Pulsa aquí para ver la versión en Español (ES)

Abstract

Due to the increasing importance of acquiring technological tools in communication strategies, and while taking into account that non-Governmental Organizations (NGO) use Instagram as a potential artivist tool to disseminate their initiatives and needs, the present article aims to investigate the form and content of photographs published in the social website Instagram during 2017 by the 20 most relevant NGOs at the international level. Specifically, we study the choice of formal elements, such as the design and editing, the intended purpose and feeling of the message transmitted in the photographs, as well as the type of actor or actors of the images (including their role, number, gesture, sex and age). In addition, we study the use and the engagement generated by children’s images. Content analysis, non-parametric statistical analysis with Chi-square test and variance analysis (ANOVA) are used as methodologies. The results of the study show how prototypical images used by NGOs (young children enjoying the benefits of aid with positive appearance and gestures) present content and formats that do not correspond to the type of image that generates more engagement from the target audience.

Download the PDF version

1. Introduction and status of the issue

For decades, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have been the primary vehicles from which humanitarian projects supporting the most disadvantaged groups have been carried out. The United Nations Organization (UN) has the most detailed official record of the number of NGOs. As of February 2017, the list had 13,137 organizations, with more than half (6,625) based in Africa (United Nations: Department of Economics and Social Affairs, 2014). When describing their fields of activity, the NGOs describe themselves as operating in the economic and social sphere (6,528), sustainable development (4,686), social development (4,686) and women-related issues (3,936). Other non-official sources, such as the International Forum of National NGO Platforms, (International Forum of National NGOs, 2012) estimates that there are 10 million non-governmental organizations around the world of all sizes and activities and equal to the fifth largest economy in the world – which provides an idea of its breadth and depth.

The term “non-governmental organization” was used in 1945 in Article 71, Chapter 10 of the United Nations Charter ((International Forum of National NGO Platforms FIP, 2012) with the purpose of regulating the concept of a non-profit organization independent of the state, and whose historical function developed as world-wide charitable and assistance associations, but without a legal framework that protected them. One of the main consequences of the process of separating them from states’ powers is that, in most cases, they did not have a truly effective voice for their work, for raising funds for their job beyond limited promotional activities, and for the invaluable support from private patrons with an awareness of helping others.

Today, all these organizations are faced with the challenge of developing effective communication methods that help mobilize citizens by engaging them in their social assistance projects. To this end, NGOs seek strategies that allow them to denounce social injustice and raise awareness of unmet humanitarian needs, as well as to communicate and disseminate the benefits of their projects and their activities.

In this regard, new technologies have modified ways of communicating (Aladro, 2011) by providing empowering and facilitating advocacy methods (Soengas-Pérez & Assif, 2017; González-Lizárraga, Becerra-Traver, & Yanez-Díaz, 2016; Cmeciu & Coman, 2016). Social networks, in particular, have provided NGOs with tools not only for social and group cohesion (Blight, Ruppel, & Schoenbauer, 2017), but also for the communication and dissemination with a still fully unknown and unrealized power (Byrne, 2010). The NGO, Save the Children Fund, for example, was able to reach more than 10 million people through Twitter in 2010 (Cooper, 2011) due to, among other factors, the impact of the earthquake in Haiti, dubbed the “First Disaster on Twitter”. For example, 2.3 million tweets with the words “Haiti” or “Red Cross” were published in just three days (Cooper, 2014) during the event. Similarly, during Hurricane Sandy, 10 disaster photos per second were uploaded to Instagram and a total of 1.3 million photos were shared on the platform under the same hashtag (Taylor, 2012).

Today, with limited human resources and at hardly any cost, a large number of NGOs make use of most of the major social networks such as Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram and Flickr, because they are a powerful showcase of unlimited scope to show their work.

The present research focuses on one of them (Instagram) because of its increasing relevance and notoriety, and for the interest of its main characteristic; the almost exclusive use of artistic images as a communicative tool.

Instagram is the social network that has grown the most in recent years. In September 2017, it reached 800 million users according to the latest data according to the company itself (Instagram for Business, 2017). 59% of users are between 18 and 29 years old, 33% are between 30 and 49. 60% have higher academic studies, and 63%, almost one in three, earn more than $50,000 per year, an important factor for any NGO (Greenwood, Perrin, & Duggan, 2016).

As mentioned above, its distinctive element, and perhaps one of the reasons for this increasingly widespread use, is the use of image as the main communicative tool (Lee & al., 2015). This is especially relevant because, as previous research has shown, an image has a communicative power that is different from the written word (and much more so when present in other social networks such as Twitter). For example, Knobloch and others (2003) showed how information that incorporates images receives more attention from recipients, is better understood, and generates better memory. Likewise, because viewers tend to assume that images are a true reflection of reality, they give greater credibility to the messages, since a large part of the public tends to question information less when it is presented with images (Messaris & Abraham, 2001).

On the other hand, the possibilities of photographic editing offered by the platform allow all users to make artistic decisions that increase and enhance both the beauty and the impact of the images, such as, how to frame the subject, which filters to select, etc. Thus, it could be argued that Instagram becomes a means in which a democratization of photographic art takes place (Millard, 2016). Thus, from this perspective, NGOs with a clear intention of promoting social mobilization through social networks can consider contemporary “artivism” as a new tool at their disposal. Felshin (1995) defines the term “artivism” as the conjunction between the world of art and political and social activism that also participates in the community in which it is directed (for research related to artivism, see Danko, 2018, and Delgado, 2013). Instagram not only allows artistic photography to be used in the service of activism, but also because of the interactivity of social networks, it allows participation (even as protagonist) in community dialogue. In fact, by mobilizing the use of Instagram, practically all of the main characteristics of artivism can be found: procedural forms and methods for its implementation, denouncing social problems, encouraging participant self-reflection, creating and promoting a social conscience, seeking the public manifestation of the issue, expanding on-going projects, using available public sites, using collaborative methods, and wielding advertising methods to exhibit their own work (Santos, 2015).

This research focuses, therefore, on NGOs use of the artivist style on Instagram. In other words, through content analysis, it aims to study how NGOs use photographic images to communicate, denounce, provoke reflect, and create social awareness on Instagram. Questions to be answered include: What types of images are used? Are they focused on people, and, within that question, is there a greater presence of volunteers or aid recipients? To what extent and under what circumstances are children used for social awareness campaigns? What feelings are conveyed in the image? Do they rely on optimistic messages to arouse the conscience, or on the contrary, do they choose to show the realities of pain, suffering and urgency? Are these messages mainly used to offer congratulations for work well done, or as a wake-up call for the conscience?

This research also intends to study the extent to which each of the mentioned variables (independently or combined) generates greater “engagement” (as measured by the number of “likes” and comments) from the recipients, and therefore, greater communicative impact.

Thus, the research has the following objectives:

• Describe in a general way the main variables involved in the published images (type of actors employed, feeling transmitted in the photographs, etc.).

• Analyze the use of different variables depending on the purpose of the communicated message.

• Study the use of children in the photographs according to the different variables.

• Analyze and measure the engagement associated with each of the variables.

• Establish what the ‘typical image’ published by the NGOs studied looks like.

• Check if the ‘typical image’ coincides with the image model that generates the most engagement on Instagram.

From the objectives presented above, the following research questions arise:

• Are there common characteristics in the photographs published by the NGOs in terms of the purpose of the message to be disseminated?

How are children used in the published photographs? Is there any relationship between the purpose of photography and the fact that children appear in them?

• Do NGOs achieve their objectives from the published photographs? Does the most used type of image generate the most engagement?

2. Material and methods

In order to study the type of images used by NGOs and how they are used, a content analysis was carried out by Neuendorf (2002), for studies with a similar methodology (Berganza & del-Hoyo, 2006; Muñiz, Igartua, & Otero, 2006). To select the study sample, the 20 most relevant NGOs for 2017 at the international level were identified through NGO Advisor (NGO Advisor, 2018). Once identified, NGOs with an international profile in Instagram were found and all the photographs published in 2017 by each of these NGOs were downloaded. The total number of photographs obtained was 2,933. From this total, a random sample of 340 photographs was selected (the N necessary for a 5% margin of error and a confidence level of 95% according to the statistical equation for population proportions).

The data form used to perform the content analysis contained four fundamental parts. Although the study focused on what the image conveyed, when it was considered necessary, the text that accompanied each photograph was used to contextualize or to provide data not sufficiently made clear by the image alone (i.e., origin of the protagonists, their age, circumstances reflected in the message, etc.).

