035.jpg

5. Conclusions and discussion

This research has proposed two, in principle, complementary hypotheses, on the way in which decisions are taken that affect research within Spanish academia in the field of communication. The first of these links the selection of members of academia with those who have a more productive scientific activity either in terms of publications (and its type) or in terms of the impact (measured by the number of citations or by the h-index) of those publications. The second hypothesis links these decisions to the social activity of the scientists following the assumptions of the sociology of science and the logic of invisible colleges (Crane, 1972; De-Solla-Price, 1963; Kuhn, 1962; Merton, 1973). The results offer no support for the first and uphold the second of these hypotheses.

These findings have three important implications. The first is that social factors play a prominent role in scientific activity and can condition it, as confirmed in earlier studies in other knowledge areas of the social sciences (Casanueva & Espasandín, 2004; Casanueva & Larrinaga, 2013). Scientific productivity (and its underlying indicators, which have a day-to-day effect on the activities of researchers and academics in the field of communication, such as publications, citations or the impact factor of the journals in which they publish) as an objective measure of good scientific practice does not occupy the most relevant place among the selection criteria in important scientific activities, such as those analysed here. This raises problems of incentives for the most active researchers who may encounter limitations to their possibilities of progressing towards a position in the social elite. It also erodes the dominant discourse on the immediate relation between scientific productivity and academic and investigative development. The third implication is that it leaves each of the two earlier positions as a sort of alternative model in which, on the one hand, the social and the subjective predominates and, on the other, the scientific and the objective. In this interplay, the social component appears as a momentary victor.

It may be asked whether a model in which the social aspect predominates over the scientific aspect is unfair and even perverse. The consideration of social structures arising from the network of the academia of communication in Spain has provided a partial response to this question. A problem would arise if the situation were one in which the social aspect was fundamental and in which the social structure was dominated by a more-or-less closed elite or core that could control the processes as they were happening. Our earlier analyses of the characteristics of the networks in the area would suggest that we can discard that scenario. The different centrality measures were found to be very low, so the concentration of selection in one part of the network may, it appears, be discounted. An additional analysis was completed to confirm this idea. The correlation between the matrix of choices of doctoral committee members with its transposed matrix were tested to validate the degree of symmetry in the choices. The correlation level is over 0.400 and significative, such that we have relations that are basically symmetric where the roles of those selecting and those selected interchange, which discards the idea of a hierarchical structure in the network of communication academics. Although it could also reflect zones in the network in which reciprocal choices occur and in which rather more closed social sub-groups are forming.

This work presents a series of limitations. The first is the impossibility of generalization from the network of the 180 most active doctors to the complete network, as the latter was not randomly chosen. The second is related to the degree of adjustment between indicators and the phenomenon to be measured. Particularly, the use of the core as a reference for social activity, based on how many people know each other, will be a possible approximation to a more complex phenomenon. Neither has the time factor been taken into account that might add some bias to the analyses. An interesting line of future research would perhaps be a longitudinal analysis of the variables to analyse their evolution and the institutional aspects and context that might influence them. The most promising line of work, however, would be to look more deeply into the question of whether a real and a single invisible college exists in communication and to look more closely at the connections between the invisible college in communication and other elements of scientific activity such as the means of scientific communication (basically journals and their impact) or other social and conceptual networks (the existence of which may be deduced from co-citations, co-authorships and citations). The results leave open other questions, such as whether the most scientifically productive thesis directors also choose doctoral committee members using social criteria and whether social activity conditions the type and the quantity of scientific production.

References

Alcántara, A. (2000). Ciencia, conocimiento y sociedad en la investigación científica universitaria. Perfiles educativos, 87. (www.monografias.com/trabajos29/ciencia-conocimiento-sociedad-investigacion-cientifica/ciencia-conocimiento-sociedad-investigacion-cientifica.pdf) (03-01-2012).

Ben-David, J. & Sullivan, T.A. (1975). Sociology of Science. Annual Review of Sociology, 1, 203-222. (DOI:10.1146/annurev.so.01.080175.001223).

Borgatti, S.P., Everett, M.G. & Freeman, L.C. (2002). Ucinet 6 for Windows. Software for social network analysis. Harvard: Analytic Technologies.

Casanueva, C. & Espasadín, F. (2004). La red social del Área de Marketing: Rela-ciones entre Universidades. XXIV International Sunbelt Social Network Conference. Portorož (Eslovenia).

Casanueva, C. & Larrinaga, C. (2013). The (Uncertain) Invisible College of Spanish Accounting Scholars. Critical Perspectives on Accounting, 24, 19-31. (DOI:10.1016/j.cpa.2012.05.002).

Casanueva, C., Escobar, B. & Larrinaga, C. (2007). Red social de contabilidad en España a partir de los tribunales de tesis. Revista Española de Financiación y Contabilidad, 136, 707-722.

Castillo, A. & Carretón, M. (2010). Investigación en Comunicación. Estudio bi-bliométrico de las Revistas de Comunicación en España. Comunicación y Sociedad, XXIII, 2, 289-327.

Castillo, A. & Ruiz, I. (2011). Las revistas científicas españolas de Comunicación en Latindex. In Fonseca-Mora, M.C. (Coord.). Acceso y visibilidad de las revistas científicas españolas de Comunicación. Colección Cuadernos Artesanos de Latina, 10.

Castillo-Esparcia, A., Rubio-Moraga, A. & Almansa-Martínez, A. (2012). La Investigación en comunicación. Análisis bibliométrico de las revistas de mayor impacto del ISI. Revista Latina, 67, 248-270. (DOI:10.4185/RLCS-067-955-248-270).

Chang, T.K. & Tai, Z. (2005). Mass Communication Research and the Invisible College Revisited: The Changing Landscape and Emerging Fronts in Journalism-related Studies. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 82(3), 672-694. (DOI:10.1177/107769900508200312).

Crane, D. (1969). Social Structure in a Group of Scientists: A Test of the ‘Invisible College’ Hypothesis. American Sociological Review, 34, 335-352.

Crane, D. (1972). Invisible Colleges. Diffusion of Knowledge in Scientific Communities. Chicago: Chicago University Press.

De-Solla-Price, D. (1963). Little Science, Big Science. New York: Columbia University Press.