Although the comments published by the users in each of the photographs were used for the calculation of engagement, the content of these comments was not taken into account in this investigation.

• For each photograph, formal features and location data related to the photograph were analyzed, including the style of the image, and whether it was taken outdoors or indoors; if taken indoors, what type of indoor space.

• Analysis of message purpose: The photographs were classified from three points of view; first, depending on the purpose of the aid required (either a long-term project or an emergency call for a natural catastrophe); second, according to the intention of the message (I.e., whether the message seeks to promote and disseminate general activities of the NGO, provide examples of currently active aid and the actual results of donations, or the urgent reminder of uncompleted humanitarian work for which specific support had earlier been requested); third, whether the message is positive (with signs of happiness, active aid or ongoing projects), negative (wounds, pain, distress, concern for or the consequences of war, famines and natural disasters) or neutral (depending on the type of sentiment shown in the image).

• Analysis of the actors: the types of people (aid recipients or cooperators) that appeared in the images, in what number, and separately, their age, sex, and the aid recipient’s gesture on one hand, and cooperators on the other, were studied independently. For a deeper study, an additional analysis was performed when children or babies appeared in the photographs. Although the Convention on the Rights of the Child is recognized for any minor under 18 (UNICEF Spanish Committee, 2006), for this research, a ‘child’ was identified as only to what is commonly recognized as a baby or child, and not adolescents or young people.

• Analysis of the artistic component: images were identified when some type of editing (i.e. cropping, filters, etc.) software was used through Instagram, or if they appeared unaltered.

• Engagement analysis: the “likes” and the comments of each photograph were codified for later analysis of the followers’ engagement (nº likes +nº comments)/Nºfollowers * 1.000) (Laurence, 2017) achieved by each.

Once the data collected was encrypted, they were analyzed with the SPSS program, Ver. 24. For the subsequent data study, first, a descriptive analysis was carried out (frequency tables) and later, the possible relationships between the different variables were analyzed through contingency tables using a non-parametric statistical analysis with a Chi-square test and by variance analysis (ANOVA).

3. Analysis and results

3.1. Descriptive results


Carrasco-Polaino et al 2018a-69563-en011.jpg

The following shows the frequency table of the analyzed variables (Table 1).

Regarding the artistic component, it was found that most of the photos analyzed (61.7%) had undergone some kind of editing, which supports the hypothesis that the NGOs are concerned with the aesthetic and artistic side of the images they share on the platform.

As for the image type, the mid-shot predominates (45.7%), followed by the wide-shot (33.7%) and the close-up (20.6%). When including the close-up and mid-shot together (for which differentiation in many cases does not correspond to a specific intention on the part of the photographer, but simply with a camera shot only slightly more or less open), it is concluded that essentially two out of three photographs use a close-up image to establish an identification between the Instagram user and the aid recipient.

As for the purpose of the message, in almost half of the analyzed posts, 43.8% were chosen to show examples and benefits of active support. Examples of such messages are images showing construction of water wells, minors attending school class, environmental projects, and job training programs. In a smaller percentage (26.4%), users are shown the humanitarian work to be done. In almost a third of the cases, the purpose was advertising and broadcasting campaigns (29.8%), although sometimes without identifying specific projects.

When focusing on the analysis of feelings shown in the photographs, only 15.6% of the images transmit a negative feeling, that is, one that shows pain, anguish, anxiety, worry or wounds caused by man or natural disasters. However, in 68.8% of the images, there is a message of positive sentiment with hopeful, smiling or obviously happy faces of cooperation and of aid recipients with graphic evidence of the collaborative results. Finally, due to the inability to choose openly between a positive or negative sentiment, 15.6% of the images were determined to possess a “neutral” feeling,Thus, based on in the aid recipients’ gestures, it was determined that the feeling of happiness dominates (44.9%) versus neutral expressions (33%) and feelings of pain/suffering (15.4%).

Also very relevant is the type of actors NGOs chose to use in their messages and in the design of the photographs. In a majority of cases (68.8%), only the aid receiver appears, while cooperators or volunteers appear in 21.9%, and in less than one in ten (9.4%), both are present in the image.

As for the analysis of the aid recipient’s gender, half are girls/women (48.7%), while in a noticeable disproportion, males appeared in 22.6%, and in the remaining 24.3% of the images, both men and women appear.

In regards to their age, 63.6% of the aid recipients shown were either a baby or a child, and 9.2% are young or adolescent. The elderly barely amount to 2.2% of the posts, and the remaining 23.7% were middle-aged individuals.

As such, contingency tables were used and a non-parametric statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-square test in order to identify possible dependency relationships between the analyzed variables.

3.2. Analysis of the photographs according to the purpose of the message

Regarding the relationship between the image type used and the intentionality of the message, the data showed a significant dependency ratio (x2(4)=14.988, p=0.005). Although the close-up is the type of framing that appears less (20%), its use increases to 31.8% when the NGO wants to show the viewer to what extent help is necessary by centering in a specific face.

Even more relevant are the differences (x2(4)=125.416, p<0.001) relating to the sentiment and the intentionality of the published message. It is interesting to see how positive sentiment is most used by NGOs (80.6%) along with their activities and benefits (86.1%). However, when decrying the needs and work needed, the feeling most represented is negative (51.7%) versus neutral (18.4%) and positive (29%).

As for the differences in the type of actors present in the image depending on the purpose of the message, there were significant differences found (x2(4)=79.31, p<0.001). In general terms, the central focus of the photographs is the aid recipient (69.1%), but the proportion is not uniform. While they are mainly used to raise awareness about the aid needed (97%) and the activities and benefits provided need to be promoted (68.7%), when promoting the NGO itself, they prefer to give prominence to the cooperators (51.3%) instead of the recipients (44.9%).

Significant differences were found when the analysis (x2(8)=80.862, p<0.001) focused not only on the type, but also on the number of actors employed. One can see a tendency to personalize a single subject (in 53.4% of the cases by either a recipient or an aid provider), compared to an image of more than one cooperator, more than one receiver, or both categories (46.6%). Despite the fact that the differences are not as pronounced as in the previous ones, the same pattern is apparent: the beneficiaries of aid are used, in this case alone, when it is necessary to raise awareness about the need for aid. In this way, in over half of the cases (58.6%), the urgency of the needed aid is shown as being individualized toward the receiving person.

Regarding the relationship between the age of the recipient and the purpose of the disseminated message, it is significant (x2(8)=21.388, p<0.01) that, despite the fact that the figure of the child is present in the majority of all types of messages (63.1%), it is at the time of requesting help and collaboration when the child is the protagonist to a greater extent (76.8%). If the age range includes youths and adolescents, the percentage rises to almost 9 out of 10 (85.5%) compared to middle-aged recipients (8.7%). Babies and children are also in the majority of the disseminated images that represent activities and project results (62.6%). Only when the message is related to the branding of the NGO do middle-aged adults (39%) appear most prominently. Finally, it is striking how seniors do not have a prominent presence in any form of NGO communication, never exceeding 3% in any message type on Instagram.

As for the gestures of the receiver, significant differences were also found depending on the purpose of the message (2, p<0.001). In particular, the positive gestures (happiness, smiles) are most present and have a greater role in the messages destined to promote the NGO (42.5%) and the dissemination of activities and benefits (59.1%). The only message in which gestures of pain have a majority presence is the urgent announcement for help (40.6%) where only 21% of the actors are cheerful.

3.3. Analysis of the figure of the child in NGO communication on Instagram

When analyzing the use of images in which children appear, there are also differences depending on different variables. For example, with regard to the purpose of the message and the appearance of minors, the results show a significant difference (x2(2)=14.750, p<0.005). When the objective of the published photograph is to make the NGO and its brand known, a child appears in only 42.55% of the images. However, when publicizing specific activities as well as the activity’s results and highlighting the need for resources for different initiatives or projects, the child appears in 62.6% and 79.1%, respectively.

At the same time, the differences found in function of the protagonist’s gesture were also significant (x2(3)=8.564, p<0.05). Most children display a negative gesture (pain, suffering, sadness, etc. in 77.1% of the cases) or positive (smiling, playing, etc. in 69.6%). The figure of the minor does not appear as frequently (52.1%) when the protagonist presents a neutral gesture in the published image.

However, when analyzing the presence of children depending on the sentiment of the image, no significant differences were found (x2(2)=2.564, p=0.278). In other words, the presence of children is majoritarian regardless of whether the transmitted sentiment is negative (74%), positive (61.6%) or neutral (62.1%). Regarding the appearance of minors according to the plane used, significant differences appeared (x2(2)=12.375, p=0.005).

While children appear in equal measure as adults (50%) in wide-shot images, children are present in the majority of mid-shots (67%), but are especially present in close-up images (80.9%).

Regarding gender, the results showed that an exclusively female presence was much higher (70.5%) in those images using adults than in those with minors only (37,9%) (x2(3)=24.937, p<0.001). From this it can be concluded that middle-aged and elderly men are under-represented in the photographs used by NGOs.

3.4. Analysis of the differences in the “engagement” of the photographs

To calculate the effect of each of the photographs published in each account of the NGOs studied, the “engagement” of each of the photographs was calculated to check whether there were significant relationships between the content of the images and their engagement. To determine the statistical significance among the different variables, a one-way ANOVA model (Tobergte & Curtis, 2013) was used.

When the engagement of the images was analyzed according to the purpose of the message, the ANOVA results showed significant differences (F(3) =7.51, p<0.001). Specifically, the images aimed at promoting the NGO generated more engagement (M=28.37, DT= 024.55) than those in which the activities and their benefits are shown (M=18.61, DT= 13.74) and those whose purpose is to announce urgent humanitarian and social needs (M=19.21, DT=11.04).

In turn, the results showed significant differences in the engagement depending on the emotion transmitted by the image (F(2)=4.376, p<0.05). When the photograph showed a negative feeling, the engagement (M=15.59, DT=8.75) was less than when the feeling of the photograph was positive (M=23.44, DT=18.81) or neutral (M=21.24, DT=18.02).

In the same way, significant differences were also found in the engagement depending on the type of actors that appeared in the image (F(4)=13.51, p<0.001). The images starring cooperators showed much higher engagement (M=32.90, DT=24.05) than those images in which the protagonists were the recipients of the aid (M=17.03, DT=11.86) or in which receivers appeared with cooperators (M=19.55, DT=21.59).

Significant differences were also found (F(5)=12.47, p<0.001) in engagement depending on the age of the aid recipient. Middle-aged people engaged the most (M=21.07, DT=17.24) followed by children (M=17.20, DT=11.14), while seniors generated the least engagement (M=6.84, DT=4.78).

The aid receiver’s gesture in the images also significantly affected “engagement” (F(4)=17.33, p<0.001). When the protagonist of the image showed a positive gesture, the engagement was higher (M=20.07, DT=14.94) than when the person showed a negative (M=13.20, DT=5.26) or neutral gesture (M=13.98, DT=9.13).

On the other hand, no significant differences were found depending on the engagement and image type (F (3)=2.12, p=0.96), whether the images are close-ups (M=22.60, DT=16.82), mid-shots (M=23.86, DT=18.70) or wide-shot images (M=18.46, FT=16.81).

Likewise, when checking whether the presence of aid recipients as individuals or in groups had a different effect, no significant differences were found (F (1)=0.99, p=0.32). The same result was found whether the cooperator appeared individually or in a group (F (1)=0.002, p=0.963).

4. Discussion and conclusions

Social networks represent a platform for NGOs from which to mobilize society and disseminate information about the work they do. Of all these social networks, Instagram, because of its rapid growth and the prominence it bestows on the artistic image, offers different characteristics from all other social networks.

It is precisely this commitment to the image with all the possibilities involved in editing, the selection of one type of message or another, the composition of the different actors that appear in it, the choices of a positive or negative feeling when transmitting, and the inclusion of filters, graphic details and other similar effects, which allows Instagram to be considered a platform from which to perform artivism.

And that is what this research aims to analyze: to see what this new form of artivism is and to what use NGOs make with it. As a starting point, it can be concluded that the typical post of an NGO in Instagram is that of an image of a possible aid recipient, usually in childhood, alone and female, posing in front of the camera in a mid- or close-up shot with a hopeful or at least neutral gesture, and as an example of the social activities and benefits that this NGO carries out while attempting to convey a positive feeling. In 62% of the cases, the image has some kind of editing.

This recourse of displaying only one aid recipient (usually accompanied by a text where personal data of the protagonist is provided) in a mid- or close-up image is probably due to the purpose of increasing the emotional burden of the message, and consequently, its efficiency. This strategy is in line with the theory known as the “arithmetic of compassion”, which states that the fewer the number of aid recipients appearing, the greater the intentions and the satisfaction of donating and providing aid (Slovic & Slovic, 2015).

But, even more significant than this first analysis and all the conclusions derived from it are the results obtained by combining some of these variables, allowing for a more precise idea of the use of photographs by the NGOs.

For example, when analyzing the presence of different characteristics according to the communicative purpose of the image, it can be concluded that when the purpose is to raise awareness in the Instagram follower for the need to help, the NGOs try to transmit a negative feeling, showing mainly the potential aid receivers, usually alone, in a mid- or close-up image, with a gesture of distress or concern. However, when its purpose is to promote the NGO or show the benefits of a project, a positive feeling prevails. Finally, the only type of message that focuses on the cooperators is when the purpose is to promote the NGO.

On the other hand, when analyzing the appearance of the figure of the child in the images, it can be concluded that their presence occurs especially in those messages destined to show the need and the benefits of the aid (and less in the messages intended to promote the NGO). In addition, they usually appear in close-up and mid-shots showing an emotional expression on their faces, either positive or negative.

But does this type of pattern have any direct consequences in the number of ‘likes’ and comments received (indicators commonly used to evaluate the possible effectiveness of the message emitted) among Instagram users?

When engagement was analyzed according to the different characteristics of the images, the results showed that the type of image generating greater engagement was be composed of a middle-aged NGO cooperator or volunteer who, independent of the image type used, shows a smiling gesture in order to promote the NGO itself.

As a result, it can be concluded that, surprisingly, the ‘type’ image most used by NGOs is not the one that generates more engagement. It can be deduced that the traditional image so often used by NGOs, a recipient of help in an attitude of distress or suffering, does not generate as an intense interaction between Instagram users as do their own cooperators/workers in the promotion of the NGO. Whether provoking the phenomenon of “compassion fatigue” (Chouliaraki, 2006) or excessive information, the truth is that the followers of Instagram show greater involvement in positive messages and direct action.

This disconnect between what is done and what works to provoke engagement can be one of the reasons that explain why the engagement average of the photographs uploaded by NGOs (2.18% according to the data analyzed in the sample) is inferior to the general average among Instagram users (between 3% and 6%) (Laurence, 2017).

Finally, future research should establish what the relationship is between the interactions, or the engagement, in Instagram and the subsequent economic collaborations with humanitarian projects by the users – which is perhaps the main purpose of their presence in social networks.

Funding agency

This activity is part of the program of R&D activities between research groups in social sciences and humanities in the Community of Madrid, PROVULDIG-CM, with Ref. S2015/HUM-3434. This program and its activities are financed by the Community of Madrid and the European Social Fund.

References

Aladro-Vico, E. (2011). La teoría de la información ante las nuevas tecnologías de la comunicación. Cuadernos de Información y Comunicación, 16(0). https://doi.org/10.5209/rev_CIYC.2011.v16.4

Berganza, M.R., & del-Hoyo, M. (2006). La mujer y el hombre en la publicidad televisiva: imágenes y estereotipos. Zer, 21, 161-175.

Blight, M.G., Ruppel, E.K., & Schoenbauer, K.V. (2017). Sense of community on Twitter and Instagram: Exploring the roles of motives and parasocial relationships. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 20(5), 314-319. https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2016.0505

Byrne, K. (2010). Social media plays growing role in aid world. https://bit.ly/2jO9Vcl

Chouliaraki, L. (2006). The spectatorship of suffering. London: SAGE Publications Ltd. http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781446220658.

Cmeciu, C., & Coman, C. (2016). Digital civic activism in Romania: Framing anti-Chevron online protest community «Faces». [Activismo cívico digital en Rumanía: La comunidad de Facebook en las protestas online contra Chevron]. Comunicar, 47, 19-28. https://doi.org/10.3916/C47-2016-02

Cooper, G. (2011). From their own correspondent?: New media and the changes in disaster coverage: Lessons to be learnt. University of Oxford, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.

Cooper, G. (2014). Text appeal? NGOs and digital media. Leadership and expertise: The Centre for Law, Justice and Journalism (CLJJ) is directed by three of city University London’s leading Academics, as well as being supported by a number of specialists the University, 35.

Danko, D. (2018). Artivism and the spirit of avant-garde art. Art and the Challenge of Markets, 2, 235-261. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-64644-2_9

Delgado, M. (2013). Artivismo y pospolítica. Sobre la estetización de las luchas sociales en contextos urbanos. Quaderns de l’Institut Catala d’Antropologia, 18(2), 68-80.