Fernández-Quijada, D. (2010). El perfil de las revistas españolas de comunicación (2007-2008). Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 33 (4), 553-581. (DOI:10.3989/redc.2010.4.756).

Fernández-Quijada, D. (2011). De los investigadores a las redes: una aproximación tipológica a la autoría en las revistas españolas de comunicación. I Congreso Nacional de Metodología de la Investigación en Comunicación. Madrid. [Conference Paper].

Ginés, J. (2004). La necesidad del cambio educativo para la Sociedad del Conocimiento. Revista Iberoamericana de Educación, 35, 13-37.

Jones, D.E., Baró, J. & Ontalba, J.A. (2000). Investigación sobre comunicación en España. Aproximación bibliométrica a las tesis doctorales (1926-1998). Barcelona: Comcat.

Joy, S. (2009). Productividad académica de los psicólogos académicos. Boletín de Psicología, 97, 93-116.

Kuhn, T.S. (1962). The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. México: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

Lamo-de-Espinosa, E.; González, J.M. & Torres, C. (1994). La sociología del conocimiento y de la ciencia. Madrid: Alianza.

Laumann, E., Marsden, P. & Prensky, D. (1989). The Boundary Specification Problem in Network Analysis. In R.S. Burt & J.S. Minor (Eds.), Applied Network Analysis: A Methodological Introduction. Berverly Hills: Sage.

López-Ornelas, M. (2010). Estudio cuantitativo de los procesos de comunicación de la Revista Latina de Comunicación Social (RLCS), 1998-2009. Revista Latina, 65, 538-552. (DOI:10.4185/RLCS-65-2010-917-538-552).

Martínez-Nicolás, M. & Saperas-Lapiedra, E. (2011). La investigación sobre Comunicación en España (1998-2007). Análisis de los artículos publicados en revis-tas científicas. Revista Latina, 66, 101-129. (DOI:10.4185/RLCS-66-2011-926-101-129).

Martínez-Nicolás, M. (2006). Masa (en situación) crítica. La investigación sobre periodismo en España: comunidad científica e intereses de conocimiento. Anàlisi, 33, 135-170.

Masip, P. (2011). Efecto Aneca: producción española en comunicación en el Social Science Citation Index. Anuario Thinkepi, 5, 206-210.

Merton, R.K. (1973). The Sociology of Science: Theoretical and Empirical Investigations. Chicago: Chicago University Press.

Molina, J.L., Muñoz, J.M. & Domenech, M. (2002). Redes de publicaciones científicas: un Análisis de la estructura de coautorías. Redes, 1, 3.

Moody, J. (2004). The Structure of a Social Science Collaboration Network: Disciplinary Cohesion from 1963 to 1999. American Sociological Review, 69, 213-238.

Muller-Camen, M. & Salzgeber, S. (2005). Changes in Academic Work and the Chair Regime: The Case of German Business Administration Academics. Organization Studies, 26, 271-290. (DOI:10.1177/0170840605049802).

Newman, M.E.J. (2001). From the Cover: The Structure of Scientific Collaboration Networks. PNAS 98, 404-409.

Perveval, J.M. & Fornieles, J. (2008). Confucio contra Sócrates: la perversa relación entre la investigación y la acreditación. Anàlisi, 36, 213-224.

Repiso, R., Torres, D. & Delgado, E. (2011a). Análisis bibliométrico y de redes sociales en tesis doctorales españolas sobre televisión (1976/2007). Comunicar, 37, 151-159. (DOI:10.3916/C37-2011-03-07).

Repiso, R., Torres, D. & Delgado, E. (2011b). Análisis de la investigación sobre radio en España: una aproximación a través del análisis bibliométrico y de redes sociales de las tesis doctorales defendidas en España entre 1976-2008. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 17(2), 417-429.

Repiso, R., Torres, D. & Delgado, E. (2011c). Análisis bibliométrico de la producción española de tesis doctorales sobre cine, 1978-2007. IV Congreso Internacional sobre Análisis Fílmico, 976-987. Castellón, 3-6 de Mayo.

Rodríguez, J.A. (1993). La sociología académica. Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociológicas, 64, 175-200.

Scott, J. (1991). Social Network Analysis. A Handbook. London: Sage.

Sierra, G. (2003). Deconstrucción de los Tribunales del CSIC en el Periodo 1985-2002: Profesores de Investigación en el Área de Física. Apuntes de Ciencia y Tecnología, 7, 30-38.

Soriano, J. (2008). El efecto ANECA. Congreso internacional fundacional de la AE-IC. Santiago de Compostela. (www.ae-ic.org/santiago2008/contents/pdf/co-municaciones/286.pdf) (02-12-2012).

Sorli, Á. & Merlo, J.A. (2002). Bases de datos y recursos en Internet de tesis doc-torales. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 25, 1, 95-106.

Tai, Z. (2009). The Structure of Knowledge and Dynamics of Scholarly Communication in Agenda Setting Research, 1996-2005. Journal of Communication, 59(3), 481-513. (DOI:10.1111/j.1460-2466.2009.01425.x).

Wasserman, S. & Faust, K. (1994). Social Network Analysis. Methods and Applications. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Wellman, B. & Berkowitz, S.D. (1988). Social Structures: A Network Approach. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Zuccala, A. (2006). Modeling the Invisible College. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 57, 152-168. (DOI:10.1002/asi.20256).



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

En un momento en que la actividad académica en el ámbito de la comunicación se valora principalmente por el impacto de las revistas y los medios de comunicación científica y por la productividad de los investigadores, surge la cuestión de si los factores sociales pueden condicionar la actividad científica con la misma fuerza que estos elementos objetivos. Esta investigación analiza la influencia de la productividad científica y de la actividad social en el ámbito de la comunicación. Se ha identificado la red social de los investigadores de comunicación a partir de las tesis doctorales. Para los 180 investigadores más activos en los tribunales de tesis se ha calculado su producción científica. Se utiliza el análisis de redes sociales para estudiar las relaciones que se producen en los tribunales de tesis doctorales. Los resultados muestran que los factores sociales influyen positivamente en una actividad académica y científica tan relevante como la obtención del grado de doctor, mientras que la productividad científica individual no lo hace. Como conclusiones cabe señalar que existe una desconexión entre la productividad científica y la proyección internacional de los investigadores y su papel en la red social. Las implicaciones de este hecho están matizadas por una estructura no jerarquizada de las relaciones entre los científicos de comunicación.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción

El desarrollo y el devenir de la actividad científica ha sido tratado generalmente como un fenómeno endógeno ligado a la evolución de la investigación, a los grandes descubrimientos científicos, al proceso de transmisión de la ciencia y el saber, etc., generando un avance progresivo, imparable y, en algunos casos, exponencial. Pero desde hace décadas se ha puesto de manifiesto que la actividad científica tiene un fuerte componente social en su creación, difusión y delimitación que puede condicionarla de forma extraordinaria (Kuhn, 1962; Merton, 1973). La actividad científica puede ser el origen y/o el resultado de estructuras sociales, dando lugar a disciplinas específicas, como la sociología de la ciencia (Ben-David & Sullivan, 1975; Lamo-de-Espinosa & al., 1994).