Equipo de Instagram para empresas (2017). Reforzamos nuestro compromiso con la seguridad y la amabilidad para 800 millones de personas | Instagram for Business. https://bit.ly/2IdoVv3

Felshin, N. (1995). But is it art?: Spirit of art as activism. Lacey: Bay Press, U.S.

Foro Internacional de las Plataformas Nacionales de ONGs FIP (2012). ¿Quiénes Somos? Ifp-Fip FIP. February 24, 2018, https://bit.ly/2Ib6bQI

González, M.G., Becerra, M.T., & Yanez, M.B. (2016). Cyberactivism: A new form of participation for University Students. [Ciberactivismo: nueva forma de participación para estudiantes universitarios]. Comunicar, 46, 47-54. https://doi.org/10.3916/C46-2016-05

Greenwood, S., Perrin, A., & Duggan, M. (2016). Demographics of social media users in 2016. Pew Research Center. https://bit.ly/2Ix8nBC

Knobloch, S., Hastall, M., Zillmann, D., & Callison, C. (2003). Imagery effects on the selective reading of Internet newsmagazines. Communication Research, 30(1), 3-29. https://doi.org/10.1177/0093650202239023

Laurence, C. (2017). How do I calculate my engagement rate on Instagram? https://bit.ly/2jOEkXW

Lee, E., Lee, J.A., Moon, J.H., & Sung, Y. (2015). Pictures speak louder than words: Motivations for using Instagram. Cyberpsychology, 18(9), 552-556. https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2015.0157

Messaris, P., & Abraham, L. (2001). The role of images in framing news stories. In S.D. Reese, O.H. Gandy, Jr., & A.E. Grant (Eds.), LEA's communication series. Framing public life: Perspectives on media and our understanding of the social world (pp. 215-226). Mahwah, NJ, US: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers.

Millard, R. (2016). Is Instagram an art form? [blog]. https://bit.ly/2rC5ncG

Muñiz, C., Igartua, J.J., & Otero, J.A. (2006). Imágenes de la inmigración a través de la fotografía de prensa. Un análisis de contenido ‘Inmigration Images through Press Photography’. A content analysis. Comunicación y Sociedad, 19(1), 103-128.

Neuendorf, K.A. (2016). The content analysis guidebook. Los Angeles: SAGE Publications Ltd.

NGO Advisor (2018). Top 20 NGOs world. [web]. February 23, 2018, https://bit.ly/2KPpjl7

ONU (1945). Carta de las Naciones Unidas. https://bit.ly/2rzaGdK

Participation (iCSO). Department of Economics and Social Affairs. [web]. https://bit.ly/2I74l3b

Santos-Perales, E. (2015). Diseño gráfico y fotografía en el activismo social. Estudio de casos. Universidad de Barcelona.

Slovic, S., & Slovic, P. (2015). Numbers and nerves: Information, emotion, and meaning in a world of data. Oregon: Oregon State Uniersity Press. https://bit.ly/2KfHAa4

Soengas, X., & Assif, M. (2017). Cyberactivisim in the process of political and social change in Arab countries. [El ciberactivismo en el proceso de cambio político y social en los países árabes]. Comunicar, 53, 49-57. https://doi.org/10.3916/C53-2017-05

Taylor, C. (2012). Sandy really was Instagram’s moment: 1.3 million pics posted. [web]. https://bit.ly/2G9VSX8

Tobergte, D.R., & Curtis, S. (2013). Procesamiento de Datos y Análisis Estadístico usando SPSS. Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, 53. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107415324.004

UNICEF Comité Español. (2006). Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño. Madrid. https://bit.ly/2rBfYVU

United Nations. Department of Economics and Social Affairs. (2014). United Nations Civil Society



Click to see the English version (EN)

Resumen

Debido a la creciente importancia que adquieren las herramientas tecnológicas en las estrategias de comunicación, y teniendo en cuenta que las Organizaciones no Gubernamentales (ONG) utilizan Instagram como una herramienta con potencial artivista para difundir sus iniciativas y necesidades, el presente artículo tiene como objetivo investigar la forma y el contenido de las fotografías publicadas en esta red social a lo largo del año 2017 por las 20 ONG más relevantes a nivel internacional. En concreto, se estudia la elección de elementos formales, como el tipo de plano o la edición, la finalidad del mensaje que se quiere trasladar o el sentimiento transmitido en las fotografías, así como el tipo de actor o actores protagonistas de las imágenes (rol, número, gesto, sexo y edad). Además, se estudia el «engagement» generado por las fotografías y el uso que se hace en ellas de la figura del niño. Se utiliza como metodología el análisis de contenido, el análisis estadístico no paramétrico con prueba de Chi-cuadrado y el análisis de varianzas (ANOVA). Los resultados del estudio muestran cómo la imagen prototípica que usan las ONG -receptor de la ayuda menor de edad, disfrutando de los beneficios de esta ayuda y con gesto positivo- presenta un contenido y un formato que no se corresponden con el tipo de imagen que más «engagement» genera entre los usuarios y seguidores.

Descarga aquí la versión PDF

1. Introducción y estado de la cuestión

Las Organizaciones no Gubernamentales (ONG) son desde hace décadas el vehículo fundamental a partir del cual se llevan a cabo proyectos humanitarios de apoyo a los colectivos más desfavorecidos. El registro oficial más detallado de cuántas ONG hay en el mundo es el elaborado por la Organización de Naciones Unidas (ONU), que a fecha de febrero de 2017 tenía contabilizadas 13.137 organizaciones, más de la mitad de ellas (6.625) radicadas en África (United Nations. Department of Economics ans Social Affairs, 2014). Por campos de actividad, los más citados por las propias ONG son los del ámbito económico y social (6.528), desarrollo sostenible (4.686), desarrollo social (4.686) y asuntos relacionados con la mujer (3.936). Otras fuentes no oficiales, como el Foro Internacional de las Plataformas Nacionales de ONG (Foro Internacional de las Plataformas Nacionales de ONGs FIP, 2012) calcula que en todo el mundo hay 10 millones de organizaciones no gubernamentales, de cualquier tamaño y actividad, el equivalente a la quinta economía más grande del mundo, lo que da una idea de su alcance y envergadura.

El término «organización no gubernamental» fue fijado en 1945 en el artículo 71 del capítulo 10 de la Carta fundacional de la ONU (Foro Internacional de las Plataformas Nacionales de ONGs FIP, 2012) con el propósito de regular el concepto de una organización independiente de los poderes públicos y sin ánimo de lucro, una función que históricamente habían desarrollado asociaciones caritativas y asistenciales en numerosos puntos del planeta, pero sin un marco legal que las amparase. Una de las consecuencias principales de este proceso de separación del poder público es que, en la mayoría de los casos, no cuentan con un altavoz realmente eficaz para mostrar su labor y recaudar fondos para su trabajo, más allá de actos promocionales de reducido alcance y el inestimable apoyo de mecenas privados con una conciencia de ayuda a los demás.

Hoy en día, cualquiera de estas organizaciones se enfrenta al reto de desarrollar una comunicación eficaz que le ayude a movilizar a los ciudadanos para involucrarles en sus proyectos de ayuda social. Para ello, las ONG buscan estrategias que les permitan denunciar las injusticias sociales y concienciar sobre las necesidades humanitarias insatisfechas, así como comunicar y difundir los beneficios de sus proyectos y sus acciones.

A este respecto, las nuevas tecnologías han modificado las formas de comunicarse (Aladro, 2011), presentando un instrumento potenciador y facilitador del activismo (Soengas-Pérez & Assif, 2017; González-Lizárraga, Becerra-Traver, & Yanez-Díaz, 2016; Cmeciu & Coman, 2016). Especialmente, las redes sociales han proporcionado a las ONG herramientas no solo de cohesión social y grupal (Blight, Ruppel & Schoenbauer, 2017), sino también de comunicación y difusión con un poder hasta ahora desconocido (Byrne, 2010). La ONG «Save the children», por ejemplo, consiguió en 2010 llegar a más de 10 millones de personas a través de Twitter (Cooper, 2011), debido entre otras cosas a la repercusión del terremoto de Haití, bautizado como el «primer desastre de Twitter». En concreto, 2,3 millones de tuits fueron publicados en todo el mundo con las palabras «Haití» o «Cruz Roja» en tan solo tres días (Cooper, 2014). Igualmente, durante el episodio del Huracán Sandy se subieron a Instagram 10 fotos del desastre por segundo y un total de 1,3 millones de fotos fueron compartidas en la plataforma bajo el mismo hashtag (Taylor, 2012).