En las ciencias sociales, por su relativa juventud y por la coexistencia habitual de posibles paradigmas o corrientes de pensamiento que discurren en paralelo y, a veces, ocupando posiciones enfrentadas y antagónicas, las estructuras sociales que soportan la actividad científica son objeto de una atención especial (Rodríguez, 1993). Muchas comunidades científicas tienen una delimitación geográfica de mayor o menor amplitud dependiendo del ámbito de conocimiento, siendo las tradiciones académicas, el entorno idiomático y las estructuras físicas de la actividad científica las que generan con mayor frecuencia un entorno geográfico nacional. Por ello es interesante conocer las especificidades de las comunidades científicas en cada país o región.

En este contexto, parece pertinente profundizar en los aspectos sociales de la comunidad científica española ligada al campo de la comunicación. Los estudios universitarios en este terreno son recientes (la primera Facultad se creó en 1971) y nacen en el marco del modelo universitario denominado «napoleónico», centrado en la formación de profesionales. En la actualidad, se está experimentando una transición hacia el modelo «humboldtiano», cuya meta principal es la generación y transmisión de conocimiento científico (Ginés, 2004: 14). Esto está provocando el aumento paulatino del peso específico de la investigación en la promoción del profesorado universitario. Al mismo tiempo, como en otras disciplinas sociales con un alto componente de interdisciplinariedad, la comunicación es terreno abonado para que los aspectos sociales ocupen un lugar destacado en la actividad científica. Menos del 50% de las aportaciones españolas a las revistas de comunicación del Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) proceden de las facultades y departamentos de comunicación (Masip, 2011: 7). Además parece especialmente relevante ligar la actividad social en este ámbito a los aspectos relacionados con la comunicación científica, ya que la tendencia actual es que se valore a los científicos y académicos del campo en función de sus publicaciones o del impacto de las mismas (Soriano, 2008; Perveval & Fornieles, 2008; Fernández-Quijada, 2010; Masip, 2011; Castillo & Ruiz, 2011). La atención sobre la academia española de comunicación se está concentrando en las revistas más relevantes, en su papel en el avance del conocimiento y en detectar la estructura del campo a través de estudios bibliométricos (Castillo & Carretón, 2010; López-Ornelas, 2010; Martínez & Saperas, 2011; Castillo, Rubio & Almansa, 2012). Sin embargo, cabría preguntarse si el peso de las medidas aparentemente objetivas de la prominencia científica (publicaciones o citas) es el criterio articulador de la estructura de la academia española de comunicación y si el movimiento de fondo que suponen las relaciones sociales entre los científicos juega un papel determinante sobre la actividad de los mismos.

Este trabajo tiene como objetivo determinar si la relevancia demostrada de un investigador de comunicación, medida por su productividad científica, y su posición social, medida por su pertenencia al núcleo activo de la academia, influyen en decisiones importantes para la actividad académica y científica. Para responder a esta cuestión se va a estudiar cómo influyen tanto la productividad científica como la actividad social en una decisión académica destacada en la comunidad científica: la elección de los miembros de los tribunales que juzgan las tesis doctorales en el campo de conocimiento. Para un adecuado análisis de las relaciones sociales entre los científicos derivados del acto académico de la lectura de una tesis doctoral se ha empleado como marco de referencia el análisis de redes sociales (Scott, 1991).

2. La comunidad académica y científica en el campo de comunicación

El análisis de los factores sociales en la producción científica tiene una larga tradición y ha generado un campo particular del saber, la sociología de la ciencia (Merton, 1973). La influencia de las estructuras sociales en la producción científica puede ser considerada a partir del concepto de colegios invisibles. De Solla Price (1963) apunta la existencia de grupos de científicos que se conformaban básicamente por un contacto y una comunicación informal que generaba una estructura social estable (destacando el papel de la élite dentro de ellos). Si De Solla Price destaca el papel de la comunicación informal como base de la estructura social, Crane (1969; 1972) hace hincapié en la posibilidad de pertenencia al grupo (colegio invisible) por medio de contactos indirectos entre científicos entre los que se establecen múltiples relaciones de forma simultánea (coautorías, citaciones, intercambio de borradores, presencia conjunta en eventos y en organizaciones, dirección de tesis doctorales, etc.). Crane (1969; 1972) utiliza un incipiente análisis de redes para poner de manifiesto la aparición de estructuras sociales emergentes en un campo científico en forma de colegios invisibles o círculos sociales (social circles). Utiliza para ello varias relaciones entre científicos e indica que el conjunto de relaciones conforma de manera informal un círculo social (una estructura social informal y de límites difusos).

Zuccala (2006) plantea el concepto de colegio invisible como la estructura organizativa de un conjunto de actores sociales (investigadores) que intercambian información formal e informal en el marco de las reglas de una disciplina y ciertos problemas de investigación. Utiliza el análisis de redes sociales y el análisis de cocitaciones para identificar estos colegios invisibles en un campo determinado. Moody (2004) utiliza la relación de coautoría para describir la red de colaboración en la ciencia social y para contrastar en varios modelos alternativos cómo afecta la colaboración a la práctica científica (aparición de pequeños grupos relativamente aislados, intercambios entre grupos con intereses distintos, y redes dominadas por científicos estrella). Las dos primeras posibilidades fueron también exploradas por Crane (1969). En el ámbito de la comunicación también han sido explorado los colegios invisibles y su determinación a través de estudios bibliométricos (Chang & Tai, 2005; Tai, 2009).