A día de hoy, un gran número de ONG hace uso de la mayoría de las principales redes sociales, como Twitter, Youtube, Facebook, Instagram o Flickr, ya que suponen un potente escaparate de alcance ilimitado en el que mostrar su labor con pocos recursos humanos y sin apenas coste económico. La presente investigación se ha centrado en una de ellas (Instagram) por su cada vez mayor relevancia y notoriedad y por el interés de su característica principal: el uso casi exclusivo de la imagen artística como herramienta comunicativa.

Instagram es la red social que más ha crecido en los últimos años. En concreto, en septiembre de 2017 alcanzó los 800 millones de usuarios únicos al mes, según los últimos datos ofrecidos por la propia compañía (Equipo de Instagram para empresas, 2017). El 59% de ellos tiene entre 18 y 29 años (el 33%, entre 30 y 49), el 60% cuenta con estudios superiores y el 63%, casi uno de cada tres, gana más de 50.000 dólares al año, un elemento importante para cualquier ONG (Greenwood, Perrin, & Duggan, 2016).

Como se indicaba anteriormente, su elemento distintivo, y quizá una de las razones de este uso cada vez más extendido, es el empleo de la imagen como principal herramienta comunicativa (Lee & al., 2015). Esto es especialmente relevante ya que, como la investigación previa ha puesto de manifiesto, la imagen tiene un poder comunicativo distinto al de la palabra escrita (mucho más presente en otras redes sociales como Twitter). Por ejemplo, Knobloch y otros (2003) mostraron cómo las informaciones que incorporan imágenes reciben más atención por parte de los receptores, son mejor comprendidas y generan un mayor recuerdo. A su vez, debido a que se tiende a asumir que las imágenes son fiel reflejo de la realidad, tienen el poder de otorgar una mayor credibilidad a los mensajes, ya que una gran parte del público tiende a cuestionar en menor medida cualquier información recibida cuando es presentada mediante imágenes (Messaris & Abraham, 2001).

Por otro lado, las posibilidades de edición fotográfica que ofrece la plataforma permiten al usuario tomar decisiones artísticas que aumenten y potencien tanto la belleza como el impacto de las imágenes: qué encuadre realizar, qué filtros seleccionar, etc. De este modo, se podría argumentar que Instagram se convierte en un medio en el que tiene lugar una democratización del arte fotográfico (Millard, 2016).

Así pues, desde esta perspectiva, el uso que las ONG hacen de esta red social con una intención clara de promover la movilización social podría considerarse una nueva herramienta de artivismo contemporáneo. Felshin (1995) definió el artivismo como la conjugación entre el mundo del arte y del activismo político y social que además hace partícipe a la comunidad a la cual se va a dirigir para otras investigaciones relacionadas con el artivismo (Danko, 2018; Delgado, 2013). Instagram no solo permite poner la fotografía artística al servicio del activismo, sino que, además, gracias a la interactividad propia de las redes sociales, permite hacer partícipe (e incluso a veces protagonista) del diálogo a la comunidad a la que se dirige. De hecho, en el uso movilizador que las ONG pueden hacer de Instagram se puede encontrar prácticamente la totalidad de las principales características del artivismo: poseer formas y métodos procesuales para su realización, denunciar problemas sociales, hacer reflexionar al espectador, promover la creación de una conciencia social, procurar la manifestación pública de la problemática, elaborar una obra reproducible, utilizar emplazamientos públicos, trabajar mediante métodos colaborativos y esgrimir los medios publicitarios para exhibir su obra (Santos, 2015).

La presente investigación se centra, por tanto, en el uso «artivístico» que las ONG hacen de Instagram. Es decir, lo que la investigación pretende es, mediante un análisis de contenido, estudiar cómo las ONG emplean las imágenes fotográficas en esta red social para comunicar, denunciar, provocar la reflexión y crear conciencia social. ¿A qué tipo de imágenes se acude? ¿Están protagonizadas por personas y, dentro de ellas, hay una mayor presencia de voluntarios o de receptores de la ayuda? ¿En qué medida y en qué circunstancias se recurre a la infancia para las campañas de concienciación social? ¿Qué sentimiento transmiten a través de la imagen? ¿Apuestan por los mensajes optimistas o, por el contrario, optan por mostrar una realidad de dolor, sufrimiento y urgencia con el fin de remover conciencias? ¿Son estos mensajes, mayoritariamente, una felicitación por el trabajo bien hecho o un aldabonazo en las conciencias?

A su vez, mediante la presente investigación se pretende estudiar en qué medida cada una de las variables anteriores (de manera independiente o combinadas entre sí) genera un mayor «engagement» (número de «likes» y de comentarios) en los receptores y, por lo tanto, mayor impacto comunicativo.

Así pues, la investigación presenta los siguientes objetivos:

• Describir de manera general las principales variables implicadas en las imágenes publicadas (tipo de actores empleados, sentimiento transmitido en las fotografías etc.).

• Analizar la utilización de las diferentes variables en función de la finalidad del mensaje que se quiera comunicar.

• Estudiar el tratamiento de la figura del niño en las fotografías en función de las diferentes variables.

• Analizar y medir el «engagement» asociado a cada una de las variables anteriores.

• Establecer la posible existencia de una imagen tipo publicada por las ONG estudiadas.

• Comprobar si la imagen tipo publicada por las ONG estudiadas coincide con el modelo de imagen que más «engagement» genera en Instagram.

A partir de los objetivos presentados surgen las siguientes preguntas de investigación:

• ¿Existen características comunes en las fotografías publicadas por las ONG en función de la finalidad del mensaje que se quiere difundir?

• ¿Cómo es el uso que se hace de los niños en las fotografías publicadas? ¿Existe alguna relación entre la finalidad de la fotografía y el hecho de que aparezcan niños en ellas?

• ¿Consiguen las ONG con las fotografías que publican los objetivos que persiguen? ¿Es el tipo de imagen más empleado el que más «engagement» genera?

2. Material y métodos

Con la finalidad de estudiar el tipo de imágenes utilizadas por las ONG y el uso que hacen de ellas, se realizó un análisis de contenido (Neuendorf, 2002) y metodología similar (Berganza & del-Hoyo, 2006; Muñiz, Igartua, & Otero, 2006). Para seleccionar la muestra de estudio, se identificaron las 20 ONG más relevantes a nivel internacional durante el año 2017 a través de NGO Advisor (2018). Una vez identificadas se localizaron aquellas ONG con perfil internacional en Instagram y se procedió a la descarga de todas las fotografías publicadas por cada una de estas ONG durante el año 2017. El total de fotografías obtenidas fue de 2.933. Sobre este universo se seleccionó una muestra aleatoria de 340 fotografías (el número necesario para un margen de error del 5% y un nivel de confianza del 95% según la ecuación estadística para proporciones poblacionales).

La ficha que se elaboró para realizar el análisis de contenido consta de cuatro apartados fundamentales. Aunque el estudio se ciñó a lo que transmitía la imagen, en los casos en los que se consideró necesario se recurrió al texto que acompañaba a cada fotografía para contextualizar o aportar los datos que no quedaban suficientemente claros (procedencia de los protagonistas, edad, circunstancias reflejadas en el mensaje…). Aunque se hizo un recuento de los comentarios publicados por los usuarios en cada una de las fotografías porque el dato era necesario para el cálculo del «engagement», no se tuvo en cuenta en esta investigación el contenido de estos comentarios.

• Datos formales y de localización: para cada fotografía se analizaron los datos relacionados con el tipo de plano de la fotografía, así como si estaba tomada en exteriores o en interiores. En el caso de ser un espacio interior, de qué tipo.

• Análisis de la finalidad del mensaje: las fotografías se clasificaron desde tres puntos de vista. En primer lugar, según la finalidad de la ayuda requerida (ya sea un proyecto a largo plazo o una llamada de emergencia para una catástrofe natural). En segundo lugar, según la intencionalidad del mensaje (dependiendo de si el mensaje busca transmitir acciones genéricas de difusión y promoción de la ONG, ejemplos de ayuda activa y del beneficio real de las donaciones, o denuncia acerca de la labor humanitaria aún por realizar y para la que se pide apoyo concreto). Y, en tercer lugar, según el tipo de sentimiento mostrado en la imagen, ya sea positivo (con muestras de felicidad, ayuda activa y proyectos en marcha), negativo (heridas, dolor, angustia, preocupación o consecuencias de situaciones de guerra, hambrunas o desastres naturales) o neutro.

• Análisis de los actores: se estudió de manera independiente el tipo de personas (receptores de ayuda o cooperantes) que aparecían en la imagen, en qué número y, de forma separada, la edad, el sexo, y el gesto de receptores de ayuda por un lado y cooperantes por otro. Además, se analizó, para un estudio más profundo, si en las fotografías aparecían niños o bebés. A pesar de que en la Convención de Derechos del niño se reconoce como tal a cualquier menor de 18 años (UNICEF Comité Español, 2006), para esta investigación se identificó como «niño» solo a lo que comúnmente se puede reconocer como bebé o niño, y no adolescentes o jóvenes.

• Análisis del componente artístico: se identificó si las fotografías tenían algún tipo de edición en relación con el corte o aplicación de algún tipo de filtro a través de Instagram o aparecían tal y como se habían capturado.

• Análisis del «engagement»: Se codificaron los «likes» y los comentarios de cada una de las fotografías para un posterior análisis del «engagement» (nº likes+nº comentarios/nº seguidores*1.000) (Laurence, 2017) logrado por cada una de ellas.

Una vez codificados los datos recogidos, se analizaron con el programa SPSS, 24. Para el posterior estudio de los datos se realizó un primer análisis descriptivo (tablas de frecuencia) y posteriormente, las posibles relaciones entre las diferentes variables fueron analizadas a través de tablas de contingencia utilizando un análisis estadístico no paramétrico con una prueba de Chi-cuadrado y mediante análisis de varianza (ANOVA).

3. Análisis y resultados

3.1. Resultados descriptivos

En la Tabla 1 se muestran las frecuencias de las variables analizadas.


Carrasco-Polaino et al 2018a-69563 ov-es011.jpg

En cuanto al componente artístico, se encontró que la mayoría de las fotos analizadas (61,7%) había sufrido algún tipo de edición, apoyando así la tesis de que las ONG se preocupan del lado estético y artístico de las imágenes que comparten en la plataforma.

En cuanto al tipo de plano, por ejemplo, predomina el medio (45,7%), seguido por el general (33,7%) y el primer plano (20,6%). Sumados el plano corto y el medio (cuya diferenciación en muchos casos no responde a una intencionalidad específica por parte del fotógrafo, sino a un tiro de cámara ligeramente más o menos abierto), se concluye que prácticamente dos de cada tres fotografías recurren a una imagen cercana para establecer en el usuario de Instagram una identificación entre el tipo de ayuda y el beneficiario.

En cuanto a la finalidad del mensaje empleado, en casi la mitad de los post analizados (43,8%) se opta por mostrar ejemplos y beneficios de ayuda activa. Ejemplos de este tipo de mensajes son imágenes donde se muestran la construcción de pozos de agua, menores asistiendo a clase en escuelas, proyectos medioambientales o programas de inserción laboral. En un porcentaje menor de informaciones (26,4%) se opta por mostrar al usuario de la red social la labor humanitaria a realizar. En casi un tercio de los casos la apuesta es mostrar campañas y acciones de difusión (29,8%), aunque en ocasiones sin precisar en proyectos concretos.

Si nos centramos en el análisis del sentimiento mostrado en las fotografías, solo el 15,6% de las imágenes transmite un sentimiento negativo, entendido con ello aquel que muestra el dolor, la angustia, la preocupación o las heridas causadas por el hombre o los desastres naturales. En el 68,8% de las imágenes, por el contrario, se muestra un mensaje de sentimiento positivo, con rostros esperanzados, sonrientes o abiertamente felices de cooperantes y destinatarios de la ayuda, y con pruebas gráficas de los resultados de esta colaboración. Por último, en el otro 15,6% de las imágenes restantes se ha optado por reflejar un sentimiento «neutro», ante la imposibilidad de elegir abiertamente por uno positivo o negativo.

Muy relacionado con esto, y en cuanto a los gestos que muestran ante la cámara, en los receptores de ayuda domina el sentimiento de felicidad (44,9%) frente al neutro (33%) o el de dolor/sufrimiento (15,4%).

También muy relevante es el tipo de actores que eligen las ONG para componer sus mensajes y la disposición que tienen en las fotografías. Se apuesta de forma mayoritaria por los receptores de las ayudas (68,8% de los casos) frente a los cooperantes o voluntarios (21,9%). En solo un 9,4%, menos de uno de cada diez, están ambos actores juntos.

En cuanto al análisis del sexo del receptor de la ayuda, la mitad de estos actores son niñas/mujeres (48,7%), en notable desproporción con el sexo masculino, el 22,6% de los casos (en el 24,3% restante están ambos sexos representados).

En cuanto a la edad, el 63,6% de los receptores de ayuda que se muestra es un bebé o un niño y el 9,2% un joven o adolescente. La tercera edad apenas acumula el 2,2% de los post. El 23,7% restante corresponde a personas de mediana edad.

A su vez, de cara a identificar una posible relación de dependencia entre las variables analizadas, se utilizaron tablas de contingencia y se realizó un análisis estadístico no paramétrico mediante la prueba de Chi-cuadrado.

3.2. Análisis de las fotografías en función de la finalidad del mensaje

Respecto a la relación entre el tipo de plano utilizado y la intencionalidad del mensaje, los datos mostraron una relación de dependencia significativa (X2(4)=14,988, p=0,005). A pesar de que el primer plano es el tipo de encuadre que menos aparece (20%), su utilización aumenta hasta el 31,8% de los casos cuando la ONG quiere mostrar al espectador hasta qué punto es necesaria la ayuda, centrándola en un rostro concreto.

Más relevantes son aún las diferencias (X2(4)=125,416, p<0,001) en relación al sentimiento de la publicación con la intencionalidad del mensaje a difundir. Resulta interesante comprobar cómo el sentimiento más empleado es el positivo en los mensajes de difusión de las ONG (80,6%) y de difusión de las actividades y beneficios (86,1%), pero sin embargo cuando se trata de denunciar las necesidades y labores por realizar el sentimiento más representado es el negativo (51,7%) frente al neutro (18,4%) o el positivo (29%).

En cuanto a las diferencias en el tipo de actores presentes en la imagen en función de la finalidad del mensaje también se encontraron diferencias significativas (X2(4)=79,31, p<0,001). En términos generales, el protagonismo de las fotografías recae en los receptores de ayuda (69,1%), pero la proporción no es uniforme. Mientras que se recurre a ellos mayoritariamente cuando hay que concienciar sobre la necesidad de la ayuda requerida (97%) y cuando se quiere difundir las actividades y beneficios proporcionados (68,7%), las ONG prefieren dar protagonismo a los cooperantes (51,3%) frente a los receptores (44,9%) cuando se trata de promocionar la propia ONG.

Se encontraron diferencias significativas (X2(8)=80,862, p<0,001) cuando el análisis se centraba no solo en el tipo, sino en el número de actores empleados. Se puede apreciar una tendencia a personalizar en un solo sujeto (53,4% de los casos, ya sea un receptor o un proveedor de ayuda), frente a una composición formada por más de un cooperante, más de un receptor o ambas categorías (46,6%). Pese a que en este campo las diferencias no son tan acusadas como en los anteriores, sí se aprecia un mismo patrón: se recurre a los beneficiarios de la ayuda, en este caso en solitario, cuando hay que sensibilizar sobre la necesidad de ayudar. De esta manera, en casi la mitad de los casos en los que se muestra lo urgente y necesario de la ayuda requerida se individualiza en una persona receptora (58,6%).

Respecto a la relación entre la edad del receptor y la finalidad del mensaje a difundir, resulta significativo (X2(8)=21,388, p<0,01) cómo a pesar de que la figura de los niños es la mayoritaria en todos los tipo de mensajes (63,1%), es a la hora de solicitar ayuda y colaboración cuando el niño es protagonista en mayor medida (76,8%). Si se amplía además al rango de edad de adolescencia/juventud, el porcentaje sube hasta casi 9 de cada 10 (85,5%), frente al 8,7% de receptores de mediana edad. Los bebés o niños también son mayoritarios en la difusión de actividades o resultados de los proyectos (62,6%). Solo cuando el mensaje está relacionado con el branding de la ONG aparecen de manera más destacada los adultos de mediana edad (39%). Es llamativo, por último, cómo las personas de tercera edad no tienen presencia destacada en ningún tipo de comunicación de las ONG a través de Instagram, no superando el 3% en ningún tipo de mensaje.