La academia de comunicación en España puede ser estudiada como un colegio invisible que genera un vínculo de pertenencia entre sus miembros y que va a generar una serie de contactos formales e informales entre los mismos en diversos actos científicos (congresos, jornadas, actos académicos, eventos profesionales, etc.), una transmisión de información y conocimiento entre los mismos y una comunicación informal tanto directa como indirecta. Varios investigadores han puesto de manifiesto la existencia de estas redes en comunicación. La mayoría han utilizado el análisis de las coautorías en los artículos publicados en las revistas científicas del ámbito (López-Ornelas, 2010; Masip, 2011). Fernández-Quijada (2011) establece una red de colaboraciones entre los profesores pertenecientes a las distintas universidades españolas a raíz del estudio bibliométrico de las coautorías en las revistas españolas de comunicación de más impacto. Este autor sugiere la necesidad de estudios de mayor profundidad que permitan comprender la formación y funcionamiento de estas redes.

Martínez-Nicolás (2006) estudia la calidad de las investigaciones en el área de Periodismo y las relaciona con la estructura de la comunidad científica. Esta estructura responde a las «vicisitudes de su constitución y desarrollo histórico». Sería interesante incidir en los grupos identificados con estudios de carácter empírico. Respecto al estudio de las tesis doctorales en comunicación hay que señalar los estudios bibliométricos pioneros de Daniel E. Jones y otros (2000) que han aportado un importante cuerpo de conocimientos que han servido de base para posteriores investigaciones.

Repiso, Torres y Delgado analizan las redes sociales en comunicación a partir de los miembros de tribunales en tesis doctorales. De esta manera estructuran el sistema de investigación en diferentes especialidades como televisión (Repiso & al., 2011a), radio (Repiso & al., 2011b) y cine (Repiso & al., 2011c) en España en torno a los principales catedráticos relacionados con las materias.

Un elemento importante de la actividad científica de la academia española de comunicación, por las características de la propia aportación y por el hecho de que supone la certificación de la capacidad investigadora de quienes la realizan, es la lectura de una tesis doctoral. Por eso es muy importante que las tesis sean valoradas por investigadores cualificados. La defensa de la misma se hace ante un tribunal compuesto por varios doctores del área y de otras afines. En la elección de dicho tribunal interviene de forma decisiva el director de la tesis doctoral y los miembros de su departamento a través de procesos de tipo informal y basados, por tanto, en consideraciones que sobrepasan las puramente científicas. Estas elecciones deberían basarse en criterios que deberían ser objetivos y derivados de la capacidad como investigadores de los miembros que conforman los tribunales de tesis. La productividad científica de los académicos es una medida de éxito de la actividad científica y marca el camino del progreso profesional (Alcántara, 2000; Joy, 2009). Por tanto, el desarrollo profesional de un investigador y consiguientemente su selección por parte de la comunidad académica para realizar las actividades ligadas a la investigación, estará condicionada por lo que sea capaz de aportar objetivamente.

• Hipótesis 1: La elección de los miembros de los tribunales de tesis del ámbito de la comunicación estará influenciada positivamente por la productividad científica de los mismos, medida por sus publicaciones y el número de citas recibidas. Por otro lado, se puede desarrollar una hipótesis complementaria que ligue los factores sociales a las decisiones relevantes de la actividad científica en comunicación. Parece lógico pensar que las estructuras sociales que se conforman en la red de investigadores y académicos de un área de conocimiento pueden determinar o condicionar el juicio de un trabajo de investigación de primer nivel y la acreditación ante la comunidad científica de la valía investigadora del aspirante a doctor. La propia concepción de círculos sociales o de colegios invisibles antes señalados (Crane, 1972) y la estructura de red en las relaciones académicas entre los investigadores (Molina, Muñoz & Doménech, 2002) permiten explicitar una posible asociación entre el conocimiento personal y profesional entre los investigadores y académicos de comunicación y las elecciones que éstos realizan para que otros actores juzguen las tesis que ellos han dirigido. Sierra (2003) demuestra de forma empírica, a partir de la composición de los tribunales del CSIC y utilizando el análisis de redes sociales, que la elección de esos tribunales no sigue unos criterios aleatorios, sino que existe una base social para esas decisiones. Por su parte, Casanueva y Larrinaga (2013) muestran evidencias de que los factores sociales y particularmente el conocimiento previo de otros miembros de la red influyen significativamente en la elección de los miembros de los tribunales de tesis en el área de contabilidad y finanzas y en la de los presidentes de los mismos.

• Hipótesis 2: Por tanto, podemos formular que la elección de los miembros de los tribunales de tesis del ámbito de comunicación estará influenciada positivamente por la actividad social de los miembros de la academia.

3. Métodos

3.1. La red del campo de comunicación basada en tribunales de tesis

Para estudiar las dos hipótesis sobre la influencia de la productividad científica y la actividad social en las decisiones científicas dentro del campo de comunicación se ha seleccionado como objeto de estudio la red conformada por los investigadores y académicos del área que han participado en los tribunales de tesis doctorales desde el año 2000 hasta 2012. Para delimitar el objeto de estudio se ha utilizado la base de datos Teseo, que proporciona diferente información sobre las tesis leídas en España. Si bien esta base de datos presenta una serie de inconvenientes como falta de normalización, exhaustividad, duplicidades y omisiones (Repiso & al., 2011: 419) es el recurso más completo y de obligada consulta para las tesis doctorales de las universidades españolas (Sorli & Merlo, 2002: 203). La determinación de las tesis propias del ámbito se hace difícil en la medida en que no existen descriptores adecuados que permitan marcar unas fronteras claras y sin solapamientos del ámbito de comunicación. Por ello, la estrategia seguida ha sido la de identificar todas las tesis que correspondían a los departamentos de comunicación audiovisual y publicidad y periodismo de todas las universidades españolas. En total se han analizado 1.298 tesis doctorales leídas en el periodo considerado. En ellas han participado casi 2.500 doctores distintos en los papeles de directores y miembros de tribunales, pudiendo tratarse de investigadores del área o de otras afines en España o de doctores extranjeros. Muchos de estos actores no tienen un papel relevante en la red. Por tanto, para realizar un análisis empírico más adecuado para responder al objetivo de esta investigación, se ha optado, siguiendo a Laumann y otros (1989), por un criterio relacional a la hora de delimitar la red y solo se van a analizar los que estuvieron en ocho tribunales o más, de forma que se tuviera una red manejable en términos de análisis y suficientemente amplia. De esta forma, el análisis de la red se limitará a los 180 doctores más activos en tribunales de tesis.

Se han obtenido datos sobre esos 180 investigadores de comunicación referidos tanto a su afiliación como a su productividad científica. Para el cálculo de la producción científica se ha usado el número de publicaciones y el número de citas de las publicaciones. La información contenida en las bases de datos internacionales más estandarizadas (SSCI y Scopus) no dieron resultados que permitieran diferenciar claramente a los 180 miembros elegidos de la red en términos de producción científica. Por ejemplo, solo el 27,22% de ellos tenía alguna publicación en SSCI. Este hecho es consistente con investigaciones anteriores que describen la limitada internacionalización en las publicaciones de los académicos de comunicación en España (Masip, 2011). Por ello, se ha acudido a Google Scholar para obtener los datos más importantes sobre la producción científica de los 180 actores. Para sistematizar la búsqueda se ha empleado el programa en red Harzing’s Publish or Perish en su versión 3.8.3.4792, considerando los datos referidos a artículos en revistas, libros y capítulos de libros. Debido a que esta herramienta no es muy discriminante respecto a los nombres ni respecto al tipo de documentos se realizó una depuración manual y registro a registro de los datos obtenidos.

3.2. Análisis de redes sociales

El estudio de la influencia de las relaciones sociales en las decisiones académicas, y más concretamente en los procesos de elección de los tribunales que juzgarán las tesis doctorales, debe atender de manera específica a las relaciones sociales que se producen y a la estructura social que se deriva de las mismas. El adecuado análisis de las estructuras sociales debe basarse en datos concretos no sobre las características de los individuos sino sobre sus vínculos sociales. Para ello se usa el análisis de redes sociales (Wellman & Berkowitz, 1988).

A diferencia de los métodos de investigación cuantitativos en ciencias sociales, basados en el análisis de atributos de los elementos de una muestra (Wasserman & Faust, 1994), el análisis de redes sociales centra su atención en la identificación de las relaciones que se producen entre una serie de elementos o de actores que conforman la red. El análisis de redes sociales pretende conocer la estructura conjunta de los vínculos entre los actores, permitiendo identificar la existencia de patrones generales de relación que resulten de la abstracción de las elecciones de los individuos o de las relaciones entre elementos.

Una red puede definirse de manera simple como un conjunto de nodos o elementos relacionados entre sí. Por ello, el punto de partida del análisis de redes sociales es el estudio de estas dos unidades básicas: los nodos que representan a los actores o elementos de la red y las relaciones entre esos nodos. Desde su reciente origen, el análisis de redes sociales se ha aplicado al estudio de la actividad científica (Crane, 1972), experimentando un notable desarrollo en los últimos años, con la disponibilidad de datos bibliográficos masivos sobre coautorías en publicaciones científicas (Moody, 2004; Newman, 2001).

3.3. Variables

Para contrastar las hipótesis se van a elaborar distintos modelos de regresión, cuyas variables se explican a continuación:

• Variable dependiente. Como variable de resultado se ha utilizado la suma de las veces que cada uno de los 180 doctores que componen la muestra de los más activos fue elegido para participar en un tribunal de tesis. Como se ha señalado el valor mínimo de esta variable es 8.

• Variables independientes. Para medir la productividad científica se han utilizado cuatro indicadores básicos de la misma. En primer lugar, la variable Publicaciones mide el montante de la producción científica de cada miembro de la red a lo largo de su carrera. Se incluyen libros, capítulos de libros y publicaciones en revistas científicas que han sido citados al menos una vez. Se recogen de forma agregada, sin diferenciar entre tipo de documentos. En segundo lugar, la variable Citas corresponde al número de citas recibidas de cada autor derivadas de las publicaciones antes señaladas. La tercera variable intenta una medición conjunta de la capacidad de publicación y del impacto de los documentos publicados medido por el número de citas que reciben. Se trata del h-Index. Un autor tendrá un índice h de valor 10, si diez de sus artículos han recibido al menos diez citas. La cuarta variable, Internacional, toma valor 1 si el miembro de la red ha publicado en alguna revista del SSCI, que se ha tomado como referencia para indicar la proyección internacional de un autor, y valor 0 si no ha publicado. La elaboración del indicador de la actividad social fue más compleja. En primer lugar, se construyó una red nueva en la que la relación considerada era la presencia conjunta de académicos en la lectura de una tesis doctoral. Es decir, cada tesis pone en contacto a cada miembro del tribunal y a los directores y codirectores de la tesis en un mismo acto académico (del que suelen derivarse otros actos sociales). Ese contacto mutuo hace que los miembros de la red se conozcan (o se intensifique ese conocimiento) unos a otros. Para construir el indicador se ha acudido al programa de redes sociales UCINET (Borgatti, Everett & Freeman, 2002) que permite dividir la red en dos grupos a través de un proceso iterativo. El primero de ellos está conformado por el núcleo de la red (core) y el segundo por su periferia. La variable Núcleo está determinada por la pertenencia de un doctor a ese núcleo de la red de presencia conjunta en tribunales de tesis del campo de comunicación.

En cuanto a las variables de control, se han empleado dos. La variable «Catedrático» intenta reflejar el valor de ocupar los puestos más elevados en la jerarquía académica como predictor de las elecciones académicas, como han puesto de manifiesto investigaciones anteriores tanto en el contexto español (Casanueva & Larrinaga, 2013) como en el contexto alemán (Muller-Camen & Salzgeber, 2005). Se ha construido una variable dicotómica con valor 1 para los académicos que ostentan la posición de catedráticos. La segunda variable de control «Consejo Revistas» mide si un miembro de la red forma o ha formado parte de los consejos de dirección, científicos y/o de redacción de las nueve revistas del primer cuartil del índice In-Recs para 2011 («Revista Latina», «Comunicación y Sociedad», «Comunicar», «Estudio del Mensaje Periodístico», «Zer», «Trípodos», «Ámbitos», «Anàlisi» y «Telos»).