En cuanto a los gestos del receptor, también se encontraron diferencias significativas en función de la finalidad del mensaje (X2(6)=59,880, p<0,001). En concreto, los gestos positivos (alegría, sonrisa…) son los más presentes y tienen un mayor protagonismo en los mensajes destinados a promocionar la ONG (42,5%) y a la difusión de actividades y beneficios (59,1%). El único mensaje en el que los gestos de dolor tienen una presencia mayoritaria es el de denuncia de necesidades (40,6%) donde solo el 21% de los actores se muestra alegre.

3.3. Análisis de la figura del niño en la comunicación de las ONG desde Instagram

Cuando se analiza la utilización de imágenes con presencia de niños también se encuentran diferencias en función de diversas variables. Por ejemplo, respecto a la aparición de menores en función de la finalidad del mensaje, los resultados mostraron una diferencia significativa (X2(2)=14,750, p<0,005). Cuando el objetivo de la fotografía publicada es dar a conocer la ONG y su marca, el niño solo aparece en el 42,55% de las imágenes. Sin embargo, cuando se trata de dar a conocer actividades concretas y sus resultados y se quiere destacar la necesidad de recursos para diferentes iniciativas o proyectos, la figura del niño aparece en el 62,6% y 79,1% respectivamente.

A su vez, las diferencias encontradas en función del gesto del protagonista también resultaron significativas (X2(3)=8,564, p<0,05). La mayoría de los niños aparecen con un gesto negativo (dolor, sufrimiento, tristeza... en el 77,1% de los casos) o positivo (sonriendo, jugando… en el 69,6% de las ocasiones). La figura del menor no aparece tanto (52,1%) cuando el protagonista presenta un gesto neutro en la imagen publicada.

Sin embargo, a la hora de analizar la presencia de los niños en función del sentimiento de la imagen, no se encontraron diferencias significativas (X2(2)=2,564, p= 0,278). Es decir, la presencia de niños es mayoritaria independientemente de si el sentimiento transmitido es negativo (74%), positivo (61,6%) o neutro (62,1%).

Respecto a la aparición de menores en función del tipo de plano empleado también aparecieron diferencias significativas (X2(2)=12,375, p= 0,005). Mientras que en las fotografías que muestran un plano general hay misma presencia de niños que de adultos (50%), la presencia de niños es mayoritaria cuando los planos son medios (67%) y sobre todo cuando son primeros planos (80,9%).

En relación al sexo, los resultados mostraron que la presencia exclusivamente femenina era mucho mayor (70,5%) en aquellas imágenes protagonizadas por adultos que en las protagonizadas exclusivamente por menores (37,9%) (X2(3)=24,937, p<0,001). De esto se puede concluir que los hombres de mediana o de tercera edad están infrarrepresentados en las fotografías empleadas por las ONG.

3.4. Análisis de las diferencias en el «engagement» de las fotografías

Para calcular el efecto que tuvo cada una de las fotografías publicadas en los seguidores de cada una de las cuentas de las ONG estudiadas, se calculó el «engagement» de cada una de las fotografías para posteriormente comprobar si había relaciones significativas entre el contenido de las imágenes y su «engagement». Para determinar la significación estadística entre las diferentes variables se llevó a cabo un modelo de one-way ANOVA (Tobergte & Curtis, 2013).

Cuando se analizó el «engagement» de las imágenes en función de la finalidad del mensaje, los resultados de la ANOVA mostraron diferencias significativas (F(3)=7,51, p<0,001). En concreto, las imágenes con finalidad de promocionar la ONG generaron más «engagement» (M=28,37, DT=024,55) que aquellas en las que se muestran las actividades y sus beneficios (M=18,61, DT=13,74) o aquellas cuya finalidad es denunciar necesidades humanitarias y sociales (M=19,21, DT=11,04).

A su vez, los resultados mostraron diferencias significativas en el «engagement» en función del sentimiento transmitido por la imagen (F(2)=4,376, p<0,05). Cuando la fotografía mostraba un sentimiento negativo, el «engagement» (M=15,59, DT=8,75) era inferior a cuando el sentimiento de la fotografía era positivo (M=23,44, DT=18,81) o neutro (M=21,24, DT=18,02).

De la misma manera, también se encontraron diferencias significativas en el «engagement» en función del tipo de actores que aparecían en la imagen (F(4)=13,51, p<0,001). Las imágenes protagonizadas por los cooperantes mostraron un «engagement» muy superior (M=32,90, DT=24,05) al de las imágenes en las que los protagonistas eran los receptores de la ayuda (M=17,03, DT=11,86) o en las que aparecían receptores junto a cooperantes (M=19,55, DT=21,59).

También se encontraron diferencias significativas (F(5)=12,47, p<0,001) en el «engagement» en función de la edad del receptor de la ayuda. Las personas de mediana edad fueron las que más «engagement» generaron (M=21,07, DT=17,24) seguidos de los niños (M=17,20, DT=11,14). El grupo de personas de la tercera edad fue el que menos «engagement» generó (M=6,84, DT=4,78).

El gesto del receptor también afectó de forma significativa al «engagement» de la fotografía (F(4)=17,33, p<0,001). Cuando la persona protagonista de la imagen mostraba un gesto positivo el «engagement» era más alto (M=20,07, DT=14,94) que cuando la persona mostraba un gesto negativo (M=13,20, DT=5,26) o neutro (M=13,98, DT=9,13).

Por otro lado, no se encontraron diferencias significativas en el «engagement» en función del tipo de plano que mostraba la imagen (F(3)=2,12, p=0,96), siendo el «engagement» de las imágenes que mostraban un primer plano (M=22,60, DT=16,82), el del plano medio (M=23,86, DT=18,70) y el del plano general (M=18,46, FT=16,81).

Igualmente, a la hora de comprobar si la aparición de receptores de ayuda de forma individual tenía un efecto diferente en el «engagement» que cuando los receptores de ayuda aparecían en grupo, tampoco se encontraron diferencias significativas (F(1)=0,99, p=0,32), de la misma forma que cuando se analizó la aparición de la figura del cooperante de manera individual o en grupo (F(1)=0,002, p=0,963).

4. Discusión y conclusiones

Las redes sociales representan para las ONG una plataforma desde la que movilizar a la sociedad y difundir la labor que realizan. De entre todas estas redes sociales, Instagram, por su rápido crecimiento y por el protagonismo que concede a la imagen artística, ofrece unas características distintas al resto.

Es precisamente esta apuesta por la imagen, con todas las posibilidades que conlleva de edición, selección de un tipo de mensaje u otro, composición de los distintos actores que aparecen en ella, elección de un sentimiento positivo o negativo a la hora de transmitir o la inclusión de filtros, gráficos o similares, lo que permite que Instagram pueda ser considerada una plataforma desde la que realizar artivismo.

Y eso es lo que pretende analizar esta investigación: comprobar cómo es esta nueva forma de artivismo y qué uso hacen de él las ONG. Como punto de inicio, se puede concluir que el post típico de una ONG en Instagram es el de una imagen de un posible receptor de la ayuda, normalmente en la niñez, generalmente solo y de género femenino, que posa ante la cámara en un plano medio o corto con gesto esperanzado o, al menos, neutro, y que se utiliza como ejemplo de las actividades y beneficios sociales que esa ONG lleva a cabo, tratando de transmitir un sentimiento positivo. En el 62% de los casos la imagen lleva algún tipo de edición.

Este recurso de mostrar solo a un destinatario de la ayuda (normalmente acompañado de un texto donde se aportan datos personales del protagonista) en un plano medio o corto probablemente obedece al propósito de aumentar la carga emocional del mensaje y, en consecuencia, su eficacia. Esta estrategia está en línea con la teoría conocida con el nombre de «aritmética de la compasión», que afirma que cuanto menor es el número de receptores de la ayuda, mayores son las intenciones y la satisfacción de donar y prestar ayuda (Slovic & Slovic, 2015).

Pero más significativo aún que este primer análisis, y todas las conclusiones que de él se extraen, es el resultado que se obtiene al cruzar algunas de esas variables, permitiendo obtener una imagen más precisa del uso de la fotografía por parte de las ONG.

Por ejemplo, cuando se analiza la presencia de las diferentes características en función de la finalidad comunicativa de la imagen, se puede concluir que cuando la finalidad es concienciar al seguidor de la necesidad de ayudar, las ONG intentan transmitir un sentimiento negativo, mostrando principalmente a los posibles destinatarios de la misma, normalmente en solitario, en un plano corto o medio y con gesto serio, de angustia o de preocupación. Sin embargo, cuando la intencionalidad es hacer promoción de la ONG o mostrar los beneficios del proyecto, predomina el sentimiento positivo. Por último, el único tipo de mensaje en el que el protagonismo se centra en los cooperadores es aquel cuya finalidad es la promoción de la ONG.