4. Resultados

Draft Content 228004041-26775 ov-es032.jpg

El gráfico 1 muestra la red de los 180 miembros de tribunales más activos. Aunque en el grafo de dicha red se pueden apreciar la existencia de dos zonas más densas, las representaciones gráficas tienen un poder de análisis muy limitado, por lo que es mejor estudiar los indicadores derivados del análisis de redes sociales. La tabla 1 presenta los indicadores más relevantes de la red completa de elección de miembros de tribunales de tesis doctorales en el ámbito de comunicación, junto con esos mismos indicadores referidos a la red conformada por los 180 doctores seleccionados para el análisis empírico. Para poder analizar en términos comparativos los datos de la estructura de la red se adjuntan los de las redes de académicos de otras dos áreas de ciencias sociales, la de marketing (Casanueva & Espasandín, 2004) y la de contabilidad y finanzas (Casanueva, Escobar & Larrinaga, 2007).


Draft Content 228004041-26775 ov-es033.jpg

En la tabla 1 aparece en la primera fila el tamaño de la red, que dará una buena referencia para analizar su estructura, ya que muchos indicadores de la estructura de la red dependen de ella. El tamaño de la red de todos los doctores participantes en los tribunales de tesis considerados es de 2.496, mientras que se han analizado detenidamente las relaciones entre los 180 más activos, frente a 255 para contabilidad y a 84 para marketing.

En la segunda fila de la tabla 1 aparece la densidad. La densidad hace referencia al número de relaciones reales en la red en comparación con todas las relaciones posibles entre los miembros de la misma. La baja densidad de la red completa de comunicación, con solo el 0,1% de los vínculos posibles, viene motivada principalmente por el gran número de elementos que componen dicha red en relación con el número de personas que pueden intervenir en cada evento considerado (lectura de tesis). En la segunda red la densidad se multiplica por 50 llegando casi al 5%. Este nivel de relaciones ya es moderadamente alto y muestra que los 180 elementos de la red tienen una importante cohesión entre sí y que han tenido la oportunidad de compartir con otros muchos miembros de la red labores en los tribunales de tesis. De hecho, la densidad es el doble que la de las dos otras áreas de conocimiento señaladas, por lo que aparentemente las elecciones en el ámbito de comunicación están bastante más interconectadas que en otras ciencias sociales en España.

La centralización respecto al grado de entrada indica cómo la red está concentrada alrededor de ciertos puntos, pero el nivel en la relación de elección es muy bajo para la red completa (2,46%) y no es considerable (12,67%) en el caso de los 180 miembros más activos. Esto hace pensar en una red relativamente poco centralizada y, por lo tanto, poco jerarquizada. Esto es muy importante, ya que plantea el acontecimiento académico de la lectura de tesis como bastante abierto a la participación de muchos y no concentrado en estructura social con un núcleo central dominante.

Respecto a la centralización de grado de salida es un indicador del nivel en que está centralizado el proceso de dirección de tesis en pocos doctores. Tanto para la red general (casi 7%) como para la de 180 miembros (15,48%) los valores son bajos, por lo que de nuevo la actividad de la dirección de tesis no corresponde mayoritariamente a un grupo central. Los valores son similares en las otras dos áreas analizadas.

La centralización de intermediación presenta en las cuatro redes presentadas en la tabla 1 valores bajos, por lo que los doctores difícilmente pueden aprovechar su posición de intermediario o bróker (en términos generales) para conectar partes más distantes o separadas de la red y obtener ventajas de esa posición. Esto es un indicador de que la red está bien conectada y que cualquiera puede acceder a otro punto de la red por diferentes caminos. De nuevo, podemos pensar que esta estructura está bastante alejada de la jerárquica.

La tabla 2 muestra la media y la desviación típica de las variables anteriormente explicadas. Lo más llamativo es comprobar que la productividad científica media de los 180 miembros más activos de la red de tribunales de tesis en el ámbito de comunicación es bastante elevada, rozando las 20 publicaciones con al menos una cita como media, lo mismo que el impacto de las mismas, ya que el número medio de citas que poseen es de 186. Este último dato debe ser matizado ya que la desviación es muy elevada. Estos datos se explican porque existen determinados miembros de la red con un número muy elevado de citas de sus trabajos, básicamente porque se trata de los manuales más habituales de la materia. También es destacable el hecho de que aproximadamente la mitad de los miembros de la red sean catedráticos y de que una tercera parte participe o haya participado en la gestión de las revistas científicas más relevantes del campo.


Draft Content 228004041-26775 ov-es034.jpg

Para realizar el contraste de las hipótesis presentadas en el marco conceptual, se ha utilizado un conjunto de análisis de regresión con la variable Elección como dependiente. La tabla 3 presenta tres modelos de regresión. En dicha tabla aparecen los coeficientes estandarizados de las variables y su nivel de significación. El Modelo 1 es el modelo de control. Se incluyen en el mismo las variables de control «Catedrático» y «Consejo Revistas». El modelo es significativo y el porcentaje explicado de la varianza es considerable (R2= 0,114). Los resultados muestran una relación positiva y significativa (aunque a distinto nivel) de la variable dependiente con las variables de control.

El Modelo 2 intenta contrastar la hipótesis 1. Ahora intervienen como variables independientes las cuatro que miden la productividad científica. El modelo es significativo y presenta una R2=0,116. Se puede observar que la inclusión de las nuevas variables al modelo no ha supuesto casi ningún incremento de la varianza explicada. De nuevo, se muestra en el Modelo 2 una relación positiva y significativa entre la condición de catedrático y la variable dependiente, mientras que las relaciones con las cuatro variables independientes que miden la productividad científica (publicaciones, citas, h-Index e internacionalización) no son significativas. Por tanto, se rechaza la hipótesis 1.

El Modelo 3 sirve para contrastar la hipótesis 2 incluyendo la variable Núcleo en el modelo. Lo primero que se puede observar es un incremento importante de la R2 que pasa a un valor de 0,218. La variable independiente Núcleo muestra una relación positiva y significativa (con un alto grado de significación) con la variable dependiente. Por tanto, se confirma la hipótesis 2 de que las elecciones de los miembros de los tribunales de tesis del campo de comunicación están asociadas positivamente con la actividad social de los académicos.


Draft Content 228004041-26775 ov-es035.jpg

5. Conclusiones y discusión

Esta investigación ha planteado dos hipótesis, en principio complementarias, sobre la forma en que se toman las decisiones que afectan a la investigación dentro de la academia española ligada al ámbito de la comunicación. La primera de ellas vincula las elecciones de los miembros de la academia a aquellos que tienen una actividad científica más productiva en término de publicaciones (y su tipo) o del impacto (medido por el número de citas o por el h-index) de dichas publicaciones. La segunda las vincula a la actividad social de los científicos siguiendo los presupuestos de la sociología de la ciencia y de la lógica de los colegios invisibles (Crane, 1972; De-Solla-Price, 1963; Kuhn, 1962; Merton, 1973). Los resultados obtenidos permiten rechazar la primera de esas hipótesis y confirmar la segunda.

Estos resultados tienen tres importantes implicaciones. La primera de ellas es que, como se ha comprobado en estudios anteriores de otras áreas de conocimiento de las ciencias sociales en España (Casanueva & Espasandín, 2004; Casanueva & Larrinaga, 2013), los factores sociales juegan un papel destacado en la actividad científica, pudiendo condicionarla. La productividad científica (y los indicadores en los que se basan y que cada día condicionan más la actividad de investigadores y académicos del ámbito de la comunicación, como las publicaciones, las citas o el índice de impacto de las revistas en las que se publican) como medida objetiva del buen hacer científico no ocupa el lugar más relevante entre los criterios de selección en actividades científicas importantes como la analizada. Esto plantea problemas de incentivo para los investigadores más activos que pueden encontrar en su progreso un límite en sus posibilidades de alcanzar puestos en la élite social. También erosiona el discurso dominante sobre la relación inmediata entre productividad científica y desarrollo académico e investigador. La tercera implicación es que deja las dos posiciones anteriores como una suerte de modelos alternativos en los que de una parte predomina lo social y lo subjetivo y de otra lo científico y lo objetivo. En ese juego aparece como vencedor momentáneo el componente social.

Cabe preguntarse si un modelo en el que lo social predomine sobre lo científico es injusto y hasta perverso. La consideración de las estructuras sociales derivadas de la red de la academia de comunicación en España permite responder parcialmente a esta cuestión. El problema sería encontrarse en una situación en la que lo social sea lo fundamental y en la que la estructura social estuviera dominada por una élite o un núcleo más o menos cerrado que pudiera controlar los procesos que se desarrollan. El análisis de las características de las redes del área realizado previamente permite descartar ese escenario. Se ha comprobado que las distintas medidas de centralización son muy bajas, por lo que la concentración de elecciones en una parte de la red parece descartarse. Para confirmar esta idea, se ha realizado un análisis adicional. Se ha comprobado la correlación entre la matriz de las elecciones de miembros de tribunales de tesis con su matriz traspuesta para comprobar el grado de simetría en las elecciones. El nivel de correlación es superior a 0,400 y significativo, con lo que nos encontramos con unas relaciones básicamente simétricas donde los papeles de electores y elegidos se intercambian, lo que permite descartar la idea de una estructura jerarquizada en la red de académicos de comunicación. Aunque también puede ser el reflejo de zonas de la red en las que se produzcan elecciones recíprocas y se estén conformando subgrupos sociales más bien cerrados.

Este trabajo presenta una serie de limitaciones. La primera es la imposibilidad de generalización a la red completa desde la red de los 180 doctores más activos, ya que no ha sido elegida aleatoriamente. La segunda tiene que ver con el grado de ajuste entre indicadores y el fenómeno a medir. Particularmente, el uso del core o núcleo como referencia de la actividad social, basado en cuánta gente se conoce, será una aproximación posible a un fenómeno más complejo. Tampoco se ha tenido en cuenta el factor tiempo que puede añadir algún sesgo a los análisis. Quizá una interesante línea de investigación futura sea un análisis longitudinal de las variables para analizar su evolución y los aspectos institucionales y de contexto que puedan influirlas. Pero el trabajo más prometedor podría ser adentrarse en la cuestión de si existe un verdadero y único colegio invisible en comunicación y profundizar en las conexiones entre el colegio invisible y otros elementos de la actividad científica como los medios de la comunicación científica (básicamente revistas y su impacto) o como

Referencias

Alcántara, A. (2000). Ciencia, conocimiento y sociedad en la investigación científica universitaria. Perfiles educativos, 87. (www.monografias.com/trabajos29/ciencia-conocimiento-sociedad-investigacion-cientifica/ciencia-conocimiento-sociedad-investigacion-cientifica.pdf) (03-01-2012).

Ben-David, J. & Sullivan, T.A. (1975). Sociology of Science. Annual Review of Sociology, 1, 203-222. (DOI:10.1146/annurev.so.01.080175.001223).

Borgatti, S.P., Everett, M.G. & Freeman, L.C. (2002). Ucinet 6 for Windows. Software for social network analysis. Harvard: Analytic Technologies.

Casanueva, C. & Espasadín, F. (2004). La red social del Área de Marketing: Rela-ciones entre Universidades. XXIV International Sunbelt Social Network Conference. Portorož (Eslovenia).

Casanueva, C. & Larrinaga, C. (2013). The (Uncertain) Invisible College of Spanish Accounting Scholars. Critical Perspectives on Accounting, 24, 19-31. (DOI:10.1016/j.cpa.2012.05.002).

Casanueva, C., Escobar, B. & Larrinaga, C. (2007). Red social de contabilidad en España a partir de los tribunales de tesis. Revista Española de Financiación y Contabilidad, 136, 707-722.

Castillo, A. & Carretón, M. (2010). Investigación en Comunicación. Estudio bi-bliométrico de las Revistas de Comunicación en España. Comunicación y Sociedad, XXIII, 2, 289-327.

Castillo, A. & Ruiz, I. (2011). Las revistas científicas españolas de Comunicación en Latindex. In Fonseca-Mora, M.C. (Coord.). Acceso y visibilidad de las revistas científicas españolas de Comunicación. Colección Cuadernos Artesanos de Latina, 10.

Castillo-Esparcia, A., Rubio-Moraga, A. & Almansa-Martínez, A. (2012). La Investigación en comunicación. Análisis bibliométrico de las revistas de mayor impacto del ISI. Revista Latina, 67, 248-270. (DOI:10.4185/RLCS-067-955-248-270).