Por otro lado, cuando se analizan la aparición de la figura del niño en las imágenes, se puede concluir que su presencia se produce sobre todo en aquellos mensajes destinados a mostrar la necesidad y los beneficios de la ayuda (y menos en los mensajes destinados a hacer promoción de la ONG). Además, suelen aparecer en primeros y medios planos mostrando carga emocional en sus rostros, ya sea positiva o negativa.Pero, ¿este tipo de patrones tiene alguna consecuencia directa en el número de «likes» y comentarios recibidos entre los usuarios de Instagram (indicadores empleados habitualmente para evaluar la posible eficacia del mensaje emitido)?

Cuando se analizó el «engagement» en función de las diferentes características de las imágenes los resultados mostraron, que la imagen «tipo» de mayor «engagement» estaría compuesta por la fotografía de un cooperante o voluntario de media edad que, independientemente del plano utilizado, muestra un gesto sonriente con la finalidad de promocionar la propia ONG. En consecuencia, se puede concluir que es sorprendente que la imagen «tipo» más empleada por las ONG no es precisamente la que genera mayor «engagement». De aquí se puede deducir que el recurso tradicional y tan utilizado por las ONG de mostrar a un receptor de ayuda en actitud de angustia o sufrimiento no genera una interacción tan intensa entre los usuarios de Instagram como mostrar a los propios cooperantes promocionando la ONG. Ya sea porque influye demasiado el fenómeno de la «fatiga de la compasión» (Chouliaraki, 2006) o por un exceso de información, lo cierto es que los seguidores de Instagram muestran una mayor implicación ante los mensajes positivos y de acción directa. Esta desconexión entre lo que se hace y lo que funciona a la hora de provocar «engagement» puede ser una de las razones que explican que el «engagement» medio de las fotografías subidas por las ONG (2,18% según los datos analizados en la muestra) es inferior al «engagement» medio general de Instagram (entre el 3% y el 6%) (Laurence, 2017).

Por último, futuras investigaciones deberán establecer cuál es la relación existente entre esta interacción o «engagement» en Instagram y una posterior colaboración económica con los proyectos humanitarios por parte del usuario (quizá el principal propósito de la presencia en las redes sociales).

Apoyos

Esta actividad se encuadra dentro del programa de Actividades de I+D entre grupos de investigación en Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades de la Comunidad de Madrid, PROVULDIG-CM, con Ref. S2015/HUM-3434. Este programa –y sus actividades– está financiado por la Comunidad de Madrid y el Fondo Social Europeo.

Referencias

Aladro-Vico, E. (2011). La teoría de la información ante las nuevas tecnologías de la comunicación. Cuadernos de Información y Comunicación, 16(0). https://doi.org/10.5209/rev_CIYC.2011.v16.4

Berganza, M.R., & del-Hoyo, M. (2006). La mujer y el hombre en la publicidad televisiva: imágenes y estereotipos. Zer, 21, 161-175.

Blight, M.G., Ruppel, E.K., & Schoenbauer, K.V. (2017). Sense of community on Twitter and Instagram: Exploring the roles of motives and parasocial relationships. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 20(5), 314-319. https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2016.0505

Byrne, K. (2010). Social media plays growing role in aid world. https://bit.ly/2jO9Vcl

Chouliaraki, L. (2006). The spectatorship of suffering. London: SAGE Publications Ltd. http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781446220658.

Cmeciu, C., & Coman, C. (2016). Digital civic activism in Romania: Framing anti-Chevron online protest community «Faces». [Activismo cívico digital en Rumanía: La comunidad de Facebook en las protestas online contra Chevron]. Comunicar, 47, 19-28. https://doi.org/10.3916/C47-2016-02

Cooper, G. (2011). From their own correspondent?: New media and the changes in disaster coverage: Lessons to be learnt. University of Oxford, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism.

Cooper, G. (2014). Text appeal? NGOs and digital media. Leadership and expertise: The Centre for Law, Justice and Journalism (CLJJ) is directed by three of city University London’s leading Academics, as well as being supported by a number of specialists the University, 35.

Danko, D. (2018). Artivism and the spirit of avant-garde art. Art and the Challenge of Markets, 2, 235-261. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-64644-2_9

Delgado, M. (2013). Artivismo y pospolítica. Sobre la estetización de las luchas sociales en contextos urbanos. Quaderns de l’Institut Catala d’Antropologia, 18(2), 68-80.

Equipo de Instagram para empresas (2017). Reforzamos nuestro compromiso con la seguridad y la amabilidad para 800 millones de personas | Instagram for Business. https://bit.ly/2IdoVv3

Felshin, N. (1995). But is it art?: Spirit of art as activism. Lacey: Bay Press, U.S.

Foro Internacional de las Plataformas Nacionales de ONGs FIP (2012). ¿Quiénes Somos? Ifp-Fip FIP. February 24, 2018, https://bit.ly/2Ib6bQI

González, M.G., Becerra, M.T., & Yanez, M.B. (2016). Cyberactivism: A new form of participation for University Students. [Ciberactivismo: nueva forma de participación para estudiantes universitarios]. Comunicar, 46, 47-54. https://doi.org/10.3916/C46-2016-05

Greenwood, S., Perrin, A., & Duggan, M. (2016). Demographics of social media users in 2016. Pew Research Center. https://bit.ly/2Ix8nBC

Knobloch, S., Hastall, M., Zillmann, D., & Callison, C. (2003). Imagery effects on the selective reading of Internet newsmagazines. Communication Research, 30(1), 3-29. https://doi.org/10.1177/0093650202239023

Laurence, C. (2017). How do I calculate my engagement rate on Instagram? https://bit.ly/2jOEkXW

Lee, E., Lee, J.A., Moon, J.H., & Sung, Y. (2015). Pictures speak louder than words: Motivations for using Instagram. Cyberpsychology, 18(9), 552-556. https://doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2015.0157

Messaris, P., & Abraham, L. (2001). The role of images in framing news stories. In S.D. Reese, O.H. Gandy, Jr., & A.E. Grant (Eds.), LEA's communication series. Framing public life: Perspectives on media and our understanding of the social world (pp. 215-226). Mahwah, NJ, US: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers.

Millard, R. (2016). Is Instagram an art form? [blog]. https://bit.ly/2rC5ncG

Muñiz, C., Igartua, J.J., & Otero, J.A. (2006). Imágenes de la inmigración a través de la fotografía de prensa. Un análisis de contenido ‘Inmigration Images through Press Photography’. A content analysis. Comunicación y Sociedad, 19(1), 103-128.

Neuendorf, K.A. (2016). The content analysis guidebook. Los Angeles: SAGE Publications Ltd.

NGO Advisor (2018). Top 20 NGOs world. [web]. February 23, 2018, https://bit.ly/2KPpjl7

ONU (1945). Carta de las Naciones Unidas. https://bit.ly/2rzaGdK

Participation (iCSO). Department of Economics and Social Affairs. [web]. https://bit.ly/2I74l3b

Santos-Perales, E. (2015). Diseño gráfico y fotografía en el activismo social. Estudio de casos. Universidad de Barcelona.

Slovic, S., & Slovic, P. (2015). Numbers and nerves: Information, emotion, and meaning in a world of data. Oregon: Oregon State Uniersity Press. https://bit.ly/2KfHAa4

Soengas, X., & Assif, M. (2017). Cyberactivisim in the process of political and social change in Arab countries. [El ciberactivismo en el proceso de cambio político y social en los países árabes]. Comunicar, 53, 49-57. https://doi.org/10.3916/C53-2017-05

Taylor, C. (2012). Sandy really was Instagram’s moment: 1.3 million pics posted. [web]. https://bit.ly/2G9VSX8

Tobergte, D.R., & Curtis, S. (2013). Procesamiento de Datos y Análisis Estadístico usando SPSS. Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, 53. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107415324.004

UNICEF Comité Español. (2006). Convención sobre los Derechos del Niño. Madrid. https://bit.ly/2rBfYVU

United Nations. Department of Economics and Social Affairs. (2014). United Nations Civil Society

Back to Top

Document information

Published on 30/09/18
Accepted on 30/09/18
Submitted on 30/09/18

Volume 26, Issue 2, 2018
DOI: 10.3916/C57-2018-03
Licence: CC BY-NC-SA license

Document Score

0

Times cited: 1
Views 2
Recommendations 0

Share this document

claim authorship

Are you one of the authors of this document?