Chang, T.K. & Tai, Z. (2005). Mass Communication Research and the Invisible College Revisited: The Changing Landscape and Emerging Fronts in Journalism-related Studies. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 82(3), 672-694. (DOI:10.1177/107769900508200312).

Crane, D. (1969). Social Structure in a Group of Scientists: A Test of the ‘Invisible College’ Hypothesis. American Sociological Review, 34, 335-352.

Crane, D. (1972). Invisible Colleges. Diffusion of Knowledge in Scientific Communities. Chicago: Chicago University Press.

De-Solla-Price, D. (1963). Little Science, Big Science. New York: Columbia University Press.

Fernández-Quijada, D. (2010). El perfil de las revistas españolas de comunicación (2007-2008). Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 33 (4), 553-581. (DOI:10.3989/redc.2010.4.756).

Fernández-Quijada, D. (2011). De los investigadores a las redes: una aproximación tipológica a la autoría en las revistas españolas de comunicación. I Congreso Nacional de Metodología de la Investigación en Comunicación. Madrid. [Conference Paper].

Ginés, J. (2004). La necesidad del cambio educativo para la Sociedad del Conocimiento. Revista Iberoamericana de Educación, 35, 13-37.

Jones, D.E., Baró, J. & Ontalba, J.A. (2000). Investigación sobre comunicación en España. Aproximación bibliométrica a las tesis doctorales (1926-1998). Barcelona: Comcat.

Joy, S. (2009). Productividad académica de los psicólogos académicos. Boletín de Psicología, 97, 93-116.

Kuhn, T.S. (1962). The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. México: Fondo de Cultura Económica.

Lamo-de-Espinosa, E.; González, J.M. & Torres, C. (1994). La sociología del conocimiento y de la ciencia. Madrid: Alianza.

Laumann, E., Marsden, P. & Prensky, D. (1989). The Boundary Specification Problem in Network Analysis. In R.S. Burt & J.S. Minor (Eds.), Applied Network Analysis: A Methodological Introduction. Berverly Hills: Sage.

López-Ornelas, M. (2010). Estudio cuantitativo de los procesos de comunicación de la Revista Latina de Comunicación Social (RLCS), 1998-2009. Revista Latina, 65, 538-552. (DOI:10.4185/RLCS-65-2010-917-538-552).

Martínez-Nicolás, M. & Saperas-Lapiedra, E. (2011). La investigación sobre Comunicación en España (1998-2007). Análisis de los artículos publicados en revis-tas científicas. Revista Latina, 66, 101-129. (DOI:10.4185/RLCS-66-2011-926-101-129).

Martínez-Nicolás, M. (2006). Masa (en situación) crítica. La investigación sobre periodismo en España: comunidad científica e intereses de conocimiento. Anàlisi, 33, 135-170.

Masip, P. (2011). Efecto Aneca: producción española en comunicación en el Social Science Citation Index. Anuario Thinkepi, 5, 206-210.

Merton, R.K. (1973). The Sociology of Science: Theoretical and Empirical Investigations. Chicago: Chicago University Press.

Molina, J.L., Muñoz, J.M. & Domenech, M. (2002). Redes de publicaciones científicas: un Análisis de la estructura de coautorías. Redes, 1, 3.

Moody, J. (2004). The Structure of a Social Science Collaboration Network: Disciplinary Cohesion from 1963 to 1999. American Sociological Review, 69, 213-238.

Muller-Camen, M. & Salzgeber, S. (2005). Changes in Academic Work and the Chair Regime: The Case of German Business Administration Academics. Organization Studies, 26, 271-290. (DOI:10.1177/0170840605049802).

Newman, M.E.J. (2001). From the Cover: The Structure of Scientific Collaboration Networks. PNAS 98, 404-409.

Perveval, J.M. & Fornieles, J. (2008). Confucio contra Sócrates: la perversa relación entre la investigación y la acreditación. Anàlisi, 36, 213-224.

Repiso, R., Torres, D. & Delgado, E. (2011a). Análisis bibliométrico y de redes sociales en tesis doctorales españolas sobre televisión (1976/2007). Comunicar, 37, 151-159. (DOI:10.3916/C37-2011-03-07).

Repiso, R., Torres, D. & Delgado, E. (2011b). Análisis de la investigación sobre radio en España: una aproximación a través del análisis bibliométrico y de redes sociales de las tesis doctorales defendidas en España entre 1976-2008. Estudios sobre el Mensaje Periodístico, 17(2), 417-429.

Repiso, R., Torres, D. & Delgado, E. (2011c). Análisis bibliométrico de la producción española de tesis doctorales sobre cine, 1978-2007. IV Congreso Internacional sobre Análisis Fílmico, 976-987. Castellón, 3-6 de Mayo.

Rodríguez, J.A. (1993). La sociología académica. Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociológicas, 64, 175-200.

Scott, J. (1991). Social Network Analysis. A Handbook. London: Sage.

Sierra, G. (2003). Deconstrucción de los Tribunales del CSIC en el Periodo 1985-2002: Profesores de Investigación en el Área de Física. Apuntes de Ciencia y Tecnología, 7, 30-38.

Soriano, J. (2008). El efecto ANECA. Congreso internacional fundacional de la AE-IC. Santiago de Compostela. (www.ae-ic.org/santiago2008/contents/pdf/co-municaciones/286.pdf) (02-12-2012).

Sorli, Á. & Merlo, J.A. (2002). Bases de datos y recursos en Internet de tesis doc-torales. Revista Española de Documentación Científica, 25, 1, 95-106.

Tai, Z. (2009). The Structure of Knowledge and Dynamics of Scholarly Communication in Agenda Setting Research, 1996-2005. Journal of Communication, 59(3), 481-513. (DOI:10.1111/j.1460-2466.2009.01425.x).

Wasserman, S. & Faust, K. (1994). Social Network Analysis. Methods and Applications. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Wellman, B. & Berkowitz, S.D. (1988). Social Structures: A Network Approach. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Zuccala, A. (2006). Modeling the Invisible College. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 57, 152-168. (DOI:10.1002/asi.20256).

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 31/05/13
Accepted on 31/05/13
Submitted on 31/05/13

Volume 21, Issue 1, 2013
DOI: 10.3916/C41-2013-06
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 10
Views 0
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?